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The Templars: The Rise and Fall of God's Holy Warriors

The Templars: The Rise and Fall of God's Holy Warriors

Dan Jones

$39.99
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The Knights Templar were the wealthiest, most powerful - and most secretive - of the military orders that flourished in the crusading era.

Their story - encompassing as it does the greatest international conflict of the Middle Ages, a network of international finance, a swift rise in wealth and influence followed by a bloody and humiliating fall - has left a comet's tail of mystery that continues to fascinate and inspire historians, novelists and conspiracy theorists.
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Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World

Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World

Adrian Goldsworthy

$22.99
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The Pax Romana is famous for having provided a remarkable period of peace and stability, rarely seen before or since. Yet the Romans were first and foremost conquerors, imperialists who took by force a vast empire stretching from the Euphrates in the east to the Atlantic coast in the west. Their peace meant Roman victory and was brought about by strength and dominance rather than co-existence with neighbours. The Romans were aggressive and ruthless, and during the creation of their empire millions died or were enslaved.

But the Pax Romana was real, not merely the boast of emperors, and some of the regions in the Empire have never again lived for so many generations free from major wars. So what exactly was the Pax Romana and what did it mean for the people who found themselves brought under Roman rule?

Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one. He chronicles the many rebellions by the conquered, and describes why these broke out and why most failed. At the same time, he explains that hostility was only one reaction to the arrival of Rome, and from the start there was alliance, collaboration and even enthusiasm for joining the invaders, all of which increased as resistance movements faded away.

A ground-breaking and comprehensive history of the Roman Peace, Pax Romana takes the reader on a journey from the bloody conquests of an aggressive Republic through the age of Caesar and Augustus to the golden age of peace and prosperity under diligent emperors like Marcus Aurelius, offering a balanced and nuanced reappraisal of life in the Roman Empire.
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Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters

Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters

Margo Neale

$49.95
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ABBEY'S BOOKSELLER PICK ----- Although conceived as a catalogue accompanying the major exhibition at he National Museum, this splendid book is also a special record of one of the most important Indigenous story sequences. It aims to both share and preserve knowledge, and vibrantly documents artworks and the stories of the sisters who flee from one water source to the next, pursued by a lustful shape-shifter. Spinetinglingly beautiful – and an important resource for anyone who wishes to learn about the spiritual, cultural and ecological pathways of this extensive songline. Lindy Jones

-----

This book is a companion to the National Museum of Australia's blockbuster Indigenous-led exhibition, Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters.

It explores the history and meaning of songlines, the Dreaming or creation tracks that crisscross the Australian continent, of which the Seven Sisters songline is one of the most extensive.

Through stunning artworks (many created especially for the exhibition), story, and in-depth analysis, the book will provide the definitive resource for those interested in finding out more about these complex pathways of spiritual, ecological, economic, cultural, and ontological knowledge - the stories `written in the land'.
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The Best Australian Essays 2017

The Best Australian Essays 2017

Anna Goldsworthy

$29.99
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The Best Australian Essays showcase the nation's most eloquent, insightful and urgent non-fiction writing.

In her first time as editor, award-winning author Anna Goldsworthy chooses brilliant pieces that provoke, unveil, engage and enlighten, and get to the heart of what's really happening in Australia and the world. Previous contributors include Helen Garner, J.M. Coetzee, Karen Hitchcock, Tim Flannery, Robyn Davidson, Richard Flanagan, Clive James, Don Watson, Tim Winton and Caroline Baum.
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Dear Lindy: A Nation Responds to the Loss of Azaria

Dear Lindy: A Nation Responds to the Loss of Azaria

Alana Valentine

$39.99
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ABBEY’S BOOKSELLER PICK —— Anyone who remembers the 80s remembers Lindy Chamberlain and the legal battles (not to mention the media ones) over the death of her baby daughter Azaria. Lindy received thousands of letters from people all round the country, and they are now in 199 boxes in the National Library. Renowned playwright, Alana Valentine, wrote a moving play based upon a selection of these, and now presents a further collection. Ranging from outrage to compassion, eccentricity to support, these epistles represent a nation’s preoccupation with big issues. A fascinating microcosm of Australian society, compelling and at times, heart wrenching. Lindy Jones

——

'This book shows just how far, wide, and deep the story has gone' - Lindy Chamberlain-CreightonAs Lindy mourned the death of her baby daughter Azaria, taken by a dingo from a campsite at Uluru in 1980, she was tried and convicted in the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory.

