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The Wisdom of Sigmund Freud

The Wisdom of Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud

$19.99  $10.00
Citadel Press is proud to announce the newest titles in the Wisdom Library, a collection of books showcasing the thoughts and writings of diverse literary, philosophical, political, and scientific immortals. These books deserve a place on every home bookshelf and in every student's basic library.The father of psychoanalysis revolutionized both the conceptualization of human psychology, the understanding of its development, and treatment therapies for abnormal mental conditions. In this handy A -- Z reference, his key terms and concepts are clearly defined and explained in Freud's own words.

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Midnight in Peking: How the Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Last Days of Old China

Midnight in Peking: How the Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Last Days of Old China

Paul French ,  Paul French (Manchester West Mental Health Nhs Foundation)

$47.95  $18.00
In the last days of old Peking, where anything goes, can a murderer escape justice?

Peking in 1937 is a heady mix of privilege and scandal, opulence and opium dens, rumours and superstition. The Japanese are encircling the city, and the discovery of Pamela Werner's body sends a shiver through already nervous Peking. Is it the work of a madman? One of the ruthless Japanese soldiers now surrounding the city? Or perhaps the dreaded fox spirits?

With the suspect list growing and clues sparse, two detectives--one British and one Chinese--race against the clock to solve the crime before the Japanese invade and Peking as they know it is gone forever. Can they find the killer in time, before the Japanese invade?

Historian and China expert Paul French at last uncovers the truth behind this notorious murder, and offers a rare glimpse of the last days of colonial Peking.


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Sharpe's Honor: Richard Sharpe and the Vitoria Campaign, February to June, 1813

Sharpe's Honor: Richard Sharpe and the Vitoria Campaign, February to June, 1813

Bernard Cornwell

$31.95  $10.00
An unfinished duel, a midnight murder, and the treachery of a beautiful prostitute lead to the imprisonment of Sharpe. Caught in a web of political intrigue for which his military experience has left him fatally unprepared, Sharpe becomes a fugitive--a man hunted by both ally and enemy alike.

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The End of Plagues: The Global Battle Against Infectious Disease

The End of Plagues: The Global Battle Against Infectious Disease

John Rhodes

$34.95  $10.00
At the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world.

Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts our fight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand.

Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of polio.


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China 1945: Mao's Revolution and America's Fateful Choice

China 1945: Mao's Revolution and America's Fateful Choice

Richard Bernstein

$49.95  $18.00
A riveting account of the watershed moment in America's dealings with China that forever altered the course of East-West relations.

As 1945 opened, America was on surprisingly congenial terms with China's Communist rebels their soldiers treated their American counterparts as heroes, rescuing airmen shot down over enemy territory. Chinese leaders talked of a future in which American money and technology would help lift China out of poverty. Mao Zedong himself held friendly meetings with U.S. emissaries, vowing to them his intention of establishing an American-style democracy in China. By year's end, however, cordiality had been replaced by chilly hostility and distrust.

Chinese Communist soldiers were setting ambushes for American marines in north China; Communist newspapers were portraying the United States as an implacable imperialist enemy; civil war in China was erupting. The pattern was set for a quarter century of almost total Sino-American mistrust, with the devastating wars in Korea and Vietnam among the consequences. Richard Bernstein here tells the incredible story of that year's sea change, brilliantly analysing its many components, from ferocious infighting among U.S. diplomats, military leaders, and opinion makers to the complex relations between Mao and his patron, Stalin.

On the American side, we meet experienced China hands John Paton Davies and John Stewart Service, whose efforts at negotiation made them prey to accusations of Communist sympathy; FDR's special ambassador Patrick J. Hurley, a decorated general and self-proclaimed cowboy; and Time journalist, Henry Luce, whose editorials helped turn the tide of American public opinion. On the Chinese side, Bernstein reveals the ascendant Mao and his intractable counterpart, Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek; and the indispensable Zhou Enlai.

