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Routledge
30 June 2020
Philosophy & theory of education; Moral & social purpose of education
Universal school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) interventions seek to improve the social-emotional competencies (e.g. self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, responsible decision-making) of students through explicit instruction in the context of learning environments that are safe, caring, well-managed and participatory. In recent years, SEL has become a dominant orthodoxy in school systems around the world.

In this important new book, leading researchers provide a comprehensive overview of the field, including conceptual models of SEL; the assessment of social and emotional competence in children and young people; key issues in the implementation of SEL interventions; the evidence base on the efficacy of SEL in improving students' outcomes; and critical perspectives on the emergence of SEL. It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the role of schools in promoting children's wellbeing. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Cambridge Journal of Education.
Edited by:   Neil Humphrey (University of Manchester UK), Ann Lendrum (University of Manchester, UK), Michael Wigelsworth (University of Manchester, UK), Mark T. Greenberg (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
Imprint:   Routledge
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 246mm,  Width: 174mm, 
Weight:   254g
ISBN:   9780367585365
ISBN 10:   0367585367
Pages:   126
Publication Date:   30 June 2020
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Further / Higher Education ,  A / AS level
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Introduction 1. Establishing systemic social and emotional learning approaches in schools: a framework for schoolwide implementation 2. Key considerations in assessing young children's emotional competence 3. Social skills assessment and intervention for children and youth 4. Programme implementation in social and emotional learning: basic issues and research findings 5. The impact of trial stage, developer involvement and international transferability on universal social and emotional learning programme outcomes: a meta-analysis 6. Reinforcing the 'diminished' subject? The implications of the 'vulnerability zeitgeist' for well-being in educational settings

Neil Humphrey is a Professor of Psychology of Education, and Head of the Institute of Education, at the University of Manchester, UK. His research interests include social and emotional learning, mental health, and special educational needs. He is the author of Social and Emotional Learning: a critical appraisal (2013). Ann Lendrum is a Senior Lecturer on the Psychology of Education Master's programme at the Institute of Education, University of Manchester, UK. Her research focuses on the implementation of school-based interventions, particularly mental health prevention and promotion programmes. Her recent work includes the evaluation of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies programme in English primary schools, and a feasibility study of the Second Step programme in England. Michael Wigelsworth is a Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Education, University of Manchester, UK. He completed his PhD in 2010, examining the impact of the Secondary SEAL programme. His research focuses on the conceptualisation, measurement and assessment of children's psycho-social outcomes, with a focus on mental health and wellbeing. This includes the use of outcome measures in the evaluation of school-based interventions. Mark T. Greenberg holds The Bennett Endowed Chair in Prevention Research in the College of Health and Human Development at Pennsylvania State University, USA. His current research is focused on how best to help nurture awareness and compassion in our society. He is the Founding Director of The Prevention Research Center for the Promotion of Human Development.

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