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The Dawn of Christianity: People and Gods in a Time of Magic and Miracles

The Dawn of Christianity: People and Gods in a Time of Magic and Miracles

Robert C. Knapp

$49.99
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Exploring the origins of Christianity, this book looks at why it was that people first in Judea and then in the Roman and Greek Mediterranean world became susceptible to the new religion. Robert Knapp looks for answers in a wide-ranging exploration of religion and everyday life from 200 BC to the end of the first century. Survival, honour and wellbeing were the chief preoccupations of Jews and polytheists alike. In both cases, the author shows, people turned first to supernatural powers. According to need, season and place polytheists consulted and placated vast constellations of gods, while the Jews worshipped and contended with one almighty and jealous deity. Professor Knapp considers why any Jew or polytheist would voluntarily dispense with a well-tried way of dealing with the supernatural and trade it in for a new model. What was it about the new religion that led people to change beliefs they had held for millennia and which in turn, within four centuries of the birth of its messiah, led it to transform the western world? His conclusions are as convincing as they are sometimes surprising.
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Pontius Pilate: Deciphering a Memory

Pontius Pilate: Deciphering a Memory

Aldo Schiavonne ,  Jeremy Carden

$35.95
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The only historic figure outside the early Christian tradition to whom the Gospels ascribe a dialogue with Jesus is the first-century Roman prefect Pontius Pilate. Presiding over the trial and execution of Jesus, Pilate is a figure who has straddled history and legend for over two thousand years. Now, Aldo Schiavone presents a comprehensive, revisionist biography of Pilate that meticulously reconstructs the social, religious and political context in which his fateful encounter with Jesus took place. Drawing on a wealth of original research, Schiavone weaves together the sources, from epigraphs to the Gospels, from Josephus to Tacitus and Philon, to create a portrait that approaches its subject as if for the first time, without any other intent than to try to explain what happened.
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Septimius Severus: Countdown To Death

Septimius Severus: Countdown To Death

Yasmine Zahran ,  Jonathan Tubb

$34.95
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Born in the province of Leptis Magna in Africa Septimius Severus was Roman Emperor from 193 to 211. Severus seized power after the death of Emperor Pertinax in 193 during the Year of the Five Emperors. Once he had reaffirmed his rule over the Western Provinces, Severus waged a brief war in the East against the Parthian Empire, sacking their capital Ctesiphon in 197 and expanding the eastern frontier to the Tigris. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and and re-occupying the Antonine Wall. In 208 he began the conquest of Caledonia (modern Scotland) but his ambitions were cut short when he fell fatally ill in late 210. With the succession of his sons, Severus founded the Severan Dynasty, the last dynasty of the Empire before the Crisis of the Third Century.
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Roman Conquests: The Danube Frontier

Roman Conquests: The Danube Frontier

Michael Schmitz ,  Graham Sumner

$65.00
The Roman conquests of Macedonia in the 2nd century BC led directly to the extension of their authority over the troublesome tribes of Thrace to the south of the Danube. But their new neighbour on the other side of the mighty river, the kingdom of the Dacians, was to pose an increasing threat to the Roman empire. Inevitably this eventually provoked Roman attempts at invasion and conquest. 

It is a measure of Dacian prowess and resilience that several tough campaigns were required over more than a century before their kingdom was added to the Roman Empire. It was one of the Empire's last major acquisitions (and a short-lived one at that). Dr Michael Schmitz traces Roman involvement in the Danube region from first contact with the Thracians after the Third Macedonian War in the 2nd century BC to the ultimate conquest of Dacia by Trajan in the early years of the 2nd Century AD.

Like the other volumes in this series, this book gives a clear narrative of the course of these wars, explaining how the Roman war machine coped with formidable new foes and the challenges of unfamiliar terrain and climate.  Specially-commissioned colour plates bring the main troop types vividly to life in meticulously-researched detail.
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Hidden in Plain View: The Aboriginal People of Coastal Sydney

Hidden in Plain View: The Aboriginal People of Coastal Sydney

Paul Irish

$34.99
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ABBEY’S BOOKSELLER PICK —— A fascinating look at how aboriginal people in coastal Sydney adapted to the impact of white settlement during the 19th century - a revelation about a long-neglected part of our history. Dave Hall

———

Contrary to what you may have been taught, local Aboriginal people did not lose their culture and die out within decades of Governor Phillip's arrival in Sydney in 1788.

Aboriginal people are prominent in accounts of early colonial Sydney, yet we seem to skip a century as they disappear from the historical record, re-emerging early in the twentieth century. What happened to Sydney's indigenous people between the devastating impact of white settlement and increased government intervention a century later?

Hidden in Plain View shows that Aboriginal people did not disappear. They may have been ignored in colonial narratives but maintained a strong bond with the coast and its resources and tried to live on their own terms.

This original and important book tells this powerful story through individuals, and brings a poorly understood period of Sydney's shared history back into view. Its readers will never look at Sydney in the same way.

Hidden In Plain View by Paul Irish at 131 York Street Sydney
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Sydney Noir: The Golden Years

Sydney Noir: The Golden Years

Michael Duffy ,  Nick Hordern

$34.99
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The first ever book devoted entirely to the golden years of the Sydney underworld.

In the late 1960s Sydney was one of the most prosperous places on earth and one of the most corrupt. A large proportion of the population was engaged in illegal gambling and other activities that made colourful characters such as Lennie McPherson, Abe Saffron and George Freeman wealthy and, to many, folk heroes. Thousands of American soldiers on their seven-day leave from Vietnam turned Kings Cross, with its strip shows and night clubs, into one big party.

The whole corrupt carnival was run by the police in an arrangement known as 'the joke'. They could just about get away with that term because heroin had not yet turned the underworld into the killing machine it would soon become. Two of the main jokers were also lovers: vice queen Shirley Brifman and violent detective Fred Krahe.

In Sydney Noir Michael Duffy and Nick Hordern revisit this dark yet fascinating chapter of Sydney's history, telling stories that would be unbelievable were they not true. Finally, they make the bold argument that premier of the time, Sir Robert Askin, may not have been as guilty of corruption as many have claimed.

'Duffy and Hordern give the city the kicking it's been asking for, and the city gives up all the secrets and the bodies ...' - John Birmingham

'An insightful retrospective on the emergence of organised crime and corruption in Sydney in the 1960s and 1970s.' - Bob Bottom OAM, investigative journalist
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The Secret Cold War: The Official History of Asio, 1975-1989

The Secret Cold War: The Official History of Asio, 1975-1989

John Blaxland ,  Rhys Crawley

$34.99
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The inside account of Australia's national intelligence organisation as it grappled with continuing espionage from foreign agents and the rise of terrorist attacks on Australian soil during the years of the Fraser and Hawke governments. This is the third and final volume of the Official History of ASIO.

The Cold War between the West and the Soviet Bloc didn't end with detente in 1975: it just went underground. Until the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, tensions between the superpowers continued to play out across the world.

Until now, few would have known of the surprising extent of clandestine operations in Australia by foreign intelligence operatives and the violence-prone activities of local extremist groups from the Middle East, Armenia and Croatia in the 1970s and 1980s. Meanwhile, prompted by probing royal commissions and reviews, ASIO was being systematically transformed into a modern intelligence organisation.

The Secret Cold War uncovers behind the scenes stories of the Hilton bombing in Sydney, assassinations of diplomats, the Combe-Ivanov affair, and the new threat from China. It reveals that KGB officers were able to recruit and run agents in Australia for many years, and it follows ASIO's own investigations into persistent allegations of penetration by Soviet moles.

The Secret Cold War is the third and final volume of The Official History of ASIO.
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Bomber Boys: The Hair-Raising Adventures of a Group of Airmen Who Escaped the Japanese and Became the RAAF's Celebrated 18th Squadron

Bomber Boys: The Hair-Raising Adventures of a Group of Airmen Who Escaped the Japanese and Became the RAAF's Celebrated 18th Squadron

Marianne Van Velzen

$29.99
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The unknown story of a unique RAAF squadron, its men and its mission to halt the Japanese advance in the Pacific.

March 1942. Java is about to fall. An Australian military dispatch rider and a Dutch air force transport pilot embark on a frightening escape from the advancing Japanese that takes them from Bandung to a crash landing just north of Darwin. Both would later join a unique band of flyers determined to strike back at the enemy.

Bomber Boys is the extraordinary and little known story of more than 100 Dutch airmen, stranded in Australia with no country to return to, who were joined by a contingent of Australians to make up the RAAF's No. 18 (Netherlands East Indies) Squadron. Formed in Canberra in April 1942, the squadron flew operational coastal patrols before eventually being relocated to the secret MacDonald Airfield, north of Pine Creek in the Northern Territory, and eventually Batchelor, near Darwin.

This is, however, more than a story about the 900 bombing raids, reconnaissance missions and attacks on Japanese shipping that the squadron flew in its three years of existence under Australian control. At its heart, is a powerful and compelling story of a group of very different men, thrown together for a common purpose, and the strange and sometimes difficult friendships they formed.
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Flag's Up: The First 21 Years of the South Head Lookout Post 1790-1811

Flag's Up: The First 21 Years of the South Head Lookout Post 1790-1811

Peter Poland

$29.95
English, Dutch, French, American and Russian ships anhjored alongside convict vessels in Sydneys peaceful harbour. they carried Matthew Flinders and other famous navigators; political prisoners, daring escapees, Aborigines and Maoris making their first international journeys, and governors to and from their difficult postings. The South Head Lookout Post which recorded these arrivals and departures has been manned since January 1790, making it the longest permanently manned site in Australia. This illustrated book reveals the first years and the various voyages that began and ended on the shores of the bright young Sydney colony.
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London's Triumph: Merchant Adventurers and the Tudor City

London's Triumph: Merchant Adventurers and the Tudor City

Stephen Alford

$55.00
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'Consistently illuminating ...Like all the best stories, it is about the timeless tides of power and influence ...trade deals can sometimes be sexy, thrilling and epic' Sinclair McKay, Spectator Life in Europe was fundamentally changed in the 16th century by the astonishing discoveries of the New World and of direct sea routes to Asia. To start with England was hardly involved and London remained a gloomy, introverted medieval city. But as the century progressed something extraordinary happened. Stephen Alford's evocative, original and fascinating new book uses the same skills that made his widely praised The Watchers so successful, bringing to life the network of merchants, visionaries, crooks and sailors who changed London forever. In a sudden explosion of energy English ships were suddenly found all over the world - trading with Russia and the Levant, exploring Virginia and the Arctic, and fanning out across the Indian Ocean. London's Triumph is above all about the people who made this possible - the families, the guild members, the money-men who were willing to risk huge sums and sometimes their own lives in pursuit of the rare, exotic and desirable. Their ambitions fuelled a new view of the world - initiating a long era of trade and empire, the consequences of which we still live with today.
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So High a Blood: The Life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox

So High a Blood: The Life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox

Morgan Ring

$26.99
Sometime heir to the English throne, courtier in danger of losing her head, spy-mistress and would-be architect of a united Catholic Britain: Lady Margaret Douglas is the Tudor whose life demands a wider telling.

As niece to Henry VIII and half-sister to James V of Scotland, the beautiful and Catholic Margaret held a unique and precarious position in the English court. Throughout her life, she was to navigate treacherous waters: survival necessitated it. Yet Margaret was no passive pawn or bit-part player. As the Protestant Reformations unfolded across the British Isles and the Tudor monarchs struggled to produce heirs, she had ambitions of her own. She wanted to see her family ruling a united, Catholic Britain. When her niece Mary, Queen of Scots was left a widow, Margaret saw her chance. Through a thoroughly Machiavellian combination of timing, networking and family connections, she set in motion a chain of shattering events that would one day see her descendants succeed to the crowns of England, Ireland and Scotland.

Morgan Ring has revived the story of Lady Margaret Douglas to vivid and captivating effect. From a richly detailed backdrop of political and religious turbulence Margaret emerges, full of resilience, grace and intelligence. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources, So High a Blood presents a fascinating and authoritative portrait of a woman with the greatest of ambitions for her family, her faith and her countries.
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The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao

The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao

Ian Johnson

$55.00
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The human story of the vast changes now transforming China, with religion sweeping up millions of people in ways which are a profound threat to the Communist Party.

In no society on Earth was there such a ferocious attempt to eradicate all trace of religion as in modern China. But now, following a century of violent antireligious campaigns, China is awash with new temples, churches, and mosques - as well as cults, sects, and politicians trying to harness religion for their own ends. Driving this explosion of faith is uncertainty - over what it means to be Chinese, and how to live an ethical life in a country that discarded traditional morality and is still searching for new guideposts.

The Souls of China is the result of some fifteen years of studying and travelling around China. The message of Ian Johnson's extraordinary book is that China is now experiencing a 'Great Awakening' on a vast scale. Everywhere long-suppressed religions are rebuilding, often in new forms, and reshaping the values and behaviours of entire communities.

Ian Johnson is as happy explaining the wonders of the lunar calendar as talking to the yinyang man who ensures proper burials. He visits meditation masters and the charismatic head of a Chengdu church. The result is a rich and funny work that challenges conventional wisdom about China. Xi Jinping, China's current leader, has put a return to morality and Chinese tradition at the heart of his ideas for his country - but, Johnson asks, at what point will the rapid spread of belief form an unmanageable challenge to the Party's monopoly on power?
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No Place to Lay One's Head: With a Preface from Patrick Modiano

No Place to Lay One's Head: With a Preface from Patrick Modiano

Francoise Frenkel

$34.99
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An extraordinary story of one woman's attempt to survive the horrors of Vichy France.

The French sensation, now in English translation.

