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Roller-Coaster: Europe, 1950-2017

Roller-Coaster: Europe, 1950-2017

Ian Kershaw

$59.99
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The definitive history of a divided Europe, from the aftermath of the Second World War to the present.

After the overwhelming horrors of the first half of the 20th century, described by Ian Kershaw in his previous book as having gone 'to Hell and back', the years from 1950 to 2017 brought peace and relative prosperity to most of Europe. Enormous economic improvements transformed the continent. The catastrophic era of the world wars receded into an ever more distant past, though its long shadow continued to shape mentalities.

Europe was now a divided continent, living under the nuclear threat in a period intermittently fraught with anxiety. Europeans experienced a 'roller-coaster ride', both in the sense that they were flung through a series of events which threatened disaster, but also in that they were no longer in charge of their own destinies: for much of the period the USA and USSR effectively reduced Europeans to helpless figures whose fates were dictated to them depending on the vagaries of the Cold War.

There were, by most definitions, striking successes - the Soviet bloc melted away, dictatorships vanished and Germany was successfully reunited. But accelerating globalization brought new fragilities. The impact of interlocking crises after 2008 was the clearest warning to Europeans that there was no guarantee of peace and stability.

SEE ALSO

To Hell and Back: Europe, 1914-1949 by Ian Kershaw

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Dominion: A History of England Volume V

Dominion: A History of England Volume V

Peter Ackroyd

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The penultimate volume of Peter Ackroyd's masterful History of England series, Dominion begins in 1815 as national glory following the Battle of Waterloo gives way to post-war depression, spanning the last years of the Regency to the death of Queen Victoria in January 1901.

In it, Ackroyd takes us from the accession of the profligate George IV whose government was steered by Lord Liverpool, who was firmly set against reform, to the reign of his brother, William IV, the 'Sailor King', whose reign saw the modernization of the political system and the abolition of slavery.

But it was the accession of Queen Victoria, aged only eighteen, that sparked an era of enormous innovation. Technological progress - from steam railways to the first telegram - swept the nation and the finest inventions were showcased at the first Great Exhibition in 1851. The emergence of the middle classes changed the shape of society and scientific advances changed the old pieties of the Church of England, and spread secular ideas across the nation. But though intense industrialization brought boom times for the factory owners, the working classes were still subjected to poor housing, long working hours and dire poverty.

It was a time that saw a flowering of great literature, too. As the Georgian era gave way to that of Victoria, readers could delight not only in the work of Byron, Shelley and Wordsworth but also the great nineteenth-century novelists: the Bronte sisters, George Eliot, Mrs Gaskell, Thackeray, and, of course, Dickens, whose work has become synonymous with Victorian England.

Nor was Victorian expansionism confined to Britain alone. By the end of Victoria's reign, the Queen was also an Empress and the British Empire dominated much of the globe. And, as Ackroyd shows in this richly populated, vividly told account, Britannia really did seem to rule the waves.

SEE ALSO

Volume 1  Volume 2  Volume 3  Volume 4
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Before & After Alexander

Before & After Alexander

Richard Billows

$42.99
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Before and After Alexander is an invaluable addition to our understanding of this historic figure's legacy, as Billows challenges the myth of Alexander the Great as a pioneer and visionary. He argues that the real credit lies with Philip II and the generals who came after Alexander, and reveals just how complex and multifaceted were the foundations on which our modern civilisation was built.

Alexander the Great's life, career and achievements have been written about extensively, and he is famed for his strategic vision and tactical prowess – but was he truly the great hero of history we know him as? In this book, the eminent scholar Richard A. Billows reassesses the legend by delving deeper into the lesser known periods before and after Alexander's reign. A mere two decades before Alexander's accession, Macedonia was a disorganized backwater, overshadowed by Athens, Sparta and Persia. It was Alexander's father, Philip II, who shaped it into the greatest power of its time by building a new type of army and style of warfare, uniting the country and providing his son with the groundwork for Alexander's career of conquest.

As king, Alexander led an unprecedented military campaign through Asia and Africa, defeating some of the world's most powerful armies and creating one of the largest empires in history. However, in leaving no clear successor upon his death, the empire Alexander governed so briefly threatened to descend once again into instability. It fell to his generals to rule a vast territory stretching from Greece to India, and it was they who transformed it into the great Hellenistic empire.
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The Edge of Memory: Ancient Stories, Oral Tradition and the Post-Glacial World

The Edge of Memory: Ancient Stories, Oral Tradition and the Post-Glacial World

Patrick Nunn

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In today's society it is generally the written word that holds the authority. We are more likely to trust the words found in a history textbook over the version of history retold by a friend - after all, human memory is unreliable, and how can you be sure your friend hasn't embellished the facts? But before humans were writing down their knowledge, they were telling it to each other in the form of stories.

The Edge of Memory celebrates the predecessor of written information - the spoken word, tales from our ancestors that have been passed down, transmitting knowledge from one generation to the next. Among the most extensive and best-analysed of these stories are from native Australian cultures. These stories conveyed both practical information and recorded history, describing a lost landscape, often featuring tales of flooding and submergence. These folk traditions are increasingly supported by hard science. Geologists are starting to corroborate the tales through study of climatic data, sediments and land forms; the evidence was there in the stories, but until recently, nobody was listening.

In this book, Patrick Nunn unravels the importance of these tales, exploring the science behind folk history from various places - including northwest Europe and India - and what it can tell us about environmental phenomena, from coastal drowning to volcanic eruptions. These stories of real events were passed across the generations, and over thousands of years, and they have broad implications for our understanding of how human societies have developed through the millennia, and ultimately how we respond collectively to changes in climate, our surroundings and the environment we live in.

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Stern Justice

Stern Justice

Adam Wakeling

$34.99
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While the Nuremberg trials at the end of the Second World War are infamous, as are the atrocities committed by Japan in that conflict, few now remember the trials that prosecuted Japanese personnel for those crimes. Stern Justice recovers this forgotten story in a gripping, powerfully written history of an event that saw Australia emerge as a player on the stage of international law.

‘For the first time Australia speaks, not for herself alone, but for the whole British Commonwealth.’

So wrote a journalist about Australia’s leading role in the Allied program of war crimes trials which followed the end of the Second World War in the Pacific. An Australian judge, Sir William Webb, was president of the Tokyo Trial of Japan’s wartime political and military leaders, and Australia conducted hundreds of other trials throughout the Asia-Pacific region. The most tenacious of the Allied prosecutors, Australia led the unsuccessful bid to prosecute Emperor Hirohito as a war criminal and was the last country to conduct war crimes trials against the Japanese, on Manus Island in 1951.

The aim of the trials was to prevent a repetition of the horrors of the Pacific War, in which in which millions had perished, mostly civilians, and tens of thousands of prisoners of war had died in Japanese captivity. Yet debate around the trials was fierce at the time – whether they had a legal basis, whether the Emperor should have been prosecuted, and whether their devastating bombing of Japanese cities had robbed the Allies of the moral authority to put their enemies on trial.

Seventy years on, much remains to be learnt from both the successes and failures of these trials. Were they fair? Were their goals realistic? Were they acts of justice or revenge? With international law more important today than ever, Stern Justice makes an irrefutable case for not allowing them to stay forgotten.
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Australians on the Western Front 1918 Volume II: Spearheading the Great British Offensive

Australians on the Western Front 1918 Volume II: Spearheading the Great British Offensive

David W. Cameron

$34.99
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Following on from volume 1 of Australians on the Western Front 1918- The Great German Offensive, volume 2, The Battle for the Hindenburg Line, concludes with a detailed account of the final battles of World War I and the defeat of German armed forces on the Western Front.

In compelling detail, David W. Cameron recounts the military successes and challenges of the Australian Army Corps, led by Lieutenant General John Monash, during a number of key battles, including the Battle of Hamel on 4 July; the Battle of Amiens on 8 August, and the Battle for Mont St Quentin and Peronne in September; culminating in the week-long battles for the Hindenburg Outpost Line and the Hindenburg Line itself, during which many Australian and American troops tragically lost their lives just as the war was finally drawing to a close. Ultimately, however, the breaking of the Hindenburg Line by Australian, Canadian, British and American troops delivered a crucial blow to the German army, who surrendered unconditionally to the Allies one month later.

This book once again draws on the diaries and letters of the Australian soldiers on the battlefields to piece together the story of their heroic actions against enemy forces, placing them within the broader context of the 'war to end all wars'.

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Boom and Bust: The rise and fall of the mining industry, greed and the impact on everyday Australians

Boom and Bust: The rise and fall of the mining industry, greed and the impact on everyday Australians

Royce Kurmelovs

$32.99
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This is a cautionary tale. About greed, irresponsibility and failing to learn from the past.

Australia's mining boom is still talked about with a sense of awe. This once-in-a-lifetime event capped off 25 straight years of economic growth. Thanks to mining we sidestepped the worst of the Global Financial Crisis. To the rest of the world Australia was an economic miracle. And then the boom ended.

Now Australia is grappling with what that means at a time of rising economic inequality and political upheaval. The end of the boom isn't about money - it's about people. Boom and Bust looks at what happens to those who came into vast wealth only to watch it dry up. To those who thought they had a good job for life, but didn't. The bust didn't just happen on stock-market screens - it was lived, and is still being lived right now, in dusty towns and cities all around the country.

As he did in his bestselling book The Death of Holden, Royce Kurmelovs reveals the reality behind the headlines. Boom and Bust is a dirt-under-the-nails look at the winners, the losers and the impact of the boom that wasn't meant to end. This is a book all Australians should read.
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The Lost Battalions

The Lost Battalions

Tom Gilling

$32.99
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A little known story of two Australian battalions abandoned in Java during World War II and the heroes who kept them alive in the worst of Japan's prisoner of war camps.

They were thrown into a hopeless fight against an overwhelming enemy. Later, hundreds died as prisoners of war on the Thai-Burma Railway and in the freezing coal mines of Taiwan and Japan. Through it all, wrote Weary Dunlop, they showed 'fortitude beyond anything I could have believed possible'.

Until now, the story of the 2000 diggers marooned on Java in February 1942 has been a footnote to the fall of Singapore and the bloody campaign in New Guinea. Led by an Adelaide lawyer, Brigadier Arthur Blackburn VC, and fighting with scrounged weapons, two Australian battalions - plus an assortment of cooks, laundrymen and deserters from Singapore - held up the might of the Imperial Japanese Army until ordered by their Dutch allies to surrender.

Drawing on personal diaries, official records and interviews with two of the last living survivors, this book tells the extraordinary story of the 'lads from Java', who laid down their weapons, but refused to give in.
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Where History Happened: The Hidden Past of Australia's Towns and Places

Where History Happened: The Hidden Past of Australia's Towns and Places

Peter Spearritt

$39.99
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Do you know which desert town is home to one of the oldest mosques in Australia and the site of one of the trade union movement's most significant victories? You might have visited this iconic surfer's paradise, but did you know Byron Bay was once a rough industrial town, thronging with the sounds and smells of mineral sand mining, a piggery and a thriving whaling station? Where would you go to experience the great age of steam, to see and hear functioning locomotives that tell the story of Australia's railways?

Where History Happened reveals the hidden past of some of Australia's most intriguing towns and places, from mining settlements and remote caves to monuments and historic houses in our capital cities. The stories that emerge, of remote religious communities, isolated penal colonies, places of Indigenous incarceration and environmental degradation and rejuvenation, describe a vast and complex country, with a heritage worth preserving. The book contains beautiful images from the collections of the National Library of Australia, including works by renowned photographers Frank Hurley, Wolfgang Sievers and Peter Dombrovskis, colonial watercolours and sketches, newspaper cartoons, early black-and-white photographs and bold, colourful tourism posters from the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s.

Author Peter Spearritt developed a taste for exploring Australia on long family car trips from Melbourne to Brisbane in the 1950s and has visited every one of the places in this book. An Emeritus Professor at the University of Queensland and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Spearritt takes readers on a unique tour of Australia, revealing along the way a number of historical sites that you can visit today.
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Thomas Cromwell: A Life

Thomas Cromwell: A Life

Diarmaid MacCulloch

$69.99
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Diarmaid MacCulloch's biography is the most complete life ever written of this elusive figure, making connections not previously seen and revealing the channels through which power in early Tudor England flowed.

Thomas Cromwell is one of the most famous - or notorious - figures in English history. Born in obscurity in Putney, he became a fixer for Cardinal Wolsey in the 1520s. After Wolsey's fall, Henry VIII promoted him to a series of ever greater offices, such that in the 1530s he was effectively running the country for the King. That decade was one of the most momentous in English history: it saw a religious break with the Pope, unprecedented use of parliament, the dissolution of all monasteries, and the coming of the Protestantism. Cromwell was central to all this, but establishing his role with precision has been notoriously difficult.

Diarmaid MacCulloch's biography is the most complete life ever written of this elusive figure, making connections not previously seen and revealing the channels through which power in early Tudor England flowed. It overturns many received interpretations, for example that Cromwell and Anne Boleyn were allies because of their common religious sympathies, showing how he in fact destroyed her. It introduces the many different personalities contributing to these foundational years, all worrying about the 'terrifyingly unpredictable' Henry VIII, and allows readers to feel that all this is going on around them. For a time, the self-made 'ruffian', as he described himself - ruthless, adept in the exercise of power, quietly determined in religious revolution - was master of events.
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Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906

Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906

David Cannadine

$22.99
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A superbly told history of Victoria's Britain in all its grandeur and misery, triumph and doubt.

To live in Victorian Britain was to experience an astonishing series of changes, of a kind for which there was simply no precedent in the human experience. There were revolutions in transport, communication, work; cities grew vast; scientific ideas made the intellectual landscape unrecognizable. This was an exhilarating time, but also a horrifying one.

David Cannadine has created a bold, fascinating new interpretation of Victorian Britain. This was a country which saw itself at the summit of the world. And yet it was a society also convulsed by doubt, fear and introspection. Repeatedly, politicians and writers felt themselves to be staring into the abyss and what is seen as an era of irritating self-belief was in practice obsessed by a sense of its own fragility, whether as a great power or as a moral force. Victorious Century catches the relish and humour of the age, but also the dilemmas of a kind with which we remain familiar today.
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Queen Victoria: Daughter, Wife, Mother, Widow

Queen Victoria: Daughter, Wife, Mother, Widow

Lucy Worsley

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This program includes an introduction read by the author.

The story of the queen who defied convention and defined an era. Perhaps one of the best known of the English monarchs, Queen Victoria forever shaped a chapter of English history, bequeathing her name to the Victorian age. In Queen Victoria, Lucy Worsley introduces this iconic woman in a new light. Going beyond an exploration of the Queen merely as a monarch, Worsley considers Victoria as a woman leading a truly extraordinary life in a unique time period. The book is structured around the various roles that Victoria inhabited - a daughter raised to wield power, a loving but tempestuous wife, a controlling mother, and a cunning widow - all while wearing the royal crown.

Far from a proto-feminist, Queen Victoria was socially conservative and never supported women's rights. And yet, Victoria thwarted the strict rules of womanhood that defined the era to which she gave her name. She was passionate, selfish, and moody, boldly defying the will of politicians who sought to control her and emotionally controlling her family for decades. How did the woman who defined Victorian womanhood also manage to defy its conventions?

Drawing from the vast collection of Victoria's correspondence and the rich documentation of her life, Worsley recreates twenty-four of the most important days in Victoria's life including her parents' wedding day, the day she met Albert, her own wedding day, the birth of her first child, a Windsor Christmas, the death of Prince Albert, and many more. Each day gives a glimpse into the identity of this powerful, difficult queen as a wife and widow, mother and matriarch, and above all, a woman of her time.
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The Death of Hitler: The Final Word on the Ultimate Cold Case: The Search for Hitler's Body

The Death of Hitler: The Final Word on the Ultimate Cold Case: The Search for Hitler's Body

Jean-Christophe Brisard ,  Lana Parshina ,  Shaun Whiteside

$35.00
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After two years of nonstop negotiations with the Russian authorities, Jean-Christophe Brisard and Lana Parshina were granted access to secret files detailing the Soviets' incredible hunt to recover Hitler's body: the layout of the bunker, plans for escaping, eyewitness accounts of the Fuhrer's final days, and human remains - a bit of skull with traces of the lethal bullet and a fragment of jaw bone. For the first time, the skull, teeth and other elements were analysed by a medical examiner with modern equipment. The authors use these never before seen documents to reconstruct the events in fascinating new detail.
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Viceroys: The Creation of the British

Viceroys: The Creation of the British

Christopher Lee

$32.99
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Viceroys is the story of the British aristocracy sent to govern India during the reigns of five British monarchs. It is also the story of how the modern British identity was established. British history from the Hundred Years War onwards gives an impression of how the British were seen. It is a misconception or more kindly, a British view. Until the nineteenth century the British did not have an identity readily recognized throughout the world. Even the Elizabethans were never established other than as great individuals.

From 1815, an image of Britain as the first superpower was built that would make do until even the twenty first century. Direct rule in the name of a long-lived queen and the consequential superlatives of style and theatre of conquest had the whole world believing that it knew the secret of that British identity. To be white and British even at the lowest social level was enough to command and to be white, British and aristocratic was enough to rule.

By the end of Victoria's reign a quarter of the world saluted the authority of the British identity. It took until the second half of the twentieth century for even the Americans to question that authority. The token in that identity, the plumed viceroy whose quarterings linked everyone who held that office to the aristocracy that was the guardian of that image, is not just an illusion.

Viceroys is not a chronological biography of each viceroy from Canning to Mountbatten. It is instead, the story of the viceregal caste. It is the supreme view of the British in India, describing the sort of people who went out and the sort of people they were on their return. It is the story of utter power and what men did with it.

Viceroys will come to a conclusion as to what created the international identity of the British that was cherished well into the twentieth century. It was and is an identity that has coloured in the worst pictures of the British character and ambition as seen by modern radicalized people and loyalties around the globe. Ironically, it is in part the answer to how was it that such a small offshore European island people believed themselves to have the right to sit at the highest institutional tables and judge what is right and what is unacceptable in other nations and institutions.
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The British in India: Three Centuries of Ambition and Experience

The British in India: Three Centuries of Ambition and Experience

David Gilmour

$69.99
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A panoramic social history chronicling the lives of hundreds of British people of all classes in the most important territory of the British Empire.