A tour de force of narrative history, this book examines the first episode in which American power and good intentions came face-to-face with a powerful Asian revolutionary movement, and challenges familiar assumptions about the origins of modern Sino-American relations.


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Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union

Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union

Peter Savodnik

$43.95  $18.00
Lee Harvey Oswald’s assassination of President Kennedy in 1963 remains one of the most horrifying and hotly debated crimes in American history.

Just as perplexing as the assassination is the assassin himself; the 24-year-old Oswald’s hazy background and motivations—and his subsequent murder at the hands of Jack Ruby—make him an intriguing yet frustratingly enigmatic figure. 

Because Oswald briefly defected to the Soviet Union, some historians allege he was a Soviet agent. But as Peter Savodnik shows here, Oswald’s time in the U.S.S.R. reveals a stranger, more chilling story. 

Oswald ventured to Russia at the age of 19, after a failed stint in the U.S. Marine Corps and a childhood spent shuffling from address to address with his unstable, needy mother. Like many of his generation, Oswald struggled for a sense of belonging in postwar American society, which could be materialistic, atomized, and alienating. The Soviet Union, with its promise of collectivism and camaraderie, seemed to offer an alternative. While traveling in Europe, Oswald slipped across the Soviet border, soon settling in Minsk where he worked at a radio and television factory. But Oswald quickly became just as disillusioned with his adopted country as he had been with the United States. He spoke very little Russian, had difficulty adapting to the culture of his new home, and found few trustworthy friends; indeed most, it became clear, were informing on him to the KGB. After nearly three years, Oswald returned to America feeling utterly defeated and more alone than ever—and as Savodnik shows, he began to look for an outlet for his frustration and rage.

Drawing on groundbreaking research, including interviews with Oswald?s friends and acquaintances in Russia and the United States, The Interloper brilliantly evokes the shattered psyche not just of Oswald himself, but also of the era he so tragically defined.



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The Embrace of Unreason: France, 1914-1940

The Embrace of Unreason: France, 1914-1940

Professor Frederick Brown

$44.95  $18.00
From this acclaimed biographer and cultural historian, a brilliant reconsideration of the events and the political, social, and religious movements that led to France s embrace of Fascism and anti-Semitism.

Frederick Brown explores the tumultuous forces unleashed in the country by the Dreyfus Affair and its aftermath and examines how the clashing ideologies the swarm of isms and their blood-soaked political scandals and artistic movements following the horrors of World War I resulted in the country s era of militant authoritarianism, rioting, violent racism, and nationalistic fervour. We see how these forces overtook the country s sense of reason, sealing the fate of an entire nation, and led to the fall of France and the rise of the Vichy government.

The book picks up where Brown’s previous book, For the Soul of France, left off to tell the story of France in the decades leading up to World War II. We see through the lives of three writers (Maurice Barres, Charles Maurras, and Pierre Drieu La Rochelle) how the French intelligentsia turned away from the humanistic traditions and rationalistic ideals born out of the Enlightenment in favour of submission to authority that stressed patriotism, militarism, and xenophobia; how French extremists, traumatised by the horrors of the battlefront and exalted by the glories of wartime martyrdom, tried to redeem France s collective identity, as Hitler s shadow lengthened over Europe.

The author writes of the Stavisky Affair, named for the notorious swindler whose grandiose Ponzi scheme tarred numerous political figures and fuelled the bloody riots of February 1934, with right-wing paramilitary leagues, already suffering from the worldwide effects of the 1929 stock market crash, decrying Stavisky the Jew as the direct descendant of Alfred Dreyfus and an exemplar of the decaying social order.

We see the Congress of Writers for the Defense of Culture that, in June 1935, assembled Europe’s most illustrious literati under the sponsorship of the Soviet Union, whose internal feuds anticipated those recounted by George Orwell in his Spanish Civil War memoir  Homage to Catalonia. Here too, pictured as the perfect representation of Europe’s cultural doomsday, is the Paris World’s Fair of 1937, featuring two enormous pavilions, the first built by Nazi Germany, the second by Soviet Russia, each facing the other like duelists on the avenue leading to the Eiffel Tower, symbol of the French Republic. And near them both, a pavilion devoted to the art of the festival, in which speakers and displays insisted that Nazi torchlight parades at Nuremberg should serve as a model for France.

