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Goering's Man in Paris

The Story of a Nazi Art Plunderer and His World

Jonathan Petropoulos

$51.95

Hardback

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Yale University
26 January 2021
A charged biography of a notorious Nazi art plunderer and his career in the postwar art world Bruno Lohse (1911-2007) was one of the most notorious art plunderers in history. Appointed by Hermann Goering to Hitler's special art looting agency, he went on to supervise the systematic theft and distribution of over 22,000 artworks, largely from French Jews; helped Goering develop an enormous private art collection; and staged twenty private exhibitions of stolen art in Paris's Jeu de Paume museum during the war. By the 1950s Lohse was officially denazified but back in the art dealing world, offering looted masterpieces to American museums. After his death, dozens of paintings by Renoir, Monet, and Pissarro, among others, were found in his Zurich bank vault and adorning the walls of his Munich home.

Jonathan Petropoulos spent nearly a decade interviewing Lohse and continues to serve as an expert witness for Holocaust restitution cases. Here he tells the story of Lohse's life, offering a critical examination of the postwar art world.
By:   Jonathan Petropoulos
Imprint:   Yale University
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 235mm,  Width: 156mm,  Spine: 15mm
Weight:   666g
ISBN:   9780300251920
ISBN 10:   0300251920
Publication Date:   26 January 2021
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Reviews for Goering's Man in Paris: The Story of a Nazi Art Plunderer and His World

A manuscript of prime and serious scholarship. -Jean-Marc Dreyfus, University of Manchester Even in normal times, the art market can appear shadowy, even shady, and the early 1940s were not normal times. This book brings readers into the labyrinthine network of German, French, and Swiss art dealers who not only fenced goods stolen from museums and Jewish collectors in Nazi-occupied Europe, but also concealed and continued to trade in some of the loot after 1945. The result is a fascinating exploration of a netherworld where luxury and larceny met, and the perils of getting close to it. -Peter Hayes, author of Why? Explaining the Holocaust Jonathan Petropoulos's meticulously researched account of one of the great (and continuing) art thefts in history reads like an Agatha Christie mystery. The degree to which the world of art collectors, gallery owners, curators, and other supposedly cultured people participated in this crime is stupefying. A compelling and maddening page turner. -Deborah Lipstadt, author of Antisemitism: Here and Now


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