The British in this book lived in India from shortly after the reign of Elizabeth I until well into the reign of Elizabeth II. They were soldiers, officials, businessmen, doctors and missionaries of both sexes, planters, engineers and many others, together with children, wives and sisters. This book describes their lives, their work and their extraordinarily varied interactions with the native populations; it also records the very diverse roles they played in the three centuries of British-Indian history.

Gilmour writes of people who have never been written about before, men and women who are presented here with humanity and often with humour. The result is a magnificent tapestry of life, an exceptional work of scholarly recovery which reads like a great nineteenth-century novel. It makes a highly original and engaging contribution to a long an important period of British and Indian history.
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Japan Story: In Search of a Nation, 1850 to the Present

Japan Story: In Search of a Nation, 1850 to the Present

Christopher Harding

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Japan Story is a fascinating, surprising account of Japan's culture, from the 'opening up' of the country in the mid 19th century to the present, through the eyes of people who always had their doubts about modernity - who greeted it not with the confidence and grasping ambition of Japan's familiar modernizers and nationalists, but with resistance, conflict, distress.

We encounter writers of dramas, ghost stories and crime novels where modernity itself is the tragedy, the ghoul and the bad guy; surrealist and avant-garde artists sketching their escape; rebel kamikaze pilots and the put-upon urban poor; hypnotists and gangsters; men in desperate search of the eternal feminine and feminists in search of something more than state-sanctioned subservience; Buddhists without morals; Marxist terror groups; couches full to bursting with the psychological fall-out of breakneck modernization.

These people all sprang from the soil of modern Japan, but their personalities and projects failed to fit. They were 'dark blossoms' - both East-West hybrids and home-grown varieties that wreathed, probed and sometimes penetrated the new masonry and mortar of mainstream Japan.
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1918: How the First World War Was Won

1918: How the First World War Was Won

Julian Gen Thompson

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The war in 1918 changed character radically, and nowhere more so than on the Western Front. Over three years of stalemate, what had effectively become siege warfare conducted along a line of trenches from Switzerland to the sea was `unlocked' by the German March 1918 offensive. Suddenly it was a war of movement again for the first time since November 1914. After some desperate fighting the Allies stemmed the tide of the German advance, and began the counter-offensive.

1918: How the First World War Was Won gives the detailed account of the final year of the First World War. Every battle is examined and retold from a new, refreshing perspective - it wasn't just the British forces on the final push - they were accompanied by new American troops, Canadian reinforcements, and masterminded by the tactical command of French General Ferdinand Foch. This new, incredibly illustrated book tells the story of those final violent pushes to the end of the war in 1918, and is a must for any interested in the subject.
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Mutiny On The Western Front: Shamed Anzacs

Mutiny On The Western Front: Shamed Anzacs

Greg Raffin

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On 21 September 1918, with retreating German forces on their last legs, the 1st Battalion of the AIF was ordered to return to the front just as they were being relieved and preparing for a well-earnt rest. It wasn't just the Germans who were on their last legs; the Australians were depleted and exhausted. In what was the largest such instance of mass 'combat refusal' in the AIF's history, the men of one company in the 1st Battalion defied the order. The 'mutiny' spread to other companies, and when the battalion did eventually comply with the order, over 100 men were absent.

The circumstances surrounding this mutiny have long been a matter of embarrassment for the AIF, and of fascination for military historians. While historians have approached the issue in purely military terms - the men as soldiers, over-extended service, rates of wounding, promotions, and so on - this book approaches these 100 plus men as human beings. Mutiny on the Western Front traces how these events played out in the context of the exhausting demands placed upon a unit that had seen practically continuous front-line action for weeks, if not months, in the war's final, decisive stages.

Author Greg Raffin considers what happens to men's hearts and minds in the course of a prolonged conflict like the Great War. This story, which will surprise readers - is not just about a group of exhausted and war weary Australian soldiers in 1918, it is a story about humanity in war: about what men do in war, and what war does to men.
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Scots and Catalans: Union and Disunion

Scots and Catalans: Union and Disunion

John H. Elliott

$47.99
A landmark account that reveals the long history behind the current Catalan and Scottish independence movements

A distinguished historian of Spain and Europe provides an enlightening account of the development of nationalist and separatist movements in contemporary Catalonia and Scotland. This first sustained comparative study uncovers the similarities and the contrasts between the Scottish and Catalan experiences across a five-hundred-year period, beginning with the royal marriages that brought about union with their more powerful neighbors, England and Castile respectively, and following the story through the centuries from the end of the Middle Ages until today’s dramatic events.
 
J. H. Elliott examines the political, economic, social, cultural, and emotional factors that divide Scots and Catalans from the larger nations to which their fortunes were joined. He offers new insights into the highly topical subject of the character and development of European nationalism, the nature of separatism, and the sense of grievance underlying the secessionist aspirations that led to the Scottish referendum of 2014, the illegal Catalan referendum of October 2017, and the resulting proclamation of an independent Catalan republic.
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The Music Maker: One POW Provided Hope for Thousands

The Music Maker: One POW Provided Hope for Thousands

Jaci Byrne

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On May 8 1945, forty-six-year-old Drum Major Jackson staggered towards his American liberators. Emaciated, dressed in rags, his decayed boots held together with string, he'd been force-marched for twenty days over the Austrian Alps after five heinous years as a POW in Nazi labour camps. He collapsed into his liberators' arms, clinging to his only meaningful possession - his war diary.

Having already experienced the horrific nature of battle in the First World War, Jackson had now survived another War-unlike hundreds of his mates, who'd succumbed to disease, insanity, or had been killed in action. Men far younger than he.

But he could never have imagined what awaited him on the home front.

A captivating testament to human endurance, Jackson's diary and photos, one of the last such memoirs to be published, is the inspiration for The Music Maker. An unforgettable and gripping true story about the life and times.
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House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and the Russian Mafia

House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and the Russian Mafia

Craig Unger

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The explosive, news-breaking story of how Putin's Russia came to control the White House.

Much has been written about the ties between President Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. Most reports focus on Russia's interference in the presidential election, but the true extent of Trump's collusion with the Russians is only just beginning to be understood.

As the world wakes up to one of the biggest political scandals of the modern era, Craig Unger is uniquely placed to expose the truth behind Trump's long-running relations with the Russian state.

In his sweeping investigation, Unger reveals how Trump became a target of Vladimir Putin's decades-long mission to undermine Western democracy and the geopolitical hegemony of the United States, a mission for which Putin and his hand-selected group of oligarchs and mafia kingpins had ensnared Trump long before he ran for office.

Drawing on original research, exclusive sources, anonymous tips, and leaked and never-before-seen documents, Unger is the first reporter to unravel Trump's long, tangled history with Vladimir Putin and the Russian mafia, and fully grasp the significance of Russia's ambitions to destabilise the West.

House of Trump, House of Putin is both a page-turning thriller and an epic tale of intrigue, drama, and shady dealings, reported from the frontline of a new Cold War.
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Yes We (Still) Can: Politics in the age of Obama, Twitter and Trump

Yes We (Still) Can: Politics in the age of Obama, Twitter and Trump

Dan Pfeiffer

$32.99
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The Decade of Obama (2007-2017) was one of massive change that rewrote the rules of politics in ways we are only now beginning to understand (which is why we all got 2016 wrong). Yes We (Still) Can looks at how Obama navigated the forces that allowed Trump to win the White House to become one of the most consequential presidents in American history, and how those on the left can come out on top, both in the US and globally.

Pfeiffer, one of Barack Obama's longest serving advisors, tells never-before-told stories from Obama's presidential campaigns to his time in the White House, providing readers with an in-depth, behind the-scenes look at life on the front lines of politics. But this is more than a political memoir - it's also a sorely needed blueprint for progressives in the Trump era. As many look for a way through the general apathy and populism of the post-Trump/Brexit world, Yes We (Still) Can is an essential insider's take on the crazy politics of our time.
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The Assault On Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies

The Assault On Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies

Michael V. Hayden

$44.99
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A blistering critique of the forces threatening the American intelligence community, beginning with the President of the United States himself, in a time when that community's work has never been harder or more important

In the face of a President who lobs accusations without facts, evidence, or logic, truth tellers are under attack. Meanwhile, the world order is teetering on the brink. North Korea is on the verge of having a nuclear weapon that could reach all of the United States, Russians have mastered a new form of information warfare that undercuts democracy, and the role of China in the global community remains unclear. There will always be value to experience and expertise, devotion to facts, humility in the face of complexity, and a respect for ideas, but in this moment they seem more important, and more endangered, than they've ever been. American Intelligence - the ultimate truth teller - has a responsibility in a post-truth world beyond merely warning of external dangers, and in The Assault on Intelligence, General Michael Hayden takes up that urgent work with profound passion, insight and authority.

It is a sobering vision. The American intelligence community is more at risk than is commonly understood, for every good reason. Civil war or societal collapse is not necessarily imminent or inevitable, but our democracy's core structures, processes, and attitudes are under great stress. Many of the premises on which we have based our understanding of governance are now challenged, eroded, or simply gone. And we have a President in office who responds to overwhelming evidence from the intelligence community that the Russians are, by all acceptable standards of cyber conflict, in a state of outright war against us, not by leading a strong response, but by shooting the messenger.

There are fundamental changes afoot in the world and in this country. The Assault on Intelligence shows us what they are, reveals how crippled we've become in our capacity to address them, and points toward a series of effective responses. Because when we lose our intelligence, literally and figuratively, democracy dies.
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Pacific Exploration: Voyages of Discovery from Captain Cook's Endeavour to the Beagle

Pacific Exploration: Voyages of Discovery from Captain Cook's Endeavour to the Beagle

Nigel Rigby ,  Pieter van der Merwe ,  Glyn Williams

$35.00
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Captain Cook is generally acknowledged as the first great European scientific explorer. His voyage of exploration to the Pacific in HM bark Endeavour, commencing in 1768, lasted almost three years, recorded thousands of miles of uncharted lands and seas - including New Zealand, the east coast of Australia and many Pacific islands - and tested all Cook's skills as a navigator, seaman and leader. His voyages were among the first to take civilian scientists, notably Sir Joseph Banks, and they revealed to European eyes the mysterious and exotic lands, peoples, flora and fauna of the Pacific, never before seen.

But while Cook understandably dominates the story of 18th-century Pacific exploration, the achievements of those who followed him on many voyages of science and exploration into the Pacific have been neglected and deprived of the greater attention they deserve. Correcting this imbalance, Pacific Exploration explores the European voyages that continued Cook's work not only of charting but also starting to exploit and control the Pacific. These voyages, by William Bligh, George Vancouver, Matthew Flinders, Malaspina, Laperouse and Arthur Phillip, span a period that saw Britain becoming the world's leading maritime power, a situation well in place by the time that Charles Darwin's voyage in Fitzroy's Beagle laid the basis of even greater understanding of the development of life on earth.

Recounting and illustrating these achievements and legacies using fascinating text and beautiful illustrations and artworks from the period, this book explores topics of scientific discovery, engagement with indigenous peoples, the use of shipboard artists and scientists, the growing professionalism of the hydrographic service, the vessels used and the colonial, commercial and imperial contexts of the voyages.
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Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy

Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy

Serhii Plokhy

$35.00
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On 26 April 1986 at 1.23am a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Soviet Ukraine exploded. While the authorities scrambled to understand what was occurring, workers, engineers, firefighters and those living in the area were abandoned to their fate. The blast put the world on the brink of nuclear annihilation, contaminating over half of Europe with radioactive fallout.

In Chernobyl, award-winning historian Serhii Plokhy draws on recently opened archives to recreate these events in all their drama, telling the stories of the scientists, workers, soldiers, and policemen who found themselves caught in a nuclear nightmare. While the immediate cause of the accident was a turbine test gone wrong, he shows how its deeper roots lay in the nature of the Soviet political system and the ingrained flaws of its nuclear industry. A little more than five years later, the Soviet Union would fall apart, destroyed from within by its unsustainable ideology and the dysfunctional systems laid bare in the wake of the disaster.

A moment by moment account of the heroes, perpetrators and victims of a tragedy, Chernobyl is the first full account of a gripping, unforgettable Cold War story.
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The Unwomanly Face of War

The Unwomanly Face of War

Svetlana Alexievich ,  Richard Pevear ,  Larissa Volokhonsky

$22.99
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The unforgettable oral history of Soviet women's experiences in the Second World War from the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature.

'Why, having stood up for and held their own place in a once absolutely male world, have women not stood up for their history? A whole world is hidden from us. Their war remains unknown... I want to write the history of that war. A women's history.'

In the late 1970s, Svetlana Alexievich set out to write her first book, The Unwomanly Face of War, when she realized that she grew up surrounded by women who had fought in the Second World War but whose stories were absent from official narratives. Travelling thousands of miles, she spent years interviewing hundreds of Soviet women - captains, tank drivers, snipers, pilots, nurses and doctors - who had experienced the war on the front lines, on the home front and in occupied territories.

With the dawn of Perestroika, a heavily censored edition came out in 1985 and it became a huge bestseller in the Soviet Union - the first in five books that have established her as the conscience of the twentieth century.
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Milk of Paradise: A History of Opium

Milk of Paradise: A History of Opium

Lucy Inglis

$32.99
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'The only thing that is good is poppies. They are gold.' Poppy tears, opium, heroin, fentanyl: humankind has been in thrall to the 'Milk of Paradise' for millennia. The latex of papaver somniferum is a bringer of sleep, of pleasurable lethargy, of relief from pain - and hugely addictive. A commodity without rival, it is renewable, easy to extract, transport and refine, and subject to an insatiable global demand.

No other substance in the world is as simple to produce or as profitable. It is the basis of a gargantuan industry built upon a shady underworld, but ultimately it is a farm-gate material that lives many lives before it reaches the branded blister packet, the intravenous drip or the scorched and filthy spoon. Many of us will end our lives dependent on it.

In Milk of Paradise, acclaimed cultural historian Lucy Inglis takes readers on an epic journey from ancient Mesopotamia to modern America and Afghanistan, from Sanskrit to pop, from poppy tears to smack, from morphine to today's synthetic opiates. It is a tale of addiction, trade, crime, sex, war, literature, medicine and, above all, money. And, as this ambitious, wide-ranging and compelling account vividly shows, the history of opium is our history and it speaks to us of who we are.
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Sparta: Fall of a Warrior Nation

Sparta: Fall of a Warrior Nation

Philip Matyszak

$52.99
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Universally admired in 479 BC, the Spartans were masters of the Greek world by 402 BC, only for their state to collapse in the next generation. What went wrong? Was the fall of Sparta inevitable? Philip Matyszak examines the political blunders and failures of leadership which combined with unresolved social issues to bring down the nation - even as its warriors remained invincible on the battlefield.

The Spartans believed their constitution and society above the changes sweeping their world, and in resisting change, they were eventually overwhelmed by it. Yet this is also a story of defiance, for the Spartans refused to accept their humiliation and – although never more than a tiny and underpopulated city-state – for many years their city exercised influence far beyond its size and population. This is a chronicle of political failure, but also a lesson in how to go down fighting. Even with the Roman legions set to overwhelm their city, the Spartans never gave up.

Sparta: Fall of a Warrior Nation tells a seldom-told tale, yet one rich in heroes and villains, epic battles and political skulduggery.

The book features 16 illustrations.
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The Sarpedon Krater

The Sarpedon Krater

Nigel Spivey

$35.00
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The story of an object once described as 'the finest Greek vase there is', of the culture that produced it, and of the remarkably enduring influence of the scenes depicted on it.

Once the pride of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Sarpedon krater is a wine-mixing bowl crafted by two Athenians, Euxitheos (who shaped it) and Euphronios (who decorated it), in the late 6thc BC. The moving image Euphronios created for the krater, depicting the stricken Trojan hero Sarpedon being lifted from the battlefield by 'Sleep' and 'Death', was to have an influence that endured well beyond Antiquity.

Nigel Spivey not only explores the particular culture that produced the vase, but also reveals how its central motif was elaborated throughout classical antiquity and then reworked as a Christian tableau.

The Sarpedon Krater is both the extraordinary story of a small and occasionally scandalous object, once consigned to the obscurity of an Etruscan tomb, and a fascinating case study of the deep classical roots of the ideas and iconography of Western art.
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Asian Waters

Asian Waters

Humphrey Hawksley

$29.99
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Few territories are as hotly contested as the western Pacific Ocean. Across the 1.5 million square mile expanse of the East and South China Sea, six countries lay overlapping claims that date back centuries. China, Vietnam, Korea and Indonesia assert their right to trade routes, deploying military garrisons to defend disputed territories while Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines resist their expansion. But no single government can face a superpower such as China alone, and as the country extends its reach, less powerful states look to the US for diplomatic mediation creating an American security umbrella that stretches across the Asia-Pacific nicknamed the “American Lake”.

These conditions produce an unstable cocktail of competing interests and international tensions poised for conflict. BBC foreign correspondent Humphrey Hawksley has been following this increasingly precarious situation in East Asia for decades. Reporting on years of political developments, he has witnessed China's rise to become one of the world's most powerful trade entities, elbowing smaller markets out in the process.

In Asian Waters, Hawksley draws on his experience as a veteran journalist to portray the region in all its complexity and delivers a compelling account of where it is heading. Will China continue to rise to power peacefully or will its ambition prompt a new world war? Will Japan, the Philippines, South Korea, and Taiwan create a multi-lateral alliance similar to NATO to pre-empt further encroachment? Asian Waters delves into these topics and more as Hawksley presents the most comprehensive analysis of the region to date.
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The History of Central Asia: The Age of Decline and Revival

The History of Central Asia: The Age of Decline and Revival

Christoph Baumer

$71.95
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For more than a hundred years, Central Asia was the heartland of the mightiest military power on the planet. But after the fragmentation of the all-conquering Mongol polity, the region began a steep decline which rendered this former domain of horse lords peripheral to world affairs. The process of deterioration reached its nadir in the second half of the nineteenth century, when the former territories and sweeping steppes of the great khans were overrun by Tsarist Russia.

