FREIGHT DELAYS IN AND OUT: MORE INFO

Close Notification

Your cart does not contain any items

$221.00

Hardback

We can order this in for you
How long will it take?

QTY:

Routledge
15 December 2017
Teacher training; Educational equipment & technology, computer-aided learning (CAL)
Combining video analysis with the well-known Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) model, this book offers teacher educators a fresh perspective and a new tool for supporting teachers' learning and reflection. The clearly articulated and useful framework shifts the focus away from children and toward teachers' thinking about their own teaching practice. Interwoven with practical examples of the framework in use, this book identifies ways that teachers and teacher educators can foster more productive kinds of reflection about video-recorded classroom interactions and support preservice and inservice teachers. Offering key tools such as templates for reflection, video viewing guides, self-analysis checklists, and activities, this book moves the field forward and establishes video reflection and the GRR process as critical tools for teacher reflection, professional development, and effective teaching and learning.
By:   Mary B. McVee (University at Buffalo/SUNY USA), Lynn E. Shanahan (University at Buffalo/SUNY, USA), H. Emily Hayden (Iowa State University, Ames, USA), Fenice B. Boyd (University of South Carolina, USA.), P. David Pearson (University of California Berkeley, USA)
Imprint:   Routledge
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 229mm,  Width: 152mm, 
Weight:   553g
ISBN:   9781138039797
ISBN 10:   1138039799
Pages:   200
Publication Date:   15 December 2017
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Undergraduate ,  A / AS level
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Chapter 1. The Genesis of the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model Chapter 2. Learning through a Pedagogy of Video Reflection and the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model Chapter 3. I Never Knew I Did that Until I Watched this Video! Establishing a Community of Practice to Support Collective Reflection, Risk-Taking, and Trust Chapter 4. What Does It Mean to Reflect on the Practice of Teaching? Chapter 5. Taking the Long View by Focusing on Description: Examining Agency, Bias, and the Messy Parts of Teaching Chapter 6. Using Video for Reflection as an Independent Learner in a Field-based Practicum Chapter 7. The Gradual Release of Responsibility for Self-Reflection: Transitioning from a Literacy Coach to a Social Studies Teacher, with Jennifer Sharples Reichenberg Chapter 8. Looking Beyond What You See: Critical Inquiry and Video Reflection through Positioning Analysis and Story Chapter 9. The Gradual Release of Responsibility Model and a Pedagogy of Video Reflection: Where to from here?

Mary B. McVee is Professor of Literacy Education and Director of the Center for Literacy & Reading Instruction (CLaRI) at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, USA. Lynn E. Shanahan is Associate Professor of Literacy Education at University at Buffalo, SUNY, USA. H. Emily Hayden is Assistant Professor of Literacy Education at Iowa State University, Ames, USA. Fenice B. Boyd is Professor and Chair of the Instruction and Teacher Education Department at University of South Carolina, USA. P. David Pearson is former Dean and Professor in Language and Literacy and Human Development at the University of California Berkeley, USA.

Reviews for Video Pedagogy in Action: Critical Reflective Inquiry Using the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model

Rarely do readers of educational volumes have an opportunity to explore with authors the developing journeys to understanding how particular forms of reflective processes support teachers in creating ongoing learning opportunities with linguistically, culturally, socially and intellectually diverse learners in classrooms and other educational settings. In this volume, the authors create a dialogic approach to engaging readers, whether beginning or experienced teachers, administrators, or those engaged in professional development processes, in exploring the principles and processes guiding the Gradual Release of Responsibility model (GRR) Model, an approach to developing professional understandings and actions of teachers developed over the past four decades. By focusing on video-based telling cases of the historical and ongoing theoretical and process roots of this model in action, the authors provide readers with opportunities to (re)formulate what Educational Philosophers B.O. Smith and Robert Ennis (1961) framed as new fundamental concepts of education that support the complex and challenging work of teachers with diverse learners in classrooms and other educational settings. --Judith Green, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara The book presents the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model within a pedagogy of video reflection to scaffold preservice and inservice teachers in using video records to deepen reflection on literacy teaching and learning. Written in accessible prose with practical examples and activities and grounded in research, the authors demonstrate how preservice and inservice teachers, teacher educators, and educational leaders can use the GRR Model as a cornerstone in building a reflective community of practice, working toward adaptive expertise in literacy teaching, and attending to the needs of diverse learners. -- Taffy Raphael, Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois at Chicago The book presents the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model within a pedagogy of video reflection to scaffold preservice and inservice teachers in using video records to deepen reflection on literacy teaching and learning. Written in accessible prose with practical examples and activities and grounded in research, the authors demonstrate how preservice and inservice teachers, teacher educators, and educational leaders can use the GRR Model as a cornerstone in building a reflective community of practice, working toward adaptive expertise in literacy teaching, and attending to the needs of diverse learners. --Nell Duke, Professor, University of Michigan


See Also