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Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 7, Military Technology: The Gunpowder Epic

Joseph Needham Ho Ping-Yu (The University of Hong Kong) Lu Gwei-Djen (Robinson College, Cambridge) Wang Ling

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Cambridge University Press
23 March 1987
History; History of science
The Gunpowder Epic is one of three planned publications on military technology within Dr Needham's immense undertaking. The discovery of gunpowder in China by the 9th century AD was followed by its rapid applications. It is now clear that the whole development from bombs and grenades to the invention of the metal-barrel hand gun took place in the Chinese culture area before Europeans had any knowledge of the mixture itself. Uses in civil engineering and mechanical engineering were equally important, before the knowledge of gunpowder spread to Europe in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Dr Needham's new work continues to demonstrate the major importance of Chinese science and technology to world history and maintains the tradition of one of the great scholarly works of the twentieth century.
By:   Joseph Needham
With:   Ho Ping-Yu (The University of Hong Kong), Lu Gwei-Djen (Robinson College, Cambridge), Wang Ling
Imprint:   Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Volume:   v. 5
Dimensions:   Height: 246mm,  Width: 189mm,  Spine: 60mm
Weight:   1.920kg
ISBN:   9780521303583
ISBN 10:   0521303583
Series:   Science and Civilisation in China
Pages:   742
Publication Date:   23 March 1987
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Reviews for Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 7, Military Technology: The Gunpowder Epic

[An] astonishing and enduring study...[Needham brings] depth of emotion and technical finesse to his task. Jonathan Spence, New York Review of Books Perhaps the greatest single act of historical synthesis and intercultural communication ever attempted by one man. Laurence Picken, Cambridge University


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