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Global Plant Genetic Resources for Insect-Resistant Crops

Stephen L. Clement Sharron S. Quisenberry (Montana State University)

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Hardback

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CRC Press Inc
13 July 1998
This book explores plant biodiversity, its preservation, and its use to develop crops resistant to pests, thereby reducing world-wide use of chemical pesticides. From the foreward by -Masa Iwanaga, Deputy Director General (Programme), International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Italy: ...it is essential that the problem of food security be recognized as a challenge facing all of humanity, and that concerted global efforts in agricultural research be intensified...exciting successful examples of effective use of genetic diversity for the development of insect-resistant crops abound. This book provides many such examples, from which we can learn valuable lessons for the effective use of conserved germplasm. The widely applicable lesson is that close, effective, and long-term collaboration is required among different players, including germplasm curators, plant breeders, molecular biologists, entomologists, ecologists, and social scientists.
By:   Stephen L. Clement, Sharron S. Quisenberry (Montana State University)
Imprint:   CRC Press Inc
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 234mm,  Width: 156mm,  Spine: 22mm
Weight:   431g
ISBN:   9780849326950
ISBN 10:   0849326958
Pages:   320
Publication Date:   13 July 1998
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Professional and scholarly ,  Further / Higher Education ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Foreword, Masa Iwanaga Cereal Crops Germplasm Evaluation and Utilization for Insect Resistance in Rice, Elvis A. Heinrichs and Sharron S. Quisenberry The Value of Conserved Wheat Germplasm Evaluated for Arthropod Resistance, C. Michael Smith, Sharron S. Quisenberry, and Francois du Toit Insect Resistance in Barley Germplasm, David R. Porter, Dolores W. Mornhinweg, and James A. Webster Genetic Diversity of Sorghum: A Source of Insect-Resistant Germplasm, George L. Teetes, Gary C. Peterson, Kanayo F. Nwanze, and Bonnie B. Pendleton Legume Crops Bean Germplasm Resources for Insect Resistance, Cesar Cardona and Julia Kornegay Assessment of Soybean Germplasm for Multiple Insect Resistance, David J. Boethel Germplasm Resources, Insect Resistance, and Grain Legume Improvement, Stephen L. Clement, Massimo Cristofaro, Susan E. Cowgill, and Susanne Weigand. Alfalfa Germplasm Resources and Insect Resistance, George R. Manglitz and Edgar L. Sorensen Vegetable Crops Vegetable Crops: Search for Arthropod Resistance in Genetic Resources, James D. Barbour Root and Tuber Crops Utilization of Sweetpotato Genetic Resources to Develop Insect Resistance, Wanda W. Collins , Edward E. Carey, Il-Gin Mok, Paul Thompson, and Zhang Da Peng The Potato: Genetic Resources and Insect Resistance, Kathy L. Flanders, Silvia Arnone, and Edward B. Radcliffe Basic Research and Biotechnology Plant Genetic Resources for the Study of Insect-Plant Interactions, Sanford D. Eigenbrode and Stephen L. Clement Biotechnological Applications of Plant Genes in the Production of Insect Resistant Crops, Angharad M.R. Gatehouse

Reviews for Global Plant Genetic Resources for Insect-Resistant Crops

This is a well presented reference bookThe editors have done a marvelous job of selecting the right crops for the discussions in this bookThe foreword by Masa Iwanaga is an excellent essay on the economics of stress damage. --Plant Science . . . it is essential that the problem of food security be recognized as a challenge facing all of humanity, and that concerted global efforts in agricultural research be intensified. . . . exciting successful examples of effective use of genetic diversity for the development of insect-resistant crops abound. This book provides many such examples, from which we can learn valuable lessons for the effective use of conserved germplasm. The widely applicable lesson is that close, effective, and long-term collaboration is required among different players, including germplasm curators, plant breeders, molecular biologists, entomologists, ecologists, and social scientists. -Masa Iwanaga, Deputy Director General (Programme), International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Italy, in the Foreword to this book


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