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Human Rights and the Judicialisation of African Politics

Peter Brett

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Hardback

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Routledge
27 September 2018
Human Rights and the Judicialisation of African Politics shows readers how central questions in African politics have entered courtrooms over the last three decades, and provides the first transnational explanation for this development.

The book begins with three conditions that have made judicialisation possible in Africa as a whole; new corporate rights norms (including the expansion of indigenous rights), the proliferation of new avenues for legal proceedings, and the development of new support structures enabling litigation. It then studies the effects of these changes based on fieldwork in three Southern African countries - Zimbabwe, Namibia and Botswana. Examining three recent court cases involving international law, international courts and transnational NGOs, it looks beyond some of international relations' established models to explain when and why and legal rights can be clarified.

This text will be of key interest to scholars and students of African politics and human rights, and more broadly to international relations and international law and justice.
By:  
Imprint:   Routledge
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 234mm,  Width: 156mm, 
Weight:   620g
ISBN:   9781138289239
ISBN 10:   113828923X
Series:   Routledge Studies in African Politics and International Relations
Pages:   12
Publication Date:  
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Primary ,  A / AS level
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Introduction Part One: Explaining Judicialisation 1. New Norms: The Impossible Institutionalisation of Corporate Rights 2. New Courts: The Rights Revolution and the New Terrain of International Law 3. New Lawyers: South African Advocates Abroad Part Two: Case Studies 4. Who Represents Namibians? 5. Who is Indigenous to Botswana? 6. Who is a Zimbabwean? Conclusion

Peter Brett is Lecturer in International Politics at Queen Mary, University of London, UK.

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