Françoise Frenkel was a Jewish woman born in Poland and enamoured of all things literary and French. In 1921 she set up the first French-language bookshop in Berlin, recognising the craving for French culture in that city in the wake of the First World War. Her business was a success – attracting diplomats and celebrities, authors and artists. But life in Berlin for a Jewish woman and a foreigner soon became untenable.

Frenkel was forced to flee to Paris and compelled to keep moving as she attempted to survive in a world disintegrating around her. Her observations of and interactions with the French people, both those who would give her up to the Nazi authorities and those who risked their own lives and families by offering her refuge, show how humanity strives to assert itself even in the darkest times.

Frenkel's book, written with piercing clarity and sensibility in the immediate aftermath of her escape to Switzerland, was originally published in 1945 in Geneva. But only recently was a copy of this forgotten work discovered and a decision made at French publisher Gallimard to republish it, seventy years later.

Very little is known of Françoise Frenkel's subsequent life, except that she returned to live in Nice where she had spent much of her time during the war, and where she died in 1975.

No Place to Lay One's Head is the story of refugees, those fleeing terror, the world over.
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Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany

Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany

Norman Ohler ,  Shaun Whiteside

$22.99
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The sensational account of the overwhelming role of drug-taking in the Third Reich - from Hitler and his entourage to ordinary troops.

The Nazis styled themselves as warriors against moral degeneracy. Yet, as Norman Ohler's gripping bestseller reveals, the entire Third Reich was permeated with drugs: cocaine, heroin, morphine and, most of all, methamphetamines, or crystal meth, used by everyone from factory workers to housewives, and crucial to troops' resilience - even partly explaining German victory in 1940.

The promiscuous use of drugs at the very highest levels also impaired and confused decision-making, with Hitler and his entourage taking refuge in potentially lethal cocktails of stimulants administered by the physician Dr Morell as the war turned against Germany. Blitzed forms a crucial missing piece of the story of WW2.
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Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart

Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart

Scott Anderson

$19.99
In 2011, a series of anti-government uprisings shook the Middle East and North Africa in what would become known as the Arab Spring. Few could predict that these convulsions, initially hailed in the West as a triumph of democracy, would give way to brutal civil war, the terrors of the Islamic State, and a global refugee crisis. But, as New York Times bestselling author Scott Anderson shows, the seeds of catastrophe had been sown long before. In this gripping account, Anderson examines the myriad complex causes of the region's profound unraveling, tracing the ideological conflicts of the present to their origins in the United States invasion of Iraq in 2003 and beyond. From this investigation emerges a rare view into a land in upheaval through the eyes of six individuals-the matriarch of a dissident Egyptian family; a Libyan Air Force cadet with divided loyalties; a Kurdish physician from a prominent warrior clan; a Syrian university student caught in civil war; an Iraqi activist for women's rights; and an Iraqi day laborer-turned-ISIS fighter. A probing and insightful work of reportage, Fractured Lands offers a penetrating portrait of the contemporary Arab world and brings the stunning realities of an unprecedented geopolitical tragedy into crystalline focus.
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Boys in Zinc

Boys in Zinc

Svetlana Alexievich ,  Andrew Bromfield

$24.99
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From 1979 to 1989 Soviet troops engaged in a devastating war in Afghanistan that claimed thousands of casualties on both sides. While the Soviet Union talked about a 'peace-keeping' mission, the dead were shipped back in sealed zinc coffins. Boys in Zinc presents the honest testimonies of soldiers, doctors and nurses, mothers, wives and siblings who describe the lasting effects of war. Weaving together their stories, Svetlana Alexievich shows us the truth of the Soviet-Afghan conflict: the killing and the beauty of small everyday moments, the shame of returned veterans, the worries of all those left behind. When it was first published in the USSR in 1991, Boys in Zinc sparked huge controversy for its unflinching, harrowing insight into the realities of war.
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The War in the West: A New History: The Allies Fight Back 1941-1943

The War in the West: A New History: The Allies Fight Back 1941-1943

James Holland

$35.00
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In the second volume of his acclaimed new history of the Second World War, James Holland examines the momentous turning points of 1941–1943: Hitler’s invasion of Russia; America’s entry into the conflict; the devastating Thousand Bomber Raids over Germany; the long struggle in the deserts of North Africa; and the defeat of the U-boats in the crucial Battle of the Atlantic.

As in his first volume, Germany Ascendant , he interweaves his account of the well-known events of the period with the personal stories of individuals caught up in them - on all sides. Through interviews, letters, diaries and reports, he allows us to see the war not just from the perspective of politicians, military commanders and strategists, but also through the eyes of civilians bombed out of their homes, resistance members stranded in the frozen Norwegian winter, sailors risking their lives in the Atlantic convoys, German aces striving for supremacy in the air, and ordinary soldiers battling for survival in the scorching sands of Libya.

He also looks behind the scenes at the all-important ‘machinery’ of war: the manufacturing, farming and vital supply lines that underpinned the entire conflict and ultimately determined its course. From the battle fronts on land, sea and air, to the streets, fields and factories of Britain, America and Germany, he paints a dramatic and compelling portrait of these pivotal years when the tide began to turn.

Combining his own research with only recently accessible archive material, Holland looks afresh at this cataclysmic conflict, reassessing long-held views and challenging conventional assumptions. The result is ground-breaking history that redefines the war in the West and makes us think again about the events that shaped our modern world.
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Last Hope Island: Britain, Occupied Europe, and the Brotherhood That Helped Turn the Tide of War

Last Hope Island: Britain, Occupied Europe, and the Brotherhood That Helped Turn the Tide of War

Lynne Olson

$39.99
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As Hitler’s Blitzkrieg vanquished one European country after another in the chaos-filled spring of 1940, and the United States and the Soviet Union were still on the sidelines, London suddenly found itself the de facto capital of Europe, a haven for Europe’s struggling governments in exile: Holland, Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, Poland and France.

Last Hope Island is the stirring story of these conquered states and citizens as they pooled their efforts to help Britain survive the German onslaught, joining the RAF, bolstering their home countries’ resistance movements with British help, and using their considerable talents as code breakers, weapon designers and double agents. It will be the first book to focus on the extensive contributions made by all the captive nations of Europe to the Allied victory.

New York Times–bestselling author Olson will highlight this untold WWII story with a cast of colourful international characters, much as she did to such great effect in her 2010 book, Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood With Britain in its Darkest, Finest Hour. Last Hope Island is, in many ways, the natural follow-up to Citizens, which told the story of the Anglo-American partnership in World War II from the viewpoint of three prominent Americans in London.

A notable success, Citizens has sold 115,000 copies in all formats and continues to sell well four years after its publication. In addition to being a book club favorite, it’s been touted by a number of prominent figures in the public eye, including Bill and Hillary Clinton, Tom Brokaw, and Madeleine Albright, who has described Olson as ‘our era’s foremost chronicler of World War II politics and diplomacy.’ Sir Peter Westmacott, British ambassador to the U.S., and Matthew Barzun, American ambassador to Britain, both have written about Citizens and have made speeches recommending it.
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East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Philippe Sands

$22.99
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WINNER OF THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE AND THE JQ-WINGATE LITERARY PRIZE

When he receives an invitation to deliver a lecture in the Ukrainian city of Lviv, international lawyer Philippe Sands begins a journey on the trail of his family's secret history. In doing so, he uncovers an astonishing series of coincidences that lead him halfway across the world, to the origins of international law at the Nuremberg trial.

Interweaving the stories of the two Nuremberg prosecutors (Hersch Lauterpacht and Rafael Lemkin) who invented the crimes or genocide and crimes against humanity, the Nazi governor responsible for the murder of thousands in and around Lviv (Hans Frank), and incredible acts of wartime bravery, East West Street is an unforgettable blend of memoir and historical detective story, and a powerful meditation on the way memory, crime and guilt leave scars across generations.
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Rebel Cities: Paris, London and New York in the Age of Revolution

Rebel Cities: Paris, London and New York in the Age of Revolution

Mike Rapport

$32.99
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A brilliant historical narrative of London, Paris and New York in the Age of Revolution, just as they were transforming into the great global cities we know them to be today.

London, Paris and New York in the eighteenth century, as today, were places where political authority, commerce and money, art and intellectual life intersected. They straddled an Atlantic world where ships powered by nothing more than wind, currents and human muscle criss-crossed the sea, carrying with them goods, ideas and above all people: men and women, bewigged aristocrats and lawyers, rough-handed craftworkers, quill-wielding bluestockings and doughty fishwives. But the cities were also home to dangerous criminals, corrupt politicians - and slaves.

Rebel Cities explores the stormy debate about the nature of cities in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: were they places of enlightenment, sparkling wells of progress and civilisation, or were they dens of vice, degeneracy and disorder? Against a backdrop of accelerating urban expansion and revolution in both Europe and North America, revolutionary burghers of these extraordinary cities expended ink, paint, breath and, sometimes, blood in their struggle to understand, control and master the urban world.

Drawing on hundreds of letters, travelogues and eye-witness accounts, Mike Rapport vividly evokes the sights, sounds and smells of these cities, masterfully weaving their history with the politics of revolution.

When New Yorkers and Parisians experienced their revolution, when their cities went to war, and when Londoners engaged in political protest, they underwent the whole torrent and exhilaration of human emotions. Determining the character of the cities through their inhabitants, as well as their architecture, topography and the events that shaped them, this magnificent book evokes what it was like for all parts of society to live in London, Paris and New York in one of the most transformative periods in the history of civilisation.
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Native Lands: A Global Journey into History

Native Lands: A Global Journey into History

Norman Davies

$69.99
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Native Lands is Norman Davies's account of a global circumnavigation, of the places he visited and the history he found there, from Abu Dhabi to Singapore, the settlement of Tasmania to the short-lived Republic of Texas. As in Vanished Kingdoms, Davies's historical gaze penetrates behind the present to see how things became as they are, and how peoples came to tell themselves the stories which make up their identities. Everywhere, it seems, human beings have been travelling - pushing out others or arriving in terra nullius - since the beginning of recorded time. To whom is a land truly native? As always, Norman Davies has his eye on the historical horizon as well as on what is close at hand, and brilliantly complicates our view of the past.
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Pomegranate: A Global History

Pomegranate: A Global History

Damien Stone

$24.99
Juicy, crunchy, tart: with its multitude of seeds and juice akin to blood, it's not hard to see why the pomegranate has so appealed to the imagination. After being held in high esteem in the rituals of the polytheistic religions of the ancient world, the pom - egranate came to be revered in Christianity, Islam and Judaism. This book explores how people throughout history interacted with pomegranates, featuring a cast of well-known characters from the Ashurnasirpal to Anne Boleyn, from Sandro Botticelli to Salvador Dali. It is a cornucopia of strange and fascinating anecdotes about this very special fruit whose health benefits are so highly regarded today.
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Tomb Treasures: New Discoveries from China's Han Dynasty

Tomb Treasures: New Discoveries from China's Han Dynasty

Jay Xu

$44.99
This stunning Chinese art book presents almost a hundred recently unearthed objects that offer a glimpse into the extraordinary wealth and artistic accomplishments of elite society during the Western Han Dynasty (206 BCEu9 CE). These exquisite treasures are from newly discovered sites in the Jiangsu region of China and are made of gold, silver, jade, bronze, pottery, lacquer, and other refined materials.

Masterworks include a full-length jade suit sewn with gold threads, an oversized coffin shrouded in jade, and a complete set of functional bronze bells. The book's texts explore a number of ideas about life and death of Western Han royalty.
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Great Generals of the Ancient World: The Personality, Intellectual, and Leadership Traits That Made Them Great

Great Generals of the Ancient World: The Personality, Intellectual, and Leadership Traits That Made Them Great

Richard A. Gabriel

$54.99
Of the thousands of commanders who served in history's armies, why is it that only a few are remembered as great leaders of men in battle? What combination of personal and circumstantial influences conspire to produce great commanders? What makes a great leader great? Richard A Gabriel analyses the biographies of ten great generals who lived between 1481 BC and AD 632 in an attempt to identify the characteristics of intellect, psychology, personality, and experience that allowed them to tread the path to greatness. Professor Richard Gabriel has selected the ten whom he believes to be the greatest of them all. Those included, and more so those omitted, will surprise many readers. Conspicuous by their absence, for example, are Alexander the Great and Attila the Hun. Richard Gabriel, himself a retired soldier and professor at the Canadian Defence College, uses his selected exemplars to distil the timeless essence of military leadership.
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The First Signs: Unlocking the Mysteries of the World's Oldest Symbols

The First Signs: Unlocking the Mysteries of the World's Oldest Symbols

Genevieve Von Petzinger

$24.99
In an adventure worthy of Indiana Jones, archeologist von Petzinger explores the little-known geometric cave art of our ancient ancestors - perhaps the first form of human written communication and a key to unlocking some of the mysteries of our ancient past. These "remarkable" (Jean Auel, author of the bestselling Earth's Children series) findings "may represent one of the most extraordinary scientific insights of our time" (Wade Davis, author of The Serpent and the Rainbow).

Join von Petzinger as she travels throughout Europe and attempts to crack the code of these strange symbols, which persisted virtually unchanged for some 30,000 years. Clearly meaningful to their creators, these geometric signs are one of the first indicators of our human ancestors' intelligence and capacity for symbolic meaning and language-glimpses across millennia of an ancient consciousness linked to our own.