In the concluding volume of his acclaimed Central Asia quartet, Christoph Baumer shows how China in the east, and Russia in the northwest, succeeded in throwing off the Mongol yoke to become the masters of their own previous rulers. He suggests that, as traditional transcontinental trade routes declined in importance, it was the 'Great Game' - or cold war between Imperial Russia and Great Britain - which finally brought Central Asia back into play as a region of strategic importance.

This epic history concludes with an assessment of the transition to modern independence of the Central Asian states and their struggle to contain radical Islamism.
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City of Light

City of Light

Rupert Christiansen

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A sparkling, authoritative account of the reinvention of Paris in the mid-nineteenth century as the most beautiful, exciting city in the world - a position it has never relinquished.

In 1853 the French emperor Louis Napoleon inaugurated a vast and ambitious programme of public works, directed by Georges-Eugene Haussmann, the prefect of the Seine. Haussmann's renovation of Paris would transform the old medieval city of squalid slums and disease-ridden alleyways into a 'City of Light' - characterised by wide boulevards, apartment blocks, parks, squares and public monuments, new railway stations and department stores and a new system of public sanitation.

City of Light charts a fifteen-year project of urban renewal which - despite the interruptions of war, revolution, corruption and bankruptcy - would set a template for nineteenth and early twentieth-century urban planning and create the enduring and globally familiar layout of modern Paris.
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The Last Palace: Europe's Extraordinary Century Through Five Lives and One House in Prague

The Last Palace: Europe's Extraordinary Century Through Five Lives and One House in Prague

Norman Eisen

$32.99
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For any reader of Edmund de Waal's THE HARE WITH THE AMBER EYES or Erik Larson's IN THE GARDENS OF BEASTS, Norman L Eisen's THE LAST PALACE tells the story of the tumultuous past 100 years in Europe as seen from the most beautiful house in Prague, the Petschek Villa.

The Petschek Villa was Norman L Eisen's home during his tenure as US ambassador. In his remarkable book, he details the colourful lives of five of the palace's residents:

    * The optimistic Jewish financial baron who built the Petschek Villa after World War I as a statement of his faith in Europe, and who died of a broken heart after Europe brutally rejected him, his house, and his hopes.
    * The cultured, complex German general who occupied the palace during World War II, ultimately saving the house and Prague itself from destruction.
    * The American ambassador and Holocaust hero who became obsessed with the property after the war, acquiring it for the US, though neglecting to fight the Communist takeover of Czechoslovakia in the process.
    * His successor 40 years later, an iconic former child star who used her showbiz wiles, with the house as her stage, to help the Velvet Revolution succeed in restoring Czechoslovak democracy.
    * And the author, Norman L Eisen, the son of a Czech Auschwitz survivor, who moved into the palace once seized by the Nazis and found himself battling the lingering ghosts of European intolerance.

The Last Palace weaves a tapestry that is as vast and as intricate as any that hang in the palace itself. It is also an exploration of the wider themes in international history that have triggered three global wars (two hot and one cold), and threatens the peace of our world today.
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Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Lynn Vincent

$32.99
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The sinking of the USS Indianapolis is still the biggest single loss of life at sea to be suffered by the United States navy.

From a crew of 1,196 men, only 317 survived.

Torpedoed by the Japanese, dying of thirst and eaten by sharks.

For 70 years, the story of the USS Indianapolis has been told as a sinking story, or a shark story, or a story of military justice gone awry. But in Indianapolis, the true story of this mighty vessel is revealed.

As the USS Arizona embodies the beginning of the Pacific war, the USS Indianapolis embodies its fiery end. From its bridge, Admiral Raymond Spruance devised and executed the island-hopping campaign that decimated Japan's Navy and Army. Its crew led the fleet from Pearl Harbour to the islands of Japan, notching an unbroken string of victories in an exotic and uncharted theatre of war.

When the time came for President Harry S. Truman to deal Japan the decisive blow, Indianapolis answered the call. And super-spy Major Robert S. Furman climbed aboard, secreting the components of the world's first atomic bomb.

Four days after delivering her ominous cargo to the island of Tinian, the Indianapolis was sunk by a Japanese submarine, with nearly 900 men lost. The captain, Charles B. McVay III, was wrongly court-martialled for negligence over the sinking. Decades after these events, the survivors of the Indianapolis, as well as the Japanese submarine commander who sank it, joined together to finally exonerate McVay.

The voices of the Greatest Generation come alive in Indianapolis. Through first-person accounts we hear horrific stories of fear, pain, and anger but also of resilience, hope, and courage. Stories of the friendships the sailors forged with each other on board and the sacrifices they made for each other in their darkest hours are inspirational. Ultimately, Indianapolis is about the sacrifice these men made for our country at a time of unparalleled risk and of their lifelong search for justice for the captain of their ship.
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The Secret Lives of Colour

The Secret Lives of Colour

Kassia St Clair

$22.99
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'A mind-expanding tour of the world without leaving your paintbox. Every colour has a story, and here are some of the most alluring, alarming, and thought-provoking. Very hard painting the hallway magnolia after this inspiring primer.' Simon Garfield

The Secret Lives of Colour tells the unusual stories of the 75 most fascinating shades, dyes and hues. From blonde to ginger, the brown that changed the way battles were fought to the white that protected against the plague, Picasso's blue period to the charcoal on the cave walls at Lascaux, acid yellow to kelly green, and from scarlet women to imperial purple, these surprising stories run like a bright thread throughout history. In this book Kassia St Clair has turned her lifelong obsession with colours and where they come from (whether Van Gogh's chrome yellow sunflowers or punk's fluorescent pink) into a unique study of human civilisation.

Across fashion and politics, art and war, The Secret Lives of Colour tell the vivid story of our culture.
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Three Stones Make a Wall: The Story of Archaeology

Three Stones Make a Wall: The Story of Archaeology

Eric H. Cline ,  Glynnis Fawkes

$35.95
In 1922, Howard Carter peered into Tutankhamun's tomb for the first time, the only light coming from the candle in his outstretched hand. Urged to tell what he was seeing through the small opening he had cut in the door to the tomb, the Egyptologist famously replied, I see wonderful things. Carter's fabulous discovery is just one of the many spellbinding stories told in Three Stones Make a Wall. Written by Eric Cline, an archaeologist with more than thirty seasons of excavation experience, this book traces the history of archaeology from an amateur pursuit to the cutting-edge science it is today by taking the reader on a tour of major archaeological sites and discoveries. Along the way, it addresses the questions archaeologists are asked most often: How do you know where to dig? How are excavations actually done? How do you know how old something is? Who gets to keep what is found? Taking readers from the pioneering digs of the eighteenth century to today's exciting new discoveries, Three Stones Make a Wall is a lively and essential introduction to the story of archaeology.
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The Crusader Armies: 1099-1187

The Crusader Armies: 1099-1187

Steve Tibble

$59.99
A major new history of the Crusades that illuminates the strength and sophistication of the Western and Muslim armies During the Crusades, the Western and Muslim armies developed various highly sophisticated strategies of both attack and defense, which evolved during the course of the battles. In this ambitious new work, Steve Tibble draws on a wide range of Muslim texts and archaeological evidence as well as more commonly cited Western sources to analyze the respective armies' strategy, adaptation, evolution, and cultural diversity and show just how sophisticated the Crusader armies were even by today's standards.

In the first comprehensive account of the subject in sixty years, Tibble takes a fresh approach to Templars, Hospitallers, and other key Orders and makes the controversial proposition that the Crusades were driven as much by sedentary versus nomadic tribal concerns as by religious conflict. This fluently written, broad-ranging narrative provides a crucial missing piece in the study of the West's attempts to colonize the Middle East during the Middle Ages.
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Viking Britain: A History

Viking Britain: A History

Thomas Williams

$24.99
A new narrative history of the Viking Age, interwoven with exploration of the physical remains and landscapes that the Vikings fashioned and walked: their rune-stones and ship burials, settlements and battlefields.

To many, the word ‘Viking' brings to mind red scenes of rape and pillage, of marauders from beyond the sea rampaging around the British coastline in the last gloomy centuries before the Norman Conquest. It is true that Britain in the Viking Age was a turbulent, violent place. The kings and warlords who have impressed their memories on the period revel in names that fire the blood and stir the imagination: Svein Forkbeard and Edmund Ironside, Ivar the Boneless and Alfred the Great, Erik Bloodaxe and Edgar the Pacifier amongst many others. Evidence for their brutality, their dominance, their avarice and their pride is still unearthed from British soil with stunning regularity.

But this is not the whole story.

In Viking Britain, Thomas Williams has drawn on his experience as project curator of the British Museum exhibition of Vikings: Life and Legend to show how the people we call Vikings came not just to raid and plunder, but to settle, to colonize and to rule. The impact on these islands was profound and enduring, shaping British social, cultural and political development for hundreds of years. Indeed, in language, literature, place-names and folklore, the presence of Scandinavian settlers can still be felt, and their memory – filtered and refashioned through the writings of people like J.R.R. Tolkien, William Morris and G.K.Chesterton – has transformed the western imagination.

This remarkable book makes use of new academic research and first-hand experience, drawing deeply from the relics and landscapes that the Vikings and their contemporaries fashioned and walked: their runestones and ship burials, settlements and battlefields, poems and chronicles. The book offers a vital evocation of a forgotten world, its echoes in later history and its implications for the present.
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The Black Prince

The Black Prince

Michael Jones

$22.99
A major new biography of the Black Prince: hero of the battles of Crécy and Poitiers and England's greatest medieval warrior.

 In 1346, at the age of sixteen, he won his spurs at Crecy; nine years later he conducted a brutal raid across Languedoc; in 1356 he captured the king of France at Poitiers; as lord of Aquitaine he ruled a vast swathe of southwestern France. He was Edward of Woodstock, eldest son of Edward III, but better known to posterity as 'the Black Prince'. Michael Jones tells the remarkable story of a great warrior-prince – and paints an unforgettable portrait of warfare and chivalry in the late Middle Ages.
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Knight: The Medieval Warrior's (Unofficial) Manual

Knight: The Medieval Warrior's (Unofficial) Manual

Michael Prestwich

$19.99
It is the year 1415, the epic battle of Agincourt has just been fought, and never has it been a more glorious time to be a knight. But as any warrior will tell you, the path to chivalry is not an easy ride. This entertaining manual will tell you all you need to know about the ups and downs of knightly life in the Middle Ages, from how to look your best on the battlefield to the going rates for ransoming a duke, as well as the best places to go on crusade and how to deal with the amorous attentions of courtly ladies. Expertly researched and written by a leading medieval historian, Knight is packed with fascinating detail, amusing anecdotes and quotes from those who were there at the time, truly bringing the medieval world to life.
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Castles: Fortresses of Power

Castles: Fortresses of Power

John Sadler ,  Rosie Serdiville

$19.99
Fortified structures have been in existence for thousands of years. In ancient and medieval times castles were the ultimate symbol of power, dominating their surroundings, and marking the landscape with their imposing size and impregnable designs. After the Norman conquest of England, castles exploded in popularity amongst the nobility, with William the Conqueror building an impressive thirty-six castles between 1066-1087, including Windsor Castle is one example of such a castle which survives today, a monument of the remarkable architecture designed and developed in medieval England.

This concise and entertaining short history explores the life of the castle, one that often involved warfare and sieges. The castle was a first and foremost a fortress, the focus of numerous clashes which took place in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Castles became targets of sieges, such as that organised by Prince Louis of France against Dover castle in 1216, and were forced to adopt greater defensive measures.

Also explored is how they evolved from motte-and-bailey to stone keep castles, in the face of newly-developed siege machines and trebuchets. The trebuchet named Warwolf, which Edward I had assembled for his siege of Scotland's Stirling Castle, reportedly took three months to construct and was almost four hundred feet tall on completion. With features such as `murder-holes' for throwing boiling oil at the attackers, the defenders in the castle fought back in earnest. Alongside such violence, the castle functioned as a residence for the nobles and their servants, often totalling several hundred in number. It was the location for extravagant banquets held in the great hall by the lord and lady, and the place where the lord carried out his administrative duties such as overseeing laws and collecting taxes.
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Medieval Armoured Combat: The 1450 Fencing Manuscript from New Haven

Medieval Armoured Combat: The 1450 Fencing Manuscript from New Haven

Dierk Hagedorn ,  Bartlomiej Walczak

$52.99
The Gladiatoria group of German fencing manuscripts are several editions of a treatise on armoured foot combat, specifically aimed at duel fighting.

Gloriously-illustrated, and replete with substantial commentary, these works are some of the greatest achievements in the corpus of late medieval fight books. These works have both tremendous artistic merit and incalculable historical value.

In this remarkable full colour volume, authors Dierk Hagedorn and Bart?omiej Walczak elegantly present their work on the copy of this treatise now in the Yale Center for British Art, including a reproduction of the manuscript, a full transcription, and translations into English.

The work includes a foreword by Sydney Anglo which explains how the work shows a highly sophisticated pedagogical system of movement and applauds the editors for presenting the material in a clear and practical way.

Additional essays discuss other aspects of the manuscript - including a tale of Dierk Hagedorn's adventures tracking down the manuscript.
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The Middle East: The Cradle of Civilization

The Middle East: The Cradle of Civilization

Stephen Bourke ,  Maree Browne

$39.99
The Middle East: The Cradle of Civilization synthesizes the latest research and information from a range of disciplines to tell the compelling story, from the Neolithic period through to the Arab conquest, of how a group of linguistically disparate, nomadic tribes responded to specific social, economic and environmental factors to form the world's first complex societies.

This is an authoritative, detailed and accessible story, divided into six easily navigable parts arranged chronologically, and then into chapters exploring the history, religion, political and social organization, art, science and architecture of the peoples of the region. The text is illustrated with more than 500 superb full colour images - artifacts, artworks, statues, reliefs, buildings and landscapes - as well as six detailed maps, which bring the region's dramatic past vividly to life.
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Legionary: The Roman Soldier's (Unofficial) Manual

Legionary: The Roman Soldier's (Unofficial) Manual

Philip Matyszak

$19.99
Your Emperor needs you! The year is ad 100 and Rome stands supreme and unconquerable, from the desert sands of Mesopotamia to the misty highlands of Caledonia. But the might of Rome rests entirely on the shoulders of the legionaries, who stand strong against the barbarian hordes, pushing back the frontiers of the empire. This book - a kind of `unofficial guide' for the new recruit, and part of Thames & Hudson's highly successful `Unofficial Manual' series - tells you how to get in and get on in the legions, the best places to serve, life in camp, on campaign and in battle, and such things as how to stop your armour going rusty and how to storm a city. It will have immense appeal to all those who enjoy ancient history, but who want to be entertained at the same time.
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Rome at War

Rome at War

$19.99
The Roman Empire was the greatest the world has ever seen, and its legendary military might was the foundation of this success. This compact volume tells the fascinating story of the major conflicts that shaped the empire, from Julius Caesar's bloody Gallic Wars and the Civil War against Pompey that left the victorious Caesar Dictator of Rome, through the wars of expansion to its decline and fragmentation. Beautiful full colour artwork of the soldiers and battles bring the Roman world to life, along with images and colour maps.
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Roman Legionary vs Carthaginian Warrior: Second Punic War 217-206 BC

Roman Legionary vs Carthaginian Warrior: Second Punic War 217-206 BC

David Campbell ,  Adam Hook

$27.99
The peace that followed the First Punic War was shallow and fractious, with the resumption of hostilities in 218 BC sparked by Carthaginian expansion in Iberia seeing Rome suffer some of the worst defeats in her entire history.

The Carthaginian army was a composite affair primarily made up of a number of levies from Africa and around the Mediterranean augmented by mercenaries and allies, and these troops crushed the Roman heavy infantry maniples in a series of battles across Southern Europe. Improvements made to their military, however, would see Roman revenge visited on Hannibal in full measure by Scipio, who would beat him at his own game and bring Roman legions to the gates of Carthage itself.

In this study, the epic battles at Lake Trasimene (217 BC), Cannae (216 BC), and Ilipa (206 BC) are explored in detail, supported by carefully chosen illustrations and specially commissioned full-colour artwork and mapping.
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The Archaeology of Sanitation in Roman Italy: Toilets, Sewers, and Water Systems

The Archaeology of Sanitation in Roman Italy: Toilets, Sewers, and Water Systems

Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow

$69.00
The Romans developed sophisticated methods for managing hygiene, including aqueducts for moving water from one place to another, sewers for removing used water from baths and runoff from walkways and roads, and public and private latrines. Through the archeological record, graffiti, sanitation-related paintings, and literature, Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow explores this little-known world of bathrooms and sewers, offering unique insights into Roman sanitation, engineering, urban planning and development, hygiene, and public health. Focusing on the cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, and Rome, Koloski-Ostrow's work challenges common perceptions of Romans' social customs, beliefs about health, tolerance for filth in their cities, and attitudes toward privacy. In charting the complex history of sanitary customs from the late republic to the early empire, Koloski-Ostrow reveals the origins of waste removal technologies and their implications for urban health, past and present.
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The Little Red Yellow Black Book: An introduction to Indigenous Australia

The Little Red Yellow Black Book: An introduction to Indigenous Australia

AIATSIS ,  Bruce Pascoe

$19.95
Originally published in 1994, The Little Red Yellow Black Book has established itself as the perfect starting point for those who want to learn about the rich cultures and histories of Australia's First Peoples. Written from an Indigenous perspective, this highly illustrated and accessible introduction covers a range of topics from history, culture and the Arts, through to activism and reconciliation.

In this fourth edition, readers will learn about some of the significant contributions that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have made, and continue to make, to the Australian nation. Common stereotypes will be challenged, and the many struggles and triumphs that we've experienced as we've navigated through our shared histories will be revealed.

Readers will also learn about some of the key concepts that underpin Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander worldviews including concepts such as the Dreaming, the significance of Ancestral Heroes and Country.

The Little Red Yellow Black Book is for readers of all backgrounds and provides an opportunity to discover more about the diverse, dynamic and continuing cultures of Australia's First Peoples.
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A Long Way from No Go

A Long Way from No Go

Tjanara Goreng Goreng ,  Julie Szego

$29.95
This is a memoir of an Aboriginal woman, Tjanara Goreng Goreng, who began life without any of the advantages of her fellow non-Indigenous Australians except for grit, humour and diverse talent in spades.

