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The Fabric of Reality

David Deutsch

$22.99

Paperback

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Penguin
01 April 1998
Philosophy: epistemology & theory of knowledge; Mathematics & Sciences; Philosophy of science
An extraordinary and challenging synthesis of ideas uniting Quantum Theory, and the theories of Computation, Knowledge and Evolution, Deutsch's extraordinary book explores the deep connections between these strands which reveal the fabric of realityin which human actions and ideas play essential roles.
By:   David Deutsch
Imprint:   Penguin
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 198mm,  Width: 129mm,  Spine: 17mm
Weight:   277g
ISBN:   9780140146905
ISBN 10:   0140146903
Pages:   400
Publication Date:   01 April 1998
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

DAVID DEUTSCH's research in quantum physics has been influential and highly acclaimed. He is a member of the Quantum Computation and Cryptography Research Group at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, and now lives and works in Oxford.

Reviews for The Fabric of Reality

One major school of quantum theory posits a multiplicity of universes; but what does that imply about the reality we live in? A simple experiment, familiar to every student of physics, involves light passing through slits in a barrier; its results, according to Oxford physicist Deutsch, lead inevitably to the idea that there are countless universes parallel to our own, through which some of the light must pass. This many worlds interpretation of quantum theory has gained advocates in recent years, and Deutsch argues that it is time for scientists to face the full implications of this idea. (After all, the entire point of science is to help us understand the world we live in - the fabric of reality of his title.) To that end, he outlines a new view of the multiverse (the total of all the parallel universes), combining ideas from four strands of science: quantum physics, epistemology, the theory of computation, and modern evolutionary theory. He argues that quantum computation, a discipline in which he is a pioneering thinker, has the potential for building computers that draw on their counterparts in parallel universes; this could make artificial intelligence a reality, despite Roger Penrose's objections (which Deutsch deals with in some detail). Likewise, time travel into both the future and the past should be possible, though not in quite the form envisioned by science fiction writers; the trips would almost certainly be one-way, and they would likely take the travelers into different universes from the one they began in. Deutsch takes particular pains to refute Thomas Kuhn's paradigm model of science, which essentially denies progress. A final chapter looks at the long-range implications of his views, including the place of esthetic and moral values (areas more scientists now seem willing to confront). Not easy going by any means, but worth the work for anyone interested in the thought processes of a scientist on the leading edge of his discipline. (Kirkus Reviews)


  • Short-listed for Rhone-Poulenc Science Books Prize 1998
  • Shortlisted for Rhone-Poulenc Science Books Prize 1998.

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