Part travel journal, part popular science, and part personal narrative, this groundbreaking investigation explores what makes us human, how we evolved as a series, and how this cave art laid the foundation for so much of the technology that we enjoy today.
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The Last Pagan Emperor: Julian the Apostate and the War Against Christianity

The Last Pagan Emperor: Julian the Apostate and the War Against Christianity

H. C. Teitler

$35.95
Flavius Claudius Julianus was the last pagan to sit on the Roman imperial throne (361-363). Born in Constantinople in 331 or 332, Julian was raised as a Christian, but apostatized, and during his short reign tried to revive paganism, which, after the conversion to Christianity of his uncle Constantine the Great early in the fourth century, began losing ground at an accelerating pace. Having become an orphan when he was still very young, Julian was taken care of by his cousin Constantius II, one of Constantine's sons, who permitted him to study rhetoric and philosophy and even made him co-emperor in 355. But the relations between Julian and Constantius were strained from the beginning, and it was only Constantius' sudden death in 361 which prevented an impending civil war.

As sole emperor, Julian restored the worship of the traditional gods. He opened pagan temples again, reintroduced animal sacrifices, and propagated paganism through both the spoken and the written word. In his treatise Against the Galilaeans he sharply criticised the religion of the followers of Jesus whom he disparagingly called 'Galilaeans'. He put his words into action, and issued laws which were displeasing to Christians - the most notorious being his School Edict. This provoked the anger of the Christians, who reacted fiercely, and accused Julian of being a persecutor like his predecessors Nero, Decius, and Diocletian. Violent conflicts between pagans and Christians made themselves felt all over the empire. It is disputed whether or not Julian himself was behind such outbursts. Accusations against the Apostate continued to be uttered even after the emperor's early death. In this book, the feasibility of such charges is examined.
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The Crusades: Their History and Myths Revealed

The Crusades: Their History and Myths Revealed

Michael Paine

$22.99
Bloody, violent and often misunderstood, the Crusades still loom large as a chilling example of what is possible when two powerful cultures collide. They were the stage upon which the great medieval knights and their Saracen opponents acted out their dramas. And they were the battleground on which two opposing religions and cultures met, with results that have resonated down the centuries to this day.

What were the Crusades? Why were they fought? And what did they teach us?

Exploring the history, myths and imagery that comprise our modern understanding of this long and vicious clash between Christianity and Islam, The Crusades is a stimulating examination of one of the most brutal and complex chapters in our shared history.
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Ancient Ivory: Masterpieces of the Assyrian Empire

Ancient Ivory: Masterpieces of the Assyrian Empire

Georgina Herrmann

$80.00
Ivory is a wonderful material: tactile, beautiful, workable into many different forms and the strongest in the animal kingdom. Unfortunately for the elephant, it has been highly prized from the Palaeolithic to the present day, in part by virtue of its rarity and the difficulty of acquiring it.

During the early first millennium bc - the 'Age of Ivory' - literally thousands of carved ivories found their way to the Assyrian capital city of Kalhu, or modern Nimrud, in northern Iraq. The majority were not made there, in the heart of ancient Assyria, but arrived as gift, tribute or booty gathered by the Assyrian kings from the small neighbouring states of the ancient Middle Eastern world. The ivories were first unearthed in the mid-19th century by renowned Victorian traveller and adventurer Austen Henry Layard, but it was not until the mid-20th century that the extent of the treasure was realized by Max Mallowan, the archaeologist husband of Agatha Christie. Thousands of extraordinary ivories have since been excavated from the ruins of the ancient city's extravagant palaces, temples and forts.

In recent years, many have been destroyed or remain at risk following the invasion of Iraq and the sacking of the Iraq Museum, as well as in the ongoing conflict and destruction of cultural heritage in the region. As a result, the ivories preserved in these pages form a unique and unparalleled record of the otherwise lost art of the Middle East.
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Gladiators and Beasthunts: Arena Sports of Ancient Rome

Gladiators and Beasthunts: Arena Sports of Ancient Rome

Christopher Epplett

$54.99
Gladiators and Beasthunts is a comprehensive survey of arena sports in ancient Rome, focusing upon gladiatorial combat and the beast-hunts (venationes). Whilst numerous books have already been written on arena spectacles in ancient Rome, they generally neglect the venationes, despite the fact that the beast-hunts, in which men were pitted in mortal combat against various dangerous wild animals (including lions, tigers, elephants and rhinos), were almost as popular as gladiatorial spectacles and were staged over a longer period of time.

Dr Christopher Epplett, gives a full and detailed treatment of both types of spectacle. The author starts by explaining the origins of these bloody combat sports in the late Roman Republic, before surveying the growth of these events during the first two centuries of the Empire, when emperors possessed the resources to stage arena spectacles on an unmatched scale. The details of the training, equipment and fighting styles used by different types of combatants are covered, as are the infrastructure of the arenas and behind-the-scenes organization that was essential to the successful staging of arena events.

Particular attention will be paid to the means by which Roman spectacle organizers were able to procure the countless wild animals necessary for the staging of venationes throughout the Empire. This is a gladiator book with added bite and sure to be welcomed by scholars and general readers alike.
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 Roman Army Units in the Eastern Provinces (1): 31 BC-AD 195

Roman Army Units in the Eastern Provinces (1): 31 BC-AD 195

Raffaele D'Amato ,  Raffaele Ruggeri

$33.95  $30.55
Between the reigns of Augustus and Septimius Severus, the Eastern provinces of the Roman Empire frequently saw brutal fighting, most notably during the conquest of Dacia by Trajan, the suppression of the Great Revolt in Judea and intermittent clashes with Rome's great rival Parthia. In these wars, Roman soldiers had to fight in a range of different climates and terrains, from the deserts of the Middle East to the islands of the eastern Mediterranean. Using full-colour artwork, this book examines the variation of equipment and uniforms both between different military units, and in armies stationed in different regions of the Empire. Using evidence drawn from recent archaeological finds, it paints a vivid portrait of Roman army units in the Eastern provinces in the first two centuries of the Imperial period.
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The Pilum: The Roman Heavy Javelin

The Pilum: The Roman Heavy Javelin

M. C. Bishop ,  Peter Dennis

$24.99
A heavy javelin, normally used as a shock weapon immediately before contact, the pilum was designed with a particular speciality: it could penetrate a shield and carry on into the individual behind it. Relying on mass rather than velocity, at short range a volley of pila had much the same effect on a charging enemy as musketry would in later periods. The design was not uniform, with a wide diversity of types throughout the developmental history of the weapon, but for more than four centuries it remained a vital part of the arsenal of weapons at the disposal of the Roman legionary. Drawing upon recent major finds in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balkans, as well as written records and rigorous scientific analysis, this enthralling study lifts the veil on the evolving nature of the pilum, the Roman heavy javelin that helped to conquer the known world.
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Us Women, Our Ways, Our World

Us Women, Our Ways, Our World

Pat Dudgeon ,  Jeannie Herbert ,  Jill Milroy ,  Darlene Oxenham

$35.00
An exemplar of Indigenous Studies writing, epistemologically, theoretically and methodologically A collection of writings on women and Aboriginal identity from 14 senior Indigenous academics and community leaders. The collection engages with questions such as: What makes Aboriginal women strong? Why are grandmothers so important (even ones never met)? How is the connection to country different for Aboriginal people compared to non-Aboriginal people's love of nature or sense of belonging to an area? What is Aboriginal spirituality? These writings are generous, inclusive and considerate of the non-Aboriginal reader's feelings. They are hopeful for the future, with an emphasis on acknowledging, joining with, collaborating and caring.
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The Lumen Seed: Records of a Search in the Australian Desert

The Lumen Seed: Records of a Search in the Australian Desert

Juno Gemes

$67.99
The Lumen Seed sensitively depicts a cultural dialogue taking place before a backdrop of offenses against the Australian continent, as well as a history of systematic discrimination against indigenous peoples on the part of the country's white population. The images, created by Australia-based artist Judith Crispin in close consultation with indigenous people, document an attempt by the Warlpiri group to share sacred information with white people; the poems convey the artist's interpretation of those ideas, alongside her development of personal relationships with community elders. Judith Crispin returned to Australia in 2011 after living and working in Germany for several years. Since that time she has driven the 8000km round trip from her home in Canberra to the remote community of Lajamanu many times and established a close relationship with the Warlpiri community there. Crispin has a background in music composition, poetry and photography.
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The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu: The Quest for This Storied City and the Race to Save its Treasures

The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu: The Quest for This Storied City and the Race to Save its Treasures

Charlie English

$32.99
Two tales of a city: The historical race to reach one of the world's most mythologized places, and the story of how a contemporary band of archivists and librarians, fighting to save its ancient manuscripts from destruction at the hands of al Qaeda, added another layer to the legend.

To Westerners, the name  Timbuktu  long conjured a tantalising paradise, an African El Dorado where even the slaves wore gold. Beginning in the late eighteenth century, a series of explorers gripped by the fever for  discovery  tried repeatedly to reach the fabled city. But one expedition after another went disastrously awry, succumbing to attack, the climate, and disease.

Timbuktu was rich in another way too. A medieval centre of learning, it was home to tens of thousands of ancient manuscripts, on subjects ranging from religion to poetry, law to history, pharmacology, and astronomy. When al-Qaeda-linked jihadists surged across Mali in 2012, threatening the existence of these precious documents, a remarkable thing happened: a team of librarians and archivists joined forces to spirit the manuscripts into hiding. 

Relying on extensive research and firsthand reporting, Charlie English expertly twines these two suspenseful strands into a fascinating account of one of the planet's extraordinary places, and the myths from which it has become inseparable.
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Luzon 1945: The Final Liberation of the Philippines

Luzon 1945: The Final Liberation of the Philippines

Clayton Chun ,  Giuseppe Rava

$29.99
Driven from the Philippines in 1942, General Douglas MacArthur returned three years later to force the Japanese off of its main island of Luzon. Containing the capital of Manila, vital natural resources as well as thousands of Allied prisoners of war, the triumph at Luzon would be a vital step on the road to victory as the Americans continued to island-hop their way towards the Japanese home islands. This new study details one of the hardest-fought campaigns of the Pacific War with Japanese fatalities alone on Luzon topping 200,000. Emphasizing the differences in Japanese and American strategy, and detailing the combat operations of the campaign, this volume tells the story of how MacArthur kept his promise to return and liberate the Philippines.
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A History of East Asia: From the Origins of Civilization to the Twenty-First Century

A History of East Asia: From the Origins of Civilization to the Twenty-First Century

Charles Holcombe

$44.95
Charles Holcombe begins by asking the question 'what is East Asia?' In the modern age, many of the features that made the region - now defined as including China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam - distinct have been submerged by the effects of revolution, politics or globalization. Yet, as an ancient civilization, the region had both an historical and cultural coherence. This shared past is at the heart of this ambitious book, which traces the story of East Asia from the dawn of history to the twenty-first century. The second edition has been imaginatively revised and expanded to place emphasis on cross-cultural interactions and connections, both within East Asia and beyond, with new material on Vietnam and modern pop culture. The second edition also features a Chinese character list, additional maps and new illustrations.
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Married Quarter: Boots, Berets and Bloody Uniforms

Married Quarter: Boots, Berets and Bloody Uniforms

Maria August-Dunn

$29.99
Serving the nation in uniform is a career choice. But have you ever wondered about the life of a partner of these brave men and women? Married Quarter is a light-hearted glimpse into the world of the service family, through deployments, postings, illnesses and into retirement. 21 years, 9 postings, 2 deployments, 15 jobs, 1 brain tumour You will laugh and cry as Maria Augustus-Dunn tells you her story: from the perils of dining-in nights to meeting the King of Cambodia; from her disastrous attempt at making a cheesecake to seeing her husband off for a 12-month deployment; from arriving in Townsville in the middle of a cyclone to breaking down on the side of a mountain in Tasmania with a caravan in tow. Married Quarter takes you on a 21-year journey of the highs and lows of life as the spouse of a serving soldier. This book is dedicated to the thousands of unsung heroes - the military spouses of Australia. A portion of the proceeds from this book will be donated to Legacy.
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The Australian Book of Records

The Australian Book of Records

Helen Taylor ,  John Taylor

$29.95
The Australian Book Of Records (TABOR) was founded by 93 times world record driving champions Helen and John Taylor, by popular demand, with a view to giving everyone living in Australia and Australians living overseas, the opportunity to break Australian national records or world records. To date more than 65,000 Australians break and create Australian and world records annually. Record breaking creates a wonderful sense of achievement, great team work, a community spirit and a belief in oneself. There are numerous categories in The Australian Book of Records book, suiting every persons needs and requirements to strive for their record best.
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Shack Life: The Survival Story of Three Royal National Park Communities

Shack Life: The Survival Story of Three Royal National Park Communities

Ingeborg van Teeseling ,  Cooper Brady ,  Dean Saffron ,  Royal National Park Coastal Cabins Protection League

$59.99
Shack Life tells the story of three small beachside communities in the Royal National Park south of Sydney - Era, Burning Palms and Little Garie - and how their residents fought to save their beloved shacks.

During the Depression, starving miners and their families made their way 'down the hill' to a place by the sea where they could live on fish, rabbits and home-grown vegetables. Hundreds of shacks, only able to be reached on foot, sprung up, and are still standing today.