Life was tough and poor as an Aboriginal kid in No Go, in remote Queensland. Tjanara navigates the treacherous waters of her childhood, immersed in the legacy of 200 years of brutal treatment of her mother's people that has left its suppurating scars deep in their psyche. Tjanara's parents believed that education was the only way to break through systemic poverty, and found ways to send all five children to school that were at once desperate and fraught. A disempowered people are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse - in her case, by the Catholic clergy.

A strong-willed, successful student and athlete, after graduating from university, the times were ripe. She found her place in the new era of federal policymaking: land rights and self-determination, initiatives on health, education, and social justice that were spearheaded by Charlie Perkins and his bright young people. Tjanara was at the nerve centre of Australia's political life, shaping policy during the most exciting and innovative period in Australian politics.

But she struggles to escape the dark side that leads straight back to her heritage - her experiences as an Indigenous Australian: the abuse, the daily acts of cruel racism, the despairing plight of her people, the addictions to numb the pain. Rising to a management position in Social Policy within the Prime Minister's Department, the ideological landscape has taken a tectonic turn under the Howard government. When fraudulent claims are cooked up to give the government an excuse to send the military into Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, she courageously blows the whistle, and is sacked, charged and convicted for breaches of the Crimes Act relating to disclosure of confidential information; and is bankrupted for her actions.

Always the professional, engaged in numerous ways to help her people, her own damage leads her on a search for healing: from psychotherapy to Aboriginal knowledge to Indian meditation and spirituality.

Szego is captivated and captivates us with this extraordinary Australian whose irrepressible, playful wicked humour leaps off the pages, even as we glimpse the personal and communal pain and despair at times in a life that sweeps across the breadth of the land and its history.

Through one woman's story, this book shines a light on the shameful treatment and betrayal of first Australians by individuals and social institutions over generations since Europeans took over this country. Not least in her sights is the Catholic Church: her shocking claims about systemic sexual abuse of Aboriginal children, including herself, have never been aired publicly until now.

This is a story of resilience, courage and Tjanara's remarkable capacity to overcome every possible barrier that can be thrown up in Australian society. She is an inspiration to all fellow Australians and more specifically to the disenfranchised, marginalised and voiceless Indigenous communities.
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Abson & Company: Slave Traders in Eighteenth-Century West Africa

Abson & Company: Slave Traders in Eighteenth-Century West Africa

Stanley B. Alpern

$89.95
Yorkshireman Lionel Abson was the longest surviving European stationed in West Africa in the eighteenth century. He reached William's Fort at Ouidah on the Slave Coast as a trader in 1767, took over the English fort in 1770, and remained in charge until his death in 1803. He avoided the `white man's grave' for thirty-six years.

Along the way he had three sons with an African woman, the eldest partly schooled in England, and a bright daughter named Sally. When Abson died, royal lackeys kidnapped his children. Sally was placed in the king's harem and pined away; her brothers vanished. That king became so unpopular as a result that the people of Dahomey disowned him. Abson also mastered the local language and became an historian. After only two years as fort chief, he was part of the king's delegation to make peace with an enemy, a unique event in centuries of Dahomean history.

This singular book recounts the remarkable life of this key figure in an ignominious period of European and African history, offering a microcosm of the lives of Europeans in eighteenth-century West Africa, and their relationships with and attitudes towards those they met there.
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The Great Empires of Asia

The Great Empires of Asia

Jim Masselos ,  Jonathan Fenby

$19.99
Asian empires led the world economically, scientifically and culturally for hundreds of years, and posed a constant challenge to the countries of Europe. How and why did those empires gain such power, and lose it? What legacies did they leave?

This major book brings together a team of distinguished historians and 200 illustrations to survey seven great Asian empires that rose and fell between 800 CE and the mid-20th century: the Mongol Empire, Ming Dynasty of China, Khmer Empire, Ottoman Empire, Safavid Empire of Persia, Mughal Empire of India and the Meiji Restoration in Japan.

Splendidly illustrated and compellingly written, The Great Empires of Asia shows how those seven empires played a key role in forming todays global civilization and how, with the renewed ascendancy of Asia, their legacies will help shape the continents future.
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Myanmar's 'Rohingya' Conflict

Myanmar's 'Rohingya' Conflict

Anthony Ware ,  Costas Laoutides

$44.95
The plight of Myanmar's Rohingya Muslims has made global headlines in recent years. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled Myanmar for Bangladesh, amidst serious allegations of genocide, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. The impact on Myanmar's international standing has been massive. However, much of the commentary so far has been reductionist, flattening complex dynamics into a simple narrative of state oppression of a religious minority.

Exploring this long-running tripartite conflict between the Rohingya, Rakhine and the Burman-led state, this book offers a new analysis of the complexities of the current crisis: the fears and motivations driving it and the competition to control historical representations and collective memory. The authors question these competing narratives, and examine the international dimensions of this intractable conflict, ultimately arguing that the central issue is a contestation over political inclusion and control over governance.
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Hunter Wine: A History

Hunter Wine: A History

Julie McIntyre ,  John Germov

$49.99
Time is an essential element of each glass of wine that we drink. Within moments of it being poured from a bottle, or when a barrel is exposed to air, wine begins to change in subtle and irreversible ways.

At the other end of the temporal scale, the bedrock of the vineyard landscapes that grow the grapes to make this wine were formed over millennia past. From the deep past to the current moment, this book shows how historical influences and technological processes have shaped Hunter wine from vine to glass.

The Hunter Valley is Australia’s oldest wine region, so its history and heritage are integral to understanding how Australian wine has evolved. Australian cultures of making, selling and drinking wine are more than echoes of British and European traditions and trends — they represent new practices and styles.

Hunter wine is the result of horticultural, chemical, technological, social and economic experimentation by men and women who have migrated to the region since the 1820s. In turn, the Hunter landscape and people have been shaped by the presence of vineyards and wineries since early colonisation. This book gives new expression to connected histories of nature and culture in the region by viewing them through the lens of wine history.
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Fishing for the Past: Casting nets and lines into  Australia's early colonial history

Fishing for the Past: Casting nets and lines into Australia's early colonial history

Julian Pepperell

$34.95
After long voyages, hungry crews needed to be fed. On board every ship were the keen fishermen, , catching fish to eat, but also ready with a great fish tale. On some voyages there were the resident naturalists and artists, recording, sketching and painting each new species found - some familiar, some completely alien.

For tens of thousands of years Aboriginal people had been fishing these waters with spears, hooks, nets and traps, and gathering shellfish from the beaches, rocks and reefs. These activities were of considerable interest to the early mariners and were recorded in the same journals and diaries, so by these direct links we learn how the original inhabitants of this land fished at the time of first contact.
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The Passion for Muscle Cars: The Australian Pursuit of Power 1950-1980

The Passion for Muscle Cars: The Australian Pursuit of Power 1950-1980

Joel Wakely

$49.99
Following the success of The Passion for Holden, Joel Wakely takes a personal look at the golden age of Australian car manufacturing and particularly the passion for the muscle cars that arose in the 1950s and reached its height in the 1970s.

Joel looks at the three main manufacturers - Holden, Ford and Chrysler - and the cars they developed for an ever-hungrier market.

He examines the racing scene at the time and how these three big manufacturers jostled for position, both on the track and in the showrooms.

This eclectic mix of exclusive photography, technical detail, fascinating history and sheer passion for his subject shows Joel at his best - one moment extolling the merits of a specific muscle car, the next sharing recollections of his racing days at tracks that can now only shimmer and roar in our memories.
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The Battle of Maryang San

The Battle of Maryang San

Dayton Mccarthy

$19.99
For Australia, the Korean War marked its first foray as a minor power in the Cold War and it would be the first conflict to be fought by the newly formed Australian Regular Army (ARA). In this regard, the Army's premier infantry organisation, the Royal Australian Regiment (RAR), received its baptism of fire in Korea and in the process, earned a number of battle honours for its regimental colours.

This book describes the actions behind one such battle honour - the Battle of Maryang San. Over one week in October 1951 and as part of a wider divisional assault, the 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (3 RAR), manoeuvred across difficult terrain to dislodge and destroy Chinese forces three times its number. As such, Maryang San is widely regarded as one of the RAR's and the Australian Army's greatest battlefield accomplishments. Author Doctor Dayton McCarthy combines academic rigour with his experience as a professional infantry officer to analyse the battle and produce an account for the general reader and military professional alike. Using official histories, brigade and battalion war diaries as well as personal accounts, McCarthy seeks to provide not only the strategic, operational and tactical context, but also the `how' and the `why' of the battle.

Although the battle itself had no lasting impact on the course and outcome of the Korean War, it demonstrated a number of key attributes that make it worthy of professional study such as the use of ground, small unit leadership, integration of combined arms and the role of aggression in close combat. Conversely, the conduct of the battle and its immediate aftermath highlight the enduring nature of war, including friction and the `fog of war' as well as the truism that the enemy must never be discounted.
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Holden Treasures: From the 1946 prototypes to the 1966 HR

Holden Treasures: From the 1946 prototypes to the 1966 HR

Don Loffler

$59.95
Here at last is Don Loffler's long-promised book on rare and special examples of the first ten Holden models. The first five chapters feature such vehicles in their recent and/or current state. The last five are devoted to historic images of the vehicles in their heyday.

Thanks to painstaking and persistent research, Don has been able to assemble an amazing collection of over 500 images from black-and-white photographs and colour slides, many of which are bound to surprise enthusiasts and readers of this book.

'Don Loffler has evolved a unique style of automotive social history. His great capacity to find the human stories behind the cars and then to illustrate them with superb photographs makes all his books a joy to own, to read and to display. He has done the history of Australia's Own Holdens extremely proud in all his volumes. This one, aptly named Holden Treasures, and as painstakingly researched as his previous six, contains a wealth of previously unpublished material. When automotive historians of the future (if such exist) look back on the Holden, these fine books will present a ready-made archive.' - Dr John M. Wright (PhD)
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Darwin 1869: The Second Northern Territory Expedition

Darwin 1869: The Second Northern Territory Expedition

Derek Pugh

$29.95
Darwin, the unique and vibrant city in Australia's tropical north, was almost stillborn.

The Northern Territory had its beginnings under the governance of South Australia. Land was sold to investors, unseen and unsurveyed and in an unknown location. The sales raised the funds needed to found the new colony of Palmerston, the future capital of the Northern Territory of South Australia. The First Northern Territory Expedition was sent north to make it a reality. But it failed miserably and the government faced huge losses and insufficient reserves to refund its investors.

To mitigate the loss, a new venture was envisaged - The Second Northern Territory Expedition - and there was only one man thought capable of ensuring a successful survey of the north: the Surveyor General, George Woodroffe Goyder.

Goyder was an extraordinary man, full of frenetic energy and with a phenomenal work ethic. The survey took him and his expert teams of surveyors and bushmen only eight months. It resulted in the laying out of the city of Palmerston (now called Darwin), three rural towns and hundreds of rural blocks spreading over almost 270,000 hectares, all pegged out in the bush and mapped. The blocks were carved out of Larrakia and Wulna lands - without permission or compensation - and conflict with the Aborigines was an ever-present danger. Two men were speared - one fatally.

Darwin grew from these somewhat humble but tumultuous beginnings. It was the only pre-Federation Australian capital established late enough to be photographed from its first settlement, and it is a survivor of challenges and privations unheard of in more temperate climes.

Darwin's story is written on its maps. Street names such as Knuckey, McLachlan, Daly, Woods, Bennett, Harvey and Smith Streets, recall the surveyors and their teams. Suburbs such as Millner, Larrakeyah, Bellamack and Stuart Park remind us of the city's earliest days. It is the story of how the courage and diligence of a few led to the founding of the city we know today.
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Our Boys: The Story of a Paratrooper

Our Boys: The Story of a Paratrooper

Helen Parr

$59.99
Our Boys brings to life the human experiences of the paratroopers who fought in the Falklands, and examines the long aftermath of that conflict. It is a first in many ways - a social and cultural history of a regiment with an elite and aggressive reputation; a study of close-quarters combat on the Falkland Islands; and an exploration of the many legacies of this short and symbolic war. Told through the experiences of people who lived through it, Our Boys shows how the Falklands conflict began to change Britain's relationship with its soldiers. It is also the story of one particular soldier- the author's uncle, who was killed during the conflict, and whose fate has haunted both the author and his fellow paratroopers ever since.
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Royal Marriages: Diana, Camilla, Kate & Meghan and Princesses Who Did Not Live Happily Ever After

Royal Marriages: Diana, Camilla, Kate & Meghan and Princesses Who Did Not Live Happily Ever After

Susanna De Vries

$39.95
From the author of Royal Mistresses and sixteen entertaining and informative biographies of interesting women comes this is an uncensored account of bizarre royal marriages and the cruelty of nine centuries of marriages of Princes of Wales and monarchs to titled virginal European princesses and teenage aristocrats who they did not love.

Princes married to gain huge dowries from their wives or military alliances with powerful countries but often preferred seductive mistresses to their wives who, as Princess Diana observed on her 'Secrets' videotape, were used as 'baby factories.'

Young Princess Isabella of France was a romantic and was shocked to discover her new husband in love with gay Sir Piers Gavaston. His homosexual relationship caused so much jealousy at court and Gaveston was murdered. Equally, young and romantic Princess Anna of Denmark found her middle-aged husband King James I in love with the charismatic handsome courtier ennobled as Duke of Buckingham. Both these royal husbands spent long periods ignoring their arranged brides and only visited their bedchambers to fulfill their duty and attempt to sire 'the heir and the spare' so their dynasty would carry on the line.

Tall, handsome, virile King Charles II was a sex addict and sired fifteen children out of wedlock and ennobled five of his illegitimate sons as dukes. He spent little time with his arranged bride, the young Portuguese Princess Catherine whose dowry he squandered on seductive mistresses and flaunted Restoration beauties like Nell Gwyn, Barbara Villiers and Louise de Keroualle at court. King Charles' virginal teenage bride made the mistake of falling in love with her husband, but Catherine was unable give him an heir so spent much of her married life alone. Charles let a riotous life heading a court obsessed with sex. He conducted state affairs from the luxurious apartment in Whitehall Palace, the suite he had given, arrogant and debauched mistress Barbara Villiers who bore him 6 illegitimate children and hated her rival, Nell Gwyn.

George Augustus, Prince of Wales, found his mail order bride, Princess Caroline, so physically repugnant he called for a glass of brandy and only consummated a marriage made for her large dowry to pay off his debts. Edward VII had at least fifteen mistresses. These facts were hidden from the public who believed in the fairy story that a royal wedding meant the bride and groom lived happy ever after. These fascinating true stories reveal how money and power were seen as more important than love. The final chapters describe how after centuries of unhappy royal wives, Prince William and Prince Harry have been allowed to marry for love alone.

In the 21st century, Prince William and Prince Harry, painfully aware of their mother's unhappy marriage and its damaging effects on her have stood out against the system which the Queen has finally modernised and allowed them to marry for love. They have both chosen as wives who are highly intelligent university graduates, stylish girls who after a few 'princess lessons' about protocol and who they should curtsey to have changed the system which made so many young wives deeply unhappy.
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The Million Dollar Duchesses: How America's Heiresses Seduced the Aristocracy

The Million Dollar Duchesses: How America's Heiresses Seduced the Aristocracy

Julie Ferry

$19.99
Brimful of scandal, illicit affairs, spurned loves and unexpected tragedy, The Million Dollar Duchesses reveals the closed-door bargaining which led to these most influential matches and how America’s heiresses shook-up British high society for ever.

On 6th November 1895, the beautiful and brilliant heiress Consuelo Vanderbilt was wedded to the near-insolvent Charles Spencer-Churchill, 9th Duke of Marlborough in a dazzling yet miserable match – it glittered above all others for high society’s marriage brokers who, in this single year, forged a series of spectacular, and lucrative, transatlantic unions.

The bankrupt and ailing British aristocracy was suddenly injected with all the wealth and glamour of America's newest dynasties. Millions of dollars changed hands as fame, money, power and privilege were all at play.

Brimful of scandal, illicit affairs, spurned loves and unexpected tragedy, The Million Dollar Duchesses reveals the closed-door bargaining which led to these most influential matches and how America’s heiresses shook-up British high society for ever.
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A Victorian Lady's Guide to Fashion and Beauty

A Victorian Lady's Guide to Fashion and Beauty

Mimi Matthews

$34.99
What did a Victorian lady wear for a walk in the park? How did she style her hair for an evening at the theatre? And what products might she have used to soothe a sunburn or treat an unsightly blemish? Mimi Matthews answers these questions and more as she takes readers on a decade-by-decade journey through Victorian fashion and beauty history.

Women's clothing changed dramatically during the course of the Victorian era. Necklines rose, waistlines dropped, and Gothic severity gave way to flounces, frills, and an abundance of trimmings. Sleeves ballooned up and skirts billowed out. The crinoline morphed into the bustle and steam-moulded corsets cinched women's waists ever tighter.

As fashion was evolving, so too were trends in ladies' hair care and cosmetics. An era which began by prizing natural, barefaced beauty ended with women purchasing lip and cheek rouge, false hairpieces and pomades, and fashionable perfumes made with expensive spice oils and animal essences.

Using research from nineteenth century beauty books, fashion magazines, and lady's journals, Mimi Matthews brings the intricacies of a Victorian lady's toilette into modern day focus. In the process, she gives readers a glimpse of the social issues that influenced women's clothing and the societal outrage that was an all too frequent response to those bold females who used fashion and beauty as a means of asserting their individuality and independence.
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Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II

Tim Ewart

$42.95  $38.65
Former ITV Royal Editor Tim Ewart looks at the life and reign of the woman who has become one of the United Kingdom’s best-loved monarchs, Queen Elizabeth II.
 
