FREIGHT DELAYS IN AND OUT: MORE INFO

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Picador
04 March 2020
Fiction & Literature; Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945); Migration, immigration & emigration; SIGNED
Danny - Dhananjaya Rajaratnam - is an illegal immigrant in Sydney, denied refugee status after he has fled from his native Sri Lanka. Working as a cleaner, living out of a grocery storeroom, for three years he's been trying to create a new identity for himself. And now, with his beloved vegan girlfriend, Sonja, with his hidden accent and highlights in his hair, he is as close as he has ever come to living a normal Australian life.

But then one morning, Danny learns a female client of his has been murdered. When Danny recognizes a jacket left at the murder scene, he believes it belongs to another of his clients - a doctor with whom he knows the woman was having an affair. Suddenly Danny is confronted with a choice: come forward with his knowledge about the crime and risk being deported, or say nothing, and let justice go undone? Over the course of a single day, evaluating the weight of his past, his dreams for the future, and the unpredictable, often absurd reality of living invisibly and undocumented, he must wrestle with his conscience and decide if a person without rights still has responsibilities.
By:   Aravind Adiga
Imprint:   Picador
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 234mm,  Width: 153mm,  Spine: 19mm
Weight:   349g
ISBN:   9781509879045
ISBN 10:   1509879048
Pages:   352
Publication Date:   04 March 2020
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Aravind Adiga was born in 1974 in Madras (now Chennai). He was educated at Columbia University in New York and Magdalen College, Oxford. His articles have appeared in publications including the New Yorker, the Sunday Times, the Financial Times, and the Times of India. His first novel, The White Tiger, won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2008. Praise for Aravind Adiga: 'Adiga is a real writer - that is to say, someone who forges an original voice and vision' -Sunday Times 'Beautifully done . . . As honest a book as it is entertaining: funny and engaging' -John Burnside, The Times (Last Man In Tower) 'Adiga achieves in a dozen pages what many novels fail to do in hundreds: convincingly render individual desire, disappointment and survival . . . Between the Assassinations commands attention from beginning to end' -San Francisco Chronicle 'Blazingly savage and brilliant . . . Not a single detail in this novel rings false or feels confected' -Neel Mukherjee, Sunday Telegraph (The White Tiger)

Reviews for Amnesty

A forceful, urgent thriller for our times * Lit Hub * Adiga is one of the great observers of power and its deformities, showing in novels like his Booker Prize winning White Tiger and Last Man in Tower how within societies, the powerful lean on the less powerful, and the weak exploit the weaker all the way down. Telling the tale of Danny's immigration along the story of one tense day, he has built a forceful, urgent thriller for our times. -- John Freeman * Lit Hub * Engrossing . . . vivid . . . Adiga's enthralling depiction of one immigrant's tough situation humanizes a complex and controversial global dilemma. * Publishers Weekly * A taut, thrillerlike novel . . . A well-crafted tale of entrapment, alert to the risk of exploitation that follows immigrants in a new country. * Kirkus, starred review * Scrutinizes the human condition through a haves-vs.-have-not filter with sly wit and narrative ingenuity . . . Adiga's smart, funny, and timely tale with a crime spin of an undocumented immigrant will catalyze readers. * Booklist * A mesmerising, breakneck quest of a novel; a search for the true sense of self, for the answer to a moral dilemma which damns either way. The scope and profundity of Victor Hugo, the humour and wit we've come to expect from Adiga, and a novel which suggests the impossibility of keeping a sense of the self in a globalised world which either forces assimilation or exile. -- Andrew McMillan Adiga is a real writer - that is to say, someone who forges an original voice and vision * Sunday Times *


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