Since the 1960s, governments have tried to have the shacks pulled down, but the communities - with the help of the RNP Coastal Cabins Protection League - fought back each time and won. In frank interviews with 'shackies', together with tunning photographs, this book explores the fascinating history of these quintessentially Australian shacks.
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Those Wild Rabbits: How They Shaped Australia

Those Wild Rabbits: How They Shaped Australia

Bruce Munday

$39.95
A century ago Australia was home to 10 billion rabbits, thriving in their adopted home. Storyteller Bruce Munday finds the rabbit saga irresistible - the naive hopes of the early settlers, the frustration, environmental damage, cost to agriculture, dreams shattered, and the lessons learned and ignored. Those Wild Rabbits highlights not only the damage done but also Australia's missed opportunities for real rabbit control. It recognises the bush's paradoxical love affair with an animal that was at one time a significant rural industry and is still recalled with nostalgia. More importantly, it offers hope for a brighter future, making the case for continued research to drive the next rabbit-control miracle, because rabbit plagues of the past will become the future unless we capture the history and embrace the lessons.
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Pavilions in Parks: Bandstands and Rotundas All Round Australia

Pavilions in Parks: Bandstands and Rotundas All Round Australia

Allison Rose

$39.95
Reclining in the shade of a rotunda, or being serenaded from a bandstand, everyone has fond memories of sunny days in parks and pavilions. Criss-crossing the country, from Albany to Toogoolawah, travellers can find little gems that adorn the land. Bandstands, pavillions and rotundas stand testimony to the optimism and civic mindedness of our pioneering ancestors. In this lovely illustrated book, Alison Rose finds pavilions in big cities and tiny townships, reveals the history surrounding them and their locations. A beautiful book and a great present for anyone interested in local history. They can read about Cheer Up Societies, gold rushes, revelry, architecture and civic pride.
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La Trobe: The Life and Times of the First Governor of Victoria

La Trobe: The Life and Times of the First Governor of Victoria

John Barnes

$59.95
Every man and his dog has heard of La Trobe. But just who was Charles Joseph La Trobe? He is at once a household name and a mystery man. A man vilified by his opponents, and misunderstood by his modern admirers. This lavishly illustrated biography uncovers the man behind the public name, as not only an important colonial figure but an author and artist. Traces his globetrotting early years and struggles as Governor in Victoria during the goldrush to his eventual blindness in old age. Filled with interesting colonial illustrations and his personal correspondence.
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Canals in Britain

Canals in Britain

Tony Conder

$19.99
In the early years of the Industrial Revolution, canals formed the arteries of Britain. Most waterways were local concerns, carrying cargoes over short distances and fitted into regional groups with their own boat types linked to the major river estuaries. This new history of Britain's canals starts with the first Roman waterways, moving on to their golden age in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and ends with the present day, describing the rise and fall of canal building and use in the UK. It tells the story of the narrow boats and barges borne by the canals, and the boatmen who navigated them as well as the wider tale of waterway development through the progress of civil engineering. Replete with beautiful photographs, this a complete guide to some of the most accessible and beautiful pieces of Britain's heritage.
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1666: Plague, War and Hellfire

1666: Plague, War and Hellfire

Rebecca Rideal

$22.99
1666 was a watershed year for England. The outbreak of the Great Plague, the eruption of the second Dutch War and the Great Fire of London all struck the country in rapid succession and with devastating repercussions.

Shedding light on these dramatic events, historian Rebecca Rideal reveals an unprecedented period of terror and triumph. Based on original archival research and drawing on little-known sources, 1666: Plague, War and Hellfire takes readers on a thrilling journey through a crucial turning point in English history, as seen through the eyes of an extraordinary cast of historical characters.

While the central events of this significant year were ones of devastation and defeat, 1666 also offers a glimpse of the incredible scientific and artistic progress being made at that time, from Isaac Newton's discovery of gravity to Robert Hooke's microscopic wonders. It was in this year that John Milton completed Paradise Lost, Frances Stewart posed for the now-iconic image of Britannia, and a young architect named Christopher Wren proposed a plan for a new London - a stone phoenix to rise from the charred ashes of the old city.

With flair and style, 1666 shows a city and a country on the cusp of modernity, and a series of events that forever altered the course of history.
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The Black Door: Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

The Black Door: Spies, Secret Intelligence and British Prime Ministers

Richard Aldrich ,  Rory Cormac

$22.99
'The Black Door' explores the evolving relationship between successive British prime ministers and the intelligence agencies, from Asquith's Secret Service Bureau to Cameron's National Security Council. At the beginning of the 20th Century the British intelligence system was underfunded and lacked influence in government. But as the new millennium dawned, intelligence had become so integral to policy that it was used to make the case for war. Now, covert action is incorporated seamlessly into government policy, and the Prime Minister is kept constantly updated by intelligence agencies. But how did intelligence come to influence our government so completely? 'The Black Door' explores the murkier corridors of No. 10 Downing Street, chronicling the relationships between intelligence agencies and the Prime Ministers of the last century. From Churchill's code-breakers feeding information to the Soviets to Eden's attempts to assassinate foreign leaders, from Wilson's paranoia of an MI5-led coup d'etat to Thatcher's covert wars in Central America, Aldrich and Cormac entertain and enlighten as they explain how our government came to rely on intelligence to the extent that it does today.
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A Kingdom Without a King: Cromwell's Last Year

A Kingdom Without a King: Cromwell's Last Year

Paul Lay

$49.99
Paul Lay explores a year that fell within one of the least understood periods in British history - the Interregnum between the execution of Charles I and the restoration of Charles II - and reclaims it as one of the most politically exciting and culturally creative eras of European history. In 1657 popular political fervour was at its height, and new religious ideas and methods of government were being tested out. The poet John Milton held a government post (Secretary for Foreign Tongues), and the regime's concentration on military spending was transforming England into a nascent imperial power. Far from being the dreary Puritan society of royalist myth, the Interregnum was one of the most intellectually thrilling times in British history. This was the crucible in which modern British thought - inquiring, iconoclastic and creative - was forged, and it marked the foundation of modern British democracy: pluralistic, inclusive, and based on a people's charter to rule.
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Treachery and Retribution: England's Dukes, Marquesses and Earls: 1066 - 1707

Treachery and Retribution: England's Dukes, Marquesses and Earls: 1066 - 1707

Andrew Rawson

$35.00
This is the history of England's turbulent times, told through the stories of the country's nobility. The book begins with the Norman Conquest in 1066 and ends with the union of England and Scotland in 1707. The nobility fought wars against Scotland in the north and against France on the Continent. They conquered Ireland and Wales and then had to deal with the rebellions that followed. 

This is the story of their abduction plots and assassination attempts and the brutal retribution when the treachery failed. It recalls the barons' rebellions and the peasant uprisings against the king. It also explains the reasons behind the family factions who fought for the crown, the most famous example being the War of the Roses. Also covered are the noble marriages arranged by the king to reward loyalty and maintain the balance of power. It tells of the children betrothed to marry, the failed marriages of convenience and the secret marriages for love. Learn how Henry VIII introduced new problems when he appointed himself head of the Church of England. Successive monarchs switched between the new church and the Catholic Church. Then there was the challenge to Charles I's rule in the Civil Wars.

The story ends with the union of England and Scotland and the creation of Great Britain in 1707. It was also the end of the period of treachery and retribution which had plagued the English crown for nearly 650 years.
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British Destroyers 1939-45: Pre-War Classes

British Destroyers 1939-45: Pre-War Classes

Angus Konstam

$22.99
The Royal Navy entered World War II with a large but eclectic fleet of destroyers. Some of these were veterans of World War I, fit only for escort duties. Most though, had been built during the inter-war period, and were regarded as both reliable and versatile. Danger though lurked across the seas as new destroyers being built in Germany, Italy and Japan were larger and better armoured. So, until the new, larger Tribal-class destroyers could enter service, these vessels would have to hold the line. Used mainly to hunt submarines, protect convoys from aerial attack, and take out other destroyers, these ships served across the globe during the war. This fully illustrated study is the first in a two-part series on the real workhorses of the wartime Royal Navy, focusing on how these ageing ships took on the formidable navies of the Axis powers.
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The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps in France, 1917 - 1921: Women Urgently Wanted

The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps in France, 1917 - 1921: Women Urgently Wanted

Samantha Philo-Gill

$54.99
In March 1917, the first women to be enrolled into the British Army joined the newly formed Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). The women substituted men in roles that the Army considered suitable, thereby freeing men to move up the line. The WAACs served, for example, as cooks, drivers, signallers, clerks, as well as gardeners in the military cemeteries.

Due to their exemplary service, Queen Mary gave her name to the Corps in April 1918 and it became Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps (QMAAC). By the time the Corps was disbanded in 1921, approximately 57,000 women had served both at home and in France.

This book details the establishment of the Corps and subsequently explores the experience of the WAACs who served in France. It follows the women from enrolment to the camps and workplaces overseas, through to their experiences of the Spring Offensive of 1918, the Armistice and demobilisation. The final chapter reviews how the women have been remembered in art, literature, museums and memorials.

Throughout the book, the author locates the women in a society at war and examines how they were viewed by the Army, the general public and the press.The author draws on a wide range of sources to provide the background and uses the oral and written testimonies of the women themselves to tell their stories. 

This book will be of interest to social, women's and military historians, as well as family history researchers.
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History's Spoiled Children: The Formation of the Modern Greek State

History's Spoiled Children: The Formation of the Modern Greek State

Kostas Kostis ,  Jacob Moe

$55.00
History's Spoiled Children is the story of a small Ottoman province and its transformation into a modern European state. In some respects, the challenges to the formation of the Greek state could be likened to those encountered by the Western world in its efforts to impose its politico-cultural model on societies foreign to it.

Though the Greeks of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were Christians whereas the societies subject to Western experimentation today are Muslim, the political venture known as modernisation has treated both as civilising projects and in no way as equal partners.

However, there is one distinction that cannot be ignored. Western Europeans regard Greece and Greeks as foundational in their own history. With this in mind, one may better understand the West's (more or less) particular treatment of these populations, which not only rebelled against the Ottoman Empire in the name of Christianity but also invoked connections to an ancient past in which Europe sees the roots of its own identity.

Kostas Kostis explores this perception and traces the formation of this favoured modern nation, dubbed in nineteenth-century Europe the 'spoiled children of history.'
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Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-62

Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-62

Frank Dikotter

$23.99
Winner of the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction 2011 Between 1958 and 1962, 45 million Chinese people were worked, starved or beaten to death. Mao Zedong threw his country into a frenzy with the Great Leap Forward, an attempt to catch up with and overtake the Western world in less than fifteen years. It led to one of the greatest catastrophes the world has ever known. Dikotter's extraordinary research within Chinese archives brings together for the first time what happened in the corridors of power with the everyday experiences of ordinary people, giving voice to the dead and disenfranchised. This groundbreaking account definitively recasts the history of the People's Republic of China.
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At the Edge of the World: The Heroic Century of the French Foreign Legion

At the Edge of the World: The Heroic Century of the French Foreign Legion

Jean-Vincent Blanchard

$35.00
The remarkable story of the French Foreign Legion, its dramatic rise throughout the nineteenth century, and its most committed champion, General Hubert Lyautey.

An aura of mystery, romance, and danger surrounds the French Foreign Legion, the all-volunteer corps of the French Army, founded in 1831. Famous for its physically grueling training in harsh climates, the legion fought in French wars from Mexico to Madagascar, Southeast Asia to North Africa. To this day, despite its reputation for being assigned the riskiest missions in the roughest terrain, the mystique of the legion continues to attract men from every corner of the world.

In At the Edge of the World, historian Jean-Vincent Blanchard follows the legion's rise to fame during the nineteenth century - focusing on its campaigns in Indochina and especially in Africa - when the corps played a central role in expanding and protecting the French Empire. As France struggled to be a power capable of rivaling the British, the figure of the legionnaire - deadly, self-sacrificing, uncompromisingly efficient - came to represent the might and morale that would secure a greater, stronger nation.

Drawing from rare, archival memoirs and testimonies of legionnaires from the period and tracing the fascinating career of Hubert Lyautey, France's first resident-general in Morocco and a hero to many a legionnaire, At the Edge of the World chronicles the Foreign Legion at the height of its renown, when the corps and its archetypically handsome, moody, and marginalized recruits became both the symbols of a triumphant colonialism and the stuff of legend.
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Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France

Republic of Islamophobia: The Rise of Respectable Racism in France

Jim Wolfreys

$34.95
Islamophobia in France is on the increase. Muslims are being subjected to unprecedented scrutiny of what they wear, eat and say. Racist acts and rhetoric are increasingly common. Leading public figures meanwhile continue to contest the use of the term 'Islamophobia'. Republic of Islamophobia argues that such intolerance has fed off the adoption of an authoritarian neoliberal outlook by mainstream French political parties, a process that has accelerated since the jihadist attacks in Paris in January and November 2015. Jim Wolfreys describes the development of a 'new secularism' that targets Muslims and gives a respectable veneer to racism. He examines how this secularism has been championed by the Front National's Marine Le Pen, and how it has divided the anti-racist movement and undermined the left's capacity to contest bigotry. Techniques from France's colonial era, he argues, are being adapted to stigmatise Muslims. Drawing on interviews conducted in Paris in 2015-16, Wolfreys highlights the work of independent grassroots campaigns and activists organising to confront racism. Informed by their experience, he aims to provide tools for those confronting the wider backlash against Muslims that is embedding itself in Europe and the US.
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World War II German Motorized Infantry & Panzergrenadiers

World War II German Motorized Infantry & Panzergrenadiers

Nigel Thomas ,  Johnny Shumate

$22.99
In World War II Germany's doctrine of mobile warfare dominated the battlefield. By trial and error, the Germans were the first to correctly combine the strength in tanks and in mobile infantry and artillery. This integration of mobile units, equipment and tactics underpinned Germany's successes in the first half of the war. As the war dragged on, the Allies sought to copy German tactics but German armies remained supreme in this type of warfare until their losses had seriously degraded their capabilities. This study traces the development of the different types of unit that came together in the Panzergrenadier branch from the inter-war years through World War II. Using colour plates to display the changes in uniform, equipment and insignia in all theatres of operations throughout the conflict, this is a complete account of Hitler's elite armoured infantry.
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Superfast Primetime Ultimate Nation: The Relentless Invention of Modern India

Superfast Primetime Ultimate Nation: The Relentless Invention of Modern India

Adam Roberts

$32.99
Today, India stands on the threshold of global dominance. And as it faces the road ahead, attention focuses on one man: its Prime Minister, Nahrendra Modi. A controversial figure in his own country and abroad, he has garnered unprecedented political support while facing criticism for his nationalism, his record in government and his economic policies. As it seeks to control its relationships with China and Pakistan, to revitalise its economy and improve the health and education prospects of its citizens, the key to understanding its future may lie in understanding its leader. Here, Adam Roberts, formerly South Asia bureau chief for the Economist, builds up an unflinching portrayal of the man at India's helm, the country's enormous potential - and its equally vast challenges. Drawing on years of on-the-ground research, and interviews with everyone from wayside fortune-tellers to Modi himself, Superfast Primetime Ultimate Nation is essential reading for anyone who wants to know what the future holds for the world's greatest nation.
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India in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know

India in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know

Mira Kamdar

$26.95
According to current projections, India will overtake China to become the most populous country on Earth by 2050. Its 1.6 billion people will live in the world's second-largest economy, after China but ahead of the United States and the European Union. A democracy and an open society compared to China, India's destiny matters deeply to a West whose influence in shaping the 21st century will decline as that of these two Asian giants and other emerging economies in Africa and Latin America rise. InIndia in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know®, Mira Kamdar, a fellow at the Asia Society and the World Policy Institute and an award-winning author, offers readers an introduction to India today in all its complexity.