With many unique images from the Royal Archives, this beautifully illustrated book - updated to include William and Kate’s marriage and Prince Harry's engagement to Meghan Markle - covers everything from royal tours to state visits, day-to-day engagements to family festivities and grand occasions. It examines the remarkable events that have unfolded during the Queen’s rule, and how she maintains traditions that link the United Kingdom with a history stretching back more than a thousand years. Important reproductions include the 1939 speech that then-Princess Elizabeth broadcast to the children of the Commonwealth; the design for the Queen’s wedding dress by Sir Norman Hartnell; and an invitation to a garden party at Buckingham Palace.
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RAF 100: The Story of the Royal Air Force 1918-2018

RAF 100: The Story of the Royal Air Force 1918-2018

Mike Lepine

$39.99
From its genesis in the horrors of the First World War when pilots were open to the elements in craft made of little more than wood and fabric, to the iconic air battles of the Second World War, through to the lifesaving missions carried out in todays trouble zones, RAF 100 looks at the men, women and aircraft that are at the heart of this great service.
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Tudor and Stuart Seafarers: The Emergence of a Maritime Nation, 1485-1707

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers: The Emergence of a Maritime Nation, 1485-1707

James Davey

$49.99
In 1485, England was a small, inward-looking country, its priorities predominantly domestic and European. Over the subsequent two centuries, however, this country was transformed into the world's leading maritime power, as the people of the British Isles turned to the sea in search of adventure, wealth and rule.

Explorers voyaged into unknown regions of the world, while merchants, following in their wake, established lucrative trade routes with the furthest reaches of the globe. At home, people across Britain increasingly engaged with the sea, whether thorough their own lived experiences or through songs, prose and countless other forms of material culture. This is therefore a story of sailors, traders and naval officers, but also of instrument-makers, dockyard workers and the scores of Britons whose livelihoods depended on seaborne commerce.

By the turn of the eighteenth-century, Britain was no longer a peripheral European nation but a fully-fledged maritime power. This development is central to the nation's story, and this book argues that what transpired at sea shaped the course of British history.

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers showcases a stellar cast of contributors, bringing together leading naval and maritime historians alongside historians of exploration and empire, and those who study the art, science and literature of the early-modern period. Lavishly illustrated with objects from the National Maritime Museum's collections, this book will appeal to anyone with an interest in maritime history.
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The Military History of China

The Military History of China

Erik Durschmied

$34.99
The Military History of China bestselling author Erik Durschmied traces China's passage through a thousand years of war, colonial adventurism and internecine politics, and seeks to understand what this huge and unstoppable country is today - as well as what the future holds for a fragile world in which China is the latest economic and military superpower.

Long the world's most populous country, China has always flexed its muscles beyond its borders, for all its contemplative religion and dreamlike art. Catastrophic clashes with other countries are a thread woven into the fabric of the nation's history. Today China stands on the threshold of global economic domination, a true rival to the United States: in a generation or so it will be twice as wealthy as the US, Britain, France, Germany and Italy combined.
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French and Germans, Germans and French: A Personal Interpretation of France under Two Occupations, 1914-1918/1940-1944

French and Germans, Germans and French: A Personal Interpretation of France under Two Occupations, 1914-1918/1940-1944

Richard Cobb

$22.99
A magnificent account of Occupied France in both the First and Second World Wars.

'There had grown up a sort of intimacy between occupant and occupe... a peculiar blending of mutual loathing and mutual respect, a pas de deux'

An extraordinary history of French lives under occupation in the First and Second World Wars, this is an intimate, unforgettable meditation on the strange mixture of compromise and betrayal, collaboration and resistance that marks defeat, written by one of the greatest historians of France.
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Napoleon's Military Machine

Napoleon's Military Machine

Chris McNab

$39.95
The Grande Armee of Napoleon Bonaparte is widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest fighting forces ever deployed. With it the French scored a streak of historic victories that gave them an unprecedented grip on power over the European continent. At its peak it was made up of 680,000 men, a huge multi-national force of officers, infantry and cavalry, artillery and support services masterminded by a superior and highly flexible system of corps, divisions, brigades and regiments, commanded by officers in which Napoleon placed a huge degree of trust and autonomy to operate within the outlines of his strategic objectives.

Looking closely at how this military machine was constructed and mobilised this book will examine all aspects of the Grande Armee, from individual soldiers, what they wore, ate, slept in and were paid, to the chain of command, recruitment and training, intelligence and comms, and logistics and battle tactics. The legacy of Napoleon's army will be assessed, and how his organization and management initiatives influenced national armies around the world in ways that can still be seen today.
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The Plots Against Hitler

The Plots Against Hitler

Danny Orbach

$22.99
A new and definitive account of the anti-Nazi underground in Germany and its numerous efforts to assassinate Adolf Hitler.

In 1933, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. A year later, all parties but the Nazis had been outlawed, freedom of the press was but a memory, and Hitler's dominance seemed complete. Yet over the next few years, an unlikely clutch of conspirators emerged – soldiers, schoolteachers, politicians, diplomats, theologians, even a carpenter – who would try repeatedly to end the Fuhrer's genocidal reign. Danny Orbach's meticulously researched book tells the story of their noble, ingenious, and doomed efforts.

This is history at its most suspenseful: we witness secret midnight meetings, crises of conscience, fierce debates among old friends about whether and how to dismantle Nazism, and the various plots themselves being devised and executed.
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The Last Prussian: A Biography of Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt

The Last Prussian: A Biography of Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt

Charles Messenger

$44.99
Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt (1875-1953) was one of the foremost German commanders of the Second World War. After service on both the Western and Eastern Fronts during 1914-1918 he rose steadily through the ranks before retiring in 1938. Recalled to plan the attack on Poland, he played a leading part in this and the invasion of France in 1940. Thereafter he commanded Army Group South in the assault on Russia before being sacked at the end of 1941. Recalled again, he was made Commander-in-Chief West and as such faced the 1944 Allied invasion of France, but was removed that July. He resumed his post in September 1944 and had overall responsibility for the December 1944 Ardennes counter-offensive. Captured by the Americans, he was handed over to the British, who wanted to try him for war crimes. Only his ill health prevented this from coming about.
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Killing the SS: The Hunt for the Worst War Criminals in History

Killing the SS: The Hunt for the Worst War Criminals in History

Bill O'Reilly ,  Martin Dugard

$44.99
As the true horrors of the Third Reich began to be exposed immediately after World War II, the Nazi war criminals who committed genocide went on the run. A few were swiftly caught, including the notorious SS leader, Heinrich Himmler. Others, however, evaded capture through a sophisticated Nazi organization designed to hide them. Among those war criminals were Josef Mengele, the Angel of Death who performed hideous medical experiments at Auschwitz; Martin Bormann, Hitler's brutal personal secretary; Klaus Barbie, the cruel Butcher of Lyon ; and perhaps the most awful Nazi of all: Adolf Eichmann.

Killing the SS is the epic saga of the espionage and daring waged by self-styled Nazi hunters. This determined and disparate group included a French husband and wife team, an American lawyer who served in the army on D-Day, a German prosecutor who had signed an oath to the Nazi Party, Israeli Mossad agents, and a death camp survivor. Over decades, these men and women scoured the world, tracking down the SS fugitives and bringing them to justice, which often meant death.

Written in the fast-paced style of the Killing series, Killing the SS will educate and stun the reader. The final chapter is truly shocking.
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Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy, Weimar Centennial Edition

Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy, Weimar Centennial Edition

Eric D. Weitz

$46.95
Thoroughly up-to-date, skillfully written, and strikingly illustrated, Weimar Germany brings to life an era of unmatched creativity in the twentieth century - one whose influence and inspiration still resonate today.

Eric Weitz has written the authoritative history that this fascinating and complex period deserves, and he illuminates the uniquely progressive achievements and even greater promise of the Weimar Republic. Weitz reveals how Germans rose from the turbulence and defeat of World War I and revolution to forge democratic institutions and make Berlin a world capital of avant-garde art. He explores the period’s groundbreaking cultural creativity, from architecture and theater, to the new field of "sexology" - and presents richly detailed portraits of some of the Weimar’s greatest figures.

Weimar Germany also shows that beneath this glossy veneer lay political turmoil that ultimately led to the demise of the republic and the rise of the radical Right. Yet for decades after, the Weimar period continued to powerfully influence contemporary art, urban design, and intellectual life - from Tokyo to Ankara, and Brasilia to New York.

Featuring a new preface, this comprehensive and compelling book demonstrates why Weimar is an example of all that is liberating and all that can go wrong in a democracy.
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The Cognitive Challenge of War: Prussia 1806

The Cognitive Challenge of War: Prussia 1806

Peter Paret

$37.99
Responding to the enemy's innovation in war presents problems to soldiers and societies of all times. This book traces Napoleon's victory over Prussia in 1806 and Prussia's effort to recover from defeat to show how in one particular historical episode operational analyses together with institutional and political decisions eventually turned defeat to victory.

The author moves from a comparative study of French and Prussian forces to campaign narrative and strategic analysis. He examines processes of change in institutions and doctrine, as well as their dependence on social and political developments, and interprets works of art and literature as indicators of popular and elite attitudes toward war, which influence the conduct of war and the kind and extent of military innovation. In the concluding chapter he addresses the impact of 1806 on two men who fought on opposing sides in the campaign and sought a new theoretical understanding of war--Henri Jomini and Carl von Clausewitz.

Fields of history that are often kept separate are brought together in this book, which seeks to replicate the links between different areas of thought and action as they exist in reality and shape events.
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German Infantryman Manual

German Infantryman Manual

Simon Forty

$39.95
Between 1939 and 1945, close to 13 million men served in the German army - das Heer. The bulk of these men were infantrymen, who slogged their way, mostly on foot, from Finisterre to Moscow, Kirkenes to Tripoli. They swore unlimited obedience to Adolf Hitler and were ready to stake their lives for this oath: over 1.6 million men of das Heer were killed during the war and over 4.1 million were wounded.
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The Indian Empire At War: From Jihad to Victory, The Untold Story of the Indian Army in the First World War

The Indian Empire At War: From Jihad to Victory, The Untold Story of the Indian Army in the First World War

George Morton-Jack

$32.99
Almost two million volunteers served the Indian army in the Great War, always under British regimental officers, high commanders and staff. 150,000 of them were long-serving pre-war professional soldiers; most of the remainder were wartime recruits, drawn from across South Asia. Half of the Indian soldiers were sent overseas, and those who returned did so with a very different outlook on life.

In most histories of the war, the Tommies, pals and poets have dominated the tales - but what of the war as experienced by their Indian counterparts? George Morton-Jack's remarkable, fresh take on the First World War sets this right, telling the Indian army's story of 1914-18 through the voices of the service's officers and ranks, and of the princes, priests, prostitutes and others who encountered them across the continents. It reveals their journeys to the greatest battlefields mankind had ever seen, their experiences as prisoners of war in Germany, Romania and elsewhere, and their missions as secret agents that took them down rivers, across deserts and through mountain ranges from Transylvania to Afghanistan and beyond.

The Indian Empire at War is a fascinating, necessary book that illuminates a central part of the Great War that has too often been overlooked.
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The Billionaire Raj: A Journey Through India's New Gilded Age

The Billionaire Raj: A Journey Through India's New Gilded Age

James Crabtree

$32.99
Can one of the most divided nations on the planet become its next superpower? James Crabtree reveals the titans of politics and industry shaping India in a period of breakneck change - from controversial prime minister Narendra Modi, victor in the largest election in history, to the leading lights of the country's burgeoning billionaire class.

While `King of the Good Times' Vijay Mallya languishes in exile in Britain, other major `Bollygarchs' prosper at home despite a series of scandals. Issuing jewel-encrusted invitations to their children's weddings, these tycoons exert huge power in both business and politics.

But India's explosive economic rise has driven inequality to new extremes. Millions remain trapped in slums and corruption is endemic. Reformers fight to wrest the nation from these dark forces, leaving its fate poised between that of a prosperous democratic giant and a saffron-tinged version of Russia.
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Ghosts of the Tsunami: Death and Life in Japan's Disaster Zone

Ghosts of the Tsunami: Death and Life in Japan's Disaster Zone

Richard Lloyd Parry

$22.99
WINNER OF THE RATHBONES FOLIO PRIZE.

Richard LLoyd Parry uncovers the immediate aftermath and long-term effects of the Japanese earthquake and tsunami of 2011, which resulted in the loss of 18,500 souls.

On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of north-east Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than 18,500 people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned. It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki.

Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo, and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. He met a priest who performed exorcisms on people possessed by the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village which had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own.

What really happened to the local children as they waited in the school playground in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up?

Ghosts of the Tsunami is a classic of literary non-fiction, a heart-breaking and intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the personal accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the bleak struggle to find consolation in the ruins.
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Secrets of the Japanese Art of Warfare: From the School of Certain Victory

Secrets of the Japanese Art of Warfare: From the School of Certain Victory

Thomas Cleary

$14.99
This samurai strategy books is the first widely available English translation of Yamamoto Kansuke's classic treatise on strategy and tactics.

Secrets of the Japanese Art of Warfare is Thomas Cleary's translation of the seminal writings attributed to Yamamoto Kansuke on Japanese martial arts and military service. A mysterious man of humble origins, Yamamoto distinguished himself in the service of the redoubtable Takeda Shingen. Yamamoto was a career soldier and founder of the so-called "school of certain victory," from which the famous Miyamoto Musashi (The Book of Five Rings) emerged. His school developed the art of discerning situational combat advantage so that a warrior was able to commit to action only when success was virtually assured.

Translated and accompanied with helpful insights by Thomas Cleary, one of the foremost translators of the martial wisdom of Asia, this book is for all persons engaged in military, law enforcement, or emergency response, as well as for martial artists, athletes, business executives, diplomats and politicians.
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The Art of Life and Death: Lessons in Budo from a Ninja Master

The Art of Life and Death: Lessons in Budo from a Ninja Master

Daniel Fletcher ,  Sleiman Azizi ,  Masaaki Hatsumi

$14.99
This masterfully crafted guide to ninjutsu or budo explores in depth the history, culture, and philosophy of this fascinating and enduring Japanese martial art.

Budo is one of the least understood forms of art in the world. Even more than skills or techniques, the teachings of budo require faith to learn and courage to understand. One of the fundamental teachings of budo is ninjutstu, the art of perseverance that forms the basis of the Japanese martial arts.

The lessons in this book come directly from experiencing the living vitality of the world's foremost master of the ninja arts, Masaaki Hatsumi. Through the use of stories, poetry, art, and earned wisdom, the authors move beyond the common image of the martial arts and reveal the nature of the unexpected changes in themselves as they struggled to come to terms with what being a martial artist in the ninja tradition meant.

The Art of Life and Death is a reflection of the discipline, the aesthete, and the philosophy, that lies hidden within the martial way. It is a glimpse at the hidden potential of the martial arts, one where the practitioner can embrace transcendence and transformation in order to face all the fears that litter life and also life's most fearsome opponent: Death.
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The Warburgs

The Warburgs

Ron Chernow

$39.99
The definitive biography of the twentieth century's great German-Jewish banking family.

A story of brilliant achievement, dazzling personalities and human frailty set against the dark background of European racism and paranoia. The Warburgs were bankers, patrons of the arts, scholars, socialites, philanthropists and politicians. This Jewish family from Westphalia became a German success story, and embraced German culture with a passion: they loved the art, music and literature of their country and never wavered from their patriotic identification with their homeland. They advised a German Kaiser; their American cousins advised two presidents. Their investment bank still exists and is one of the oldest in the world. The Warburgs endowed libraries, built mansions and collected paintings. But in 1933 the family became a prime target of the Nazis and the world they knew came crashing down.
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The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz

The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz

Jeremy Dronfield

$49.99
In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholsterer in Vienna, was seized by the Nazis. Along with his teenage son, Fritz, he was sent to Buchenwald in Germany. There began an unimaginable ordeal that saw the pair beaten, starved and forced to build the very concentration camp they were held in.

When Gustav was set to be transferred to Auschwitz, a certain death sentence, Fritz refused to leave his side. Throughout the horrors they witnessed and the suffering they endured, there was one constant that kept them alive- the love between father and son.

Based on Gustav's secret diary and meticulous archive research, this book tells his and Fritz's story for the first time - a story of courage and survival unparalleled in the history of the Holocaust.
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The Story of Hebrew

The Story of Hebrew

Lewis Glinert

$39.99
The Story of Hebrew explores the extraordinary hold that Hebrew has had on Jews and Christians, who have invested it with a symbolic power far beyond that of any other language in history. Preserved by the Jews across two millennia, Hebrew endured long after it ceased to be a mother tongue, resulting in one of the most intense textual cultures ever known. Hebrew was a bridge to Greek and Arab science, and it unlocked the biblical sources for Jerome and the Reformation. Kabbalists and humanists sought philosophical truth in it, and Colonial Americans used it to shape their own Israelite political identity. Today, it is the first language of millions of Israelis. A major work of scholarship, The Story of Hebrew is an unforgettable account of what one language has meant and continues to mean.
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Brazil: A Biography

Brazil: A Biography

Lilia M. Schwarcz ,  Heloisa M. Starling

$71.95
A sweeping and absorbing biography of Brazil, from the sixteenth century to the present.

For many Americans, Brazil is a land of contradictions: vast natural resources and entrenched corruption; extraordinary wealth and grinding poverty; beautiful beaches and violence-torn favelas. Brazil occupies a vivid place in the American imagination, and yet it remains largely unknown.

In an extraordinary journey that spans five hundred years, from European colonization to the 2016 Summer Olympics, Lilia M. Schwarcz and Heloisa M. Starling's Brazil offers a rich, dramatic history of this complex country. The authors not only reconstruct the epic story of the nation but follow the shifting byways of food, art, and popular culture; the plights of minorities; and the ups and downs of economic cycles.

Drawing on a range of original scholarship in history, anthropology, political science, and economics, Schwarcz and Starling reveal a long process of unfinished social, political, and economic progress and struggle, a story in which the troubled legacy of the mixing of races and postcolonial political dysfunction persist to this day.
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The Beekeeper of Sinjar

The Beekeeper of Sinjar

Dunya Mikhail ,  Max Weiss

$24.99
Either we die here, or we escape together. A deeply moving story of courage in the face of unimaginable adversity.

In The Beekeeper of Sinjar, the acclaimed poet and journalist Dunya Mikhail tells the harrowing stories of women from across Iraq who have managed to escape the clutches of ISIS. Since 2014, ISIS has been persecuting the Yazidi people, killing or enslaving those who won't convert to Islam. These women have lost their families and loved ones, along with everything they've ever known. Dunya Mikhail weaves together the women's tales of endurance and near-impossible escape with the story of her own exile and her dreams for the future of Iraq.