The court of public opinion had already made its ruling, shown in the thousands of hurtful, supportive, accusatory or sympathetic letters Lindy received.

The letters featured in this book were painstakingly collected and filed by Lindy over the past 37 years, and include anonymous vitriol, eccentric rants, words of prayer and support, and every other possible response.
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Burke and Wills: The triumph and tragedy of Australia's most famous explorers

Burke and Wills: The triumph and tragedy of Australia's most famous explorers

Peter FitzSimons

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'They have left here today!' he calls to the others. When King puts his hand down above the ashes of the fire, it is to find it still hot. There is even a tiny flame flickering from the end of one log. They must have left just hours ago.

MELBOURNE, 20 AUGUST 1860. In an ambitious quest to be the first Europeans to cross the harsh Australian continent, the Victorian Exploring Expedition sets off, farewelled by 15,000 cheering well-wishers. Led by Robert O'Hara Burke, a brave man totally lacking in the bush skills necessary for his task; surveyor and meteorologist William Wills; and 17 others, the expedition took 20 tons of equipment carried on six wagons, 23 horses and 26 camels

Almost immediately plagued by disputes and sackings, the expeditioners battled the extremes of the Australian landscape and weather: its deserts, the boggy mangrove swamps of the Gulf, the searing heat and flooding rains. Food ran short and, unable to live off the land, the men nevertheless mostly spurned the offers of help from the local Indigenous people.

In desperation, leaving the rest of the party at the expedition's depot on Coopers Creek, Burke, Wills and John King made a dash for the Gulf in December 1860. Bad luck and bad management would see them miss by just hours a rendezvous back at Coopers Creek, leaving them stranded in the wilderness with practically no supplies.

Only King survived to tell the tale.

Yet, despite their tragic fates, the names of Burke and Wills have become synonymous with perseverance and bravery in the face of overwhelming odds. They live on in our nation's history - and their story remains immediate and compelling.
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The Harbour: A City's Heart, a Country's Soul

The Harbour: A City's Heart, a Country's Soul

Scott Bevan

$49.99
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SIGNED COPIES SHIPPING NOW!

ABBEY’S BOOKSELLER PICK —— This is a joyful celebration of the feature that characterises Sydney: its fabulous harbour. Bevan decided to get to know it by kayaking into all its little coves and bays, talking to the people he encountered and discovering its moods and stories. Each chapter is devoted to an area, from the Parramatta River, along the North Shore, over to Manly, across the heads, and along the southern and city reaches back towards Parramatta River. A very likeable book, written in an easy and conversational style, and full of fascinating tales of past and present! Lindy Jones

——

"The finest harbour deserves the finest book … A colourful, fascinating and enduring account of the greatest waterway in the hemisphere." Simon Winchester

"Sydney Harbour. I know what it looks like. I know what it feels like. Now with this wonderful book, I know its story. This book is a joy to read. And essential for anyone who loves Sydney Harbour ... and who doesn't?" Ken Done

In the bestselling tradition of Peter Ackroyd's The Thames, a celebration of one of the world’s great waterways.

Everyone knows Sydney Harbour. At least, we think we do.

Everyone can see the harbour, whether we've ever been to Sydney or not. By as little as a word or two, the harbour floats into our mind’s eye. The Bridge. The Opera House. Fireworks on New Year’s Eve. When we see those images, we feel a sense of belonging. No matter who we are, or where we’re from, we see the harbour and we feel good.

