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The Conviction Of Richard Nixon

The Untold Story of the Frost/Nixon Interviews

James Reston

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Three Rivers Press
27 May 2008
Memoirs; History; Political leaders & leadership; Political corruption
In 1977, Nixon agreed to a series of historic interviews with David Frost. They were aired on prime time US television and watched by millions. Nixon was confident that the interviews would launch him favorably back into public life. Instead, it sealed his fate as a political pariah. Reston worked tirelessly with Frost to develop the interrogation strategy to force Nixon into admitting culpability. His memoir was written in 1977 is an authentic, landmark historical document, relevant today as ever. Frost / Nixon has now been dramatised as a play and film.
By:   James Reston
Imprint:   Three Rivers Press
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 130mm,  Width: 203mm,  Spine: 11mm
Weight:   158g
ISBN:   9780307394903
ISBN 10:   0307394905
Pages:   207
Publication Date:   27 May 2008
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Reviews for The Conviction Of Richard Nixon: The Untold Story of the Frost/Nixon Interviews

A treasure trove of invaluable insights from an unimpeachable source. I couldn t put it down. Frank Langella, Tony Award nominee for Frost/Nixon Political history that reads like a thriller. Passionate, intelligent, entertaining, and human. Michael Sheen, Evening Standard and Laurence Olivier Award nominee for Frost/Nixon A riveting account. Richard Ben-Veniste, former chief of the Watergate Task Force Reston's memoir is a compact and gripping behind-the-scenes narrative focused on Frost's struggles to prepare for his encounter with the formidable Nixon. Reston captures Nixon's inner turmoil and myriad moods during the tapings.Above all, the book sheds important light on Nixon's failure to rehabilitate his reputation after his 1974 resignation. Matthew Dallek, Washington Post From the Hardcover edition.


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