In the midst of ISIS's reign of terror and hatred, an unlikely hero has emerged: the Beekeeper. Once a trader selling his mountain honey across the region, when ISIS came to Sinjar he turned his knowledge of the local terrain to another, more dangerous use. Along with a secret network of transporters, helpers, and former bootleggers, Abdullah Shrem smuggles brutalised Yazidi women to safety through the war-torn landscapes of Iraq, Syria, and Western Turkey.

This powerful work of literary nonfiction offers a counterpoint to ISIS's genocidal extremism: hope, as ordinary people risk torture and death to save the lives of others.
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Palestine: A Four Thousand Year History

Palestine: A Four Thousand Year History

Nur Masalha

$61.95
This rich and magisterial work traces Palestine's millennia-old heritage, uncovering cultures and societies of astounding depth and complexity that stretch back to the very beginnings of recorded history.

Starting with the earliest references in Egyptian and Assyrian texts, Nur Masalha explores how Palestine and its Palestinian identity have evolved over thousands of years, from the Bronze Age to the present day. Drawing on a rich body of sources and the latest archaeological evidence, Masalha shows how Palestine's multicultural past has been distorted and mythologised by Biblical lore and the Israel-Palestinian conflict.

In the process, Masalha reveals that the concept of Palestine, contrary to accepted belief, is not a modern invention or one constructed in opposition to Israel, but rooted firmly in ancient past. Palestine represents the authoritative account of the country's history.
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The Other

The Other

Ryszard Kapuscinski ,  Neal Ascherson

$19.99
In this distillation of reflections accumulated from a lifetime of travel, Ryszard Kapuscinski takes a fresh look at the Western idea of the Other. Looking at this concept through the lens of his own encounters in Africa, Asia and Latin America, and considering its formative significance for his own work, Kapuscinski traces how the West has understood the non-European from classical times to the present day. He observes how in the twenty-first century we continue to treat the residents of the Global South as hostile aliens, objects of study rather than full partners sharing responsibility for the fate of humankind.

In our globalised but increasingly polarised world, Kapuscinski shows how the Other remains one of the most compelling ideas of our times.
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Preventing Palestine: A Political History from Camp David to Oslo

Preventing Palestine: A Political History from Camp David to Oslo

Seth Anziska

$63.95
On the fortieth anniversary of the Camp David Accords, a groundbreaking new history that shows how Egyptian - Israeli peace ensured lasting Palestinian statelessness

For seventy years Israel has existed as a state, and for forty years it has honored a peace treaty with Egypt that is widely viewed as a triumph of U.S. diplomacy in the Middle East. Yet the Palestinians - the would-be beneficiaries of a vision for a comprehensive regional settlement that led to the Camp David Accords in 1978 - remain stateless to this day. How and why Palestinian statelessness persists are the central questions of Seth Anziska’s groundbreaking book, which explores the complex legacy of the agreement brokered by President Jimmy Carter.

Based on newly declassified international sources, Preventing Palestine charts the emergence of the Middle East peace process, including the establishment of a separate track to deal with the issue of Palestine. At the very start of this process, Anziska argues, Egyptian-Israeli peace came at the expense of the sovereignty of the Palestinians, whose aspirations for a homeland alongside Israel faced crippling challenges. With the introduction of the idea of restrictive autonomy, Israeli settlement expansion, and Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon, the chances for Palestinian statehood narrowed even further. The first Intifada in 1987 and the end of the Cold War brought new opportunities for a Palestinian state, but many players, refusing to see Palestinians as a nation or a people, continued to steer international diplomacy away from their cause.

Combining astute political analysis, extensive original research, and interviews with diplomats, military veterans, and communal leaders, Preventing Palestine offers a bold new interpretation of a highly charged struggle for self-determination.

Seth Anziska is the Mohamed S. Farsi-Polonsky Lecturer in Jewish-Muslim Relations at University College London and a visiting fellow at the U.S./Middle East Project. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Foreign Policy, and Haaretz. He lives in London.
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Jerusalem: A Brief History

Jerusalem: A Brief History

Michael Zank ,  Janet Freedman

$47.95
Provides a short, accessible, and lively introduction to Jerusalem Jerusalem - A Brief History shows how Jewish, Christian, and Islamic scriptures confer providential meaning to the fate of the city and how modern Jerusalem is haunted by waves of biblical fantasy aiming at mutually exclusive status-quo rectification. It presents the major epochs of the history of Jerusalem's urban transformation, inviting readers to imagine Jerusalem as a city that is not just sacred to the many groups of people who hold it dear, but as a united, unharmed place that is, in this sense, holy.

Jerusalem - A Brief History starts in modern Jerusalem--giving readers a look at the city as it exists today. It goes on to tell of its emergence as a holy city in three different ways, focusing each time on another aspect of the biblical past. Next, it discusses the transformation of Jerusalem from a formerly Jewish temple city, condemned to oblivion by its Roman destroyers, into an imperially sponsored Christian theme park, and the afterlife of that same city under later Byzantine and Muslim rulers. Lastly, the book returns to present day Jerusalem to examine the development of the modern city under the Ottomans and the British, the history of division and reunification, and the ongoing jostling over access to, and sovereignty over, Jerusalem's contested holy places.

Offers a unique integration of approaches, including urban history, the rhetoric of power, the history of art and architecture, biblical hermeneutics, and modern Middle Eastern Studies Places great emphasis on how Jerusalem is a real city where different people live and coexist Examines the urban transformation that has taken place since late Ottoman times Utilizes numerous line drawings to demonstrate how its monumental buildings, created to illustrate an alliance of divine and human power, are in fact quite ephemeral, transient, and fragile Jerusalem - A Brief History is a comprehensive and thoughtful introduction to the Holy City that will appeal to any student of religion and/or history.
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Longing for the Lost Caliphate: A Transregional History

Longing for the Lost Caliphate: A Transregional History

Mona Hassan

$69.00
In the United States and Europe, the word caliphate has conjured historically romantic and increasingly pernicious associations. Yet the caliphate's significance in Islamic history and Muslim culture remains poorly understood. This book explores the myriad meanings of the caliphate for Muslims around the world through the analytical lens of two key moments of loss in the thirteenth and twentieth centuries. Through extensive primary-source research, Mona Hassan explores the rich constellation of interpretations created by religious scholars, historians, musicians, statesmen, poets, and intellectuals.

Hassan fills a scholarly gap regarding Muslim reactions to the destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in Baghdad in 1258 and challenges the notion that the Mongol onslaught signaled an end to the critical engagement of Muslim jurists and intellectuals with the idea of an Islamic caliphate. She also situates Muslim responses to the dramatic abolition of the Ottoman caliphate in 1924 as part of a longer trajectory of transregional cultural memory, revealing commonalities and differences in how modern Muslims have creatively interpreted and reinterpreted their heritage. Hassan examines how poignant memories of the lost caliphate have been evoked in Muslim culture, law, and politics, similar to the losses and repercussions experienced by other religious communities, including the destruction of the Second Temple for Jews and the fall of Rome for Christians.

A global history, Longing for the Lost Caliphate delves into why the caliphate has been so important to Muslims in vastly different eras and places.
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The World of the Fatimids

The World of the Fatimids

Assadullah Souren Melikian-Chirvani

$100.00
This survey in 14 essays of Fatimid art between the 10th and 12th centuries showcases the pottery, rock crystal, metalwork, textile, architectural, wood, and calligraphic creations of one of t he most artistically inventive periods in Islamic culture, with special attention paid to the art of Christian and Jewish communities under the Fatimids.

Between the 10th and 12th centuries CE, the Fatimid caliphate ruled parts of presentday Algeria, Tunis ia, Egypt, Sicily and Syria. Tracing their descent from the Prophet Muhammad ' s daughter, Fatima, the Fatimids reinvigorated Islamic art, producing splendid pottery, metalwork, rock crystal, wood, textile and calligraphic creations. This art showcased ingen ious techniques, superb decorative methods and lively motifs displaying an inventive dynamism in the use of human, animal, vegetal, and abstract forms. Architecture, too, became a hallmark of Fatimid grandeur, resulting in such magnificent structures as al - Azhar University in Cairo, the Fatimids ' capital.
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Ghost Riders: Operation Cowboy, the World War Two Mission to Save the World's Finest Horses

Ghost Riders: Operation Cowboy, the World War Two Mission to Save the World's Finest Horses

Mark Felton

$29.99
April 1945. As Allied bombs rain down on Europe, a 400-year-old institution looks set to be wiped off the face of the Earth. The famous white Lipizzaner stallions of the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, unique and precious animals representing centuries of careful breeding, are scattered across rural Austria and Czechoslovakia in areas soon to be swallowed up by Soviet forces - there, doubtless, to become rations for the Red Army.

Their only hope lies with the Americans: what if a small, highly mobile US task force could be sent deep behind German lines, through fanatical SS troops, to rescue the horses before the Soviets arrive. Just five light tanks, a handful of armoured cars and jeeps, and 300 battle-weary GIs must plunge headlong into the unknown on a rescue mission that could change the course of European history.

So begins Operation Cowboy, the greatest Second World War story that has never been fully told. GIs will join forces with surrendered German soldiers and liberated prisoners of war to save the world's finest horses from fanatical SS and the ruthless Red Army in an extraordinary battle during the last few days of the war in Europe.
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The Few: July-October 1940

The Few: July-October 1940

Alex Kershaw

$22.99
In the early days on World War Two, Britain stood alone against the Third Reich. its defence lay in the hands of the men of Fighter Command- The Few.

In Summer 1940, with the odds against them at their most daunting, a handful of American pilots arrived - in defiance of their own country's strict neutrality laws. Adventurers, farmhands, barnstormers, even an Olympic bobsleogh champion swapped the new world for grassy East Anglian airfields. This is their gripping story.

Based on diaries, first-hand accounts and interviews with British airmen, The Few offers a bold new perspective on the greatest air battle the world has ever seen.
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SIGINT: The Secret History of Signals Intelligence in the World Wars

SIGINT: The Secret History of Signals Intelligence in the World Wars

Peter Matthews

$27.99
Communicating in the chaos of war is complicated, but vital. Signals intelligence makes it possible. In the First World War, a vast network of signals rapidly expanded across the globe, spawning a new breed of spies and intelligence operatives to code, de-code and analyse thousands of messages. Signallers and cryptographers in the Admiralty's famous Room 40 paved the way for the code-breakers of Bletchley Park in the Second World War. In the ensuing war years the world battled against a web of signals intelligence that gave birth to ENIGMA, LORENZ and ULTRA, and saw agents from Britain, France, Germany, Russia, America and Japan race to outwit each other through infinitely complex codes. In SIGINT, Peter Matthews tells the little-known story of global signals intelligence from 1914 to 1945.
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Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom

Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom

Thomas E. Ricks

$27.99
Today, as liberty and truth are increasingly challenged, the figures of Churchill and Orwell loom large. Exemplars of Britishness, they preserved individual freedom and democracy for the world through their far-sighted vision and inspired action, and cast a long shadow across our culture and politics.

In Churchill & Orwell, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Thomas E. Ricks masterfully argues that these extraordinary men are as important today as they ever were. Churchill and Orwell stood in political opposition to each other, but were both committed to the preservation of freedom. However, in the late 1930s they occupied a lonely position- democracy was much discredited, and authoritarian rulers, fascist and communist, were everywhere in the ascent.

Unlike others, they had the wisdom to see that the most salient issue was human liberty and that any government that denies its people basic rights is a totalitarian menace to be resisted. Churchill and Orwell proved their age 's necessary men, and this book reveals how they rose from a precarious position to triumph over the enemies of freedom.

Churchill may have played the larger role in Hitler 's defeat, but Orwell 's reckoning with the threat of authoritarian rule in 1984 and Animal Farm defined the stakes of the Cold War and continues to inspire to this day. Their lives are an eloquent testament to the power of moral conviction, and to the courage it takes to stay true to it.
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The Sea Devils: Operation Struggle and the Last Great Raid of World War Two

The Sea Devils: Operation Struggle and the Last Great Raid of World War Two

Mark Felton

$22.99
Using XE-craft midget submarines, the raiders will creep deep behind Japanese lines to sink two huge warships off Singapore and sever two vitally important undersea communications cables. Success will hasten ultimate victory over Japan; but if any of the men are captured they can expect a gruesome execution.

Can the Sea Devils overcome Japanese defences, mechanical failures, oxygen poisoning and submarine disasters to fulfil their missions? Mark Felton tells the true story of a band of young men living on raw courage, nerves and adrenalin as they attempt to pull off what could be the last great raid of World War Two.
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The Kaiser's Dawn: The Untold Story of Britain's Secret Mission to Murder the Kaiser in 1918

The Kaiser's Dawn: The Untold Story of Britain's Secret Mission to Murder the Kaiser in 1918

John Hughes-Wilson

$22.99
In mid summer 1918 the First World War was still finely balanced. A top secret mission, which has remained classified information for a century, was set in motion to kill Kaiser Wilhelm II. It was felt that by killing their head of state and commander in chief it would serve as a mortal blow to the German forces and they would collapse very quickly after the assassination.

In 2002 one of the participants on a battlefield tour sent a disc to Col. John Hughes-Wilson. On it was an historical treasure trove containing a Royal Flying Corps log book and photographs of service with 25 Squadron. Included among the effects of Lt A.R.Watts MC, of the newly formed Royal Air Force, was the breath-taking claim that he had taken part in a secret British mission to kill the Kaiser.

This extraordinary secret was confirmed by further research at the RAF museum and the RAF Historical Branch. This startling but never before revealed story was true. On 2nd June 1918, at the height of the final German attack of WW1, the British RAF tried to assassinate the Kaiser when he was visiting a chateau near the front.

The facts are borne out in never-before-published notebooks, maps and pilots' flying records, kept secret for a hundred years. Copies of these records are in the author's possession and are backed up by details tucked away in 25 Squadron's records. But the implications of this secret attack raise many new - and explosive - questions. Exactly who ordered an attack to kill the Kaiser? Was it sanctioned by the C-in-C, Sir Douglas Haig? By the War Office? Unlikely.

Was the King informed of the attempt to kill his royal cousin? Was Lloyd George, the Prime Minister asked? We do not know; but someone in London must have sanctioned the attack. The Official History makes no mention of any attack, and public records say nothing. Even the RAF Museum has no official record: but the attack really did take place, of that there is no doubt. Other documents and various 25 Squadron log books prove it. So someone did give an order to kill the Kaiser. But who?

John Hughes-Wilson has woven an exciting and well-paced historical novel to mark this centennial event from the research on discovering this mission. The story, based on true events, looks at this long hidden secret and puts it into the context of the time. It explores areas rarely examined: secret service operations in 1914-18; dirty, undercover intelligence work; the very real political intrigues between Whitehall and the generals and the heroics of the aircrew of the day, whose life expectancy at one point in 1917 was only eleven days in action.
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The Habsburg Empire: A New History

The Habsburg Empire: A New History

Pieter M. Judson

$41.95
A EuropeNow Editor’s Pick
A Choice Outstanding Academic Title of the Year

“Pieter M. Judson’s book informs and stimulates. If his account of Habsburg achievements, especially in the 18th century, is rather starry-eyed, it is a welcome corrective to the black legend usually presented. Lucid, elegant, full of surprising and illuminating details, it can be warmly recommended to anyone with an interest in modern European history.” ―Tim Blanning, Wall Street Journal

“This is an engaging reappraisal of the empire whose legacy, a century after its collapse in 1918, still resonates across the nation-states that replaced it in central Europe. Judson rejects conventional depictions of the Habsburg empire as a hopelessly dysfunctional assemblage of squabbling nationalities and stresses its achievements in law, administration, science and the arts.” ―Tony Barber, Financial Times

“Spectacularly revisionist…Judson argues that…the empire was a force for progress and modernity…This is a bold and refreshing book... Judson does much to destroy the picture of an ossified regime and state.” ―A. W. Purdue, Times Higher Education

“Judson’s reflections on nations, states and institutions are of broader interest, not least in the current debate on the future of the European Union after Brexit.” ―Annabelle Chapman, Prospect
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Hitler's American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law

Hitler's American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law

James Q. Whitman

$32.99
Nazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the United States. Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis? The unsettling answer is yes. In Hitler's American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime. Both American citizenship and antimiscegenation laws proved directly relevant to the two principal Nuremberg Laws - the Citizenship Law and the Blood Law. Contrary to those who have insisted otherwise, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies. He looks at the ultimate, ugly irony that when Nazis rejected American practices, it was sometimes not because they found them too enlightened but too harsh. Indelibly linking American race laws to the shaping of Nazi policies in Germany, Hitler's American Model upends the understanding of America's influence on racist practices in the wider world.
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Reaching for the Sky: One Hundred Defining Moments from the Royal Air Force 1918-2018

Reaching for the Sky: One Hundred Defining Moments from the Royal Air Force 1918-2018

Scott Addington

$32.99
2018 marks the centenary of the formation of the Royal Air Force. Founded in the final months of the Great War, this book provides the greatest facts and figures relating to the RAF. Who were the original Aces? What was the longest mission undertaken? How much did the heaviest bomb weigh? Who flew the most sorties? What was the fastest speed ever encountered in battle? How many aircraft were in the sky during the Battle of Britain? What was the day of heaviest loses in conflict? Who had the longest career? Who is the most famous? All this and much more is uncovered in a range of informative and detailed events spanning the centenary; biographies, fun facts, myth busters and illustrated throughout with infographics and contemporary photographs.
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The Battle of Milne Bay

The Battle of Milne Bay

Nicholas Anderson

$19.99
By 1942 the formidable Japanese military had conquered swathes of territory across south-east Asia and the Pacific Ocean. Despite its defeat at the Battle of Midway, Japan remained a potent enemy committed to the creation of a defensive arc to shield its captured possessions in the Pacific.

The capture of Port Moresby would cement the southern border of this defensive arc and sever the vital lines of communication between Australia and the United States. It was the Japanese plan to seize Moresby that would set the course for the Battle of Milne Bay.

Situated on the eastern tip of New Guinea, Milne Bay was a wretched hell-hole: swamp-riddled, a haven for malaria and cursed with torrential rain. It was here that General Douglas MacArthur ordered the secret construction of an Allied base with airfields to protect the maritime approach to Port Moresby.

