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Science & Technology

Genesis: On the Deep Origin of Societies

Genesis: On the Deep Origin of Societies

Edward O. Wilson

$39.99
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Asserting that religious creeds and philosophical questions can be reduced to purely genetic and evolutionary components, and that the human body and mind have a physical base obedient to the laws of physics and chemistry, Genesis demonstrates that the only way for us to fully understand human behaviour is to study the evolutionary histories of nonhuman species. Of these, Wilson demonstrates that at least seventeen - among them the African naked mole rat and the sponge-dwelling shrimp - have been found to have advanced societies based on altruism and cooperation. Whether writing about midges who 'dance about like acrobats' or schools of anchovies who protectively huddle 'to appear like a gigantic fish, or proposing that human society owes a debt of gratitude to 'postmenopausal grandmothers' and 'childless homosexuals,' Genesis is a pithy yet pathbreaking work of evolutionary theory filled with the lyrical biological and humanistic observations for which Wilson is known.
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The Order of Time

The Order of Time

Carlo Rovelli

$19.99
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Time is a mystery that does not cease to puzzle us. Philosophers, artists and poets have long explored its meaning while scientists have found that its structure is different from the simple intuition we have of it. From Boltzmann to quantum theory, from Einstein to loop quantum gravity, our understanding of time has been undergoing radical transformations. Time flows at a different speed in different places, the past and the future differ far less than we might think, and the very notion of the present evaporates in the vast universe.
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Einstein's Unfinished Revolution: The Search for What Lies Beyond the Quantum

Einstein's Unfinished Revolution: The Search for What Lies Beyond the Quantum

Lee Smolin

$29.99
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Quantum physics has been, ever since its inception, the golden child of science. It is the basis of our understanding of everything from elemental particles to the behaviour of materials. Yet is has also been a troubled child, beset by controversy and raging disagreement over which formulation best describes our world. It has helped physicists agree that atoms and radiation behave differently to rocks and cats, but often not on much else. The simple reason quantum physics is unsolvable, Lee Smolin argues, is that the theory is incomplete.

In this radical new theory of reality, he aims to go beyond quantum mechanics to find a description of the world that makes sense to everyone- an alternative theory, based on the one that nature uses. In doing so, he takes away the mystery and confusion, and presents the quantum world in a way that is accessible to all - specialist and non-specialist alike. Einstein's Unfinished Revolution is a fresh take on the big questions of our universe.
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Dr Space Junk vs The Universe: Archaeology and the future

Dr Space Junk vs The Universe: Archaeology and the future

Alice Gorman

$29.99
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Going boldly forth as a pioneer in the fledgling field of space archaeology, Dr Alice Gorman (aka Dr Space Junk) turns the common perception of archaeology as an exploration of the ancient on its head. Her captivating inquiry into the most modern and daring of technologies spanning some 60 years - a mere speck in cosmic terms - takes the reader on a journey which captures the relics of space forays and uncovers the cultural value of detritus all too readily dismissed as junk.

In this book, she takes a physical journey through the solar system and beyond, and a conceptual journey into human interactions with space. Her tools are artefacts, historical explorations, the occasional cocktail recipe, and the archaeologist's eye applied not only to the past, but the present and future as well.

Erudite and playful, Dr Space Junk reveals that space is not as empty as we might think. And that by looking up and studying space artefacts, we learn an awful lot about our own culture on earth. She makes us realise that objects from the past - the material culture produced by the Space Age and beyond - are so significant to us now because they remind us of what we might want to hold onto into the future.

`As charming as it is expert, as gripping as it is surprising, Dr Space Junk vs The Universe deftly threads together the cosmic and the personal, the stupendousness of space with the lived experience of human beings down here.' - Adam Roberts, author of Gradisil

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Blackout: How Is Energy-Rich Australia Running Out of Electricity?

Blackout: How Is Energy-Rich Australia Running Out of Electricity?

Matthew Warren

$29.99
For 20 years Australia has been in political denial about the seismic changes occurring in the way we power our country. Successive governments continue to tell people that power prices will fall while the lights stay on.

Debate is reduced to two equally preposterous narratives: coal-fired, climate change indifference versus an impossibly utopian renewable energy future. This nonsense swirls around an incredulous public while power prices rise, the grid is stretched, energy becomes political poison and the earth warms. How did it come to this and how can we find our way out of this mess?

Matthew Warren has worked for all sides of the energy industry, is regularly attacked for being too pro-coal and too pro-renewables, and writes without fear or favour. He has been lobbying for a national climate and electricity policy for over a decade. With an entertaining and fascinating narrative, Blackout cuts through the waffle to chart the disintegration of Australia's energy security, call out what is holding us back, and plot the way for a brighter future.
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Defeating the Ministers of Death

Defeating the Ministers of Death

David Isaacs

$34.99
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The compelling story of vaccination.

We may fear terrorist attacks, but in truth humans have always had far more to fear from infections. In 1919, Spanish flu killed over 50 million people, more than died in both world wars combined. In 1950, an estimated 50 million people caught smallpox worldwide, of whom 10 million died. In 1980, before measles vaccine was widely used, an estimated 2.6 million children died of measles every year.

Less than 100 years ago, losing a child to an infection like diphtheria or polio was a dreaded but almost inevitable sorrow faced by all parents, from the richest to the poorest. Today, these killer diseases are almost never seen in industrialised countries, thanks to the development of vaccines. Immunisation has given modern parents peace of mind their ancestors could not imagine.

The history of vaccination is rich with trial, error, sabotage and success. It encompasses the tragedy of lives lost, the drama of competition and discovery, the culpability of botched testing, and the triumph of effective, lifelong immunity. Yet with the eradication in the first world of some of humanity's deadliest foes, complacency has set in. We forget the power of these diseases at our peril.

