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Facts vs. Opinions vs. Robots

Michael Rex Michael Rex

$29.99

Hardback

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Penguin
31 March 2020
Children's & Educational; Picture books; Children's & young adult fiction & true stories; Humorous stories (Children's&YA); People & places (Children's&YA)
Do you know the difference between a fact and an opinion? It can be a hard thing to understand. Some things are facts--like the number of robots in this book. Other things are opinions--like which robot would make the best friend, or which robot dances best. And sometimes to tell the difference between a fact and an opinion, you need to wait to get more information--that's because facts can be proven true or false, and opinions are things you feel and believe--but that you can't prove.

Mike Rex introduces young readers to the very important distinction between facts and opinions, and he reminds us that it is nice to listen to one another's opinions, and to stand up for the facts!
By:   Michael Rex
Illustrated by:   Michael Rex
Imprint:   Penguin
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 285mm,  Width: 225mm,  Spine: 13mm
Weight:   388g
ISBN:   9781984816269
ISBN 10:   1984816268
Pages:   32
Publication Date:   31 March 2020
Recommended Age:   From 5 to 8 years
Audience:   Children/juvenile ,  English as a second language
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Michael Rex has written and/or illustrated over forty children's books, including Eat Pete,With Any Luck, I'll Drive a Truck (by David Friend), the New York Times #1 bestseller Goodnight Goon, The Runaway Mummy, Truck Duck, and the Fangbone series (which has also been turned into an animated TV series). He has a master's degree in visual arts education (K-12) and worked as a New York City art teacher for four years. He lives in Leonia, New Jersey, with his wife and their two sons.

Reviews for Facts vs. Opinions vs. Robots

'Do you know the difference between a fact and an opinion?' Rex (Eat Pete!) creates an essential picture book for the times, with a cast of digitally rendered robots as his eager-eyed, rambunctious object lessons. . . . He offers more tips. Listen to other opinions, reboot the dialogue, and find common ground. Rex and his robots ultimately make a fun, cogent argument for informed and civil conversation. These robots could teach grown-ups a thing or two. --Publishers Weekly


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