But the Japanese soon discovered the base at Milne Bay and despatched a task force to destroy its garrison and occupy the base. All that stood between the Japanese and their prize was a brigade of regular Australian soldiers untrained in tropical warfare and a brigade of Australian militia with no combat experience whatsoever.

While the Kokoda campaign is etched in public memory, its sister battle at Milne Bay has long been neglected. However the bitter fighting over this isolated harbour played an equally important role in protecting Port Moresby and made a valuable contribution to shifting Allied fortunes in the Pacific War.
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The Battle of Arnhem: The Deadliest Airborne Operation of World War II

The Battle of Arnhem: The Deadliest Airborne Operation of World War II

Antony Beevor

$63.95
The prizewinning historian and internationally bestselling author of D-Day reconstructs the devastating airborne battle of Arnhem in this gripping new account. On September 17, 1944, General Kurt Student, the founder of Nazi Germany's parachute forces, heard the groaning roar of airplane engines. He went out onto his balcony above the flat landscape of southern Holland to watch the air armada of Dakotas and gliders, carrying the legendary American 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions and the British 1st Airborne Division.

Operation Market Garden, the plan to end the war by capturing the bridges leading to the Lower Rhine and beyond, was a bold concept, but could it have ever worked? The cost of failure was horrendous, above all for the Dutch who risked everything to help. German reprisals were pitiless and cruel, and lasted until the end of the war.

Antony Beevor, using often overlooked sources from Dutch, American, British, Polish, and German archives, has reconstructed the terrible reality of the fighting, which General Student called The Last German Victory. Yet The Battle of Arnhem, written with Beevor's inimitable style and gripping narrative, is about much more than a single dramatic battle--it looks into the very heart of war.
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Towards a New Westphalia for the Middle East

Towards a New Westphalia for the Middle East

Patrick Milton ,  Michael Axworthy ,  Brendan Simms

$65.00
It was the original forever war, which went on interminably, fuelled by religious fanaticism, personal ambition, fear of hegemony, and communal suspicion. It dragged in all the neighbouring powers. It was punctuated by repeated failed ceasefires. It inflicted suffering beyond belief and generated waves of refugees. No, this is not Syria today, but the Thirty Years' War (1618-48), which turned Germany and much of central Europe into a disaster zone.

The Thirty Years' War is often cited as a parallel in discussions of the Middle East. The Peace of Westphalia, which ended the conflict in 1648, has featured strongly in such discussions, usually with the observation that recent events in some parts of the region have seen the collapse of ideas of state sovereignty - deas that supposedly originated with the 1648 settlement.

Axworthy, Milton and Simms argue that the Westphalian treaties, far from enshrining state sovereignty, in fact reconfigured and strengthened a structure for legal resolution of disputes, and provided for intervention by outside guarantor powers to uphold the peace settlement. This book argues that the history of Westphalia may hold the key to resolving the new long wars in the Middle East today.
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Logistics in World War II: 1939-1942

Logistics in World War II: 1939-1942

John Norris

$61.95
John Norris shows how logistics, though less glamorous than details of the fighting itself, played a decisive role in the outcome of every campaign and battle of World War Two.

The author marshals some astounding facts and figures to convey the sheer scale of the task all belligerents faced to equip vast forces and supply them in the field. He also draws on first-hand accounts to illustrate what this meant for the men and women in the logistics chain and those depending on it at the sharp end. Many of the vehicles, from supply trucks to pack mules, and other relevant hardware are discussed and illustrated with numerous photographs.

This first volume of two looks at the early years of the war, so we see, for example, how Hitlers panzer divisions were kept rolling in the Blitzkrieg (a German division in 1940 still had around 5000 horses, requiring hundreds of tonnes of fodder) and the British armys disastrous loss of equipment at Dunkirk. This is a fascinating and valuable study of a neglected aspect of World War Two.

150 illustrations
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The Anglo-Boer War in 100 Objects

The Anglo-Boer War in 100 Objects

War Museum of the Boer Republics

$65.99
The Anglo-Boer War in 100 Objects brings the victories and the tragedies-and the full extent of the human drama behind this war-to life through 100 iconic artefacts.

While a Mafeking siege note helps to illustrate the acute shortages caused by the siege, a spade used by a Scottish soldier at Magersfontein and the boots of a Boer soldier who died at Spion Kop tell of the severity of some of the famous battles.

The book follows the course of the war but also highlights specific themes, such as British and Boer weaponry, medical services and POW camps, as well as major figures on both sides.

The text is interspersed with striking historical images from the museum's photographic collection. More than 200 additional objects have been included to help tell the story of a conflict that left an indelible mark on the South African landscape.
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The Glory of the Empires 1880-1914: The Illustrated History of the Uniforms and Traditions of Britain, France, Germany, Russia and the United States

The Glory of the Empires 1880-1914: The Illustrated History of the Uniforms and Traditions of Britain, France, Germany, Russia and the United States

Wendell Schollander

$125.00
During the period 1880-1914, the soldiers of the great empires of Britain, France, Germany, Russia and the United States were bedecked in elaborate helmets, with ornate weapons and finery. Their colourful uniforms represented centuries of regimental history and tradition, and often bore reminders of famous victories and heroic last stands.

In Glory of the Empires, Wendell Schollander presents the definitive study of every regimental uniform across the five empires, including those of the colonies of India, the Philippines and North Africa. He explains the history behind sartorial peculiarities - such as why the Russian 15th Hussars wore a mermaid pink uniform, or why the Wiltshire Regiment had dents on their buttons - and reveals the experiences of the men who served.

Complemented by over 800 rare, black-and-white and colour illustrations, this book fulfils a need not only as a one-stop reference work but also as a narrative history of the period.
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Burned Alive: Giordano Bruno, Galileo and the Inquisition

Burned Alive: Giordano Bruno, Galileo and the Inquisition

Alberto A. Martinez

$62.99
In 1600 the Catholic Inquisition condemned the philosopher Giordano Bruno for his heretical beliefs. He was then burned alive in a public place in Rome. Historians, scientists and teachers usually deny that Bruno was condemned for his beliefs about the universe and that his trial was linked to the later confrontations between the Inquisition and Galileo in 1616 and 1633.

Based on new evidence, however, Burned Alive asserts that Bruno's beliefs about the universe were indeed the primary factors that led to Bruno's condemnation: his beliefs that the stars are suns surrounded by planetary worlds like our own, and that the Earth moves because it has a soul.

Alberto A. Martinez shows how some of the same Inquisitors who judged Bruno also confronted Galileo in 1616. Ultimately the one clergyman who wrote the most critical reports used by the Inquisition to condemn Galileo in 1633 immediately wrote an unpublished manuscript, in which he denounced Galileo and other followers of Copernicus for believing that many worlds exist and that the Earth moves because it has a soul. This book challenges the accepted history of astronomy and shows how cosmology led Bruno bravely to his death.
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London at War: 1939-1945

London at War: 1939-1945

Alan Jeffreys

$49.99
London was a city on the front line in the Second World War. It suffered hits from nearly 12,000 tons of bombs, with nearly 30,000 civilians killed by enemy action. The Blitz changed the landscape of the city. Many famous landmarks were hit, including Buckingham Palace, the Houses of Parliament, the Tower of London - even the Imperial War Museum. Some areas, such as Stepney, were so badly damaged that they had to be almost entirely rebuilt after the war.

But it wasn't just the city's physical landscape that was transformed. With the arrival of large numbers of Commonwealth and overseas service personnel, London became much more cosmopolitan. After 1942, vast numbers of American servicemen were deployed in the capital, and it was also a busy transport hub and a popular destination for troops on leave.

This book tells the story of these momentous years in London's history through IWM's unique collections. Using personal accounts from letters and diaries, objects, photographs, maps and documents it gives an up-close and revealing insight into those turbulent years in the capital, experienced by those who lived there.
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Oceans Ventured: Winning the Cold War at Sea

Oceans Ventured: Winning the Cold War at Sea

John Lehman

$39.95
When Ronald Reagan took office in 1981, the United States and NATO were losing the Cold War. The USSR had superiority in conventional weapons and manpower in Europe, and had embarked on a construction programme to gain naval pre-eminence. But Reagan had a plan.

Reagan pushed Congress to build the navy back to its 1945 strength. He gathered a circle of experienced naval planners, including the author, to devise an aggressive strategy. New radars, sensors and emissions technology would make ghosts of US submarines and surface fleets. They would operate aircraft carriers in Arctic waters which no navy had attempted. The Soviets, surrounded by their forward naval strategy, bankrupted their economy trying to keep pace. It wasn't long before the Berlin Wall fell and the USSR was disbanded.
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Contempt: A Memoir of the Clinton Investigation

Contempt: A Memoir of the Clinton Investigation

Ken Starr

$39.99
You could fill a library with books about the scandals of the Clinton administration, which eventually led to Bill Clinton's impeachment by the House and acquittal by the Senate. Bill and Hillary Clinton have told the story from their perspectives, as have journalists, pundits, and various participants. But over the last two decades, former Independent Counsel Ken Starr - the prosecutor at the center of the storm - has kept silent.

Now Starr finally shares his unique perspective on the investigation that began with the Whitewater land deal and spread to a wide range of President Clinton's actions, including accusations of sexual harassment and perjury in the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Starr's narrative includes behind-the-scenes details that have never before emerged, as well as a new analysis from the perspective of history.

With today's headlines filled with debates about presidential abuse of power, sexual harassment, and what actions actually justify impeachment, Starr's story and insights have become more relevant than ever.
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The Taking of K-129: How the CIA Used Howard Hughes to Steal a Russian Sub in the Most Daring Covert Operation in History

The Taking of K-129: How the CIA Used Howard Hughes to Steal a Russian Sub in the Most Daring Covert Operation in History

Josh Dean

$31.95
A riveting, true-life tale of military history, engineering genius, and high-stakes spy-craft set during the height of the Cold War.

In the early hours of February 25, 1968, a Russian submarine armed with three nuclear ballistic missiles set sail from its base in Siberia on a routine combat patrol to Hawaii. Then it vanished.

As the Soviet Navy searched in vain for the lost vessel, a small, highly classified American operation using sophisticated deep-sea spy equipment found it - wrecked on the sea floor at a depth of 16,800 feet, far beyond the capabilities of any salvage that existed. But the potential intelligence assets onboard the ship - the nuclear warheads, battle orders, and cryptological machines - justified going to extreme lengths to find a way to raise the submarine.

So began Project Azorian, a top secret mission that took six years, cost an estimated $800 million, and would become the largest and most daring covert operation in CIA history.

After the U.S. Navy declared retrieving the sub "impossible," the mission fell to the CIA's burgeoning Directorate of Science and Technology, the little-known division responsible for the legendary U-2 and SR-71 Blackbird spy planes. Working with Global Marine Systems, the country's foremost maker of exotic, deep-sea drilling vessels, the CIA commissioned the most expensive ship ever built and told the world that it belonged to the reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes, who would use the mammoth ship to mine rare minerals from the ocean floor. In reality, a complex network of spies, scientists, and politicians attempted a project even crazier than Hughes's reputation: raising the sub directly under the watchful eyes of the Russians.
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Mr. Trump's Wild Ride: The Thrills, Chills, Screams, and Occasional Blackouts of His Extraordinary First Year in Office

Mr. Trump's Wild Ride: The Thrills, Chills, Screams, and Occasional Blackouts of His Extraordinary First Year in Office

Major Garrett

$39.99
American politics today are more polarizing and divisive than ever, but there's one thing we can all agree on; 2017 was one long, crazy year. There were too many triumphs and tragedies to count, and dozens of moments that will impact our lives for years to come; for even the most die-hard political junkies, some of the details are already starting to fall through the cracks.

When every year in Trumpland feels like a decade, who can we turn to for an authoritative, entertaining breakdown of the most important and wide-reaching events? Look no further than Major Garrett. As CBS News' Chief White House Correspondent, he's been strapped into the front seat of Mr. Trump's Wild Ride since Inauguration Day.

Garrett has served as a White House correspondent for nearly two decades, covering the last four presidents for three different news outlets; he's an expert in executive branch intrigue, and he knows a little something about taking the long view. Mr. Trump's Wild Ride is neither an exercise in Trump-bashing nor a pro-Trump pep rally. It's a definitive, non-biased chronicle of a watershed year in the White House. Buckle up; we're in for a bumpy ride.
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Trump Must Go: The Top 100 Reasons to Dump Trump (and One to Keep Him)

Trump Must Go: The Top 100 Reasons to Dump Trump (and One to Keep Him)

Bill Press

$39.99
I'd give us an A. -Donald Trump, on his first 100 days in office.

Americans increasingly agree on one thing: Every day that Trump stays in office, he diminishes the United States and its people.

In Trump Must Go, TV and radio host Bill Press offers 100 reasons why Trump needs to be removed from office, whether by impeachment, the 25th Amendment, or the ballot box.

Beginning with the man himself and moving through Trump's executive action damage, Press covers Trump's debasement of the United States political system and destruction of the Republican Party. Ranging from banning federal employees' use of the phrase climate change, to putting down Haiti, ElSalvador, and African nations as shithole countries, we have to wonder what he'll do next. He has a bromance with Putin that enables several meetings between Trump staffers and Russian officials, and he has a wrecking crew administration: Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Education Secretary BetsyDeVos, and Housing Secretary Ben Carson, to name a few. Extensive executive time marks Trump's calendar so he can golf, watch TV, and eat fast food. Trump has done it all.badly.

But, in a political climate where the world has learned to expect the unexpected, Press offers readers a twist: one reason not to ditch Donald Trump.
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The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple

The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple

Jeff Guinn

$22.99
2018 Edgar Award Finalist-Best Fact Crime. A thoroughly readable, thoroughly chilling account of a brilliant con man and his all-too vulnerable prey (The Boston Globe) - the definitive story of preacher Jim Jones, who was responsible for the Jonestown Massacre, the largest murder-suicide in American history, by the New York Times bestselling author of Manson.

In the 1950s, a young Indianapolis minister named Jim Jones preached a curious blend of the gospel and Marxism. His congregation was racially mixed, and he was a leader in the early civil rights movement. Eventually, Jones moved his church, Peoples Temple, to northern California, where he got involved in electoral politics and became a prominent Bay Area leader. But underneath the surface lurked a terrible darkness.

In this riveting narrative, Jeff Guinn examines Jones's life, from his early days as an idealistic minister to a secret life of extramarital affairs, drug use, and fraudulent faith healing, before the fateful decision to move almost a thousand of his followers to a settlement in the jungles of Guyana in South America. Guinn provides stunning new details of the events leading to the fatal day in November, 1978 when more than nine hundred people died - including almost three hundred infants and children - after being ordered to swallow a cyanide-laced drink.

Guinn examined thousands of pages of FBI files on the case, including material released during the course of his research. He traveled to Jones's Indiana hometown, where he spoke to people never previously interviewed, and uncovered fresh information from Jonestown survivors. He even visited the Jonestown site with the same pilot who flew there the day that Congressman Leo Ryan was murdered on Jones's orders. The Road to Jonestown is the most complete picture to date of this tragic saga, and of the man who engineered it...

The result is a disturbing portrait of evil - and a compassionate memorial to those taken in by Jones's malign charisma (San Francisco Chronicle).
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No Property in Man: Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation's Founding

No Property in Man: Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation's Founding

Sean Wilentz

$54.99
A radical reconstruction of the founders' debate over slavery and the Constitution, by the best-selling, award-winning author of The Rise of American Democracy.

Americans revere the Constitution even as they argue fiercely over its original toleration of slavery. Some historians have charged that slaveholders actually enshrined human bondage at the nation's founding. The acclaimed political historian Sean Wilentz shares the dismay but sees the Constitution and slavery differently. Although the proslavery side won important concessions, he asserts, antislavery impulses also influenced the framers' work. Far from covering up a crime against humanity, the Constitution restricted slavery's legitimacy under the new national government. In time, that limitation would open the way for the creation of an antislavery politics that led to Southern secession, the Civil War, and Emancipation.

Wilentz's controversial and timely reconsideration upends orthodox views of the Constitution. He describes the document as a tortured paradox that abided slavery without legitimizing it. This paradox lay behind the great political battles that fractured the nation over the next seventy years. As Southern Fire-eaters invented a proslavery version of the Constitution, antislavery advocates, including Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, proclaimed antislavery versions based on the framers' refusal to validate what they called property in man.

No Property in Man invites fresh debate about the political and legal struggles over slavery that began during the Revolution and concluded with the Confederacy's defeat. It drives straight to the heart of the most contentious and enduring issue in all of American history.
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Unrivaled: Why America Will Remain the World's Sole Superpower

Unrivaled: Why America Will Remain the World's Sole Superpower

Michael Beckley

$59.99
The United States has been the world's dominant power for more than a century. Now many analysts believe that other countries are rising and the United States is in decline. Is the unipolar moment over? Is America finished as a superpower?

In this book, Michael Beckley argues that the United States has unique advantages over other nations that, if used wisely, will allow it to remain the world's sole superpower throughout this century. We are not living in a transitional, post-Cold War era. Instead, we are in the midst of what he calls the unipolar era - a period as singular and important as any epoch in modern history. This era, Beckley contends, will endure because the US has a much larger economic and military lead over its closest rival, China, than most people think and the best prospects of any nation to amass wealth and power in the decades ahead.

Deeply researched and brilliantly argued, this book covers hundreds of years of great power politics and develops new methods for measuring power and predicting the rise and fall of nations. By documenting long-term trends in the global balance of power and explaining their implications for world politics, the book provides guidance for policymakers, business people, and scholars alike.
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One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate, and the Not-Yet Deported

One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate, and the Not-Yet Deported

E. J. Dionne Jr. ,  Norman J. Ornstein ,  Thomas E. Mann

$26.99
American democracy was never supposed to give the nation a president like Donald Trump. We have never had a president who gave rise to such widespread alarm about his lack of commitment to the institutions of self-government, to the norms democracy requires, and to the need for basic knowledge about how government works. We have never had a president who raises profound questions about his basic competence and his psychological capacity to take on the most challenging political office in the world.

Yet if Trump is both a threat to our democracy and a product of its weaknesses, the citizen activism he has inspired is the antidote. The reaction to the crisis created by Trump's presidency can provide the foundation for an era of democratic renewal and vindicate our long experiment in self-rule.

