MARCH'S BIG RELEASES TELL ME MORE

Close Notification

Your cart does not contain any items

This self-contained textbook combines physical, mathematical, and astrophysical aspects of black hole theory. Pedagogically presented, it contains 'standard' material on black holes as well as relatively new subjects such as the role of hidden symmetries in black hole physics, and black holes in spacetimes with large extra dimensions. The book will appeal to students and young scientists interested in the theory of black holes.
By:   Valeri P. Frolov (Department of Physics University of Alberta Edmonton Canada), Andrei Zelnikov (Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada)
Imprint:   Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 246mm,  Width: 174mm,  Spine: 23mm
Weight:   988g
ISBN:   9780198729112
ISBN 10:   0198729111
Pages:   488
Publication Date:   15 February 2015
Audience:   College/higher education ,  A / AS level
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
1. Black Holes: Big Picture ; 2. Physics in a Uniformly Accelerated Frame ; 3. Riemannian Geometry ; 4. Particle Motion in Curved Spacetime ; 5. Einstein Equations ; 6. Spherically Symmetric Black Holes ; 7. Particles and Light Motion in Schwarzschild Spacetime ; 8. Rotating Black Holes ; 9. Classical and Quantum Fields near Black Holes ; 10. Black Holes and All That Jazz ; A. Fundamental Constants and Units ; B. Gauss-Codazzi Equations ; C. Conformal Transformations ; D. Hidden Symmetries ; E. Boundary Term for the Einstein-Hilbert Action ; F. Quantum Fields

Andrei Zelnikov is Research Associate at the Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Reviews for Introduction to Black Hole Physics

I am quite enthusiastic about this book, and I cannot wait to buy a copy for myself. It would be fun to teach a graduate course on black holes based on this book ... it has a remarkable breadth, and it strikes an appealing balance between astrophysics, physics, and mathematics of black holes. Alexander Kusenko, University of California at Los Angeles


See Also