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Indian Temple Sculpture

John Guy

$69.99  $25.00

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V & A Publications
21 December 2017
Sculpture; Religious subjects depicted in art; History
Illustrated with the Victoria and Albert Museum's unrivaled collection of South Asian sculpture, this freshly redesigned volume makes John Guy's classic study available once again. This is the first book to look at Indian temple sculpture within its full context, from religion and ritual to architecture and iconography. An excellent introduction to the three traditional religions of the Indian subcontinent-Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism-through the myths and manifestations of the principal deities, Indian Temple Sculpture will fascinate all those interested in Indian culture.
By:   John Guy
Imprint:   V & A Publications
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Edition:   Revised edition
Dimensions:   Height: 265mm,  Width: 200mm, 
ISBN:   9781851779192
ISBN 10:   1851779191
Pages:   192
Publication Date:   21 December 2017
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active

John Guy is the Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. He previously served for 22 years as a Senior Curator of Indian Art at the Victoria and Albert Museum. He is an elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Major publications include Arts of India: 1550-1900 (V&A 1990), Indian Art and Connoisseurship (1995, ed.), Vietnamese Ceramics: A Separate Tradition (1998), Woven Cargoes: Indian Textiles in the East (1998), Wonder of the Age: Master Painters of India (MMA 2012). Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800 (MMA 2013), and Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia (MMA 2014).

Reviews for Indian Temple Sculpture

Essential and beautiful...this lavishly illustrated book is a welcome and much needed addition to the subject of Indian religious Art. --Royal Academy Magazine


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