Written with historical insight and grasp and made immediate through the use of newspaper articles, journals, and literary works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this book  brings to life Europe’s darkest modern years.


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The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers

The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers

Peter Tomsen

$44.95  $20.00
As elder George H.W. Bush's Special Envoy and Ambassador to Afghanistan from 1989 to 1992, Peter Tomsen has arguably been as close as any foreigner to the Afghan leaders who have been involved in the last two decades of conflict in the region. Tomsen accompanied President Hamid Karzai when Karzai's motorcade was ambushed in Kandahar in 2002. He was one of the last foreigners to meet with the famed Northern Alliance leader Ahmed Shah Masood before Masood was dramatically assassinated by an al-Qaeda bomb days before 9/11. He now is a well-established commentator on Afghan affairs in the U.S. and international media.

In this book, Tomsen draws on a rich trove of never-before-published material - including declassified memos, telegrams, policy papers and his own diary notes - to shed new light on the American involvement in the long and continuing Afghan war. He also offers a deeply informed perspective on how Afghanistan's history as a "shatter zone" for foreign invaders and its tribal society has shaped the modern Afghan narrative. He chronicles the lessons learned, but always forgotten, by every great power who has disastrously invaded Afghanistan.

And he brings to life the appallingly misinformed, occasionally farcical secret operations by foreign intelligence agencies, including the Soviet NKVD and KGB, the Pakistani ISI, and the American CIA. American policy makers, Tomsen argues, still do not understand the Afghan tribal environment or how U.S. actions facilitated the ISI-supported Taliban comeback.

At this critical time, he presents proposals on how the U.S. and the coalition it leads can assist Afghanistan and the region back to stability and peace. It will answer the questions: Why is the United States failing in Afghanistan? Are we throwing away more troops and money at an intractable problem, just like we did in Vietnam? How can we succeed in Afghanistan?

At once an insider historical narrative and an indispensible policy primer, this book offers a unique view of American blunders in Afghanistan, showing how the CIA's ill-advised covert operations and the Pentagon's military strategy have strengthened extremism and chaos in the country.


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Elizabeth of York: A Tudor Queen and Her World

Elizabeth of York: A Tudor Queen and Her World

Alison Weir

$54.95  $18.00
NEW YORK TIMES  BESTSELLER Many are familiar with the story of the much-married King Henry VIII of England and the celebrated reign of his daughter, Elizabeth I. But it is often forgotten that the life of the first Tudor queen, Elizabeth of York, Henry's mother and Elizabeth's grandmother, spanned one of England's most dramatic and perilous periods. Now acclaimed historian Alison Weir presents the first modern biography of this extraordinary woman, whose very existence united the realm and ensured the survival of the Plantagenet bloodline.

Her birth was greeted with as much pomp and ceremony as that of a male heir. The first child of King Edward IV, Elizabeth enjoyed all the glittering trappings of royalty. But after the death of her father; the disappearance and probable murder of her brothers the Princes in the Tower; and the usurpation of the throne by her calculating uncle Richard III, Elizabeth found her world turned upside-down: She and her siblings were declared bastards.

As Richard's wife, Anne Neville, was dying, there were murmurs that the king sought to marry his niece Elizabeth, knowing that most people believed her to be England's rightful queen. Weir addresses Elizabeth's possible role in this and her covert support for Henry Tudor, the exiled pretender who defeated Richard at the Battle of Bosworth and was crowned Henry VII, first sovereign of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth's subsequent marriage to Henry united the houses of York and Lancaster and signalled the end of the Wars of the Roses. For centuries historians have asserted that, as queen, she was kept under Henry's firm grasp, but Weir shows that Elizabeth proved to be a model consort pious and generous who enjoyed the confidence of her husband, exerted a tangible and beneficial influence, and was revered by her son, the future King Henry VIII.

