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Wadsworth Publishing Co Inc
02 February 2017

Before we go any further: Are you buying from outside Australia? We would love to ship this book to you BUT you must be studying at an Australian institution to buy this title from us at this price. Why? Because when we process your order we are required to provide to our supplier a confirmation of your student name, student ID and the institution. You really need it? We CAN still sell to overseas students however we need to advise you of the (unfortunately) higher price after you place your order. You can then decide whether you'd still like to proceed or cancel the order. That's just how it is. (sigh...) And of course, we wish you all the best with your studies : )




INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY brings the study of physical anthropology to life! With a focus on the big picture of human evolution, the 15th Edition helps you master the basic principles of the subject and arrive at an understanding of the human species and its place in the biological world. Each chapter begins with new Student Learning Objectives and a chapter outline to help you focus your study time. Each chapter then ends with an expanded section of 'How Do We Know?', followed by a critical thinking question, designed to help cement your understanding of the concepts.
By:   Wenda Trevathan (New Mexico State University), Robert Jurmain (Professor Emeritus, San Jose State University), Lynn Kilgore (University of Colorado, Boulder), Russell Ciochon (University of Iowa), Eric Bartelink (California State University, Chico)
Imprint:   Wadsworth Publishing Co Inc
Country of Publication:   United States
Edition:   15th edition
Dimensions:   Height: 276mm,  Width: 217mm,  Spine: 21mm
Weight:   1.225kg
ISBN:   9781337099820
ISBN 10:   1337099821
Pages:   592
Publication Date:   02 February 2017
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Primary
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
1. Introduction to Physical Anthropology. 2. The Development of Evolutionary Theory. 3. The Biological Basis of Life. 4. Heredity and Evolution. 5. Macroevolution: Processes of Vertebrate and Mammalian Evolution. 6. Survey of the Living Primates. 7. Primate Behavior. 8. Overview of the Fossil Primates. 9. Paleoanthropology: Reconstructing Early Hominin Behavior and Ecology. 10. Hominin Origins in Africa. 11. The First Dispersal of the Genus Homo: Homo Erectus and Contemporaries. 12. Premodern Humans. 13. The Origin and Dispersal of Modern Humans. 14. Modern Human Biology: Patterns of Variation. 15. Modern Human Biology: Patterns of Adaptation. 16. Legacies of Human Evolutionary History: Effects on the Human Life Course. 17. The Human Disconnection. Appendix A. Atlas of Primate Skeletal Anatomy. Appendix B. Sexing and Aging the Skeleton.

Wenda Trevathan is regents' professor, emerita, of anthropology at New Mexico State University, where she taught from 1983 to 2009. She is a biological anthropologist whose research focuses on the evolutionary and biocultural factors underlying human reproduction, including childbirth, maternal behavior, sexuality, and menopause. Her primary publications include works on the evolution of childbirth and evolutionary medicine. Her recent books include ANCIENT BODIES, MODERN LIVES: HOW EVOLUTION HAS SHAPED WOMEN'S HEALTH (2010, Oxford University Press) and COSTLY AND CUTE: HELPLESS INFANTS AND HUMAN EVOLUTION (2016, SAR/UNM Press). She is also the Editor in Chief of the INTERNATIONAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, which will be published by John Wiley and Sons in 2018. She has taught courses in physical anthropology, nutritional anthropology, medical anthropology, evolutionary medicine, and anthropology of reproduction. Robert Jurmain received an A.B. in Anthropology from UCLA and a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology from Harvard. He taught at San Jose State University from 1975 to 2004 and is now professor emeritus. During his teaching career, he taught courses in all major branches of physical anthropology, including osteology and human evolution, with the greatest concentration in general education teaching for introductory students. His research interests are skeletal biology of humans and non-human primates, paleopathology, and paleoanthropology. In addition to his three textbooks, which together have appeared in 35 editions, he is the author of STORIES FROM THE SKELETON: BEHAVIORAL RECONSTRUCTION IN HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (1999, Gordon Breach Publishers), as well as numerous articles in research journals. Lynn Kilgore earned her Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder, where she now holds an affiliate faculty position. Her primary research interests are osteology and paleopathology. She has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate courses in human osteology, primate behavior, human heredity and evolution, and general physical anthropology. Her research focuses on developmental defects as well as on disease and trauma in human and great ape skeletons. Russell L. Ciochon is a leading paleoanthropologist specializing in primate and human evolution in Asia, as well as the geochronology of Asian Plio-Pleistocene sites. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and teaches at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, where he is Chair of the Department of Anthropology. He teaches courses in hominin and non-human primate evolution, as well as primate behavior, ecology, and functional anatomy. Besides co-authoring more than one hundred technical articles, he has also co-written two popular books: DRAGON BONE HILL: AN ICE AGE SAGA OF HOMO ERECTUS (2004, Oxford University Press) and OTHER ORIGINS: THE SEARCH FOR THE GIANT APE IN PREHISTORY (1990, Bantam Books). Eric Bartelink received a B.S. in Anthropology from Central Michigan University (1995), an M.A. in Anthropology at California State University, Chico (2001), and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Texas A&M University (2006). He has taught for eleven years at California State University, Chico, where he is currently a Full Professor and Director of the Human Identification Laboratory. He teaches courses in introductory physical anthropology, human osteology, human growth and development, human origins, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology, and statistics. His research interests focus on the bioarchaeology of Native California, dietary reconstruction using stable isotope analysis, and applications within forensic anthropology. He is a co-author on ESSENTIALS OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (10e, Cengage Learning), FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY: CURRENT METHODS AND PRACTICE (2014, Academic/Elsevier Press), and has authored and co-authored numerous articles in scientific journals.

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