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Oxford University Press
15 January 2009
Development studies; Peace studies & conflict resolution; Ethical issues & debates; Indigenous peoples; Anthropology; Politics & government; Geopolitics; Land rights
The UN's International Decade of the Rights of Indigenous People recently ended in the failure of negotiating governments to accommodate, within international law, the concept of a 'collective' right to land. The consequences of such a failure are far-reaching for the world's indigenous peoples. This book, which arose out of the 13th annual Oxford Amnesty Lecture series, brings together a number of experts from diverse fields and organisations- anthropologists, historians, lawyers, conservationists, and campaigners - to debate the whole notion of 'Land Rights'. What do indigenous people mean when they invoke their collective right to land? Set against these rights are the individual rights of property-owners or corporations. How are national governments, and international law, to arbitrate between them?
Edited by:   Timothy Chesters (Lecturer in Modern Languages Royal Holloway University of London)
Imprint:   Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 196mm,  Width: 129mm,  Spine: 18mm
Weight:   182g
ISBN:   9780199545100
ISBN 10:   0199545103
Series:   Oxford Amnesty Lectures
Pages:   240
Publication Date:   15 January 2009
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Professional and scholarly ,  Professional & Vocational ,  A / AS level ,  Further / Higher Education
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Preface; Contributors; Introduction; 1. Land: Intangible or Tangible Property?; Response to Marilyn Strathern; 2. Indigenous Peoples and International Human Rights; Response to Romeo Saganash; 3. Standing in Deep Time; Standing in the Law; Response to Frank Brennan; 4. If this is your land, where are your stories?; Response to Ken Wiwa; 5. Whose world is it anyway?; Response to Richard Leakey; 6. Land Reform in the Eastern Cape: An Argument against Recommunalisation

Reviews for Land Rights: Oxford Amnesty Lectures

Review from previous edition All good citizens should probably want to buy them ... simply because they are published in support of such a good cause. It turns out, though, that no self-sacrifice is involved. [These] are immensely rich, challenging, stimulating volumes ... The contributors' lists are star-studded ... and each book has a clear, coherent, overarching theme, despite the extreme diversity of the individual lectures' The Independent


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