An ancient civilization tracing its roots back 5,000 years, the Republic of India was the first of Europe's former colonies to gain independence in the mid-20th century. With institutions of governance and a legal system inherited from the British, as well as the English language, India has the potential to function as a "bridge nation" between Asia and the West, between the advanced economies of the global North and the developing countries of the South. As such, India is set to play a critical role in how our world evolves during the coming decades.

In a concise question-and-answer format, Kamdar addresses India's history, including its colonial legacy and independence movement; the political and social structures in place today; its rapidly growing economy and financial system; the geopolitical landscape of the 21st century and India's place in global politics; and the environmental concerns faced by the country, among other topics. She explores India's contradictions and complications, from its worringly narrow politics of patronage to its willingness to censor information by banning books and controlling internet content. At the same time, Kamdar celebrates the merging of India's muticultural landscape and deep artistic and intellectual heritage with the dawning of the Information Age and the expansion of mass media, which have made it one of the world's 21st-century cultural powerhouses.
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Ireland: The Autobiography: One Hundred Years of Irish Life, Told by its People

Ireland: The Autobiography: One Hundred Years of Irish Life, Told by its People

John Bowman

$26.99
Ireland in its own words: a dazzling compendium Over the past hundred years, Ireland has undergone profound political, social and cultural changes. But one thing that has not changed is the Irish genius for observation and storytelling, invective and self-scrutiny. Ireland: The Autobiography draws upon this genius to create a portrait of a century of Irish life through the words of the people who lived it. Broadcaster and historian John Bowman has mined archives, diaries and memoirs to create a remarkably varied and delightfully readable mosaic of voices and perspectives. Ireland: The Autobiography is a brilliantly selected, wide-ranging and engrossing take on the last century of Irish life. It gives us a portrait of Ireland unlike anything we've read before. 'Absorbing and illuminating ...John Bowman has selected a range of accounts of Irish life that do justice to what happened, what it felt like, and the personal and societal experiences alongside the official version.' Diarmaid Ferriter, Irish Times 'A treasure' Irish Examiner 'A whistle-stop tour of the seismic, seminal and explosive events which shaped the nation as we know it' Irish Independent 'Entertaining and informative' Sunday Business Post 'A remarkably varied and delightfully readable mosaic of voices and perspectives' Women's Way 'A thoughtful and eclectic collection' Irish Mail on Sunday
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Brief History of Japan: Samurai, Shogun and Zen: the Extraordinary Story of the Land of the Rising Sun

Brief History of Japan: Samurai, Shogun and Zen: the Extraordinary Story of the Land of the Rising Sun

Jonathan Clements

$19.99
This fascinating history of Japan tells the story of the people of Japan, from ancient teenage priest-queens to teeming hordes of salarymen, a nation that once sought to conquer China, yet also shut itself away for two centuries in self-imposed seclusion.

Stretching for nearly 2000 miles and encompassing almost 7000 islands, Japan has the fourth largest GDP and the tenth largest population in the world. Japan is a country of paradoxes, a modern nation steeped in ancient traditions; a democracy with an emperor as head of state; a famously safe society built on 108 volcanoes and an active earthquake zone. Despite a reputation for sprawling cities and cutting-edge technology, seventy-three percent of its land comprises uninhabited mountains and forests.

First revealed to the West in the Travels of Marco Polo, Japan was the legendary faraway land defended by the fearsome Kamikaze storm, and ruled by a divine sovereign. It was the terminus of the Silk Road and the edge of the known world, a fictional construct for European arts and crafts, and an enduring symbol of the mysterious east. In recent times, it became the powerhouse of global industry, a nexus of pop culture and a harbinger of post-industrial decline.
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Hell's Traces

Hell's Traces

Victor Ripp

$37.99
In July 1942, the French police in Paris, acting for the German military government, arrested Victor Ripp’s three-year-old cousin, Alexandre. Two months later, the boy was killed in Auschwitz. In Hell’s Traces, Ripp examines this act through the prism of family history. In addition to Alexandre, ten members of Ripp’s family on his father’s side died in the Holocaust. His mother’s side of the family, numbering thirty people, was in Berlin when Hitler came to power. Without exception they escaped the Final Solution.

Hell’s Traces tells the story of the two families’ divergent paths. To spark the past to life, he embarks on a journey to visit Holocaust memorials throughout Europe. “Could a stone pillar or a bronze plaque or whatever else constitutes a memorial,” he asks, “cause events that took place more than seven decades ago to appear vivid?”

A memorial in Warsaw that included a boxcar like the ones that carried Jews to Auschwitz compels Ripp to contemplate the horror of Alexandre’s transport to his death. One in Berlin that invokes the anti-Jewish laws of 1930s allows him to better understand how his mother’s family the Nazi trap. In Paris he stumbles across a playground dedicated to the memory of the French children who were deported, Alexandre among them. Ultimately, Ripp sees thirty-five memorials in six countries. He encounters the artists who designed the memorials, historians who recall the events that are memorialized, and survivors with their own stories to tell.

Defiantly unsentimental, Hell’s Traces is structured like a travelogue in which each destination enables a reckoning with the past.
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Jewish History: A Very Short Introduction

Jewish History: A Very Short Introduction

David N. Myers

$13.95
How have the Jews survived? For millennia, they have defied odds by overcoming the travails of exile, persecution, and recurring plans for their annihilation. Many have attempted to explain this singular success as a result of divine intervention.

In this engaging book, David N. Myers charts the long journey of the Jews through history. At the same time, it points to two unlikely-and decidedly this-worldly - factors to explain the survival of the Jews: antisemitism and assimilation. Usually regarded as grave dangers, these two factors have continually interacted with one other to enable the persistence of the Jews. At every turn in their history, not just in the modern age, Jews have adapted to new environments, cultures, languages, and social norms. These bountiful encounters with host societies have exercised the cultural muscle of the Jews, preventing the atrophy that would have occurred if they had not interacted so extensively with the non-Jewish world. It is through these encounters - indeed, through a process of assimilation - that Jews came to develop distinct local customs, speak many different languages, and cultivate diverse musical, culinary, and intellectual traditions.

Left unchecked, the Jews' well-honed ability to absorb from surrounding cultures might have led to their disappearance. And yet, the route toward full and unbridled assimilation was checked by the nearly constant presence of hatred toward the Jew. Anti-Jewish expression and actions have regularly accompanied Jews throughout history. Part of the ironic success of antisemitism is its malleability, its talent in assuming new forms and portraying the Jew in diverse and often contradictory images - for example, at once the arch-capitalist and revolutionary Communist. Antisemitism not only served to blunt further assimilation, but, in a paradoxical twist, affirmed the Jew's sense of difference from the host society.

And thus together assimilation and antisemitism (at least up to a certain limit) contribute to the survival of the Jews as a highly adaptable and yet distinct group.
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A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS

A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS

Robert F. Worth

$22.99
In 2011, a wave of revolution spread through the Middle East as protesters demanded an end to tyranny, corruption and economic decay. From Egypt to Yemen, a generation of young Arabs insisted on a new ethos of common citizenship. Their bravery and idealism stirred observers around the world and led militant jihadists to worry that they had been superseded by a new and peaceful uprising.

Five years later, the utopian aspirations of 2011 have darkened. In one country after another, brutal terrorists and dictators have risen to the top as old divides reemerge and deepen. Egypt has become a more repressive police state than ever before; Libya, Syria and Yemen endure civil war and the extremists of ISIS have spread chaos and carnage across the region, and beyond it.

A Rage for Order tracks the tormented legacy of what was once called the Arab Spring. Writing with bold literary ambition, the distinguished New York Times correspondent Robert F. Worth introduces a riveting cast of characters. We meet a Libyan rebel who must decide whether to kill the torturer who murdered his brother; a Yemeni farmer who lives in servitude to a poetry-writing, dungeon-operating chieftain; two young Syrian women whose close friendship devolves into enmity as their sects go to war; and an Egyptian doctor who is caught between his loyalty to the Muslim Brotherhood and his hopes for a new, tolerant democracy. In a final chapter, Worth tells the moving story of the two eighty-something statesmen whose unlikely camaraderie allowed Tunisia to escape its neighbours' worst fates.

Combining dramatic storytelling with an original analysis of the Arab world today, A Rage for Order captures the psychological and actual civil wars raging throughout the Middle East and explains how the dream of an Arab renaissance gave way to a new age of discord.
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Lost Islamic History: Reclaiming Muslim Civilisation from the Past

Lost Islamic History: Reclaiming Muslim Civilisation from the Past

Firas Alkhateeb

$22.95
Islam has been one of the most powerful religious, social, and political forces in history. Over the last 1400 years, from origins in Arabia, a succession of Muslim polities and later empires expanded to control territories and peoples that ultimately stretched from southern France, to East Africa and South East Asia. Yet many of the contributions of Muslim thinkers, scientists, and theologians, not to mention rulers, statesmen and soldiers, have been occluded.

This book rescues from oblivion and neglect some of these personalities and institutions while offering the reader a new narrative of this lost Islamic history. The Umayyads, Abbasids, and Ottomans feature in the story, as do Muslim Spain, the savannah kingdoms of West Africa and the Mughal Empire, along with the later European colonisation of Muslim lands and the development of modern nation-states in the Muslim world. Throughout, the impact of Islamic belief on scientific advancement, social structures, and cultural development is given due prominence, and the text is complemented by portraits of key personalities, inventions and little known historical nuggets. 

The history of Islam and of the world's Muslims brings together diverse peoples, geographies, and states, all interwoven into one narrative that begins with Muhammad and continues to this day.
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The New Sultan: Erdogan and the Crisis of Modern Turkey

The New Sultan: Erdogan and the Crisis of Modern Turkey

Soner Cagaptay

$37.99
In a world of rising tensions between Russia and the United States, the Middle East and Europe, Sunnis and Shiites, Islamism and liberalism, Turkey is at the epicentre. And at the heart of Turkey is its right-wing populist president, Recep Tayyip Erdo?an. Since 2002, Erdo?an has consolidated his hold on domestic politics while using military and diplomatic means to solidify Turkey as a regional power. His crackdown has been brutal and consistent - scores of journalists arrested, academics officially banned from leaving the country, university deans fired and many of the highest-ranking military officers arrested. In some senses, the nefarious and failed 2016 coup has given Erdo?an the licence to make good on his repeated promise to bring order and stability under a 'strongman'. Here, leading Turkish expert Soner Cagaptay will look at Erdo?an's roots in Turkish history, what he believes in and how he has cemented his rule, as well as what this means for the world. The book will also unpick the 'threats' Erdogan has worked to combat - from the liberal Turks to the Gulen movement, from coup plotters to Kurdish nationalists - all of which have culminated in the crisis of modern Turkey.
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Where the Line is Drawn: Crossing Boundaries in Occupied Palestine

Where the Line is Drawn: Crossing Boundaries in Occupied Palestine

Raja Shehadeh

$32.99
As a young boy, Raja Shehadeh was entranced by a forbidden Israeli postage stamp in his uncle's album, intrigued by tales of a green land beyond the border. Impossible then to know what Israel would come to mean to him, or to foresee the future occupation of his home in Palestine. Later, as a young lawyer, he worked to halt land seizures and towards peace and justice in the region, and made close friends with several young Israelis. But as life became increasingly unbearable under Occupation, and horizons shrank, it was impossible to escape politics or the past, and friendships and hopes were put to the test. Brave, intelligent and deeply controversial, in Where the Line is Drawn award-winning author Raja Shehadeh explores the devastating effect of Occupation on even the most intimate aspects of life. Looking back over decades of political turmoil, Shehadeh traces the impact on the fragile bonds of friendship across the Israel-Palestine border, and asks whether those considered bitter enemies can come together to forge a common future.
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Operation Nemesis: The Assassination Plot That Avenged the Armenian Genocide

