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Are Prisons Obsolete?

Angela Davis

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Seven Stories
01 August 2011
Penology & punishment; Politics & government
Since the 1980s prison construction and incarceration rates in the U.S. have been rising exponentially, evoking huge public concern about their proliferation, their recent privatisation and their promise of enormous profits. But these prisons house hugely disproportionate numbers of people of colour, betraying the racism embedded in the system, while studies show that increasing prison sentences has had no effect on crime. Here, esteemed civil rights activist Angela Davis lays bare the situation and argues for a radical rethinking of our rehabilitation programmes.
By:   Angela Davis
Imprint:   Seven Stories
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 178mm,  Width: 126mm,  Spine: 6mm
Weight:   106g
ISBN:   9781583225813
ISBN 10:   1583225811
Pages:   144
Publication Date:   01 August 2011
Audience:   College/higher education ,  General/trade ,  Primary ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Angela Davis, a long-time member of the Communist party and the Black Panthers, became only the third woman in history to appear on the FBI's most wanted list. Wrongly charged with taking part in a conspiracy to free George Jackson by arming prisoners in a California courthouse, Davis spent sixteen months behind bars, until her subsequent acquittal on all charges. A Professor of History of Consciousness at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Davis has been involved in prison activism for the last thirty-five years. She is author of many books, including Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude 'Ma' Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday. Her new book, forthcoming from Random House, is Prisons and Democracy.

Reviews for Are Prisons Obsolete?

As useful an exposition of the current dilemmas of the women's movement as one could hope for. - Los Angeles Times Book Review


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