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Oxford University Press
11 June 2019
The vast majority of statistics books delineate techniques used to analyze collected data. The Joy of Statistics is not one of these books. It consists of a series of 42 short stories , each illustrating how statistical methods applied to data produce insight and solutions to the questions the data were collected to answer. Real-life and sometimes artificial data are used to demonstrate the often painless method and magic of statistics. In addition, the text contains brief histories of the evolution of statistical methods and a number of brief biographies of the most famous statisticians of the 20th century. Sprinkled throughout are statistical jokes, puzzles and traditional stories.
By:   Steve Selvin (Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Department of Biostatistics Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology Department of Biostatistics University of California Berkeley)
Imprint:   Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 224mm,  Width: 146mm,  Spine: 17mm
Weight:   442g
ISBN:   9780198833444
ISBN 10:   019883344X
Pages:   224
Publication Date:   11 June 2019
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Steve Selvin is a professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley. He has taught on the Berkeley campus for more than 40 years. Professor Selvin is also a member of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health faculty and has taught in the Summer Institute of Biostatistics and Epidemiology for the last fifteen years. He lives in the Berkeley hills with two cats, one dog and a wife who is a well known ceramic artist. He has authored or co-authored more than 250 scientific papers in the area of statistics applied to epidemiological/health issues with emphasis on birth defects and childhood cancer. In addition he has written 10 books on applied statistical methods. He has received a number of awards for teaching excellence, including the most prestigious award given by the University of California called the Berkeley Citation. His present research concerns the analysis of spatial patterns of childhood cancers in the state of California over the last decade.

Reviews for The Joy of Statistics: A Treasury of Elementary Statistical Tools and their Applications

I recommend The Joy of Statistics to those who want to begin studying statistics or who need a quick refresher book. Dr Selvin does an exemplary job of explaining basic concepts without overwhelming the reader with jargon or dense details. * ANNA MILLER, AC Review of books * The format is some 40 or so short chapters...the reader is consistently presented with topics and questions that are specifically not conventional compared to the often rather identikit ones offered and discussed in ordinary textbooks...In the hands of a thoughtful undergraduate, this may well inspire curiosity for the wider subject of statistics. A teacher will certainly find a fresh wrinkle or three to keep a motivated group engaged for a number of classes. * Andrew Ruddle, Mathematics Today * The Joy of Statistics provides a short, accessible and, at times, light-hearted glimpse into the vast world of statistics. This book delivers the general background needed to begin understanding statistical methods and how to apply them alongside an assortment of anecdotes, jokes, and historical information...I recommend The Joy of Statistics to those who want to begin studying statistics or who need a quick refresher book. Dr Selvin does an exemplary job of explaining basic concepts without overwhelming the reader with jargon or dense details. Thus, readers from a diverse set of statistical backgrounds can find assistance from this book. * Anna Miller, AC Review of Books * This treasury of statistical anecdotes offers 41 engaging yet substantive examples of statistics and probability as found in real-life settings. One remarkable feature is the surprising range of everyday contexts from which Selvin draws material, turning now to a TV show, then to a legal case, and often to his own specialty of public health and epidemiology. Another attractive feature is that the text lucidly explains the subtle differences and implications of similar but different concepts: correlation and association, relative risk and odds ratio, to name a few...this book deserves welcome as a supplementary introduction to the discipline. * S-T Kim, North Carolina A&T State University *


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