This is a book for everyone who wants to understand our past - and cares about our future.

PRAISE 'Isaacs explores the understanding of immunity as it develops from the fifth century BC to the present day and thrills us with the progressive successes of each of the 14 vaccines which a child routinely receives today ... The work is authoritative, beguiling, amusing, instructive and inspirational.

It deserves a wide readership, including infectious disease experts, other health professionals and, most assuredly, a diversity of lay people' Sir Gustav Nossal, immunologist and director of The Walter and Eliza Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, 1965-1996 'A rollicking story of human endeavour, error, misinformation, success and failure ... and more than a glimpse of why we need to continue to research, evaluate, educate and fund vaccines to prevent disease' Fiona Stanley, Distinguished Research Professor, University of Western Australia 'Effortlessly accessible, Defeating the Ministers of Death brilliantly reveals the people behind the most important public health intervention in history' Professor Andrew J pollard, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford 'This book is an unflinching look at the triumphs and inevitable tragedies in the war against infectious diseases. Nonfiction is at its best when it reads like fiction. And David Isaacs has written a page turner' Paul A. Offit, MD, author of Bad Advice: Or Why Celebrities, Politicians, and Activists Aren't Your Best Source of Health Information
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Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Teach Us about Ourselves

Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Teach Us about Ourselves

Frans de Waal

$32.99
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Mama's Last Hug is a whirlwind tour of new ideas and findings about animal emotions, based on Frans de Waal's renowned studies of the social and emotional lives of chimpanzees, bonobos and other primates.

It opens with the moving farewell between Mama, a dying 59-year-old chimpanzee matriarch, and Jan Van Hoof, who was Frans de Waal's mentor and thesis advisor. The filmed event has since gone viral (over 9.5 million views on YouTube).

De Waal discusses facial expressions, animal sentience and consciousness, the emotional side of human politics, and the illusion of free will. He distinguishes between emotions and feelings, all the while emphasising the continuity between our species and other species. And he makes the radical proposal that emotions are like organs: we haven't a single organ that other animals don't have, and the same is true for our emotions.
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The Art of Statistics: Learning from Data

The Art of Statistics: Learning from Data

David Spiegelhalter

$39.99
How can statistics help us understand the world? Can we come to reliable conclusions when data is imperfect? How is statistics changing in the age of data science?

Statistics has played a leading role in our scientific understanding of the world for centuries, yet we are all familiar with the way statistical claims can be sensationalised, particularly in the media. In the age of big data, as data science becomes established as a discipline, a basic grasp of statistical literacy is more important than ever.

In The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides the reader through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data. Drawing on real world problems to introduce conceptual issues, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if screening for ovarian cancer is beneficial.

How many trees are there on the planet? Do busier hospitals have higher survival rates? Why do old men have big ears? Spiegelhalter reveals the answers to these and many other questions - questions that can only be addressed using statistical science.
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The Dinosaurs Rediscovered: How a Scientific Revolution is Rewriting History

The Dinosaurs Rediscovered: How a Scientific Revolution is Rewriting History

Michael J. Benton

$49.99
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`If you want to know how we know what we know about dinosaurs, read this book!' Steve Brusatte Over the past twenty years, the study of dinosaurs has changed from natural history to a true scientific discipline. New technologies have revealed secrets locked in the prehistoric bones in ways that nobody predicted - we can now work out the colour of dinosaurs, their bite forces, top speeds, and even how they cared for their young. Remarkable new fossil finds, such as giant sauropod dinosaur skeletons from Patagonia, dinosaurs with feathers from China, and even a tiny dinosaur tail in Burmese amber - complete down to every detail of its filament-like feathers, skin, bones, and mummified tail muscles - have caused media sensations. New fossils are the lifeblood of modern palaeobiology of course, but it is the advances in technologies and methods that have allowed the revolution in the scope and confidence of the field.

Dinosaurs Rediscovered gathers together all the latest palaeontological evidence and takes us behind the scenes on the expeditions and in museum laboratories, tracing the transformation of dinosaur study from its roots in antiquated natural history to a highly technical, computational, and indisputably scientific field today. Benton explores what we know of the world of the dinosaurs, how dinosaur remains are found and excavated, and especially how palaeontologists read the details of the life of the dinosaurs from the fossils - their colours, their growth, feeding and locomotion, how they grew from egg to adult, how they sensed the world, and even whether we will ever be able to bring them back to life. Dinosaurs are still very much a part of our world.
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Rocket Billionaires: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the New Space Race

Rocket Billionaires: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the New Space Race

Tim Fernholz

$29.95
Featured on NPR and PBS's SciTech Now, and in Fast Company, Forbes, and the Wall Street Journal The inside story of the new race to conquer space For the outsize personalities staking their fortunes on spaceships, the new race to explore space could be a dead end, a lucrative opportunity--or the key to humanity's survival. Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos take center stage in this fast-paced narrative as they attempt to disrupt the space economy and feed their own egos. We meet a supporting cast of equally fascinating entrepreneurs, from the irrepressible British mogul Richard Branson to the satellite internet visionary Greg Wyler. Tim Fernholz's fly-on-the-wall reporting captures an industry in the midst of disruption. NASA seeks to preserve its ambitious space program, traditional aerospace firms like Boeing and Lockheed Martin scramble to adapt to new competitors, lobbyists tussle over public funds, and lawmakers try to prevent this new space race from sparking global conflict. Fernholz spins this high-stakes marathon into a riveting tale of rivalry and survival.
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On the Trail of Stardust: The Guide to Finding Micrometeorites: Tools, Techniques, and Identification

On the Trail of Stardust: The Guide to Finding Micrometeorites: Tools, Techniques, and Identification

Jon Larsen

$29.99
Stardust-also known as micrometeorites-is the oldest matter anywhere. Nothing has traveled farther to reach Earth. For a century, scientists have searched everywhere for stardust, but only found it in remote areas like Antarctica and, more recently, outer space. Author and citizen scientist extraordinaire Jon Larsen was the first to find them in populated areas. With this book, you too can discover stardust as near as your own rooftop!

