SUMMER CATALOGUE OUT NOW: VIEW

Close Notification

Your cart does not contain any items

Race, Discourse and Labourism

Caroline Knowles

$221.00

Hardback

We can order this in for you
How long will it take?

QTY:

Routledge
27 August 1992
Social & cultural history; Social issues & processes; Ethnic studies; Ethnic minorities & multicultural studies; Sociology; Physical anthropology & ethnography; Political manifestos
Race, Discourse and Labourism documents the Labour party's construction of the concept of race in political discourse from the 1930s Indian independence negotiations and the defence of jews from anti-semitic attack in East London. Caroline Knowles argues that in these historical processes Labour constructed a range of negative significances for black citizenship and multi-culturalism and, despite recasting its approach to race in the 1960s and early 1970s, Labour is still unable to officially sanction the effective representation of black voices in its own ranks. The author shows that Labour has not only tolerated racial inequality, it has given it important political direction. Race, Discourse and Labourism is about political processes. It is about the theoretical and political analysis of how race was constructed and sustained as a category in British politics.
By:   Caroline Knowles
Imprint:   Routledge
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 216mm,  Width: 138mm, 
Weight:   408g
ISBN:   9780415050128
ISBN 10:   041505012X
Series:   International Library of Sociology
Pages:   220
Publication Date:   27 August 1992
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Primary ,  Further / Higher Education
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Introduction 1. Exploring Race and Labourism: A Conceptual Framework 2. Socialism in the Thirites and for the Nineties 3. The Labour Party's Commonwealth 4. Anti-Semitism in East London 5. Race and Race Relations in Postwar Britain 6. Labour and Immigration from the Fifties to the Nineties 7. Anti-Racism in the Thirties 8. Anti-Racism in the Seventies 9. Black Representation: Prospects for the Nineties

See Also