Drawing from a rich trove of historical records, Weir gives a long overdue and much-deserved look at this unforgettable princess whose line descends to today's British monarch a woman who overcame tragedy and danger to become one of England's most beloved consorts.


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Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Liberties and Enlightenment Values

Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Liberties and Enlightenment Values

A. C. Grayling

$22.99  $10.00
The means of defence against foreign danger historically have become the instruments of tyranny at home.  James Madison Our societies, says Anthony Grayling, are under attack not only from the threat of terrorism, but also from our governments' attempts to fight that threat by reducing freedom in our own societies - think the 42-day detention controversy, CCTV surveillance, increasing invasion of privacy, ID Cards, not to mention Abu Ghraib, rendition, Guantanamo...

As Grayling says: 'There should be a special place for political irony in the catalogues of human folly. Starting a war 'to promote freedom and democracy' could in certain though rare circumstances be a justified act; but in the case of the Second Gulf War that began in 2003, which involved reacting to criminals hiding in one country (Al Qaeda in Afghanistan or Pakistan) by invading another country (Iraq), one of the main fronts has, dismayingly, been the home front, where the War on Terror takes the form of a War on Civil Liberties in the spurious name of security. To defend 'freedom and democracy', Western governments attack and diminish freedom and democracy in their own country.

By this logic, someone will eventually have to invade the US and UK to restore freedom and democracy to them.' In this lucid and timely book Grayling sets out what's at risk, engages with the arguments for and against examining the cases made by Isaiah Berlin and Ronald Dworkin on the one hand, and Roger Scruton and John Gray on the other, and finally proposes a different way to respond that makes defending the civil liberties on which western society is founded the cornerstone for defeating terrorism.


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Time Albert Einstein: The Enduring Legacy of a Modern Genius

Time Albert Einstein: The Enduring Legacy of a Modern Genius

Richard Lacayo ,  Time Magazine

$29.95  $10.00
TIME invites readers to explore the life and times of one of history's greatest minds, the genius selected by TIME as the Most Infl uential Person of the 20th Century. The book provides an illuminating overview of Albert Einstein's life, work and theories, presented for the everyday reader. It also explores the great physicist's life beyond the laboratory as an engaged citizen in an era of world confl ict, and it features scores of now little-recalled photographs.

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Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power

Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power

Robert Dallek

$32.95  $10.00
Working side by side in the White House, Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger were two of the most compelling, contradictory, and powerful figures in America in the second half of the twentieth century. While their personalities could hardly have seemed more different, both were largely self-made men, brimming with ambition, driven by their own inner demons, and often ruthless in pursuit of their goals.

Tapping into a wealth of recently declassified archives, Robert Dallek uncovers fascinating details about Nixon and Kissinger's tumultuous personal relationship and brilliantly analyses their shared roles in monumental historical events - including the nightmare of Vietnam, the unprecedented opening to China, detente with the Soviet Union, the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East, the disastrous overthrow of Allende in Chile, and the scandal of Watergate.


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Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math

Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math

Daniel Tammet

$43.95  $15.00
The irresistibly engaging book that enlarges one's wonder at Tammet's mind and his all-embracing vision of the world as grounded in numbers. --Oliver Sacks, MD THINKING IN NUMBERS is the book that Daniel Tammet, mathematical savant and bestselling author, was born to write. In Tammet's world, numbers are beautiful and mathematics illuminates our lives and minds. Using anecdotes, everyday examples, and ruminations on history, literature, and more, Tammet allows us to share his unique insights and delight in the way numbers, fractions, and equations underpin all our lives. Inspired variously by the complexity of snowflakes, Anne Boleyn's eleven fingers, and his many siblings, Tammet explores questions such as why time seems to speed up as we age, whether there is such a thing as an average person, and how we can make sense of those we love. His provocative and inspiring new book will change the way you think about math and fire your imagination to view the world with fresh eyes.