Following his successful debut, In Search of Stardust, Larsen turns his attention from explaining the formation and various kinds of stardust to revealing his methods and techniques for finding micrometeorites in a compact, durable guide. Larsen covers everything from the origins and formation of micrometeorites to assembling the simple array of gear needed to get out there and find stardust in your own neighborhood, rooftop, or rain gutters.

Larsen explains the best places to look and offers step-by-step photo sequences of the techniques he has developed to assemble his collection of 1,500-plus verified micrometeorites (and counting). And you don't need a multi-million-dollar scanning electron microscope to document your collection; Jon shows how to assemble a serviceable photo setup from easily accessible equipment.

The book is capped off with a field guide of sorts that offers a taxonomy of the various types of micrometeorites, along with sample images, as well as the kinds of man-made and terrestrial spherules that stardust hunters are likely to encounter and how to identify them as imposters.

Once thought to exist only at the bottoms of oceans and atop polar ice, it turns out that stardust is everywhere...and On the Trail of Stardust is your indispensable tool to finding it for yourself.
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A Natural History of the Milky Way

A Natural History of the Milky Way

Cristina Chiappini ,  Francesca Matteucci

$88.45
One of the most stunning features of the night sky, and Earth's home, the Mily Way is fertile ground for exploring the mysteries of the universe. This book will provide an overview of how astronomers have attempted to uncover our Galaxy's past, and how current models of its structure may account for some of the most recent observations. Indeed, the distribution of chemical elements in our Galaxy serves as a `fossil record' of its evolutionary history and is a powerful tool for studying the formation and evolution, not only of the Milky Way, but also of other galaxies.

In their journey through the history of our Galaxy the authors answer many fascinating and intriguing questions, such as: what can the Milky Way tell us about the Big Bang? What were the very first stars like? Are we able to find any of these first stars, still shining today, but born at a time when no metals had been formed and the gas and the Galaxy consisted of only hydrogen and helium? How did the main biogenic elements form and how are they distributed throughout the Galaxy? Are there regions of our Galaxy where Earth-like planets such as ours might more easily form?

The text is addressed to the curious or interested reader and is intended to unveil to a general popular science audience some of the topics about the structure and evolution of our Galaxy which are now the subject of hot debate amongst professional astronomers around the world.
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Sun and Moon: A Story of Astronomy, Photography and Cartography

Sun and Moon: A Story of Astronomy, Photography and Cartography

Mark Holborn

$120.00
From the beginning of time, human beings have looked up at the stars and speculated on other worlds. Published to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing, SUN AND MOON tells the story of that burning human need to comprehend the universe, from Neolithic observatories that mark the solstice to the latest space telescopes. It shows, for the first time, how the development of photography and cartography; the means of documenting other worlds; is linked indelibly to the charting of the heavens, from the first image on a glass plate to the Hubble Space Telescope.
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30-Second Weather: The 50 most significant phenomena and events, each explained in half a minute

30-Second Weather: The 50 most significant phenomena and events, each explained in half a minute

Adam Scaife

$19.99
If you only have 30 seconds, there is time - using this book - to make sense of the science behind the seeming vagaries of the weather, the controversies, predictions and forecasts for climate change that shape our day-to-day experiences of the great outdoors. Ever since Aristotle first tried to explain the forces that seem to fall from the heavens, meteorology has opened up the study of weather, and caused disputes over the reasons why seasons change, where precipitation falls, why winds blow and when the sun shines. From halcyon days to hurricanes, supercells to silver linings, global warming to giant hailstones, here is the ultimate guide to a near-universal preoccupation: what's the weather like?
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Plastic Soup: An Atlas of Ocean Pollution

Plastic Soup: An Atlas of Ocean Pollution

Michiel Roscam Abbing

$37.99
Plastics have transformed every aspect of our lives. Yet the very properties that make them attractive - they are cheap to make, light, and durable - spell disaster when trash makes its way into the environment. Plastic Soup: An Atlas of Ocean Pollution is a beautifully-illustrated survey of the plastics clogging our seas, their impacts on wildlife and people around the world, and inspirational initiatives designed to tackle the problem.

In Plastic Soup, Michiel Roscam Abbing of the Plastic Soup Foundation reveals the scope of the issue: plastic trash now lurks on every corner of the planet. With striking photography and graphics, Plastic Soup brings this challenge to brilliant life for readers. Yet it also sends a message of hope; although the scale of the problem is massive, so is the dedication of activists working to check it. Plastic Soup highlights a diverse array of projects to curb plastic waste and raise awareness, from plastic-free grocery stores to innovative laws and art installations.

According to some estimates, if we continue on our current path, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish by the year 2050. Created to inform and inspire readers, Plastic Soup is a critical tool in the fight to reverse this trend.
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One Planet, One Health

One Planet, One Health

Merrilyn Walton

$40.00
One Planet, One Health provides a multidisciplinary reflection on the state of our planet, human and animal health, as well as the critical effects of climate change on the environment and on people. Climate change is already affecting many poor communities and traditional aid programs have achieved relatively small gains. Going beyond the narrow disciplinary lens and an exclusive focus on human health, a planetary health approach puts the ecosystem at the centre. The contributors to One Planet, One Health argue that maintaining and restoring ecosystem resilience should be a core priority, carried out in partnership with local communities.