In this beautiful, authoritative and meditative journey, Scott Bevan takes us from cove to cove - by kayak, yacht and barge - to gather the harbour’s stories, past and present, from boat builders, ship captains and fishermen to artists, divers, historians and environmentalists, from signs of ancient life to the submarine invasion by the Japanese.

This is the ultimate story of Sydney Harbour – a city’s heart and a country's soul.

The Harbour by Scott Bevan at 131 York Street Sydney
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Monash and Chauvel: How Australia's Two Greatest Generals Changed the Course of World History

Monash and Chauvel: How Australia's Two Greatest Generals Changed the Course of World History

Roland Perry

$34.99
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Monash and Chauvel is a gripping narrative history that follows the extraordinary campaigns of the two most outstanding battlefield commanders of the First World War across all the Allied armies: John Monash and Harry Chauvel.

John Monash commanded the Australian forces on the Western Front at the most critical time of the war, 1918. With his German Jewish heritage, Monash was an outsider who had risen to his position through his ground-breaking military achievements. Almost uniquely among Allied generals on the Western Front, he learned the lessons of past failures and devised the tactics that allowed his Australian troops to break through the stalemate of trench warfare, masterminding crucial battles, including Amiens, Mont St Quentin, Peronne, and at the Hindenburg Line that broke the German Army in France. In the war against the Ottoman Empire in the Middle East, Harry Chauvel led the 34,000-strong Desert Mounted Column.

Chauvel was an Empire man, who considered himself as British first, Australian second. His attitude changed in the course of the war, when he realised he would have to ignore the directives of his British superiors and take the initiative in planning battle tactics himself if he was to defeat the Turks. He did this at Romani in the Sinai in August 1916; at Beersheba on 31 October 1917; and in the final 1918 drive to push the Turks right out of the Middle East after 400 years of brutal rule over the Arab tribes.

By the end of the war Monash and Chauvel had brought a distinctly Australian sensibility to their areas of operation, involving flexibility, innovation and a deep respect for the troops they led, which was in turn reciprocated by their men.

Their impact on the war was immense and, in this fascinating and compelling account, bestselling author Roland Perry does full justice to their extraordinary careers and the soldiers under their command.

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Dissent: The Student Press in 1960s Australia

Dissent: The Student Press in 1960s Australia

Sally Percival Wood

$32.99
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A passionate portrayal of Australia's social awakening - the people, the politics, and the power of the student press.

The 1960s was a decade of profound change, marked by an accumulating tension between political conservatism and social restlessness. During this time, university campuses became sites of dissent, amplified by the proliferation of tertiary institutions, producing the best-educated generation in Australian history.

Student newspapers began probing the Vietnam War and resisting conscription, challenging racism and the absence of Aborigines at university, stirring gender politics, and testing the limits of obscenity. With erudition, wit, and daring creativity - and enabled by new printing technology - student newspapers played an immensely important role in Australia's social, cultural, and political transformation, the results of which still resonate throughout Australia today.

In Dissent, historian Sally Percival Wood encapsulates the spirit of the era, delving into the people, the places, and the politics of the time to reveal how this transformation took place. From 1961, when Monash University opened, to 1972, when the Whitlam government came to power, Dissent shows just how profoundly the political conservatism emblematic of post-war Australia struggled to adapt to this new generation, with its new, sometimes alarming, audacity - and goes on to ask - has the student press lost its nerve?
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No Front Line: Australia's Special Forces at War in Afghanistan

No Front Line: Australia's Special Forces at War in Afghanistan

Chris Masters

$34.99
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Australia's foremost investigative journalist goes deep into the heart of our Special Forces long war in Afghanistan.

The soldiers of the SAS, the Commandos and Special Operations Engineer Regiment are Australia's most highly trained soldiers. Their work is often secret, their bravery undeniable and for thirteen years they were at the forefront of Australia's longest war. Shunning acclaim, they are the Australian Defence Forces' brightest and best skilled.

