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Too Good to Leave, Too Bad to Stay

A Step by Step Guide to Help You Decide Whether to Stay in or Get Out of Your Relationship

Mira Kirshenbaum

$35

Paperback

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MICHAEL JOSEPH
21 June 1996
'Your relationship is either too goog to leave or too bad to stay in.

But it can't be both.' If you've picked up this book the chances are you're trying to make a decision about where your particular relationship is going at the moment.

Help is at hand.

Drawing on her years of experience as a counsellor, psychotherapist Mira Kirshenbaum presents you with a series of straightforward questions that will help you discover what is precious and lasting in your relationship and what is hurtful and destructive.

All you need to do is answer the questions truthfully and allow yourself to be guided by the answers.

Waste no more time in ambivalence - make a well-informed, carefully considered choice with the help of this invaluable book.

'A very helpful book .. . . You can't rush it byt the pay-off is a definite - and, for some, very cheering - answer' - Deidre Sanders, agony aunt for the Sun 'Too Good to Leave, Too Bad to Stay is in a separate class.

It works . . . So read this book and don't get separated or divorced till you've finished it' - Philip Hodson, psychotherapist and broadcaster 'A great one-foot-in-front-of-the-other guide to getting back on track' - Deborah McKinlay, Contributing Editor, Cosmopolitan
By:   Mira Kirshenbaum
Imprint:   MICHAEL JOSEPH
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 216mm,  Width: 135mm,  Spine: 22mm
Weight:   323g
ISBN:   9780718141776
ISBN 10:   0718141776
Pages:   304
Publication Date:   21 June 1996
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Mira Kirshenbaum is an individual and family psychotherapist in private practice and the clinical director of the Chestnut Hill Institute in Massachusetts. She is the author of four books, including the phenomenally successful Too Good to Leave, Too Bad to Stay (available from Plume), and has appeared on many national television shows, including The Today Show, Maury Povich, Geraldo, Sally Jessy Raphael, and an ABC News special with John Stossel. She is married, has two grown children, and lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

Reviews for Too Good to Leave, Too Bad to Stay: A Step by Step Guide to Help You Decide Whether to Stay in or Get Out of Your Relationship

The ever-challenging Carnegie winner turns to New Zealand for an action-packed story that, as a colonial adventure involving new settlers and indigenous people, recalls the themes and limitations of Drift (1986): the locale and Maori are generic; but the elegantly described events, many verging on fantastical, elevate universal strivings and concerns to almost mythic stature. Charlie, his little sister Elisabeth ( Liss ), and his Maori classmate Wiremu venture onto the empty ocean floor after an earthquake to explore a long-submerged ship. A tidal wave sweeps the vessel, and them, beyond the inaccessible mountain they've seen from their home in Jade Bay, reputed to harbor the fierce, mysterious Koroua. Indeed, they meet him: a crippled ancient who feeds them and gradually wins their trust, though he doesn't know their language; together, they make their way back to Jade Bay, only to find it a ruin of long standing. On the Koroua's instruction, the boys leave him and Liss, return to the ship, and - in perilous stages - get it down a river to an intact, present-day (i.e., 1892) Jade Bay, where Charlie's parents are horrified to see him without Lisa and incredulous of his story. Readers who persist through the exquisitely mapped (but not always easy to follow) adventure will be well rewarded with the unraveling of several mysteries, involving two sunken ships and more than one reunion. More compactly composed than Drift, a poetic, genuinely childlike view of a simpler world where prejudice can be dispelled by familiarity, and by the truth. A fine readaloud for sophisticated listeners. (Kirkus Reviews)


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