One Planet, One Health offers an integrated approach to improving the health of the planet and its inhabitants. With chapters on ethics, research and governance, as well as case studies of government and international aid-agency responses to illustrate successes and failures, the book aims to help scholars, governments and non-governmental organisations understand the benefits of focusing on the interdependence of human and animal health, food, water security and land care.
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How Population Change Will Transform Our World

How Population Change Will Transform Our World

Sarah Harper

$20.95
Predicting the shape of our future populations is vital for installing the infrastructure, welfare, and provisions necessary for society to survive. There are many opportunities and challenges that will come with the changes in our populations over the 21st century. In this new addition to the 21st Century Challenges series, Sarah Harper works to dispel myths such as the fear of unstoppable global growth resulting in a population explosion, or that climate change will lead to the mass movement of environmental refugees; and instead considers the future shape of our populations in light of demographic trends in fertility, mortality, and migration, and their national and global impact.

How Population Change Will Transform Our World looks at population trends by region to highlight the key issues facing us in the coming decades, including the demographic inertia in Europe, demographic dividend in Asia, high fertility and mortality in Africa, the youth bulge in the Middle East, and the balancing act of migration in the Americas. Harper concludes with an analysis of global challenges we must plan for such as the impact of climate change and urbanization, and the difficulty of feeding 10 billion people, and considers ways in which we can prepare for, and mitigate against, these challenges.
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Climate Change and the Health of Nations: Famines, Fevers, and the Fate of Populations

Climate Change and the Health of Nations: Famines, Fevers, and the Fate of Populations

Anthony McMichael

$38.95
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When we think of climate change, we often picture human-made global warming, caused by greenhouse gas emissions. But natural climate change has occurred throughout human history, and populations have had to adapt to the climate's vicissitudes. Anthony J. McMichael, a renowned epidemiologist and a pioneer in the field of how human health relates to climate change, is the ideal person to tell this story.

In Climate Change and the Health of Nations, McMichael shows how the natural environment has vast direct and indirect repercussions for human health and welfare. He takes us on a tour of human history through the lens of major transformations in climate. From the very beginning of our species some five million years ago, human biology has evolved in response to cooling temperatures, new food sources, and changing geography. As societies began to form, they too adapted in relation to their environments, most notably with the development of agriculture eleven thousand years ago. Agricultural civilization was a Faustian bargain, however: the prosperity and comfort that an agrarian society provides relies on the assumption that the environment will largely remain stable. Indeed, for agriculture to succeed, environmental conditions must be just right, which McMichael refers to as the Goldilocks phenomenon. Global warming is disrupting this balance, just as other climate-related upheavals have tested human societies throughout history. As McMichael shows, the break-up of the Roman Empire, the bubonic Plague of Justinian, and the mysterious collapse of Mayan civilization all have roots in climate change.

Why devote so much analysis to the past, when the daunting future of climate change is already here? Because the story of humankind as previous survival in the face of an unpredictable and unstable climate, and of the terrible toll that climate change can take, could not be more important as we face the realities of a warming planet. This sweeping magnum opus is not only a rigorous, innovative, and fascinating exploration of how the climate affects the human condition, but also an urgent call to recognize our species' utter reliance on the earth as it is.
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RSPB British Birdfinder

RSPB British Birdfinder

Marianne Taylor

$29.99
Most bird books are designed to help you identify the birds that you've seen. This book is different. It is a species-by-species guide that shows you how to find and watch more than 250 species of birds that can be seen in Britain. Some are common; others are rare migrants or scarce breeding birds, but this book will tell you the best places to see and watch all of them. Readers will be able to see their most coveted species but also enjoy rewarding watching experiences that will enhance their understanding of the species, of bird behaviour and of key fieldcraft techniques.

Sections include:

- How to find including the best time of day, how to search the habitat and behavioural signs - Watching tips including ways to get close to the bird without disturbing it and how to attract it to your garden. - Super sites includes a short list of some of the best places to see the species.
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Marine Plants of Australia

Marine Plants of Australia

John M. Huismann

$49.99
To most people, the mention of marine plants conjures up images of rotting seaweeds piled high on the beach, or slithering threateningly around bare ankles during a paddle in the shallows. Certainly, the seaweeds do not inspire the imagination or the romanticism that is usually associated with the sea. Marine Plants of Australia might well alter that perception. This second edition illustrates over 600 species of Australia's underwater plant life, mostly using underwater photographs that reveal the amazing colours and intricate patterns found in this largely unknown realm of life. Imagine plants with blue foliage that turns red in the dark, or iridescent plants, or plants that look like rocks painted in shades of pink. There are seaweeds with the consistency of jelly, or with fronds that form an intricate mesh that rivals the best lace. These plants have evolved a startling myriad of shapes, colours and patterns that will impress everyone who views them - underwater, or through the pages of this book.
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Plankton: A Guide to Their Ecology and for Water Quality

Plankton: A Guide to Their Ecology and for Water Quality

Iain M. Suthers ,  David Rissik ,  Anthony J. Richardson

$79.99
Healthy waterways and oceans are essential for our increasingly urbanised world. Yet monitoring water quality in aquatic environments is a challenge, as it varies from hour to hour due to stormwater and currents. Being at the base of the aquatic food web and present in huge numbers, plankton are strongly influenced by changes in environment and provide an indication of water quality integrated over days and weeks. Plankton are the aquatic version of a canary in a coal mine. They are also vital for our existence, providing not only food for fish, seabirds, seals and sharks, but producing oxygen, cycling nutrients, processing pollutants, and removing carbon dioxide from our atmosphere.

