Welcome to our new site MORE INFO

Close Notification

Your cart does not contain any items

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

John Mandeville C. Moseley

$19.99

Paperback

In stock
Ready to ship

QTY:

Penguin Classics
20 April 2005
Classic travel writing; Penguin Black Classics; Literature, Poetry & Criticism
Immediately popular when they first appeared around 1356, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville became the standard account of the East for several centuries. Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India and China. Mandeville claims to have served in the Great Khan's army, and to have travelled in 'the lands beyond' - countries populated by dog-headed men, cannibals, Amazons and Pygmies. Although Marco Polo's slightly earlier narrative ultimately proved more factually accurate, Mandeville's was widely known, used by Columbus, Leonardo do Vinci and Martin Frobisher, and inspired writers as diverse as Swift, Defoe and Coleridge. This intriguing blend of fact, exaggeration and absurdity offers both fascinating insight into and subtle criticism of fourteenth-century conceptions of the world.
By:   John Mandeville
Translated by:   C. Moseley
Imprint:   Penguin Classics
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 198mm,  Width: 129mm,  Spine: 13mm
Weight:   168g
ISBN:   9780141441436
ISBN 10:   0141441437
Pages:   224
Publication Date:   20 April 2005
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Sir John Mandeville left his native St Albans in 1322 and died in Liege in 1372.

Reviews for The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

'Both reader and author have marvellous fun. Some ten or dozen emperors or empresses are stabbed, hacked to pieces, poisoned or otherwise brutally murderred. Few varieties of curious sex are not given a showing. And as for the burning of Rome, throwing Christians to the lions, and the sacking of the temple at Jerusalem - what an opportunity they provide for Burgess's rumbustious style' SUNDAY TELEGRAPH


See Also