The award-winning authors of One Nation After Trump explain Trump's rise and the danger his administration poses to our free institutions. They also offer encouragement to the millions of Americans now experiencing a new sense of citizenship and engagement and argue that our nation needs a unifying alternative to Trump's dark and divisive brand of politics-an alternative rooted in a New Economy, a New Patriotism, a New Civil Society, and a New Democracy. One Nation After Trump is the essential book for our era, an unsparing assessment of the perils facing the United States and an inspiring roadmap for how we can reclaim the future.
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Stanton: Lincoln's War Secretary

Stanton: Lincoln's War Secretary

Walter Stahr

$37.95
New York Times bestselling author Walter Stahr tells the story of Edwin Stanton, who served as Secretary of War in Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. This exhaustively researched, well-paced book should take its place as the new, standard biography of the ill-tempered man who helped to save the Union. It is fair, judicious, authoritative, and comprehensive (The Wall Street Journal).

Of the crucial men close to President Lincoln, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton (1814-1869) was the most powerful and controversial. Stanton raised, armed, and supervised the army of a million men who won the Civil War. He directed military movements. He arrested and imprisoned thousands for war crimes, such as resisting the draft or calling for an armistice. Stanton was so controversial that some accused him at that time of complicity in Lincoln's assassination. He was a stubborn genius who was both reviled and revered in his time.

Stanton was a Democrat before the war and a prominent trial lawyer. He opposed slavery, but only in private. He served briefly as President Buchanan's Attorney General and then as Lincoln's aggressive Secretary of War. On the night of April 14, 1865, Stanton rushed to Lincoln's deathbed and took over the government since Secretary of State William Seward had been critically wounded the same evening. He informed the nation of the President's death, summoned General Grant to protect the Capitol, and started collecting the evidence from those who had been with the Lincolns at the theater in order to prepare a murder trial.

Now Walter Stahr's highly recommended (Library Journal, starred review) essential book is the first major account of Stanton in fifty years, restoring this underexplored figure to his proper place in American history. A lively, lucid, and opinionated history (Kirkus Reviews, starred review).
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Liars, Leakers, and Liberals: The Case Against the Anti-Trump Conspiracy

Liars, Leakers, and Liberals: The Case Against the Anti-Trump Conspiracy

Jeanine Pirro

$39.99
Judge Jeanine writes a firsthand account of the real Trump presidency, based on her interviews with top administration officials, family members and insiders. This is the story the Fake News media doesn't want you to hear!

At this point in American history, we are victims of a subterfuge and sabotage of the presidency that we've never witnessed before. Nevertheless President Trump continues to fight every day to keep his promise to Make America Great Again. Today that bold idea has already led to a conservative judge on the Supreme Court, tax reform, and deregulation that has unleashed an economy stronger than anyone could have imagined.

But there are dark forces that seek to obstruct and undermine the president, their ultimate goal to reverse the results of the 2016 presidential election. They are part of a wide-ranging conspiracy that would seem incredible if it weren't being perpetrated openly, for all the world to see. Driven by unbridled ambition, blinded by greed, and bound by a common goal - to unseat the 45th President of the United States - this cabal is determined to maintain its hold on a power to which its members have no legitimate claim.

Using the same talents that made her a top prosecutor, Jeanine Pirro proves beyond a reasonable doubt that a plot against the People of the United States exists and that the conspirators have the means and motive to destroy our democratic republic.

Pirro uncovers the elements of this conspiracy, including "fake news" propaganda, law enforcement corruption at the highest levels, and felonious national security leaks by members of the intelligence community. She exposes bureaucratic resistance to lawful and constitutional executive orders issued by the duly elected president and crooked deals with foreign governments by U.S. officials sworn to defend our Constitution.

It's about time the American public knows the truth about the plot to bring down the Trump presidency. By the time you've finished this book, you'll agree with Judge Pirro that the only way to stop these hoodlums is to Take Them Out in Cuffs!
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The Making of Donald Trump

The Making of Donald Trump

David Cay Johnston

$19.99
The international bestseller that brought Trump's long history of racism, mafia ties, and shady business dealings into the limelight. Now with a new introduction and epilogue.

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist David Cay Johnston, who had spent thirty years chronicling Donald Trump for the New York Times and other leading newspapers, takes readers from the origins of the Trump family fortune - his grandfather's Yukon bordellos during the Gold Rush - to his tumultuous gambling and real estate dealings in New York and Atlantic City, all the way to his election as president of the United States, giving us a deeply researched and shockingly full picture of one of the most controversial figures of our time.
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Rising Star, Setting Sun - Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and the Presidential Transition that Changed America

Rising Star, Setting Sun - Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and the Presidential Transition that Changed America

John T. Shaw

$42.95
After winning the presidency by a razor-thin victory on November 8, 1960 over Richard Nixon, Dwight D. Eisenhower's former vice president, John F. Kennedy became the thirty-fifth president of the United States. But beneath the stately veneers of both Ike and JFK, there was a complex and consequential rivalry.

In Rising Star, Setting Sun, John T. Shaw focuses on the intense ten-week transition between JFK's electoral victory and his inauguration on January 20, 1961. In just over two months, America would transition into a new age, and nowhere was it more marked that in the generational and personal difference between these two men and their dueling visions for the country they led. The former general espoused frugality, prudence, and stewardship. The young political wunderkid embodied dramatic themes and sweeping social change.

Extensively researched and eloquently written, Shaw paints a vivid picture of what Time called a turning point in the twentieth century as Americans today find themselves poised on the cusp of another watershed moment in our nation's history.
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The Tragedy of Benedict Arnold: An American Life

The Tragedy of Benedict Arnold: An American Life

Joyce Lee Malcolm

$39.95
Proud and talented, history now remembers this conflicted man solely through the lens of his last desperate act of treason. Yet the fall of Benedict Arnold remains one of the Revolutionary period's great puzzles. Why did a brilliant military commander, who repeatedly risked his life fighting the British, who was grievously injured in the line of duty, and fell into debt personally funding his own troops, ultimately became a traitor to the patriot cause?

Historian Joyce Lee Malcolm skillfully unravels the man behind the myth and gives us a portrait of the true Arnold and his world. There was his dramatic victory against the British at Saratoga in 1777 and his troubled childhood in a pre-revolutionary America beset with class tension and economic instability. We witness his brilliant wartime military exploits and learn of his contentious relationship with a newly formed and fractious Congress, fearful of powerful military leaders, like Arnold, who could threaten the nation's fragile democracy.

Throughout, Malcolm weaves in portraits of Arnold's great allies-George Washington, General Schuyler, his beautiful and beloved wife Peggy Shippen, and others-as well as his unrelenting enemy John Adams, British General Clinton, and master spy John Andre. Thrilling and thought-provoking, The Tragedy of Benedict Arnold sheds new light on a man-as well on the nuanced and complicated time in which he lived.
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American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic

American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic

Johnson

$42.95
When Dr David Hosack tilled the America's first botanical garden in the Manhattan soil more than two hundred years ago, he didn't just dramatically alter the New York landscape; he left a monumental legacy of advocacy for public health and wide-ranging support for the sciences. A charismatic dreamer admired by the likes of Jefferson, Madison and Humboldt, and intimate friends with both Hamilton and Burr, the Columbia professor devoted his life to inspiring Americans to pursue medicine and botany with a rigour to rival Europe's. Though he was shoulder-to-shoulder with the founding fathers Hosack and his story remain unknown. Now, in melodic prose, Victoria Johnson eloquently chronicles Hosack's tireless career to reveal the breadth of his impact.
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Tatau: A cultural history of Samoan tattooing

Tatau: A cultural history of Samoan tattooing

Sean Mallon ,  Sebastien Galliot

$69.99
A strikingly designed and richly illustrated retelling of the unique history of Samoan tattooing, from 3000 years ago to today.

The Samoan Islands are unusual in that tattooing has been continuously practised with indigenous techniques: the design of the full male tattoo, the pe'a has evolved in subtle ways since the nineteenth century, but remains as elaborate, meaningful and powerful as it ever was.

This first history of Samoan tatau explores the people, encounters, events and external forces that have defined Samoan tattooing over many centuries.

Stunningly illustrated with images of nineteenth and twentieth century and contemporary Samoan tattoos, along with intricate diagrams of designs and motifs, Tatau is the definitive guide to this rich and influential living art form.
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The Russian Revolution: A View from the Third World

The Russian Revolution: A View from the Third World

Walter Rodney

$32.99
Renowned Pan-African and socialist theorist on the Bolshevik Revolution and its post-colonial legacy

In his short life, Guyanese intellectual Walter Rodney emerged as one of the foremost thinkers and activists of the anticolonial revolution, leading movements in North America, Africa, and the Caribbean. Wherever he was, Rodney was a lightning rod for working-class Black Power organizing. His deportation sparked Jamaica’s Rodney Riots in 1968, and his scholarship trained a generation how to approach politics on an international scale. In 1980, shortly after founding the Working People’s Alliance in Guyana, the thirty-eight-year-old Rodney was assassinated.

Walter Rodney’s Russian Revolution collects surviving texts from a series of lectures he delivered at the University of Dar es Salaam, an intellectual hub of the independent Third World. It had been his intention to work these into a book, a goal completed posthumously with the editorial aid of Robin D.G. Kelley and Jesse Benjamin. Moving across the historiography of the long Russian Revolution with clarity and insight, Rodney transcends the ideological fault lines of the Cold War. Surveying a broad range of subjects - the Narodniks, social democracy, the October Revolution, civil war, and the challenges of Stalinism - Rodney articulates a distinct viewpoint from the Third World, one that grounds revolutionary theory and history with the people in motion.
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The MiG-29: Russia's Legendary Air Superiority, and Multirole Fighter, 1977 to the Present

The MiG-29: Russia's Legendary Air Superiority, and Multirole Fighter, 1977 to the Present

Andy Groening

$76.99
This book presents the development and operational use of the Soviet/Russian Mikoyan MiG-29. The MiG-29 was the Soviet response to the new generation of air-superiority fighter aircraft fielded by NATO, such as the American F-15 and F-16. The aircraft entered service with the Soviet Air Force in 1982, and was soon flown by many Eastern Bloc air forces. The fighter's performance came as surprise to the West, and modernized variants are still in service today. Described in superb detail are the many MiG-29 variants, and export models that flew in such countries as Algeria, Cuba, Hungary, India, Malaysia, North Korea, Peru, Poland, Sudan, Syria, Ukraine, and many others. Aircraft technical systems and armaments are also discussed in detail.
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Brutal Bloc: Soviet era postcards from the Eastern Bloc

Brutal Bloc: Soviet era postcards from the Eastern Bloc

Damon Murray ,  Stephen Sorrell ,  Jonathan Meades

$45.00
A collection of previously unpublished postcards from the former Eastern Bloc - sinister, funny, poignant and surreal, they depict the social and architectural values of the period.

Brutal concrete hotels, futurist TV towers, heroic worker statues - this collection of Soviet era postcards documents the uncompromising landscape of the Eastern Bloc through its buildings and monuments. They are interspersed with quotes from prominent figures of the time, that both support and confound the ideologies presented in the images.

In contrast to the photographs of a ruined and abandoned Soviet empire we are accustomed to seeing today, the scenes depicted here publicise the bright future of communism: social housing blocks, Palaces of Culture and monuments to Comradeship. Dating from the 1960s to the 1980s, they offer a nostalgic yet revealing insight into social and architectural values of the time, acting as a window through which we can examine cars, people, and of course, buildings. These postcards, sanctioned by the authorities, intended to show the world what living in communism looked like.

Instead, this postcard propaganda inadvertently communicates other messages: outside the House of Political Enlightenment in Yerevan, the flowerbed reads `Glory to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union'; in Novopolotsk, art school pupils paint plein air, their subject is a housing estate; at the Irkutsk Polytechnic Institute students stroll past a five metre tall concrete hammer and sickle.
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Theatre of the World: The Maps That Made History

Theatre of the World: The Maps That Made History

Thomas Reinertsen Berg ,  Alison McCullough

$55.00
A beautifully presented, prize-winning book about how maps have changed the world.

What is a map? How have people been drawing the world throughout history? What do maps say about us?

Theatre of the World is a unique book detailing the full and incredible history of maps. Thomas Reinertsen Berg takes us all the way from the mysterious symbols of the Stone Age to Google Earth in a fascinating tale about science and worldview, about art and technology, power and ambitions, practical needs and distant dreams of the unknown.

Along the way, we encounter visionary geographers and heroic explorers along with the unknown heroes of the map-making world, both ancient and modern. And the fascinating visual material allows us to witness the extraordinary breadth of this history with our own eyes.
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Atlas of the Unexpected: Haphazard discoveries, chance places and unimaginable destinations

Atlas of the Unexpected: Haphazard discoveries, chance places and unimaginable destinations

Travis Elborough

$39.99
A voyage to places both infamous and unknown that have, often by chance or by haphazard means, been destinations of discovery that make up our world today.

From the fortuitous discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, to the savvy invention of Vaseline at an American oil rig, Atlas of the Unexpected uncovers the most astounding and bizarre discoveries which have been unearthed on our planet. Spanning centuries and reaching all around the globe, each entry provides key information, wittily observed, and is accompanied by specially-drawn maps that illuminate the geographical oddities of each discovery.
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Letters to Change the World: From Pankhurst to Orwell

Letters to Change the World: From Pankhurst to Orwell

Travis Elborough

$32.99
A collection of some of the most politically and socially inspiring letters that have helped change the world and the way we see it

‘We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed’ Martin Luther King

In an era where the liberties we often take for granted are under threat, Letters To Change the World is a collection of inspiring letters offering reminders from history that standing up for and voicing our personal and political beliefs is not merely a crucial right but a duty if we want to change the world.

Edited by Travis Elborough, the collection includes George Orwell's warning on totalitarianism, Martin Luther King's 'Letter from a Birmingham Jail', Albert Camus on the reasons to fight a war, Bertrand Russell on peace, Emmeline Pankhurst rallying her suffragettes, Nelson Mandela's letter to his children from prison and Time's Up on the abuse of power.
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The Internationalists: And Their Plan to Outlaw War

The Internationalists: And Their Plan to Outlaw War

Oona Hathaway ,  Scott J. Shapiro

$29.99
Since the end of the Second World War, the world has moved from an international system in which war was legal, and accepted as the ultimate arbiter of disputes between nations, to one in which it was not. How did this epochal transformation come about? This remarkable book, which combines political, legal and intellectual history, traces the origins and course of one of the great shifts in the modern world. The pivot of The Internationalists is the Paris Peace Pact of 1928. Spurred by memories of the First World War and driven by the idealism of a small number of statesmen and thinkers, virtually every nation renounced war as a means of international policy. Eleven years later, on the outbreak of the Second World War, the Pact looked like an embarrassing lapse in the serious business of international affairs. That is how historians have seen it ever since. Hathaway and Shapiro show, however, that the Pact shaped a new world order.
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Fayke Newes: The Media vs the Mighty, From Henry VIII to Donald Trump

Fayke Newes: The Media vs the Mighty, From Henry VIII to Donald Trump

Derek J. Taylor

$27.99
"Fake news." "Psycho." "Enemy of the people."

The insults President Donald Trump and the media hurl at each other are, in fact, nothing new. Over many centuries, journalists have accused governments of being "horrible monsters," with "guilty consciences," while reporters have been branded "poisoners of the people" putting out "false fables." Ever since the invention of the printing press, those in positions of power have seen mass communication as a dangerous threat, usurping their ability to tell people what to think, and capable of stirring up discontent and even rebellion.

Historian and international journalist Derek J. Taylor tracks the story of what’s been a long, bloody and messy war, and discovers that neither side has always had clean hands. He takes us from Henry VIII’s reign when writers and printers were executed, to the later struggles for the right to a free press, to the media’s battles with the governments of President Richard Nixon and Prime Minister Tony Blair. Taylor ends with the social media revolution, which has put mass communication in the hands of ordinary people, as well as those of a certain U.S. president.
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Trading Territories: Mapping the Early Modern World

Trading Territories: Mapping the Early Modern World

Jerry Brotton

$24.99
Trading Territories tells the compelling story of maps and geographical knowledge in the early modern world from the fifteenth to the early seventeenth century. Examining how European geographers mapped the territories of the Old World - Africa and Southeast Asia - this book shows how the historical preoccupation with Columbus's `discovery' of the New World of America in 1492 obscured the ongoing importance of mapping territories that have since been defined as `eastern', especially those in the Muslim world. In this book, now available in paperback and updated with a new preface by the author, Jerry Brotton shows that trade and diplomacy defined the development of maps and globes in this period, far more than the disinterested pursuit of scientific accuracy and objectivity, and challenges our preconceptions about not just maps, but also the history and geography of what we call East and West.
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Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War Between Islam and the West

Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War Between Islam and the West

Raymond Ibrahim ,  Victor Davis Hanson

$51.95
A sweeping history of the often-violent conflict between Islam and the West, shedding a revealing light on current hostilities

The West and Islam - the sword and scimitar - have clashed since the mid-seventh century, when, according to Muslim tradition, the Roman emperor rejected Prophet Muhammad's order to abandon Christianity and convert to Islam, unleashing a centuries-long jihad on Christendom.

Sword and Scimitar chronicles the decisive battles that arose from this ages-old Islamic jihad, beginning with the first major Islamic attack on Christian land in 636, through the Muslim occupation of nearly three-quarters of Christendom which prompted the Crusades, followed by renewed Muslim conquests by Turks and Tatars, to the European colonization of the Muslim world in the 1800s, when Islam largely went on the retreat - until its reemergence in recent times. Using original sources in Arabic and Greek, preeminent historian Raymond Ibrahim describes each battle in vivid detail and explains how these wars and the larger historical currents of the age reflect the cultural fault lines between Islam and the West.

The majority of these landmark battles - including the battles of Yarmuk, Tours, Manzikert, the sieges at Constantinople and Vienna, and the crusades in Syria and Spain - are now forgotten or considered inconsequential. Yet today, as the West faces a resurgence of this enduring Islamic jihad, Sword and Scimitar provides the needed historical context to understand the current relationship between the West and the Islamic world - and why the Islamic State is merely the latest chapter of an old history.
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