In an extraordinary investigation undertaken over ten years, Chris Masters opens up the heart of Australia's Special Forces and their war in Afghanistan. He gives voice to the soldiers, he takes us to the centre of some of the fiercest combat Australia has ever experienced and provides the most intimate examination of what it is like to be a member of this country's elite fighting forces. But he also asks difficult questions that reveal controversial clouds hanging over our Special Operations mission in Afghanistan.

For Australia, there is no more important war to examine in detail. Afghanistan lives in our recent past and will continue to occupy our future. Masterfully told, No Front Line will find a place as one of Australia's finest books on contemporary soldiering.
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The Ascent to Power, 1996: The Howard Government Volume 1

The Ascent to Power, 1996: The Howard Government Volume 1

Tom Frame

$39.99
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The Ascent to Power, 1996 takes a critical look at the Howard Government's rise to power; its policies and priorities, successes and shortcomings in what Paul Kelly calls the `foundational year'. This first of four volumes on the Howard Government's nearly 12 years in office draws on unpublished documents from John Howard's papers held at UNSW Canberra. It covers the 1996 election, relationships with the Australian Public Service and Senate crossbenchers, reversing the budget `black hole' and gun law reform following the Port Arthur massacre. With contributions from John Howard, other politicians, media commentators, key public servants and academics, The Ascent to Power, 1996 will inform future assessments of the Howard Government and its place in Australian history.`
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Queen Victoria's Match-making: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe

Queen Victoria's Match-making: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe

Deborah Cadbury

$27.99
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ABBEY’S BOOKSELLER PICK —— After the death of her consort Albert, Victoria felt it was her sacred duty to uphold his vision of disseminating British constitutional monarchy to other royal houses of Europe through matrimonial ties. To that end she had very decided ideas about who their grandchildren should marry. This captivating book follows the grandchildren who eventually married rulers of various countries. From the doomed to the defiant and the dutiful, this is an enjoyably readable and deeply researched history that shows the human heart and politics rarely ever mix well! Lindy Jones

——

A captivating exploration of the role in which Queen Victoria exerted most international power and influence: her role as matchmaking grandmother.

By the 1890s, Queen Victoria had over thirty grandchildren and to maintain and increase royal power in Europe, she knew she had to manoeuvre them into a series of dynastic marriages. In her sights was royalty from across the world. Yet for all their seeming obedience, her grandchildren often had plans of their own, plans fuelled by strong wills and romantic hearts. Her matchmaking plans were only further complicated by their coinciding with tumultuous international upheavals; revolution and war were in the air and after her death, her most carefully laid plans fell to ruin.

Queen Victoria's Matchmaking travels through the most glittering, decadent palaces of Russia and Europe, weaving in scandals, political machinations and family tensions, to enthralling effect. It is at once an intimate portrait of the royal family and an examination of the conflict caused by the power, love and duty that shaped the marriages that Queen Victoria arranged. At the heart of it all is Queen Victoria herself: doting grandmother one moment, determined manipulator the next.
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The White King: Charles I, Traitor, Murderer, Martyr

The White King: Charles I, Traitor, Murderer, Martyr

Leanda de Lisle

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Barely forty years after the England's golden age under Elizabeth, the country was at war with itself, split between loyalty to the Crown and Parliament, with armies raised in Scotland and Ireland, and fighters arriving from Europe to wage war on English soil for the last time in England's history. The English Civil War would set family against family, friend against friend, and its casualties were immense?a greater proportion of the population than in World War I. England had become a failed state.

At the head of the disintegrating kingdom was the figure of the king: Charles I. In this vivid portrait?newly informed by previously unseen manuscripts, including royal correspondence between the king and his queen, some of it written in code?Leanda de Lisle depicts a man who was not cruel enough for his cruel times. He would not persecute his opponents in the bloody style of his Tudor antecedents, or throw his servants to the wolves to save his own skin in the time-honored royal style. He was tutored by his father in the rights and obligations of kings, but had none of his father's political subtlety and experience in survival. In a court of remarkable women he was happily married?but to a French Catholic princess, which caused consternation to his protestant subjects. Principled and high minded, he would pay a terrible price for the personal honor he so valued, and for having enemies more ruthless than he was. Nothing, however, would reflect on his character as much as the scene at his terrible death, speaking on the scaffold as a ?martyr of the people."