This Second Edition of Plankton is a fully updated introduction to the biology, ecology and identification of plankton and their use in monitoring water quality. It includes expanded, illustrated descriptions of all major groups of freshwater, coastal and marine phytoplankton and zooplankton and a new chapter on teaching science using plankton. Best practice methods for plankton sampling and monitoring programs are presented using case studies, along with explanations of how to analyse and interpret sampling data.

Plankton is an invaluable reference for teachers and students, environmental managers, ecologists, estuary and catchment management committees, and coastal engineers.
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Wildlife of the Otways and Shipwreck Coast

Wildlife of the Otways and Shipwreck Coast

Grant Palmer

$49.99
The Otways and Shipwreck Coast is known for its natural beauty and attracts millions of visitors each year, particularly along the Great Ocean Road. The value of the region's rich biodiversity is recognised at the national and global level and its wildlife is markedly different to other regions, including eastern Victoria which supports similar vegetation types.

Wildlife of the Otways and Shipwreck Coast is a photographic field guide to the vertebrate wildlife of Victoria's south-west. It covers all the mammals, birds, reptiles and frogs that occur in the region, including on land and in coastal waters. Each of the 288 species profiles includes a description and information on identification, range, conservation status, habitat use and ecology and is complemented by an exquisite colour photograph and a detailed distribution map. The book also includes chapters on habitat types, conservation and management, and on 14 key places in the region to view wildlife.

This book will allow those interested in wildlife, including residents and visitors, to identify vertebrate animals found in the region. Readers will also become more familiar with the distinct role the Otways has in conserving Australia's biodiversity.
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Voyages of Discovery: A visual celebration of ten of the greatest natural history expeditions

Voyages of Discovery: A visual celebration of ten of the greatest natural history expeditions

Tony Rice

$34.99
Voyages of Discovery is a mesmerising visual record of ten of the world's most significant natural history expeditions.

Superb artworks and photographs spanning three centuries document advances and watersheds in the field of natural science. The stories behind these images - of explorers, naturalists, artists and photographers - entwine into a fascinating study of human achievement and natural wonder.

Among the many stories of adventure and great scientific endeavour are: Sir Hans Sloane's journey to Jamaica in 1687; James Cook's perilous Pacific crossings; and Darwin's historic voyage aboard HMS Beagle.

Hand-picked from the vast Library of the Natural History Museum, London, the illustrations and artworks contained here form a rare collection, most of which have been presented for the first time in this stunning book.
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The History of Science

The History of Science

Tom Jackson

$27.99
Mankind has forever strived to learn. The tribe with the better weapons can hunt more efficiently, defend itself better and take what it lacked from their neighbours. With the advent of farming and the ability to domesticate wild animals, the first civilisations began to form. Better housing, advances in medicine and the ability to pass knowledge down through the generations increased mankind's knowledge of himself and his environment.

The History of Science follows mankind's journey from primitive stone tools and weapons, through the bronze and iron ages, through the Renaissance and on to a quest for the stars. With informative text, illustrations, diagrams and maps and a continuous timeline The History of Science will take you on a journey the like of which has never been seen before.
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The Shape of a Life: One Mathematician's Search for the Universe's Hidden Geometry

The Shape of a Life: One Mathematician's Search for the Universe's Hidden Geometry

Shing-Tung Yau ,  Steve Nadis

$42.99
A Fields medalist recounts his lifelong transnational effort to uncover the geometric shape-the Calabi-Yau manifold-that may store the hidden dimensions of our universe.

Harvard geometer and Fields medalist Shing-Tung Yau has provided a mathematical foundation for string theory, offered new insights into black holes, and mathematically demonstrated the stability of our universe. In this autobiography, Yau reflects on his improbable journey to becoming one of the world's most distinguished mathematicians. Beginning with an impoverished childhood in China and Hong Kong, Yau takes readers through his doctoral studies at Berkeley during the height of the Vietnam War protests, his Fields Medal-winning proof of the Calabi conjecture, his return to China, and his pioneering work in geometric analysis. This new branch of geometry, which Yau built up with his friends and colleagues, has paved the way for solutions to several important and previously intransigent problems. With complicated ideas explained for a broad audience, this book offers readers not only insights into the life of an eminent mathematician, but also an accessible way to understand advanced and highly abstract concepts in mathematics and theoretical physics.
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Wilding: The Return of Nature to a British Farm

Wilding: The Return of Nature to a British Farm

Isabella Tree

$19.99
'The remarkable story of an astounding transformation' George Monbiot, author of Feral.

In Wilding, Isabella Tree tells the story of the 'Knepp experiment', a pioneering rewilding project in West Sussex, using free-roaming grazing animals to create new habitats for wildlife. Part gripping memoir, part fascinating account of the ecology of our countryside, Wilding is, above all, an inspiring story of hope.

Forced to accept that intensive farming on the heavy clay of their land at Knepp was economically unsustainable, Isabella Tree and her husband Charlie Burrell made a spectacular leap of faith: they decided to step back and let nature take over. Thanks to the introduction of free-roaming cattle, ponies, pigs and deer - proxies of the large animals that once roamed Britain - the 3,500 acre project has seen extraordinary increases in wildlife numbers and diversity in little over a decade.

Extremely rare species, including turtle doves, nightingales, peregrine falcons, lesser spotted woodpeckers and purple emperor butterflies, are now breeding at Knepp, and populations of other species are rocketing. The Burrells' degraded agricultural land has become a functioning ecosystem again, heaving with life - all by itself.

Personal and inspirational, Wilding is an astonishing account of the beauty and strength of nature, when it is given as much freedom as possible.
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Hacking the Code of Life: How gene editing will rewrite our futures

Hacking the Code of Life: How gene editing will rewrite our futures

Nessa Carey

$27.99
Just 45 years ago, the age of gene modification was born. Researchers could create glow-in-the-dark mice, farmyard animals producing drugs in their milk, and vitamin-enhanced rice that could prevent half a million people going blind every year.

