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The Puzzle Solver

A scientist's desperate hunt to cure Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and save his son

Tracie White Ronald W Davis

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Allen & Unwin
19 January 2021
At the age of twenty-seven, a mysterious illness began to eat away at Whitney Dafoe. It stole away the strength of his legs, then his voice, and his ability to eat, until even the sound of a footstep in his room became unbearable. For years, he underwent endless medical tests until finally receiving a diagnosis: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

With no cure or successful treatment, Whitney's father, Ron Davis, PhD-a world class geneticist at Stanford University whose legendary research helped crack the code of DNA-suddenly changed the course of his career in a race against time to cure his son's debilitating condition.

In The Puzzle Solver, journalist Tracie White-who wrote the viral and award-winning piece on Ron and his family in Stanford Medicine-tells the full story. In gripping prose, she masterfully takes readers along on this journey with Davis to solve one of the greatest mysteries in medicine.
By:   Tracie White, Ronald W Davis
Imprint:   Allen & Unwin
Country of Publication:   Australia
Dimensions:   Height: 234mm,  Width: 153mm, 
Weight:   302g
ISBN:   9781760875695
ISBN 10:   1760875694
Pages:   240
Publication Date:   19 January 2021
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Tracie White is an award-winning journalist and a science writer for Stanford University. Her work has also appeared in Salon, the Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine, the San Francisco Chronicle Sunday Magazine, and the San Jose Mercury News Magazine. She received her bachelor's degree in literature and public health from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University. She lives in Santa Cruz, CA. Ron Davis is a professor of Biochemistry and Genetics at Stanford University and a member of the Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Institute. He has won numerous awards for his research, including the Gruber Genetics Prize and the Genetics Society of America's Lifetime Achievement Award. After his son was diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in 2011, he dedicated himself to finding a cure for the debilitating disease. He lives in Palo Alto, CA.

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