In his own destruction Charles did not sow the seeds of the monarchy's destruction but its rebirth. England's revolution lasted eleven unhappy years and the Crown was then restored, to national rejoicing. Today England enjoys rule by parliament and monarch while the Church of England has the bishops Charles was determined to preserve. More radical religious experimenters took their faith to the New World and the seeds of a republic, leaving England to mend its wounds and restore its fortunes and future as the world's preeminent constitutional monarchy.
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The Bettencourt Affair: The World's Richest Woman and the Scandal That Rocked Paris

The Bettencourt Affair: The World's Richest Woman and the Scandal That Rocked Paris

Tom Sancton

$44.99
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Heiress to the nearly forty-billion-dollar L’Oréal fortune, Liliane Bettencourt is the world’s richest woman and the fourteenth wealthiest person. But her gilded life has taken a dark yet fascinating turn in the past decade. At ninety-four, she’s now embroiled in what has been called the Bettencourt Affair, a scandal that dominated the headlines in France. Why? It’s a tangled web of hidden secrets, divided loyalties, frayed relationships, and fractured families, set in the most romantic city - and involving the most glamorous industry - in the world.

The Bettencourt Affair started as a family drama but quickly became a massive scandal, uncovering L’Oréal’s shadowy corporate history and buried World War II secrets. From the Right Bank mansions to the Left Bank artist havens; and from the Bettencourts’ servant quarters to the office of President Nicolas Sarkozy; all of Paris was shaken by the blockbuster case, the shocking reversals, and the surprising final victim.

It all began when Liliane met François-Marie Banier, an artist and photographer who was, in his youth, the toast of Paris and a protégé of Salvador Dalí. Over the next two decades, Banier was given hundreds of millions of dollars in gifts, cash, and insurance policies by Liliane. What, exactly, was their relationship? It wasn’t clear, least of all to Liliane’s daughter and only child, Françoise, who became suspicious of Banier’s motives and filed a lawsuit against him. But Banier has a far different story to tell...

The Bettencourt Affair is part courtroom drama; part upstairs-downstairs tale; and part characterdriven story of a complex, fascinating family and the intruder who nearly tore it apart.
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Stormtroopers: A New History of Hitler's Brownshirts

Stormtroopers: A New History of Hitler's Brownshirts

Daniel Siemens

$59.99
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The first full history of the Nazi Stormtroopers whose muscle brought Hitler to power, with revelations concerning their longevity and their contributions to the Holocaust Germany's Stormtroopers engaged in a vicious siege of violence that propelled the National Socialists to power in the 1930s.

Known also as the SA or Brownshirts, these ordinary men waged a loosely structured campaign of intimidation and savagery across the nation from the 1920s to the Night of the Long Knives in 1934, when Chief of Staff Ernst Rohm and many other SA leaders were assassinated on Hitler's orders.

In this deeply researched history, Daniel Siemens explores not only the roots of the SA and its swift decapitation but also its previously unrecognized transformation into a million-member Nazi organization, its activities in German-occupied territories during World War II, and its particular contributions to the Holocaust.

The author provides portraits of individual members and their victims and examines their milieu, culture, and ideology. His book tells the long-overdue story of the SA and its devastating impact on German citizens and the fate of their country.
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Young Hitler: The Making of the Fuhrer

Young Hitler: The Making of the Fuhrer

Paul Ham

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When Adolf Hitler went to war in 1914, aged 25, he lived through what he would later call the 'most stupendous experience of my life'. Twice decorated for bravery, the future dictator thrilled to battle, relished violence and was willing to give everything for his beloved Fatherland. He heard of Germany's defeat as he lay immobilised in a hospital bed, temporarily blinded from mustard gas. He opened his eyes on a terrible new world, of Germany's loss and humiliation, the flight of the Kaiser, a Marxist uprising in Bavaria and the destruction of his beloved army.

