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As Democracy Goes, So Does Journalism

Evolution of Journalism in Liberal, Deliberative, and Participatory Democracy

Seong Jae Min

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Lexington Books
15 December 2019
As Democracy Goes, So Does Journalism: Evolution of Journalism in Liberal, Deliberative, and Participatory Democracy explores the symbiotic relationship between democracy and journalism in an engaging historical narrative. From a liberal to a deliberative and to a participatory model, theories and practices of democracy are constantly looking for better governance. How is journalism evolving to match the vibrant changes in its democratic counterpart? This book suggests that the dominant trustee model of journalism that flourished in liberal democracy has waned; the civic-minded public journalism in deliberative democracy has had ups and downs; and the free-wheeling citizen journalism in participatory democracy is now under the spotlight, whether for its brilliance or ill repute. This book attempts to answer the vital questions facing journalism today, namely its identities, functions, and relationship to democracy and the good life. Scholars and students of journalism as well as the public interested in the past, present, and future of journalism will find this book valuable.
By:   Seong Jae Min
Imprint:   Lexington Books
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 218mm,  Width: 154mm,  Spine: 10mm
Weight:   200g
ISBN:   9781498574723
ISBN 10:   1498574726
Pages:   126
Publication Date:   15 December 2019
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Seong Jae Min is associate professor of communication studies at Pace University.

Reviews for As Democracy Goes, So Does Journalism: Evolution of Journalism in Liberal, Deliberative, and Participatory Democracy

The role of journalism in a democracy has been generalized as a normative ideal without explaining what journalism is and what democracy looks like. This book takes these assumptions apart by explicating how different types of democracies enable distinct varieties of journalism, and in turn, alternative conceptions of the type of imagined public. -- Nikki Usher, The George Washington University


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