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Ten Days in Harlem

Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s

Simon Hall

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Faber & Faber
01 October 2020
History; History of the Americas; Postwar 20th century history, from c 1945 to c 2000; Social & cultural history; The Cold War
New York City, September 1960. Fidel Castro has just arrived for the opening of the UN General Assembly.

Wild rumours are circulating that the Cubans 'killed, plucked, and cooked chickens in their rooms...extinguishing cigars on expensive carpets'; Castro - in his trademark olive fatigues - receives a rapturous reception from the local African American community, and holds court with political and cultural luminaries including Malcolm X, Gamal Abdel Nasser, Nikita Khrushchev ('about as welcome to the US as the Black Plague' - Time), Amiri Baraka, and Allen Ginsberg. His fervour in promising the politics of anti-imperialism, racial equality, and leftist revolution makes him an icon of the 1960s.

In this brilliant slice of modern history, Simon Hall reveals how these ten days were a crucial hinge point in the trajectory of the Cold War. Encompassing international geopolitics, decolonisation, the nascent Civil Rights and Black Power movements, and radical student counterculture, Ten Days in Harlem revolutionises our understanding of the unique melting pot that was the Sixties - and beyond.
By:   Simon Hall
Imprint:   Faber & Faber
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Edition:   Export - Airside ed
Dimensions:   Height: 234mm,  Width: 153mm,  Spine: 20mm
Weight:   394g
ISBN:   9780571353071
ISBN 10:   057135307X
Pages:   288
Publication Date:   01 October 2020
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Simon Hall studied history at Sheffield and Cambridge, and held a Fox International Fellowship at Yale, before moving to the University of Leeds in 2003 to teach American history. His most recent book is 1956: The World in Revolt (Faber).

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