But now GM is rapidly being supplanted by a new system called CRISPR or 'gene editing'. Using this approach, scientists can manipulate the genes of almost any organism with a degree of precision, ease and speed that we could only dream of ten years ago.

But is it ethical to change the genetic material of organisms in a way that might be passed on to future generations? If a person is suffering from a lethal genetic disease, is it even more unethical to deny them this option? Who controls the application of this technology, when it makes 'biohacking' - perhaps of one's own genome - a real possibility?

Nessa Carey's book is a thrilling and timely snapshot of a technology that will radically alter our futures.
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The Consciousness Instinct: Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind

The Consciousness Instinct: Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind

Michael S. Gazzaniga

$29.95
The father of cognitive neuroscience illuminates the past, present, and future of the mind-brain problem. How do neurons turn into minds? How does physical stuff - atoms, molecules, chemicals, and cells - create the vivid and various worlds inside our heads? The problem of consciousness has gnawed at us for millennia. In the last century there have been massive breakthroughs that have rewritten the science of the brain, and yet the puzzles faced by the ancient Greeks are still present. In The Consciousness Instinct, the neuroscience pioneer Michael S. Gazzaniga puts the latest research in conversation with the history of human thinking about the mind, giving a big-picture view of what science has revealed about consciousness.

The idea of the brain as a machine, first proposed centuries ago, has led to assumptions about the relationship between mind and brain that dog scientists and philosophers to this day. Gazzaniga asserts that this model has it backward - brains make machines, but they cannot be reduced to one. New research suggests the brain is actually a confederation of independent modules working together. Understanding how consciousness could emanate from such an organization will help define the future of brain science and artificial intelligence, and close the gap between brain and mind.

Captivating and accessible, with insights drawn from a lifetime at the forefront of the field, The Consciousness Instinct sets the course for the neuroscience of tomorrow.
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The Secret Life of Genes

The Secret Life of Genes

Derek Harvey

$19.99
Genes have a huge impact on who we are, from defining us as humans, to governing how we behave. Whether controlling our cells or creating new forms of life, discover how DNA makes each of us unique.

In THE SECRET LIFE OF GENES, you'll learn all about the past, present and future of the human genome. Filled with colourful, graphic illustrations to help you to understand the world of genetics, from the basics to the most complex theories, this book brings the inner workings of the human body to life.

Derek Harvey answers the biggest questions, from the nature of inheritance, evolution and reproduction, to how genes are arranged and how DNA is read.

Take a trip through the history of the world's DNA and unlock the future of the field.
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Dogs Unleashed

Dogs Unleashed

Tamsin Pickeral

$29.99
Everything you need to know about that puppy in the window.

One glance around the local park will confirm that man's best friend comes in many varieties. As the first animal domesticated by humans, dogs have been selectively bred for tens of thousands of years to be herders, hunters, guard dogs, and friends. The result is a plethora of breeds that are as different as the pint-sized chihuahua and the massive St. Bernard.

Now there is a guide to each of them. Dogs Unleashed contains all the information required to differentiate breeds of canine. From the standard poodle to the Finnish spitz, readers will become experts of identification. Alongside beautiful photography, discover information on conformation, history, temperament, health risks, and more. This book even contains a section on today's designer breeds like the labradoodle, the puggle, and the cockapoo. Ideal for researching a new family pet, or for general knowledge, this book reveals which dogs are the most expensive to keep, which are the best swimmers, and which breed has the longest life expectancy.

A complete compendium of canine varieties, Dogs Unleashed is one book that is sure to keep tails wagging.
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Bats: An illustrated guide to all species

Bats: An illustrated guide to all species

Marianne Taylor ,  Merlin D. Tuttle

$49.99
Bats: An Illustrated Guide to All Species looks in detail at the more than 1,300 species known today. Nocturnal, fast-flying and secretive, they are endlessly fascinating, yet extremely difficult to observe and catalogue. The diversity of bats is both rich and underestimated and the threats they face from humans are very real. This guide illuminates the world of bats and reveals their true nature as intelligent, social and deeply misunderstood creatures.

This extravagantly illustrated handbook features the work of famed nature photographer Merlin D. Tuttle and in-depth profiles of 288 bats, from the Large Flying Fox, which has a wingspan of more than five feet, to the Bumblebee Bat, contender for the world's smallest mammal. Bats includes close-up images of these animals' delicate and intricate forms and faces, each shaped by evolution to meet the demands of an extraordinarily specialized life, and a thorough introduction which explores their natural history and unique adaptations to life on the wing.
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Dragonflies & Damselfies: A natural history

Dragonflies & Damselfies: A natural history

Dennis Paulson

$49.99
Dragonflies are often called birdwatchers' insects. They are large, brightly coloured, active in the daytime, and with complex and interesting behavior. Like butterflies, they appeal even to people who don't think highly of insects in general. They have been with us since the dinosaurs lived, and they continue to flourish. Their ancestors were the biggest insects ever, and they still impress us with their size - the largest is bigger than a small hummingbird. There are over 6,000 species of Odonata known at present, and you need only to visit any wetland on a warm summer day to be enthralled by their bright colors and fascinating behavior.
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Rainforests of Australia's East Coast

Rainforests of Australia's East Coast

Peter Krisch

$39.99
Rainforests of Australia's East Coast is aimed primarily at the reader group of more than 500,000 active bushwalkers in Australia. A large percentage of bushwalkers visit all subforms of rainforests on a regular basis and identification of plant species is a common subject. The book is written in a comprehensible, engaging style and employs descriptive illustrations and photos to raise the interest into the great diversity, primeval origins and uniqueness of Australian rainforests.
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Our Planet

Our Planet

Alastair Fothergill ,  Keith Scholey ,  Fred Pearce ,  David Attenborough

$49.99
________ THE OFFICAL COMPANION TO THE GROUNDBREAKING NEW NETFLIX DOCUMENTARY SERIES 'The future of all life on this earth depends on our willingness to take action now' - David Attenborough ________ With a foreword by Sir David Attenborough, breathtakingly beautiful still photography, specially commissioned maps and graphics, and compelling text expanding on the remarkable TV stories and giving the reader a depth of information that is impossible on screen, this companion to the groundbreaking NETFLIX series presents a whole new view of the place we call home.