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Year Zero: A History of 1945

Year Zero: A History of 1945

Ian Buruma

$46.95  $18.00
A marvellous global history of the pivotal year 1945 as a new world emerged from the ruins of World War II, this is a landmark reckoning with the great drama that ensued after war came to an end in 1945. One world had ended and a new, uncertain one was beginning.

Regime change had come on a global scale: across Asia (including China, Korea, Indochina, and the Philippines, and of course Japan) and all of continental Europe. Out of the often vicious power struggles that ensued emerged the modern world as we know it. In human terms, the scale of transformation is almost impossible to imagine. Great cities around the world lay in ruins, their populations decimated, displaced, starving. Harsh revenge was meted out on a wide scale, and the ground was laid for much horror to come. At the same time, in the wake of unspeakable loss, the euphoria of the liberated was extraordinary, and the revelry unprecedented. The postwar years gave rise to the European welfare state, the United Nations, decolonisation, Japanese pacifism, and the European Union. Social, cultural, and political  reeducation  was imposed on vanquished by victors on a scale that also had no historical precedent. Much that was done was ill advised, but in hindsight, as Ian Buruma shows us, these efforts were in fact relatively enlightened, humane, and effective.

A poignant grace note throughout this history is Buruma's own father's story. Seized by the Nazis during the occupation of Holland, he spent much of the war in Berlin as a labourer, and by war's end was literally hiding in the rubble of a flattened city, having barely managed to survive starvation rations, Allied bombing, and Soviet shock troops when the end came. His journey home and attempted reentry into  normalcy  stand in many ways for his generation's experience. A work of enormous range and stirring human drama, conjuring both the Asian and European theatres with equal fluency, this is a book that Ian Buruma is perhaps uniquely positioned to write. It is surely his masterpiece.


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So, Anyway...

So, Anyway...

John Cleese

$53.95  $20.00
John Cleese's huge comedic influence has stretched across generations; his sharp irreverent eye and the unique brand of physical comedy he perfected with Monty Python, on Fawlty Towers, and beyond now seem written into comedy's DNA.

In this rollicking memoir, Cleese takes readers on a Grand Tour of his ascent in the entertainment world, from his humble beginnings in a sleepy English town and his early comedic days at Cambridge University (with future Python partner Graham Chapman), to the founding of the landmark comedy troupe that would propel him to worldwide renown. Cleese was just days away from graduating Cambridge and setting off on a law career when he was visited by two BBC executives, who offered him a job writing comedy for radio. That fateful moment and a near-simultaneous offer to take his university humour revue to London's famed West End propelled him down a different path, cutting his teeth writing for stars like David Frost and Peter Sellers, and eventually joining the five other Pythons to pioneer a new kind of comedy that prized invention, silliness, and absurdity.

Along the way, he found his first true love with the actress Connie Booth and transformed himself from a reluctant performer to a world class actor and back again. Twisting and turning through surprising stories and hilarious digressions with some brief pauses along the way that comprise a fascinating primer on what's funny and why this story of a young man's journey to the pinnacle of comedy is a masterly performance by a master performer.


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Victoria: A Life

Victoria: A Life

A N Wilson

$59.95  $20.00
PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography (2015 LONGLIST)

When Queen Victoria died in 1901, she had ruled for nearly sixty-four years. She was a mother of nine and grandmother of forty-two and the matriarch of royal Europe through her children's marriages. To many, Queen Victoria is a ruler shrouded in myth and mystique, an aging, stiff widow paraded as the figurehead to an all-male imperial enterprise. But in truth, Britain's longest-reigning monarch was one of the most passionate, expressive, humorous and unconventional women who ever lived, and the story of her life continues to fascinate.  