Operation Nemesis: The Assassination Plot That Avenged the Armenian Genocide

Eric Bogosian

$26.99
In 1921, a small group of self-appointed patriots set out to avenge the deaths of almost one million victims of the Armenian Genocide. They named their operation Nemesis after the Greek goddess of retribution. Over several years, the men tracked down and assassinated former Turkish leaders. The story of this secret operation has never been fully told until now. Eric Bogosian goes beyond simply telling the story of this cadre of Armenian assassins to set the killings in context by providing a summation of the Ottoman and Armenian history as well as the history of the genocide itself. Casting fresh light on one of the great crimes of the twentieth century and one of history's most remarkable acts of political retribution, and drawing upon years of new research across multiple continents, OPERATION NEMESIS is both a riveting read and a profound examination of evil, revenge and the costs of violence.
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Longbowman vs Crossbowman: Hundred Years' War 1337-60

Longbowman vs Crossbowman: Hundred Years' War 1337-60

David Campbell ,  Peter Dennis

$24.99
For centuries, the crossbow had played a key role on the battlefields of continental Europe, with mercenaries from Genoa and Brabant in particular filling the ranks of the French army, yet on the outbreak of the Hundred Years' War they came up against a more powerful foe. To master the English longbow was a labour of years, requiring far greater skill to use than the crossbow, but it was much more flexible and formidable, striking fear into the French and their allies. This study examines three battles - Sluys (1340), Crecy (1346) and Poitiers (1356) - and shows how the use of the longbow allowed England's armies to inflict crushing defeats on numerically superior forces. The longbow changed the shape of war, becoming the defining weapon of the age and wreaking havoc upon the French armies that would face it. Featuring full-colour artwork, this is the engrossing story of the first clashes between the English longbowmen and the crossbowmen of the French king on the bloody battlefields of the Hundred Years' War.
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Fontenoy 1745: Cumberland's Bloody Defeat

Fontenoy 1745: Cumberland's Bloody Defeat

Michael McNally ,  Sean O'Brogain

$29.99
A disputed succession to the Austrian throne led to general war between the leading powers of Europe in 1740, with France, Spain and Prussia on one side, and Britain, Habsburg Austria and the Dutch Republic on the other. While fighting occurred across the globe, the bloodiest battles were fought on the European continent, with none more costly than the battle of Fontenoy in 1745. Fearing an encirclement of France by a resurgent Habsburg-controlled Austria, the French commander Marshall Saxe planned to overrun the Austrian Netherlands, thereby dealing a decisive blow against their enemy's ability to wage war. Saxe's army, the cream of the French military, invaded and set up a defensive position at Fontenoy, near Tournai - daring his enemies to knock him off his perch. This title, beautifully illustrated with full colour plates, is an in-depth study of the British Duke of Cumberland's attempt to assault Saxe's position. It focuses on the inability of allied leaders to coordinate their attacks and how Cumberland came within a whisker of achieving a major victory.
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Napoleon's Last Army: Volume 1: Imperial Guard Cavalry

Napoleon's Last Army: Volume 1: Imperial Guard Cavalry

Paul Dawson ,  Dana Lombardy ,  Keith Rocco

$57.95
This is a groundbreaking series of books in English by author, re-enactor, and equestrian Paul L. Dawson that use thousands of pages of French archival documents, translations of more than 200 French eyewitness accounts, and dozens of new paintings by Keith Rocco to tell the story of Napoleon's final military operations and his defeat at the battle of Waterloo. Napoleon's Last Army (NLA) is the most comprehensive study ever made of the French army in 1815, using primary source information that provides new insights into this famous campaign. NLA will expose persistent myths and errors about the French forces at Waterloo and in the campaign of 1815.
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Napoleon's Last Army: Volume 2: Imperial Guard Infantry and Artillery

Napoleon's Last Army: Volume 2: Imperial Guard Infantry and Artillery

Paul Dawson ,  Dana Lombardy ,  Keith Rocco

$57.95
This is a groundbreaking series of books in English by author, re-enactor, and equestrian Paul L. Dawson that use thousands of pages of French archival documents, translations of more than 200 French eyewitness accounts, and dozens of new paintings by Keith Rocco to tell the story of Napoleon's final military operations and his defeat at the battle of Waterloo. Napoleon's Last Army (NLA) is the most comprehensive study ever made of the French army in 1815, using primary source information that provides new insights into this famous campaign. NLA will expose persistent myths and errors about the French forces at Waterloo and in the campaign of 1815.
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The East India Company, 1600 - 1858: A Short History with Documents

The East India Company, 1600 - 1858: A Short History with Documents

Ian Barrow

$27.95
In existence for 258 years, the English East India Company ran a complex, highly integrated global trading network. It supplied the tea for the Boston Tea Party, the cotton textiles used to purchase slaves in Africa, and the opium for China's nineteenth-century addiction. In India it expanded from a few small coastal settlements to govern territories that far exceeded the British Isles in extent and population. It minted coins in its name, established law courts and prisons, and prosecuted wars with one of the world's largest armies. Over time, the Company developed a pronounced and aggressive colonialism that laid the foundation for Britain's Eastern empire. A study of the Company, therefore, is a study of the rise of the modern world. In clear, engaging prose, Ian Barrow sets the rise and fall of the Company into political, economic, and cultural contexts and explains how and why the Company was transformed from a maritime trading entity into a territorial colonial state. Excerpts from eighteen primary documents illustrate the main themes and ideas discussed in the text. Maps, illustrations, a glossary, and a chronology are also included.
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The Habsburg Empire: A Very Short Introduction

The Habsburg Empire: A Very Short Introduction

Martyn Rady

$15.95
The Habsburgs are the most famous dynasty in continental Europe. From the thirteenth to the twentieth centuries, they ruled much of Central Europe, and for two centuries were also rulers of Spain. Through the Spanish connection, they acquired lands around the Mediterranean and a chunk of the New World, spreading eastwards to include the Philippines. Reaching from South-East Asia to what is now Ukraine, the Habsburg Empire was truly global. In this Very Short Introduction Martin Rady looks at the history of the Habsburgs, from their tenth-century origins in Switzerland, to the dissolution of the Habsburg Empire in 1918. He introduces the pantheon of Habsburg rulers, which included adventurers, lunatics, and at least one monarch who was so malformed that his true portrait could never be exhibited. He also discusses the lands and kingdoms that made up the Habsburg Empire, and the decisive moments that shaped their history. Dynasty, Europe, global power, and the idea of the multi-national state all converge on the history of the Habsburg Empire.
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Obama: From Promise to Power

Obama: From Promise to Power

David Mendell

$32.99
Barack Obama is arguably the most dynamic political figure to grace the American stage since John F. Kennedy. His meteoric ascent from promise to power stunned even the cynics and inspired a legion of devout followers.

For anyone who wants to know more about the man, David Mendell’s Obama is essential reading. Mendell, who covered Obama for the Chicago Tribune, had far-reaching access to the Chicago politician as Obama climbed the ladder to the White House, the details of which he shares in this compelling biography. Positioning Obama as the savior of a fumbling Democratic party, Mendell reveals how Obama conquered Illinois politics and paved the way brick by brick for a galvanizing, historic presidential run.

With a new afterword by the author, which includes a fresh perspective on Barack Obama following his two historic terms as the first African-American president, and with exclusive interviews with family members and top advisers, as well as details on Obama’s voting record, Mendell offers a complete, complex, and revealing portrait. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in American politics in general and President Barack Obama in particular.
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Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era

Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era

Glenn F. Williams

$49.95
Known to history as  Dunmore's War,  the 1774 campaign against a Shawnee-led Indian confederacy in the Ohio Country marked the final time an American colonial militia took to the field in His Majesty's service and under royal command.

Led by John Murray, the fourth Earl of Dunmore and royal governor of Virginia, a force of colonials including George Rogers Clark, Daniel Morgan, Michael Cresap, Adam Stephen, and Andrew Lewis successfully enforced the western border established by treaties in parts of present-day West Virginia and Kentucky. The campaign is often neglected in histories, despite its major influence on the conduct of the Revolutionary War that followed.

In Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era, award-winning historian Glenn F. Williams describes the course and importance of this campaign. 

Supported by primary source research, the author corrects much of the folklore concerning the war and frontier fighting in general, demonstrating that the Americans did not adopt Indian tactics for wilderness fighting as is often supposed, but rather used British methods developed for fighting irregulars in the woods of Europe, while incorporating certain techniques learned from the Indians and experience gained from earlier colonial wars. As an immediate result of Dunmore's War, the frontier remained quiet for two years, giving the colonies the critical time to debate and declare independence before Britain convinced its Indian allies to resume attacks on American settlements. Ironically, at the same time Virginia militiamen were fighting under command of a king's officer, the colony was becoming one of the leaders in the move toward  American independence. Although he was hailed as a hero at the end of the war, Lord Dunmore's attempt to maintain royal authority put him in direct opposition to many of the subordinates who followed him on the frontier, and in 1776 he was driven from Virginia and returned to England.
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Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution

Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution

Nathaniel Philbrick

$32.99
In June 1776, as Nathaniel Philbrick’s enthralling new book opens, the vulnerable Continental army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the largest naval fleet in the history of the world. In September, near the Canadian border, his favorite general, Benedict Arnold, accomplishes a miracle victory on Lake Champlain. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons but Arnold is on trial for treason, and America is forced to realize that the real threat to their liberties might not come from without but from within.

As always, Philbrick is fabulous in his set pieces - the Battle of Brooklyn and the routing of Washington’s troops, the victory at Saratoga that ironically almost ruined the Continental army, the nightmare of Valley Forge. But his real focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of Washington and Arnold, who is an impulsive (and, to Philbrick, sympathetic) hero whose devastating injuries at Saratoga erode his soul, and whose misfortunes at the hands of distant politicians fatally destroy his faith in the legitimacy of the rebellion. He also captures the tortured dynamics of Britain’s military command, whose generals came to see the struggle as a dreary quagmire out of which few were likely to emerge with honor.

The Revolution, as Philbrick describes it, has become a near civil war, with bloody confrontations more about settling old grudges against hated neighbors than liberty and freedom. The Founding Fathers here are no band of idealistic brothers but driven by the same self-righteous opportunism that plagues Congress today. As a country wary of tyrants suddenly must figure out how it should be led, Washington emerges as a kind of Job in epaulettes whose unmatched ability to rise above the petty politics of his time enabled him to win the war that really mattered. Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation.
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King Philip's War: The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict

King Philip's War: The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict

Eric B. Schultz ,  Michael J. Tougias ,  Nathaniel Philbrick

$26.95
At once an in-depth history of this pivotal war and a guide to the historical sites where the ambushes, raids, and battles took place, King Philip's War expands our understanding of American history and provides insight into the nature of colonial and ethnic wars in general. Through a careful reconstruction of events, first-person accounts, period illustrations, and maps, and by providing information on the exact locations of more than fifty battles, King Philip's War is useful as well as informative. Students of history, colonial war buffs, those interested in Native American history, and anyone who is curious about how this war affected a particular New England town, will find important insights into one of the most seminal events to shape the American mind and continent.
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Old School: Life in the Sane Lane

Old School: Life in the Sane Lane

Bill O'Reilly ,  Bruce Feirstein

$39.99
Old School is in session...

You have probably heard the term Old School, but what you might not know is that there is a concentrated effort to tear that school down. It's a values thing. The anti-Old School forces believe the traditional way of looking at life is oppressive. Not inclusive. The Old School way may harbor microaggressions. Therefore, Old School philosophy must be diminished.

Those crusading against Old School now have a name: Snowflakes. You may have seen them on cable TV whining about social injustice and income inequality. You may have heard them cheering Bernie Sanders as he suggested the government pay for almost everything. The Snowflake movement is proud and loud, and they don't like Old School grads.

So where are you in all this? Did you get up this morning knowing there are mountains to climb - and deciding how you are going to climb them? Do you show up on time? Do you still bend over to pick up a penny? If so, you're Old School.

Or did you wake up whining about safe spaces and trigger warnings? Do you feel marginalized by your college's mascot? Do you look for something to get outraged about, every single day, so you can fire off a tweet defending your exquisitely precious sensibilities? Then you're a Snowflake.

So again, are you drifting frozen precipitation? Or do you matriculate at the Old School fountain of wisdom? This book will explain the looming confrontation so even the ladies on The View can understand it.

Time to take a stand. Old School or Snowflake. Which will it be?
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United States of Jihad: Who are America's Homegrown Terrorists and How Do We Stop Them?

United States of Jihad: Who are America's Homegrown Terrorists and How Do We Stop Them?

Peter Bergen

$34.99
A riveting, panoramic look at "homegrown" Islamist terrorism from 9/11 to the present.
 
Since 9/11, more than three hundred Americans-born and raised in Minnesota, Alabama, New Jersey, and elsewhere-have been indicted or convicted of terrorism charges. Some have taken the fight abroad: an American was among those who planned the attacks in Mumbai, and more than eighty U.S. citizens have been charged with ISIS-related crimes. Others have acted on American soil, as with the attacks at Fort Hood, the Boston Marathon, and in San Bernardino. What motivates them, how are they trained, and what do we sacrifice in our efforts to track them?
 
Paced like a detective story, United States of Jihad tells the entwined stories of the key actors on the American front. Among the perpetrators are Anwar al-Awlaki, the New Mexico-born radical cleric who became the first American citizen killed by a CIA drone and who mentored the Charlie Hebdo shooters; Samir Khan, whose Inspire webzine has rallied terrorists around the world, including the Tsarnaev brothers; and Omar Hammami, an Alabama native and hip hop fan who became a fixture in al Shabaab's propaganda videos until fatally displeasing his superiors.
 
Drawing on his extensive network of intelligence contacts, from the National Counterterrorism Center and the FBI to the NYPD, Peter Bergen also offers an inside look at the controversial tactics of the agencies tracking potential terrorists-from infiltrating mosques to massive surveillance; at the bias experienced by innocent observant Muslims at the hands of law enforcement; at the critics and defenders of U.S. policies on terrorism; and at how social media has revolutionized terrorism.
 