Hitler would never accept Germany's defeat or the terms of the peace settlement. Out of his fury arose an unquenchable thirst for revenge, against the 'November criminals' who had signed the armistice; against the socialists whom he blamed for stabbing the army in the back; and, most violently, against the Jews, on whom he would load the blame for all Germany's woes and whom he considered a direct threat to the German master race of his imagination. The seeds of that hatred lay in Hitler's youthful experiences, growing up in Linz, Vienna and Munich, and as a young soldier in the Great War.

By peeling back the layers of Hitler's childhood, war record and early political career, Paul Ham conjures the ordinary man beneath the myth and seeks to solve the riddle behind the enigma of the Nazi leader.

What turned 'a Viennese bum', as Goring later damned him, into one of the most brutal dictators in human history? How had Hitler's first war, the defining years of his life, affect his rise to power? In a broader sense, was Hitler a freak of history? Or rather an extreme example of a recurring 'type' of demagogue, who thrives in chaos, revolution and economic collapse? Who will do and say anything to seize power? And who personifies in his words and actions the darkest prejudices of humankind?
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The Tunnels: The Untold Story of the Escapes Under the Berlin Wall

The Tunnels: The Untold Story of the Escapes Under the Berlin Wall

Greg Mitchell

$24.99
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In the summer of 1962, one year after the rise of the Berlin Wall, a group of daring young West Germans risked prison, Stasi torture and even death to liberate friends, lovers, and strangers in East Berlin by digging tunnels under the Wall.

Then, as the world’s press heard about the secret projects, two television networks raced to be the first to document them from the inside, funding two separate tunnels for exclusive rights to film the escapes. In response, President John F. Kennedy and his administration, wary of anything that might raise tensions and force a military confrontation with the Soviets, maneuvered to quash both documentaries.

As Greg Mitchell's riveting narrative unfolds, we meet extraordinary characters: the legendary cyclist who became East Berlin’s most wanted man; the tunneller who had already served four years in the East German gulag; the Stasi informer who betrays the ‘CBS tunnel’; the young East Berliner who escapes with her baby, then marries one of the tunnellers; and an engineer who would later help build the tunnel under the English Channel.

Capturing the hopes and fears of everyday Berliners, the chilling reach of the Stasi secret police, and the political tensions of the Cold War, The Tunnels is breaking history, a propulsive read whose themes still reverberate today.
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Auschwitz Testimonies: 1945-1986

Auschwitz Testimonies: 1945-1986

Primo Levi ,  Leonardo De Benedetti ,  Fabio Levi ,  Domenico Scarpa

$33.95
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In 1945, soon after liberation, Soviet authorities in control of the Kattowitz (Katowice) camp in Poland asked Primo Levi and his fellow captive Leonardo De Benedetti to compile a detailed report on the sanitary conditions in Auschwitz. The result was an extraordinary testimony and one of the first accounts of the extermination camps ever written. The Report on the Monowitz Camp, published in a medical journal in 1946, marked the beginnings of Levi's lifelong work as writer, analyst and witness.

In the subsequent four decades, Levi never ceased to recount his experiences in Auschwitz in a wide variety of texts, many of which are assembled together here for the first time, alongside other testimony from De Benedetti. From early research into the fate of their companions to the deposition written for Eichmann's trial, from the 'letter to the daughter of a fascist who wants to know the truth' to newspaper and magazine articles, Auschwitz Testimonies is a rich mosaic of memories and critical reflections of great historic and human value.

