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The Truth Must Dazzle Gradually

'A moving and powerful novel from one of Ireland's finest new writers' John Boyne

Helen Cullen

$32.99

Paperback

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MICHAEL JOSEPH
20 October 2020
A celebration of the complex, flawed and stubbornly optimistic human heart 'There's a crack in everything, it's how the light gets in' Leonard Cohen On an island off the west coast of Ireland, the Moone family are poised for celebration - but are instead shattered by tragedy. Murtagh Moone is a potter and devoted husband to Maeve, an actor struggling with her most challenging role yet as mother to their four children. Now Murtagh must hold his family close as we bear witness to their story before that night.

We return to the day Maeve and Murtagh meet, outside Trinity College in Dublin, and watch how one love story gives rise to another. As the Moone children learn who their parents truly are, we journey onwards with them to a future that none of the Moones can predict.

Except perhaps Maeve herself.
By:   Helen Cullen
Imprint:   MICHAEL JOSEPH
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 234mm,  Width: 153mm,  Spine: 25mm
Weight:   409g
ISBN:   9780718189211
ISBN 10:   0718189213
Pages:   432
Publication Date:   20 October 2020
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Out of Print

Helen Cullen is an Irish writer living in London. She is the author of The Lost Letters of William Woolf which has been optioned for television. She was shortlisted for Newcomer of the Year at the Irish Book Awards. To learn more, please visit www.helencullen.ie

Reviews for The Truth Must Dazzle Gradually: 'A moving and powerful novel from one of Ireland's finest new writers' John Boyne

I found myself totally transported into William's poignant and beguiling world of lost opportunities and love Deeply moving * Irish Times * Delightful * Sunday Times * If you liked Harold Fry and Me Before You, you will love Cullen's nostalgic debut. This life-affirming book will draw you in and keep you there * Independent * Praise for Helen Cullen * - * A beautifully observed saga of abandoned dreams, loss and self-discovery -- Alan McGonagle, author of <i>Ithaca</i> Loved it. Beautiful and original * Sunday Independent * A superb second novel that goes to places you mightn't expect but which ultimately end up making a great deal of sense. It touches on a lot thematically and doesn't ever suggest that any one life path can be a cure for severe mental illness and it does some things that... are very pleasing indeed. I had a LOT OF FEELINGS -- Claire Hennessy, author and editor of <i>Banshee Journal</i> A remarkable book -- Joy Rhoades, author of <i>The Woolgrower's Companion</i> A perfect combination of deeply-felt tragedy with great hopefulness -- Anne Youngson, author of <i>Meet Me at the Museum</i> Such a tender read. Astute and compassionate, it made me cry. It's full of love. And it's quietly magnificent -- Tor Udall, author of <i>A Thousand Paper Birds</i> A beautiful novel - Helen Cullen writes with such deft care and attention about the things that hold us together when everything falls apart -- Ronan Hession, author of <i>Leonard and Hungry Paul</i> Beautifully-observed [...] charts a family across 37 years, living through a tragedy on a remote island; portraying mental health and the fall-out around it with enormous humanity and integrity. Tonally reminiscent of recent Colm Toibin -- Caoilinn Hughes, author of <i>Orchid and The Wasp</i> A powerful and poignant narrative told over a lifetime; exploring unconditional love, heartbreak and the beautiful flaws of human nature set within a family unit. (Cullen) is an astute and empathic writer and an incredible voice in Irish literature. You'll fall in love with the Moone family and they will linger in your heart long after you read the final pages -- Cat Hogan, author of <i>They All Fall Down</i> and <i>There Was A Crooked Man</i> So wonderful on the Irish family and the utter complexity of motherhood, family entanglement and love -- Elaine Feeney, poet and author of <i>As You Were</i> I devoured this, falling in love with the setting and with every character - and when I reached the end, I wept. It is just glorious. A sweeping family safe and, at the same time, a close-up on the everyday beautiful details that make up love -- Emma Flint, author of <i>Little Deaths</i>


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