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Cambridge University Press
06 March 2014
The association between poor nutrition and disease is well established. Integrating nutritional sciences into clinical practice offers a valuable tool to improve patient care and prognosis, particularly within the critical care environment where nutrition is often overlooked. However, optimizing nutritional support offers a safe and simple adjunct to more expensive and technologically challenging treatments for these complex patients. This volume provides comprehensive guidelines for the nutritional support of critically ill patients and is valuable reading for doctors, nurses, dieticians and practitioners working within the critical care environment. It begins by discussing nutritional physiology and patient assessment, providing an essential foundation for planning and managing the dietary requirements of critically ill patients. Internationally-recognized authors present evidence-based guidelines for managing various groups, including surgical patients, patients with burns, and patients with renal failure. The implications of enteral vs. parenteral nutrition, timing of nutritional support, therapeutic strategies, and management of complications are discussed.
Edited by:   Peter Faber, Mario Siervo (University of Newcastle upon Tyne)
Imprint:   Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 233mm,  Width: 154mm,  Spine: 12mm
Weight:   440g
ISBN:   9781107669017
ISBN 10:   1107669014
Pages:   261
Publication Date:   06 March 2014
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Peter Faber, MD, PhD, FRCA, FFICM is a Consultant Cardio-Thoracic Anaesthetist, Department of Cardiac Anaesthesia, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary. Mario Siervo, MD, MSc, PhD, RPHN is Lecturer in Nutrition and Ageing, Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University.

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