Featuring some of the world's rarest creatures and previously unseen parts of the Earth-from deep oceans to remote forests to ice caps-Our Planet takes nature-lovers deep into the science of our natural world.

Revealing the most amazing sights on Earth in unprecedented ways, alongside stories of the ways humans are affecting the world's ecosystems-from the wildebeest migrations in Africa to the penguin colonies of Antarctica-this book captures in one concise narrative a fundamental message- What we do in the next twenty years will determine the future of not just the natural world but humanity itself.

If we don't act now to protect and preserve our planet, the beauty we're lucky enough to witness on these pages will have disappeared . . .
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Think Like a Canine: Training Working Dogs

Think Like a Canine: Training Working Dogs

Ken Sykes

$19.95
A succinct, down to earth guide on training working dogs, by someone with extensive theoretical and practical knowledge, leavened with humour, suitable for all dog owners whether cherished pet, companion or working dog.

Think Like a Canine covers canine communication, critical stage development, instinct conditioning training and livestock guarding, subjects missing from most dog training books. Ken Sykes draws on extensive research from a broad field including findings by guide dog researchers, armed forces dog trainers, the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre. Feature writer for Australian Working Stock Dog Magazine, he runs regular training days for livestock producers, and gives working dog demonstrations. He is a successful competitor in sheep dogs trials.
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Making Eden: How Plants Transformed a Barren Planet

Making Eden: How Plants Transformed a Barren Planet

David Beerling

$40.95
Over 7 billion people depend on plants for healthy, productive, secure lives, but few of us stop to consider the origin of the plant kingdom that turned the world green and made our lives possible. And as the human population continues to escalate, our survival depends on how we treat the plant kingdom and the soils that sustain it. Understanding the evolutionary history of our land floras, the story of how plant life emerged from water and conquered the continents to dominate the planet, is fundamental to our own existence. In Making Eden David Beerling reveals the hidden history of Earth's sun-shot greenery, and considers its future prospects as we farm the planet to feed the world. Describing the early plant pioneers and their close, symbiotic relationship with fungi, he examines the central role plants play in both ecosystems and the regulation of climate. As threats to plant biodiversity mount today, Beerling discusses the resultant implications for food security and climate change, and how these can be avoided. Drawing on the latest exciting scientific findings, including Beerling's own field work in the UK, North America, and New Zealand, and his experimental research programmes over the past decade, this is an exciting new take on how plants greened the continents.
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Understanding Numbers: Simplify life's mathematics. Decode the world around you

Understanding Numbers: Simplify life's mathematics. Decode the world around you

Marianne Freiberger ,  Rachel Thomas

$19.99
In Understanding Numbers, Marianne Freiberger and Rachel Thomas will show key number patterns and maths principles that are vital to our every day - and, far from learning complex sums by heart, they reveal techniques and insights to equip us with an innate numerical common sense. Using a unique, visual approach, Marianne Freiberger and Rachel Thomas dissect the mathematics that you rely on every day. From the statistics that underpin our news feeds, through the big data that informs our health and finance services, to the algorithms that underpin how we communicate - mathematics is at the heart of how our modern world functions. In 20 dip-in lessons, Understanding Numbers examines how and why mathematics is used and guides you to better understand the numbers that fuel your world.
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Abelian Varieties

Abelian Varieties

Serge Lang

$27.99
Based on the work in algebraic geometry by Norwegian mathematician Niels Henrik Abel (1802-29), this monograph was originally published in 1959 and reprinted later in author Serge Lang's career without revision. The treatment remains a basic advanced text in its field, suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in mathematics. Prerequisites include some background in elementary qualitative algebraic geometry and the elementary theory of algebraic groups.

The book focuses exclusively on Abelian varieties rather than the broader field of algebraic groups; therefore, the first chapter presents all the general results on algebraic groups relevant to this treatment. Each chapter begins with a brief introduction and concludes with a historical and bibliographical note. Topics include general theorems on Abelian varieties, the theorem of the square, divisor classes on an Abelian variety, functorial formulas, the Picard variety of an arbitrary variety, the I-adic representations, and algebraic systems of Abelian varieties. The text concludes with a helpful Appendix covering the composition of correspondences.
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Matter: A Very Short Introduction

Matter: A Very Short Introduction

Geoff Cottrell

$15.95
What is matter? Matter is the stuff from which we and all the things in the world are made. Everything around us, from desks, to books, to our own bodies are made of atoms, which are small enough that a million of them can fit across the breadth of a human hair. Inside every atom is a tiny nucleus and orbiting the nucleus is a cloud of electrons. The nucleus is made out of protons and neutrons, and by zooming in further you would find that inside each there are even smaller particles, quarks. Together with electrons, the quarks are the smallest particles that have been seen, and are the indivisible fundamental particles of nature that have existed since the Big Bang, almost 14 billion years ago. The 92 different chemical elements that all normal matter is made from were forged billions of years ago in the Big Bang, inside stars, and in violent stellar explosions.