A. N. Wilson's exhaustively researched and definitive biography includes a wealth of new material from previously unseen sources to show us Queen Victoria as she's never been seen before. Wilson explores the curious set of circumstances that led to Victoria's coronation, her strange and isolated childhood, her passionate marriage to Prince Albert and his pivotal influence even after death and her widowhood and subsequent intimate friendship with her Highland servant John Brown, all set against the backdrop of this momentous epoch in Britain's history and the world s.

Born at the very moment of the expansion of British political and commercial power across the globe, Victoria went on to chart a unique course for her country even as she became the matriarch of nearly every great dynasty of Europe. Her destiny was thus interwoven with those of millions of people not just in Europe but in the ever-expanding empire that Britain was becoming throughout the nineteenth century. The famed queen had a face that adorned postage stamps, banners, statues and busts all over the known world. A towering achievement, a masterpiece of biography by a writer at the height of his powers.


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When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation

When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation

Francois Furstenberg

$63.95  $18.00
In 1789, as the French Revolution shook Europe to the core, the new United States was struggling for survival in the face of financial insolvency and bitter political and regional divisions. When the United States Spoke French  explores the republic's formative years from the viewpoint of a distinguished circle of fiveFrenchmen taking refuge in America. When theFrench Revolution broke out, these men had been among its leaders. They were liberal aristocrats and ardent Anglophiles, convinced of the superiority of the British system of monarchy and constitution.

They also idealised the new American republic, which seemed to them an embodiment of the Enlightenment ideals they celebrated. But soon the Revolutionary movement got ahead of them, and they found themselves chased across the Atlantic. Francois Furstenberg follows these five men Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord, Napoleon's future foreign minister; theorist reformer Rochefoucauld, the duc de Liancourt; Louis-Marie Vicomte de Noailles; Moreau deSaint-Mery; and Constantin-Francois Chasseboeuf, Comte Volney as they left their homes and families in France, crossed the Atlantic, and landed in Philadelphia then America's capital, its principal port, and by far its most cosmopolitan city and the home of the wealthiest merchants and financiers.

The book vividly reconstructs their American adventures, following along as they integrated themselves into the city and its elite social networks, began speculating on backcountry lands, and eventually became enmeshed in Franco-American diplomacy. Through their stories, we see some of the most famous events of early American history in a new light, from the diplomatic struggles of the1790s to the Haitian Revolution to the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. By the end of this period, the United States was on its way to becoming a major global power. 

Through this small circle of men, we find new ways to understand the connections between U.S. and world history, and gain fresh insight into American history's most critical era. Beautifully written and brilliantly argued,  When the United States Spoke French  offers a fresh perspective on the tumultuous years of the young nation, when the first great republican experiments were put to the test.

Lin-Manuel Miranda's smash Broadway musical Hamilton has sparked new interest in the Revolutionary War and the Founding Fathers. In addition to Alexander Hamilton, the production also features George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Aaron Burr, Lafayette, and many more.


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Denial: Self-Deception, False Beliefs, and the Origins of the Human Mind

Denial: Self-Deception, False Beliefs, and the Origins of the Human Mind

Ajik Varki

$49.95  $15.00
At a chance meeting in 2005, Danny Brower posed an unusual idea to Ajit Varki that explained the origins of human uniqueness in a revolutionary way. Haunted by this encounter, Varki tried years later to contact Brower, only to find he had died unexpectedly.

Inspired by an unfinished manuscript Brower left behind, DENIAL represents a unique collaboration that integrates Varki's own knowledge on human origins, to explain what sets us apart from other animal species: our ability to fully understand the minds of others. This single evolutionary leap, they argue, required crossing a psychological barrier: giving us the uniquely human ability to deny reality in the face of inarguable evidence-including the wilful ignorance of our own inevitable deaths.

However our unique instinct for denial will also be our undoing, if we continue to disregard the consequences of unrealistic approaches to everything from personal health to financial risk-taking to climate change. Only in understanding this radical new idea can we hope to tackle many vexing issues facing us today, and to imagine where our species might go from here.


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