Lucid and rigorously researched, United States of Jihad is an essential new analysis of the Americans who have embraced militant Islam both here and abroad.
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He Calls Me by Lightning: The Life of Caliph Washington and the Forgotten Saga of Jim Crow, Southern Justice, and the Death Penalty

He Calls Me by Lightning: The Life of Caliph Washington and the Forgotten Saga of Jim Crow, Southern Justice, and the Death Penalty

S. Jonathan Bass

$38.95
Caliph Washington didn't pull the trigger but, as Officer James Cowboy Clark lay dying, he had no choice but to turn on his heel and run. The year was 1957; Cowboy Clark was white, Caliph Washington was black, and this was the Jim Crow South. As He Calls Me by Lightning painstakingly chronicles, Washington, then a seventeen-year-old simply returning home after a double date, was swiftly arrested, put on trial, and sentenced to death by an all-white jury. The young man endured the horrors of a hellish prison system for thirteen years, a term that included various stints on death row fearing the lightning of the electric chair. Twentieth-century legal history is tragically littered with thousands of stories of such judicial cruelty, but S. Jonathan Bass's account is remarkable in that he has been able to meticulously re-create Washington's saga, animating a life that was not supposed to matter. Given the familiar paradigm of an African American man being falsely accused of killing a white policeman, it would be all too easy to apply a reductionist view to the story. What makes He Calls Me by Lightning so unusual are a spate of unknown variables-most prominently the fact that Governor George Wallace, nationally infamous for his active advocacy of segregation, did, in fact, save this death row inmate's life. As we discover, Wallace stayed Washington's execution not once but more than a dozen times, reflecting a philosophy about the death penalty that has not been perpetuated by his successors. Other details make Washington's story significant to legal history, not the least of which is that the defendant endured three separate trials and then was held in a county jail for five more years before being convicted of second-degree murder in 1970; this decision was overturned as well, although the charges were never dismissed. Bass's account is also particularly noteworthy for his evocation of Washington's native Bessemer, a gritty, industrial city lying only thirteen miles to the east of Birmingham, Alabama, whose singularly fascinating story is frequently overlooked by historians. By rescuing Washington's unknown life trajectory-along with the stories of his intrepid lawyers, David Hood Jr. and Orzell Billingsley, and Christine Luna, an Italian-American teacher and activist who would become Washington's bride upon his release-Bass brings to multidimensional life many different strands of the civil rights movement. Devastating and essential, He Calls Me by Lightning demands that we take into account the thousands of lives cast away by systemic racism, and powerfully demonstrates just how much we still do not know.
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USS Lawrence vs HMS Detroit: The War of 1812 on the Great Lakes

USS Lawrence vs HMS Detroit: The War of 1812 on the Great Lakes

Mark Lardas ,  Paul Wright

$24.99
The most critical naval fighting during the War of 1812 took place, not on the high seas, but on the inland lakes of North America: the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. Carrying between 12 and 22 cannon, the British and American sloops-of-war were ship-rigged, brig-rigged or schooner-rigged vessels. Lakes actions often involved two ships facing each other broadside to broadside, the best example of which was the battle of Lake Erie in 1813 where HMS Detroit led a Royal Navy squadron against the USS Lawrence-led US Navy. Featuring full-colour artwork, this lively study investigates the prolonged struggle between British and US sloops-of-war, highlighting the differences between the war on the lakes and the war on the oceans during the Age of Fighting Sail. It reveals the circumstances under which these ships were built, how they were armed, and the human story behind their construction and use in battle.
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North American X-15

North American X-15

Peter E. Davies

$24.99
The revolutionary X-15 remains the fastest manned aircraft ever to fly. Built in the two decades following World War II, it was the most successful of the high-speed X-planes. The only recently broken 'sound barrier' was smashed completely by the X-15, which could hit Mach 6.7 and soar to altitudes above 350,000ft, beyond the edge of space. Several pilots qualified as astronauts by flying above 50 miles altitude in the X-15, including Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon. The three X-15s made 199 flights, testing new technologies and techniques which greatly eased America's entry into manned space travel, and made the Apollo missions and Space Shuttle viable propositions. With historical photographs and stunning digital artwork, this is the story of arguably the greatest of the X-Planes.
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American Foreign Policy and its Thinkers

American Foreign Policy and its Thinkers

Perry Anderson

$19.99
Since the birth of the nation, impulses of empire have been close to the heart of the United States. How these urges interact with the way the country understands itself, and the nature of the divergent interests at work in the unfolding of American foreign policy, is a subject much debated and still obscure. In a fresh look at the topic, Anderson charts the intertwined historical development of America's imperial reach and its role as the general guarantor of capital. The internal tensions that have arisen are traced from the closing stages of the Second World War through the Cold War to the War on Terror. Despite the defeat and elimination of the USSR, the planetary structures for warfare and surveillance have not been retracted but extended. Anderson ends with a survey of the repertoire of US grand strategy, as its leading thinkers-Brzezinski, Mead, Kagan, Fukuyama, Mandelbaum, Ikenberry, Art and others-grapple with the tasks and predicaments of the American imperium today.
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Jefferson: Architect of American Liberty

Jefferson: Architect of American Liberty

John B. Boles

$49.99
Not since Merrill Peterson's Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation has a scholar attempted to write a comprehensive biography of the most complex Founding Father. In Jefferson, John B. Boles plumbs every facet of Thomas Jefferson's life, all while situating him amid the sweeping upheaval of his times. We meet Jefferson the politician and political thinker-as well as Jefferson the architect, scientist, bibliophile, paleontologist, musician, and gourmet. We witness him drafting of the Declaration of Independence, negotiating the Louisiana Purchase, and inventing a politics that emphasized the states over the federal government - a political philosophy that shapes our national life to this day. Boles offers new insight into Jefferson's actions and thinking on race. His Jefferson is not a hypocrite, but a tragic figure - a man who could not hold simultaneously to his views on abolition, democracy, and patriarchal responsibility. Yet despite his flaws, Jefferson's ideas would outlive him and make him into nothing less than the architect of American liberty.
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After Aquarius Dawned: How the Revolutions of the Sixties Became the Popular Culture of the Seventies

After Aquarius Dawned: How the Revolutions of the Sixties Became the Popular Culture of the Seventies

Judy Kutulas

$154.00
In this book, Judy Kutulas complicates the common view that the 1970s were a time of counterrevolution against the radical activities and attitudes of the previous decade. Instead, Kutulas argues that the experiences and attitudes that were radical in the 1960s were becoming part of mainstream culture in the 1970s, as sexual freedom, gender equality, and more complex notions of identity, work, and family were normalized through popular culture--television, movies, music, political causes, and the emergence of new communities. Seemingly mundane things like watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show, listening to Carole King songs, donning Birkenstock sandals, or reading Roots were actually critical in shaping Americans' perceptions of themselves, their families, and their relation to authority. Even as these cultural shifts eventually gave way to a backlash of political and economic conservatism, Kutulas shows that what critics perceive as the narcissism of the 1970s was actually the next logical step in a longer process of assimilating 1960s values like individuality and diversity into everyday life. Exploring such issues as feminism, sexuality, and race, Kutulas demonstrates how popular culture helped many Americans make sense of key transformations in U.S. economics, society, politics, and culture in the late twentieth century.
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After Aquarius Dawned: How the Revolutions of the Sixties Became the Popular Culture of the Seventies

After Aquarius Dawned: How the Revolutions of the Sixties Became the Popular Culture of the Seventies

Judy Kutulas

$64.99
In this book, Judy Kutulas complicates the common view that the 1970s were a time of counterrevolution against the radical activities and attitudes of the previous decade. Instead, Kutulas argues that the experiences and attitudes that were radical in the 1960s were becoming part of mainstream culture in the 1970s, as sexual freedom, gender equality, and more complex notions of identity, work, and family were normalized through popular culture--television, movies, music, political causes, and the emergence of new communities. Seemingly mundane things like watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show, listening to Carole King songs, donning Birkenstock sandals, or reading Roots were actually critical in shaping Americans' perceptions of themselves, their families, and their relation to authority. Even as these cultural shifts eventually gave way to a backlash of political and economic conservatism, Kutulas shows that what critics perceive as the narcissism of the 1970s was actually the next logical step in a longer process of assimilating 1960s values like individuality and diversity into everyday life. Exploring such issues as feminism, sexuality, and race, Kutulas demonstrates how popular culture helped many Americans make sense of key transformations in U.S. economics, society, politics, and culture in the late twentieth century.
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George Washington: A Life

George Washington: A Life

Woodrow Wilson

$27.99
A president-to-be chronicles the life and times of the historic first Chief Executive in this insightful biography. Noted educator and historian Woodrow Wilson profiles George Washington's rise to leadership, providing a fascinating portrait of colonial America along the way. Numerous atmospheric illustrations by Howard Pyle and other artists enhance the text.
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Obama: The Call of History

Obama: The Call of History

Peter Baker

$70.00
Peter Baker's authoritative history of the Obama presidency is the first complete account that will stand the test of time. Baker takes the measure of Obama's achievements and disappointments in office and brings into focus the real legacy of the man who, as he described himself, doesn't look like all the presidents on the dollar bills. With vivid colour photographs by New York Times photographers and others of the events, major and minor, public and behind-the scenes, that defined Barack Obama's eight years in office, Obama: The Call of History is a portrait in full of America's first African-American president against the background of these tumultuous times.
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Lincoln's Lieutenants: The High Command of the Army of the Potomac

Lincoln's Lieutenants: The High Command of the Army of the Potomac

Stephen W. Sears

$65.00
The high command of the Army of the Potomac was a changeable, often dysfunctional band of brothers, going through the fires of war under seven commanding generals in three years, until Grant came east in 1864. The men in charge all too frequently appeared to be fighting against the administration in Washington instead of for it, increasingly cast as political pawns facing down a vindictive congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War. President Lincoln oversaw, argued with, and finally tamed his unruly team of generals as the eastern army was stabilised by an unsung supporting cast of corps, division, and brigade generals. With characteristic style and insight, Stephen Sears brings these courageous, determined officers, who rose through the ranks and led from the front, to life.
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The Earth is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West

The Earth is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West

Peter Cozzens

$49.99
Winner of the Gilder Lehrman Prize for Military History In a sweeping narrative, Peter Cozzens tells the gripping story of the wars that destroyed native ways of life as the American nation continued its expansion onto tribal lands after the Civil War, setting off a conflict that would last nearly three decades. By using original research and first-hand sources from both sides, Cozzens illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies. Bringing together a cast of fascinating characters, including Custer, Sherman, Grant and a host of other military and political figures, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo and Red Cloud, The Earth is Weeping is the fullest account to date of how the West was won...and lost.
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Sevastopol's Wars: Crimea from Potemkin to Putin

Sevastopol's Wars: Crimea from Potemkin to Putin

Mungo Melvin

$49.99
Founded by Catherine the Great, the maritime city of Sevastopol has been fought over for centuries. Crucial battles of the Crimean War were fought on the hills surrounding the city, and the memory of this stalwart defence inspired those who fruitlessly battled the Germans during World War II. Twice the city has faced complete obliteration yet twice it has risen, phoenix-like, from the ashes. In this groundbreaking volume, award-winning author Mungo Melvin explores how Sevastopol became the crucible of conflict over three major engagements - the Crimean War, the Russian Civil War and World War II - witnessing the death and destruction of countless armies yet creating the indomitable 'spirit of Sevastopol'. By weaving together first-hand interviews, detailed operational reports and battle analysis, Melvin creates a rich tapestry of history.
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The Red Army and the Second World War

The Red Army and the Second World War

Alexander Hill

$74.95
In a definitive new account of the Soviet Union at war, Alexander Hill charts the development, successes and failures of the Red Army from the industrialisation of the Soviet Union in the late 1920s through to the end of the Great Patriotic War in May 1945. Setting military strategy and operations within a broader context that includes national mobilisation on a staggering scale, the book presents a comprehensive account of the origins and course of the war from the perspective of this key Allied power. Drawing on the latest archival research and a wealth of eyewitness testimony, Hill portrays the Red Army at war from the perspective of senior leaders and men and women at the front line to reveal how the Red Army triumphed over the forces of Nazi Germany and her allies on the Eastern Front, and why it did so at such great cost.
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The Last Days of the Spanish Republic

The Last Days of the Spanish Republic

Paul Preston

$27.99
Told for the first time in English, Paul Preston’s new book tells the story of a preventable tragedy that cost many thousands of lives and ruined tens of thousands more at the end of the Spanish Civil War.

This is the story of an avoidable humanitarian tragedy that cost many thousands of lives and ruined tens of thousands more.

It has many protagonists but centres on three individuals. One, Dr Juan Negrín, the victim of what might be termed a conspiracy of fools, tried to prevent it. Two bore responsibility for what transpired. One of those, Julián Besteiro, was guilty of culpable naïvety. The other, Segismundo Casado behaved with a remarkable combination of cynicism, arrogance and selfishness.

On 5 March 1939, the eternally malcontent Colonel Casado launched a military coup against the government of Juan Negrín. Ironically, he ensured that the end of the Spanish Civil War was almost identical to its beginning. As Mola, Franco and the other conspirators of 1936 had done, Casado led a part of the Republican Army in revolt against the Republican government. He claimed, as they had done, and equally without foundation, that Negrín’s government was the puppet of the Communist Party and that a coup was imminent to establish a Communist dictatorship.

Casado’s ambition was to go down in history as the man who ended the Spanish Civil War. Instead he ensured the Republic ended in catastrophe and shame as Negrin’s attempts to achieve an honourable and negotiated peace with guarantees for the civilian population were thwarted and Franco and his forces wreaked havoc and revenge. Madrid collapsed into civil war and two thousand people died. Refugees fled reprisals in their thousands and those who couldn’t escape met a terrible fate.

