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Oxford University Press
15 June 2016
Graham Priest presents an original exploration of questions concerning the one and the many. He covers a wide range of issues in metaphysics--unity, identity, grounding, mereology, universals, being, intentionality and nothingness--and draws on Western and Asian philosophy as well as paraconsistent logic to offer a radically new treatment of unity.
By:  
Imprint:   Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 235mm,  Width: 156mm,  Spine: 15mm
Weight:   422g
ISBN:   9780198776949
ISBN 10:   0198776942
Pages:   272
Publication Date:  
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Professional and scholarly ,  Primary ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Preface: What One Needs to Know Part I: Unity 1: Gluons and their Wicked Ways 2: Identity and Gluons 3: Form, Universals, and Instantiation 4: Being and Nothing 5: A Case of Mistaken Identity Part II: In Plato's Trajectory 6: Enter Parmenides: Mereological Sums 7: Problems with the Forms--and their Solutions 8: The One--and the Others 9: In Search of Falsity 10: Perception, Intentionality, and Representation Part III: Buddhist Themes 11: Absence of Self, and the Net of Indra 12: Embracing the Groundlessness of Things 13: The World, Language, and their Limits 14: Peace of Mind 15: Compassion Bibliography Index

Graham Priest was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, and the London School of Economics. He has held professorial positions at a number of universities in Australia, the UK, and the USA. He is well known for his work on non-classical logic, and its application to metaphysics and the history of philosophy.

Reviews for One

If you are looking for a book doing something genuinely innovative, doing it with rigor, clarity, and a deep sensitivity to the breadth of philosophical tradition, then One is one for you. Jason Turner, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews Online


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