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The Broken House

Growing up Under Hitler: The Lost Masterpiece

Horst Krüger Shaun Whiteside

$24.99

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English
Vintage
10 January 2023

ABBEY'S BOOKSELLER PICK ----- First published in 1966 before it quickly went out of print. Now reissued this book deserves to be rediscovered. Kruger looks back at his childhood and Germany during the Nazi period. He wrote this at a time when Germans did not want to confront their history -this book acts almost as a cathartic experience for its author who delivers in the most heartfelt and telling prose an account of a Germany who losses itself to a madness that enveloped the country. As a journalist Kruger finds himself reporting on the Auschwitz Trials looking at the defendants and pondering how would he have acted if in their position? This is one of the most extraordinary books I’ve read this year.
Greg

The major rediscovery of a forgotten masterpiece in the mould of Alone in Berlin and Stoner. The literary memoir of a youth in Nazi Germany.

'Exquisitely written... haunting... Few books, I think, capture so well the sense of a life broken forever by trauma and guilt.' The Sunday Times

'An unsparing, honest and insightful memoir, it shows how private failure becomes national disaster.' Hilary Mantel

20 years after the end of WWII, Horst Kruger attempted to make sense of his childhood. He had grown up in a quiet Berlin suburb where people lived ordinary lives, believed in God, obeyed the law... and were gradually seduced by the promises of Nazism.

He had been "the typical child of innocuous Germans who were never Nazis, and without whom the Nazis would never have been able to do their work". With tragic inevitability, this world of respectability, order and duty began to crumble.

Written in accomplished prose of lingering beauty, The Broken House is a moving, coming-of-age story that provides a searing portrait of life under the Nazis.

By:  
Translated by:  
Imprint:   Vintage
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 199mm,  Width: 130mm,  Spine: 13mm
Weight:   570g
ISBN:   9781529113198
ISBN 10:   1529113199
Pages:   208
Publication Date:  
Audience:   General/trade ,  Professional and scholarly ,  College/higher education ,  ELT Advanced ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Horst Kr ger (1919-99) was a German journalist, novelist and travel writer. Published in 1966, The Broken House was critically acclaimed as an exemplary portrait of youth in Nazi Germany.

Reviews for The Broken House: Growing up Under Hitler: The Lost Masterpiece

ABBEY'S BOOKSELLER PICK ----- First published in 1966 before it quickly went out of print. Now reissued this book deserves to be rediscovered. Kruger looks back at his childhood and Germany during the Nazi period. He wrote this at a time when Germans did not want to confront their history -this book acts almost as a cathartic experience for its author who delivers in the most heartfelt and telling prose an account of a Germany who losses itself to a madness that enveloped the country. As a journalist Kruger finds himself reporting on the Auschwitz Trials looking at the defendants and pondering how would he have acted if in their position? This is one of the most extraordinary books I’ve read this year.
Greg





Exquisitely written... haunting... Few books, I think, capture so well the sense of a life broken for ever by trauma and guilt -- Dominic Sandbrook * Sunday Times * A masterpiece. An astonishing piece of literature. Complex, heartfelt, vibrant, intense, urgent. A must read. I read it straight through to the last page and then wanted to read it all over again -- Thomas Harding, bestselling author of Hanns and Rudolf The major rediscovery of a forgotten treasure. No book has ever so honestly evoked the wretched terror of life in Nazi Germany -- James Hawes, author of The Shortest History of Germany I often think that the key to a successful memoir is to find the right place to stand, the effective distance. Writing in the sixties, Kruger had enough clarity to see where his story fitted into the big picture, but he can still make the reader feel the passion, danger and grief. It is an unsparing, honest and insightful memoir, that shows how private failure becomes national disaster. There is no mercy from the author and no false hope, but he fills a gap in the historical imagination -- Hilary Mantel A book of hard-won simplicity and quite beautiful precision * The Times *


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