Paul Preston, the leading historian of 20th century Spain, tells this shocking story for the first time in English. It is a harrowing tale of how the flawed decisions of politicans can lead to tragedy...
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Game of Spies: The Secret Agent, the Traitor and the Nazi, Bordeaux 1942-1944

Game of Spies: The Secret Agent, the Traitor and the Nazi, Bordeaux 1942-1944

Paddy Ashdown

$19.99
A riveting three-way spy story set in occupied France. 'Game of Spies' tells the story of a lethal spy triangle between 1942 and 1944 in Bordeaux - and of France's greatest betrayal by aristocratic and right-wing Resistance leader Andre Grandclement. The story centres on three men: one British, one French and one German and the duel they fought out in an atmosphere of collaboration, betrayal and assassination, in which comrades sold fellow comrades, Allied agents and downed pilots to the Germans, as casually as they would a bottle of wine. It is a story of SOE, treachery, bed-hopping and executions in the city labelled 'la plus collaboratrice' in the whole of France.
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Dilly: The Man Who Broke Enigmas

Dilly: The Man Who Broke Enigmas

Mavis Batey

$24.99
The highly eccentric Alfred Dillwyn Knox, known simply as 'Dilly', was one of the leading figures in the British codebreaking successes of the two world wars. During the first, he was the chief codebreaker in the Admiralty, breaking the German Navy's main flag code, before going on to crack the German Enigma ciphers during the Second World War at Bletchley Park.Here, he enjoyed the triumphant culmination of his life's work: a reconstruction of the Enigma machine used by the Abwehr, the German Secret Service. This kept the British fully aware of what the German commanders knew about Allied plans, allowing MI5 and MI6 to use captured German spies to feed false information back to the Nazi spymasters.Mavis Batey was one of 'Dilly's girls', the young female codebreakers who helped him to break the various Enigma ciphers. She was called upon to advise Kate Winslet, star of the film Enigma, on what it was like to be one of the few female codebreakers at Bletchley Park. This gripping new edition of Batey's critically acclaimed book reveals the vital part Dilly played in the deception operation that ensured the success of the D-Day landings, altering the course of the Second World War.
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Silver: The Spy Who Fooled the Nazis: The Most Remarkable Agent of the Second World War

Silver: The Spy Who Fooled the Nazis: The Most Remarkable Agent of the Second World War

Mihir Bose

$55.00
Silver was the codename for the only quintuple spy of the Second World War, spying for the Italians, Germans, Japanese, Soviets and the British. The Germans awarded him the Iron Cross, Germany s highest military decoration, and paid him 2.5 million in today s money. In reality Silver deceived the Nazis on behalf of the Soviets and the British. In 1942 the Russians decided to share Silver with the British, the only time during the war that the Soviets agreed to such an arrangement. This brought him under the control of Peter Fleming who acted as his spy master. Germans also gave Silver a transmitter which broadcast misleading military information directly to Abwehr headquarters in Berlin. Silver was one of many codenames for a man whose real name was Bhagat Ram Talwar, a Hindu Pathan from the North West Frontier province of then British India. Between 1941 and 1945 Silver made twelve trips from Peshawar to Kabul to supply false information to the Germans, always making the near-200-mile journey on foot over mountain passes and hostile tribal territory.Once when an Afghan nearly rumbled him, he invited him to a curry meal in which he had mixed deadly tiger s whiskers killing the Afghan.
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Agent 110: An American Spymaster and the German Resistance in WWII

Agent 110: An American Spymaster and the German Resistance in WWII

Scott Miller

$39.99
This is the secret and suspenseful account of how OSS spymaster Allen Dulles led a network of Germans conspiring to assassinate Hitler and negotiate surrender to bring about the end of World War II before the Soviet’s advance.

Agent 110 is Allen Dulles, a newly minted spy from an eminent family. From his townhouse in Bern, and in clandestine meetings in restaurants, back roads, and lovers’ bedrooms, Dulles met with and facilitated the plots of Germans who were trying to destroy the country’s leadership. Their underground network exposed Dulles to the political maneuverings of the Soviets, who were already competing for domination of Germany, and all of Europe, in the post-war period.

Scott Miller’s fascinating Agent 110 explains how leaders of the German Underground wanted assurances from Germany’s enemies that they would treat the country humanely after the war. If President Roosevelt backed the resistance, they would overthrow Hitler and shorten the war. But Miller shows how Dulles’s negotiations fell short. Eventually he was placed in charge of the CIA in the 1950s, where he helped set the stage for US foreign policy. With his belief that the ends justified the means, Dulles had no qualms about consorting with Nazi leadership or working with resistance groups within other countries to topple governments.

Now Miller brings to life this exhilarating, and pivotal, period of world history - of desperate renegades in a dark and dangerous world where spies, idealists, and traitors match wits and blows to ensure their vision of a perfect future.
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Churchill, Roosevelt, and Company: Studies in Character and Statecraft

Churchill, Roosevelt, and Company: Studies in Character and Statecraft

Lewis E. Lehrman

$49.99
During World War II the "special relationship" between the United States and Great Britain cemented the alliance that won the war in the West. But the ultimate victory of that partnership has obscured many of the conflicts behind Franklin Roosevelt's charm and Winston Churchill's victory signs-the clashes of principles and especially personalities between and within the leadership of the two nations.

Synthesizing an impressive variety of sources from memoirs and letters to histories and biographies, Lewis E. Lehrman explains how the Anglo-American alliance worked-and occasionally did not work-by presenting portraits and case studies of the men who worked the back channels and back rooms, the generals and the admirals, the secretaries and under secretaries, ambassadors and ministers, responsible for carrying out Roosevelt's and Churchill's agendas while also pursuing their own.

Scrupulous in its research and fair in its judgments, Lehrman's book reveals the personal diplomacy, the character and statecraft, at the core of the leadership of the Anglo-American alliance.
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Flashpoint Trieste: The First Battle of the Cold War

Flashpoint Trieste: The First Battle of the Cold War

Christian Jennings

$39.99
IN THE DYING DAYS OF WORLD WAR II OLD ALLIES BECOME NEW ENEMIES Flashpoint Trieste is the story of one year in one city as the Cold War begins. The Western Allies had captured the Adriatic port city before the Russians could reach it, but having survived the war, everybody is now desperate to make it through the liberation. Life is fast and violent, as former warring parties find common cause against the Soviet Union and the borders of the new Europe are being hammered out. Against this deadly backdrop of intelligence operations, escape and revenge, the British and Americans are locked into the opening salvoes of the Cold War on the beautiful shores of the Adriatic, opposing the Russians and Yugoslavs. This is the story of the first turbulent post-war year of lethal cat-and-mouse in south-eastern Europe, told through the stories of twelve men and women from seven different countries thrown together on a strategically vital frontier between East and West.
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Bolt Action: Campaign: Sea Lion

Bolt Action: Campaign: Sea Lion

Warlord Games

$39.99
The year is 1940, and the German invasion of Britain has begun. With this new campaign book for Bolt Action, players can fight the battles of World War II's greatest 'what if' scenario. Defend the cliffs of Dover and the beaches of Kent from wave after wave of German landing craft. Parachute into the Home Counties in a surgical strike to capture Winston Churchill. Rally the Home Guard in a last, desperate attempt to keep England free of the Nazi invaders! Containing new rules, scenarios, and unit types covering all of the unique features of this alternate history campaign, it offers a chance for all Bolt Action players to truly rewrite the history of World War II.
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Ju 52/3M Bomber and Transport Units 1936-41

Ju 52/3M Bomber and Transport Units 1936-41

Robert Forsyth ,  Jim Laurier ,  Mark Postlethwaite

$43.95  $39.55
The all-metal Junkers Ju 52/3m enjoyed a solid - indeed, revered - reputation amongst its crews and the troops and paratroopers who used and depended on it. For more than ten years, it saw service as a successful military transport, with its distinctive, three-engined design and corrugated metal construction becoming instantly recognisable. It was a mainstay in the Luftwaffe's inventory, first seeing service in the 1930s in bombing and transport operations in the Spanish Civil War, and subsequently during the German invasion of Poland. It then served on every front on which the Luftwaffe was deployed until May 1945. The Junkers served as a stalwart transport, confronting both freezing temperatures and ice, and heat and dust, lifting men, animals, food and supplies vital for German military operations. This, the first of two books on the Ju 52/3m, details its service as a bomber in Spain and in South America, followed by its pivotal role in early war operations during the invasions of Poland and France, the airborne invasion of Crete and the early stages of Operation Barbarossa.
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Human Rights After Hitler: The Lost History of Prosecuting Axis War Crimes

Human Rights After Hitler: The Lost History of Prosecuting Axis War Crimes

Dan Plesch ,  Benjamin B. Ferencz

$56.99
Human Rights after Hitler reveals thousands of forgotten US and Allied war crimes prosecutions against Hitler and other Axis war criminals based on a popular movement for justice that stretched from Poland to the Pacific. These cases provide a great foundation for twenty-first-century human rights and accompany the achievements of the Nuremberg trials and postwar conventions.

They include indictments of perpetrators of the Holocaust made while the death camps were still operating, which confounds the conventional wisdom that there was no official Allied response to the Holocaust at the time. This history also brings long overdue credit to the United Nations' War Crimes Commission (UNWCC), which operated during and after World War II.

Dan Plesch describes the commission's work and Washington's bureaucratic obstruction to a 1944 proposal to prosecute crimes against humanity before an international criminal court. From the 1940s until a recent lobbying effort by Plesch and colleagues, the UNWCC's files were kept out of public view in the UN archives under pressure from the US government. 

The book answers why the commission and its files were closed and reveals that the lost precedents set by these cases have enormous practical utility for prosecuting war crimes today. They cover US and Allied prosecutions of torture, including  water treatment,  wartime sexual assault, and crimes by foot soldiers who were just following orders. 

Plesch's book will fascinate anyone with an interest in the history of the Second World War as well as provide ground-breaking revelations for historians and human rights practitioners alike.
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Lorenz: Breaking Hitler's Top Secret Code at Bletchley Park

Lorenz: Breaking Hitler's Top Secret Code at Bletchley Park

Jerry Roberts

$49.99
The breaking of the Enigma machine is one of the most heroic stories of the Second World War and highlights the crucial work of the codebreakers of Bletchley Park, which prevented Britain's certain defeat in 1941. But there was another German cipher machine, used by Hitler himself to convey messages to his top generals in the field. A machine more complex and secure than Enigma. A machine that could never be broken. For sixty years, no one knew about Lorenz or 'Tunny', or the determined group of men who finally broke the code and thus changed the course of the war. Many of them went to their deaths without anyone knowing of their achievements. Here, for the first time, senior codebreaker Captain Jerry Roberts tells the complete story of this extraordinary feat of intellect and of his struggle to get his wartime colleagues the recognition they deserve. The work carried out at Bletchley Park during the war to partially automate the process of breaking Lorenz, which had previously been done entirely by hand, was groundbreaking and is recognised as having kick-started the modern computer age.
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Seaweed: A Global History

Seaweed: A Global History

Kaori O'Connor

$24.99
Seaweed is both the world's oldest and newest superfood. As a food, seaweeds are now more associated with the East than with the West, yet they have long been eaten in many parts of the world, including Europe and the Americas. Mistakenly thought of today as a forage food for the poor, in ancient times seaweed was highly prized, a delicacy reserved for royalty in Japan, China, Korea and the Pacific Islands. Driven by the growing limitations of land resources, the search for new sustainable foods, pharmaceuticals and other products is turning to seaweeds - the world's last great renewable natural resource and a culinary treasure ready for rediscovery.
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My European Family: The First 54,000 Years

My European Family: The First 54,000 Years

Karin Bojs

$27.99
Karin Bojs grew up in a small, broken family. At her mother's funeral she felt this more keenly than ever.

So as part of the healing process, she decided to use DNA research to learn more about herself, her family and the interconnectedness of society. After all, we're all related. And in a sense, we are all family.

My European Family tells the story of Europe and its people through its genetic legacy, weaving in the latest archaeological findings. Karin goes deep in search of her genealogy; by having her DNA sequenced and tested and effectively becoming an experimental subject, she was able to trace the path of her ancestors back, through the Viking age, through the Bronze age to the Neolithic and beyond into prehistory, back even further to a time when Neanderthals ran the European show.

This book looks at genetics from a uniquely pan-European perspective, with the author meeting dozens of geneticists, historians and archaeologists in the course of her research. The genes of this seemingly ordinary modern European woman have a truly fascinating story to tell.
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The One Cent Magenta

The One Cent Magenta

James Barron

$24.99
When it was issued in 1856, it cost a penny. In 2014, this tiny square of faded red paper known as the one-cent magenta sold at Sotheby’s for nearly $US9.5 million, the highest amount ever paid for a postage stamp at auction. Through the stories of the eccentric characters who have bought, owned and sold this stamp, The One-Cent Magenta weaves a fascinating tale of obsession to own a treasure that no one else can have.

One-cent magentas were provisional stamps, printed in British Guiana when a shipment of official stamps from London failed to arrive. They were intended for periodicals, and most were thrown out. But one stamp survived. It has had only nine owners since a 12-year-old Scottish boy discovered it in 1873 (and sold it for what would be $17 today).

Later owners included a fabulously wealthy Frenchman who hid the stamp from view – even King George V of England couldn’t get a peek – a businessman who travelled with the stamp in a briefcase he handcuffed to his wrist; and John E. du Pont, heir to the chemical fortune, who died while serving a thirty-year sentence for the murder of Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz.
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