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After One-Hundred-and-Twenty: Reflecting on Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in the Jewish Tradition...
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Hillel Halkin
After One-Hundred-and-Twenty: Reflecting on Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in the Jewish Tradition by Hillel Halkin at Abbey's Bookshop,

After One-Hundred-and-Twenty: Reflecting on Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in the Jewish Tradition

Hillel Halkin


9780691181165

Princeton University Pres


Religion & beliefs;
Judaism: theology


Paperback

232 pages

$39.99
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After One-Hundred-and-Twenty provides a richly nuanced and deeply personal look at Jewish attitudes and practices regarding death, mourning, and the afterlife as they have existed and evolved from biblical times to today. Taking its title from the Hebrew and Yiddish blessing to live to a ripe old age--Moses is said to have been 120 years old when he died--the book explores how the Bible's original reticence about an afterlife gave way to views about personal judgment and reward after death, the resurrection of the body, and even reincarnation. It examines Talmudic perspectives on grief, burial, and the afterlife, shows how Jewish approaches to death changed in the Middle Ages with thinkers like Maimonides and in the mystical writings of the Zohar, and delves into such things as the origins of the custom of reciting Kaddish for the deceased and beliefs about encountering the dead in visions and dreams.

After One-Hundred-and-Twenty is also Hillel Halkin's eloquent and disarmingly candid reflection on his own mortality, the deaths of those he has known and loved, and the comfort he has and has not derived from Jewish tradition.

By:   Hillel Halkin
Imprint:   Princeton University Pres
Country of Publication:   United States
Dimensions:   Height: 216mm,  Width: 140mm, 
ISBN:   9780691181165
ISBN 10:   0691181160
Series:   Library of Jewish Ideas
Pages:   232
Publication Date:   March 2018
Audience:   College/higher education ,  A / AS level ,  Further / Higher Education
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Unspecified

Frontmatter, pg. i BY WAY OF AN INTRODUCTION, pg. 1 CHAPTER ONE, pg. 9 CHAPTER TWO, pg. 43 CHAPTER THREE, pg. 89 CHAPTER FOUR, pg. 137 CHAPTER FIVE, pg. 177

Hillel Halkin is an author, translator, critic, and journalist. His books include Jabotinsky: A Life and Yehuda Halevi, which won the National Jewish Book Award.


In this important new book, Hillel Halkin explores Jewish attitudes towards death and the world to come. . . . A highly readable book which provokes reflection on an often uncomfortable subject. It would prove a valuable resource for all those involved in the field of pastoral care.---Randall C. Belinfante, Association of Jewish Libraries Reviews Charming, frankly vulnerable, and deceptively deep.---Abraham Socher, Jewish Review of Books At once scholarly and passionate, secular and religious, detached and autobiographical.---Edward Alexander, Chicago Jewish Star Instructive and thought-provoking. . . . One would be hard-pressed to find a more knowledgeable or astute guide through the vast literature of Jewish thanatology than Hillel Halkin. . . . The Biggest of Mysteries being tackled by one of our best and brightest.---Matt Nesvisky, Jerusalem Post Hillel Halkin, an American-born Israeli scholar and novelist, poignantly explores his own experiences while providing a history of Jewish thought.---Amy Frykholm, Christian Century A very user-friendly historical account of Jewish ideas about death . . . and how those ideas change. . . . [Halkin] is a master at 'popularisation' in the best sense of that term, bringing to a non-academic audience what are, in essence, some very complicated ideas.---David Hillel-Ruben, Jewish Chronicle Deeply moving.---Ray Olson, Booklist Well-rounded and thoroughly readable.---Jeff Fleischer, ForeWord It's refreshing to read a Jewish book on death that does not presume to offer guidance, either through that dark portal, or around it. Instead, Hillel Halkin. . . has written a brief, pellucid account of the role death has played in Jewish texts, law, thought and lives--including his own.---Esther Schor, Wall Street Journal In this important new book, Hillel Halkin explores Jewish attitudes towards death and the world to come. . . . A highly readable book which provokes reflection on an often uncomfortable subject. It would prove a valuable resource for all those involved in the field of pastoral care. --Randall C. Belinfante, Association of Jewish Libraries Reviews Charming, frankly vulnerable, and deceptively deep. --Abraham Socher, Jewish Review of Books Learned and beautifully written. --Choice Instructive and thought-provoking. . . . One would be hard-pressed to find a more knowledgeable or astute guide through the vast literature of Jewish thanatology than Hillel Halkin. . . . The Biggest of Mysteries being tackled by one of our best and brightest. --Matt Nesvisky, Jerusalem Post Deeply moving. --Ray Olson, Booklist Well-rounded and thoroughly readable. --Jeff Fleischer, ForeWord Halkin combines an accessible and trenchant exploration of Judaism's evolving concepts of death with his own struggle with understanding it. He leavens what could be a depressing read with humor. . . . Halkin's frankness about his own difficulties . . . help make this nuanced quest for meaning personal and affecting. --Publishers Weekly It's refreshing to read a Jewish book on death that does not presume to offer guidance, either through that dark portal, or around it. Instead, Hillel Halkin. . . has written a brief, pellucid account of the role death has played in Jewish texts, law, thought and lives--including his own. --Esther Schor, Wall Street Journal At once scholarly and passionate, secular and religious, detached and autobiographical. --Edward Alexander, Chicago Jewish Star Long-listed for the 2017 Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize Hillel Halkin, an American-born Israeli scholar and novelist, poignantly explores his own experiences while providing a history of Jewish thought. --Amy Frykholm, Christian Century A very user-friendly historical account of Jewish ideas about death . . . and how those ideas change. . . . [Halkin] is a master at 'popularisation' in the best sense of that term, bringing to a non-academic audience what are, in essence, some very complicated ideas. --David Hillel-Ruben, Jewish Chronicle


  • Long-listed for 2017 Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize 2017
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