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The Only Gaijin in the Village

Iain Maloney

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Polygon
01 March 2020
Memoirs; Humour; Travel & holiday; Travel writing
In 2016 Scottish writer Iain Maloney and his Japanese wife Minori moved to a village in rural Japan. This is the story of his attempt to fit in, be accepted and fulfil his duties as a member of the community, despite being the only foreigner in the village.

Even after more than a decade living in Japan and learning the language, life in the countryside was a culture shock. Due to increasing numbers of young people moving to the cities in search of work, there are fewer rural residents under the retirement age - and they have two things in abundance: time and curiosity. Iain's attempts at amateur farming, basic gardening and DIY are conducted under the watchful eye of his neighbours and wife. But curtain twitching is the least of his problems. The threat of potential missile strikes and earthquakes is nothing compared to the venomous snakes, terrifying centipedes and bees the size of small birds that stalk Iain's garden.

'Intelligent, warm-hearted, down-to-earth and often very funny.' - Alan Spence
By:   Iain Maloney
Imprint:   Polygon
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 215mm,  Width: 135mm,  Spine: 20mm
Weight:   317g
ISBN:   9781846975141
ISBN 10:   184697514X
Pages:   256
Publication Date:   01 March 2020
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Iain Maloney is an editor and lectures on writing in Japan. He has degrees in English (Aberdeen) and Creative Writing (Glasgow) and has published three novels and a haiku collection. He reviews regularly for a number of publications including the Japan Times. He moved from Scotland in 2005 and lives in rural Japan with his wife, Minori.

Reviews for The Only Gaijin in the Village

'This book is extraordinary. It is a tour de force. It is a funny, committed and impassioned account of how a young Scots writer came to the decision that he would spend the rest of his life in rural Japan... a hymn of praise about the joys of living in Japan as a foreigner, a gaijin. He is the only gaijin in the village and he loves it' * GoodReads.com * 'Expats in Japan will laugh out loud at many of Maloney's experiences as he struggles to fit into Japanese village life. Maloney writes with panache and finds humor in even the most mundane circumstances' * Books on Asia * 'Radiant with an infectious enthusiasm for life, Scottish writer Iain Maloney has created a playful, powerful page-turner in The Only Gaijin in the Village, a brilliant blend of memoir and travel writing at its most edifyingly entertaining' * LoveReading * 'Laugh-out-loud lessons from Japan's proud countryside - layered with shrewd observations about race, gender and generation, and cultural asides, all glued together with levity and distinctive social commentary... a thought-provoking, lively examination of one immigrant's quest to create a new home outside his country of birth' * The Japan Times * 'Scottish writer Iain Maloney is far from home in this funny and uplifting read. Having decided to setting in a rural Japanese village, Iain and his wide imagine a world of pastoral delights - they meet bird-sized bees and hawk-eyed neighbours instead' * Wanderlust Magazine * 'a delightful tumble into village life, complete with a vivid cast of characters and a beautiful sense of place' -- Elsa Maishman * Scotsman * 'This book is guaranteed to make you laugh, but its emotional moments hit hard and by the end, you'll feel like you've made a friend' * SavvyTokyo.com * 'A perfect read for the novice of Japanese culture. ... Bold, humorous and current' * Japan Society * 'a treasure ... written with affection, insight and a lot of humour' -- Ali Hull * Sorted Magazine * 'n a world fascinated by the bright lights of Tokyo The Only Gaijin in the Village offers a new and welcome perspective of life in Japan' * Geographical Magazine * 'A gently quirky memoir' * Canberra Times *


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