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Beware of the Trains
— —
Edmund Crispin
Beware of the Trains by Edmund Crispin at Abbey's Bookshop,

Beware of the Trains

Edmund Crispin


9781448217465

Bloomsbury


Fiction & Literature;
Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945);
Classic fiction (pre c 1945);
Short stories;
Crime Chronicle - Modern Crime


Paperback

176 pages

$19.99
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How acute are your powers of perception? Do they begin to match those of Gervase Fen, Oxford don and sleuth supreme?

First published in 1953, Beware of the Trains is a collection of sixteen short mysteries. Fen must link a missing train conductor to the murder of a thief, decipher cryptograms to solve the death of a cipher expert and puzzle out a locked-room mystery on Boxing Day.

Erudite and complex, these Gervase Fen cases are classic crime at its finest: plot, atmosphere and anecdote, bound together by Edmund Crispin's inimitable wit and charm.

By:   Edmund Crispin
Imprint:   Bloomsbury
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 198mm,  Width: 129mm, 
ISBN:   9781448217465
ISBN 10:   1448217466
Series:   The Gervase Fen Mysteries
Pages:   176
Publication Date:   February 2019
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Edmund Crispin was the pseudonym of Robert Bruce Montgomery (usually credited as Bruce Montgomery) (2 October 1921 - 15 September 1978), an English crime writer and composer. Montgomery wrote nine detective novels and two collections of short stories under the pseudonym Edmund Crispin (taken from a character in Michael Innes's Hamlet, Revenge!). The stories feature Oxford don Gervase Fen, who is an eccentric, sometimes absent-minded Professor of English at the university. Crispin's whodunit novels have complex plots and fantastic, somewhat unbelievable solutions. They are written in a humorous, literary and sometimes farcical style and contain frequent references to English literature, poetry, and music. They are also among the few mystery novels to break the fourth wall occasionally and speak directly to the audience. The Times chose Edmund Crispin as one of their '50 Greatest Crime Writers'.


Witty and stylishly told anecdotes, just the kind one might hear in a commons room at Oxford. * The Washington Post *

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