This Very Short Introduction takes us on a journey from the human scale of matter in the familiar everyday forms of solids, liquids, and gases to plasmas, exotic forms of quantum matter, and antimatter. On the largest scales matter is sculpted by gravity into planets, stars, galaxies, and vast clusters of galaxies. All the matter that that we normally encounter however constitutes only 5% of the matter that exists. The remaining 95% comes in two mysterious forms: dark matter, and dark energy. Dark matter is necessary to stop the galaxies from flying apart, and dark energy is needed to explain the observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Geoff Cottrell explores the latest research into matter, and shows that there is still a lot we don't know about the stuff our universe is made of.

ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
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A Dictionary of Physics

A Dictionary of Physics

Richard Rennie ,  Jonathan Law

$26.95
Now with over 4,000 entries, this new eighth edition has been fully updated to reflect progress in physics and related fields. It sees expansion to the areas of cosmology, astrophysics, condensed matter, quantum technology, and nanotechnology, with 125 new entries including Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, kilonova, leptoquark, and muscovium. The dictionary's range of appendices, updated for the new edition, includes the periodic table, the electromagnetic spectrum, and a detailed chronology of key dates. 15 new diagrams add to the clarity and accessibility of the text, with 150 line drawings, tables, and graphs in total, and many entries contain recommended web links.

This popular dictionary remains the most up-to-date of its kind: the essential introductory reference tool for students encountering physics terms and concepts, as well as for professionals and anyone with an interest in the subject.
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Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Quantum Physics Is... Different

Beyond Weird: Why Everything You Thought You Knew About Quantum Physics Is... Different

Philip Ball

$22.99
PHYSICS WORLD 2018 BOOK OF THE YEAR

'A clear and deeply researched account of what's known about the quantum laws of nature, and how to think about what they might really mean' Nature

'I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.' Richard Feynman wrote this in 1965 - the year he was awarded the Nobel prize in physics for his work on quantum mechanics. Over the past decade, the enigma of quantum mechanics has come into sharper focus. We now realise that quantum mechanics is less about particles and waves, uncertainty and fuzziness, than a theory about information- about what can be known and how.

The quantum world isn't a different world- it is our world, and if anything deserves to be called 'weird', it's us. This exhilarating book is about what quantum maths really means - and what it doesn't mean.

'Gorgeously lucid...takes us to the edge of contemporary theorizing about the foundations of quantum mechanics... Easily the best book I've read on the subject' Washington Post
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Axiomatics of Classical Statistical Mechanics

Axiomatics of Classical Statistical Mechanics

Rudolf Kurth

$27.95
This monograph constructs classical statistical mechanics as a deductive system, based on the equations of motion and the basic postulates of probability. The treatment consists chiefly of theorems and proofs that are expressed in a manner that reveals the theory's logical structure. Requiring only familiarity with the elements of calculus and analytical geometry, Axiomatics of Classical Statistical Mechanics is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students in mathematical physics. An opening chapter on mathematical tools makes the text as self-contained as possible. Subsequent chapters explore the phase flows of mechanical systems, the initial distribution of probability in the phase space, and both time-dependent and time-independent probability distributions. A final chapter covers statistical thermodynamics.
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The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: The Untold Story of a Lost World

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: The Untold Story of a Lost World

Steve Brusatte

$19.99
66 million years ago the dinosaurs were wiped from the face of the earth. Today a new generation of dinosaur hunters, armed with cutting edge technology, is piecing together the complete story of how the dinosaurs created a hugely successful empire that lasted for around 150 million years.

In this hugely ambitious and engrossing story of how dinosaurs rose to dominate the planet, using the fossil clues that have been gathered using state of the art technology, Steve Brusatte, one of the world's leading paleontologists, follows these magnificent creatures from the Early Triassic period at the start of their evolution, through the Jurassic period to their final days in the Cretaceous' and the legacy that they left behind.

Along the way, Brusatte introduces us to the cast of new dinosaur hunters and gives an insight into what it's like to be a paleontologist whose job it is to hunt for dinosaurs. He offers thrilling accounts of some of the remarkable discoveries he has made, including primitive human-sized tyrannosaurs, monstrous carnivores even larger than T. rex, and feathered raptor dinosaurs preserved in lava from China.

At a time when Homo sapiens has existed for less than 200,000 years and we are already talking about planetary extinction, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs is a timely reminder of what humans can learn from the magnificent creatures who ruled the earth before us.
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The Smart Neanderthal: Bird catching, Cave Art, and the Cognitive Revolution

The Smart Neanderthal: Bird catching, Cave Art, and the Cognitive Revolution

Clive Finlayson

$40.95
Since the late 1980s the dominant theory of human origins has been that a 'cognitive revolution' (C.50,000 years ago) led to the advent of our species, Homo sapiens. As a result of this revolution our species spread and eventually replaced all existing archaic Homo species, ultimately leading to the superiority of modern humans.

Or so we thought.

As Clive Finlayson explains, the latest advances in genetics prove that there was significant interbreeding between Modern Humans and the Neanderthals. All non-Africans today carry some Neanderthal genes. We have also discovered aspects of Neanderthal behaviour that indicate that they were not cognitively inferior to modern humans, as we once thought, and in fact had their own rituals and art. Finlayson, who is at the forefront of this research, recounts the discoveries of his team, providing evidence that Neanderthals caught birds of prey, and used their feathers for symbolic purposes. There is also evidence that Neanderthals practised other forms of art, as the recently discovered engravings in Gorham's Cave Gibraltar indicate.

Linking all the recent evidence, The Smart Neanderthal casts a new light on the Neanderthals and the 'Cognitive Revolution'. Finlayson argues that there was no revolution and, instead, modern behaviour arose gradually and independently among different populations of Modern Humans and Neanderthals. Some practices were even adopted by Modern Humans from the Neanderthals. Finlayson overturns classic narratives of human origins, and raises important questions about who we really are.
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