Underpinned by his characteristically clear language, rigorous method and deep psychological insight, this collection of testimonies, reports and analyses reaffirms Primo Levi's position as one of the most important chroniclers of the Holocaust. It will find a wide readership, both among the many readers of Levi's work and among all those who wish to understand one of the greatest human tragedies of all time.
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Enemies and Neighbours: Arabs and Jews in Palestine and Israel, 1917-2017

Enemies and Neighbours: Arabs and Jews in Palestine and Israel, 1917-2017

Ian Black

$55.00
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A century after Britain's Balfour Declaration promised a Jewish 'national home' in Palestine, veteran Guardian journalist Ian Black has produced a major new history of one of the most polarising conflicts of the modern age.

Drawing on a wide range of sources - from declassified documents to oral testimonies and his own decades of reporting - Enemies and Neighbours brings much-needed perspective and balance to the long and unresolved struggle between Arabs and Jews in the Holy Land.

Beginning in the final years of Ottoman ruleand the British Mandate period, when Zionist immigration transformed Palestine in the face of mounting Arab opposition, the book re-examines the origins of what was a doomed relationship from the start. It sheds fresh light on critical events such as the Arab rebellion of the 1930s; Israel's independence and the Palestinian catastrophe (Nakba in Arabic) of 1948; the watershed of the 1967 war; two Intifadas; the Oslo Accords and Israel's shift to the right. It traces how - after five decades of occupation, ever-expanding Jewish settlements and the construction of the West Bank 'separation wall' - hopes for a two-state solution have all but disappeared, and explores what the future might hold.

Yet Black also goes beyond the most newsworthy events - wars, violence and peace initiatives - to capture thereality of everyday life on the ground in Jerusalem and Hebron, Tel Aviv,Ramallah, Haifa and Gaza, for both sides of an unequal struggle. Lucid, timelyand gripping, Enemies and Neighbours illuminates a bitter conflict that shows no sign of ending - which is why it is so essential that we understand it.
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All Things Made New: Writings on the Reformation

All Things Made New: Writings on the Reformation

Diarmaid MacCulloch

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The most profound characteristic of Western Europe in the Middle Ages was its cultural and religious unity, a unity secured by a common alignment with the Pope in Rome, and a common language - Latin - for worship and scholarship. The Reformation shattered that unity, and the consequences are still with us today. In All Things Made New, Diarmaid MacCulloch, author of the New York Times bestseller Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years, examines not only the Reformation's impact across Europe, but also the Catholic Counter-Reformation and the special evolution of religion in England, revealing how one of the most turbulent, bloody, and transformational events in Western history has shaped modern society.

The Reformation may have launched a social revolution, MacCulloch argues, but it was not caused by social and economic forces, or even by a secular idea like nationalism; it sprang from a big idea about death, salvation, and the afterlife. This idea - that salvation was entirely in God's hands and there was nothing humans could do to alter his decision - ended the Catholic Church's monopoly in Europe and altered the trajectory of the entire future of the West.

By turns passionate, funny, meditative, and subversive, All Things Made New takes readers onto fascinating new ground, exploring the original conflicts of the Reformation and cutting through prejudices that continue to distort popular conceptions of a religious divide still with us after five centuries. This monumental work, from one of the most distinguished scholars of Christianity writing today, explores the ways in which historians have told the tale of the Reformation, why their interpretations have changed so dramatically over time, and ultimately, how the contested legacy of this revolution continues to impact the world today.
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The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President

The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President

Bandy X. Lee

$39.99
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The consensus view of two dozen psychiatrists and psychologists that Trump is dangerously mentally ill and that he presents a clear and present danger to the nation and our own mental health.

This is not normal.

Since the start of Donald Trump's presidential run, one question has quietly but urgently permeated the observations of concerned citizens: What is wrong with him? Constrained by the American Psychiatric Association's "Goldwater rule," which inhibits mental health professionals from diagnosing public figures they have not personally examined, many of those qualified to answer this question have shied away from discussing the issue at all. The public has thus been left to wonder whether he is mad, bad, or both.

In THE DANGEROUS CASE OF DONALD TRUMP, twenty-seven psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental health experts argue that, in Mr. Trump's case, their moral and civic "duty to warn" America supersedes professional neutrality. They then explore Trump's symptoms and potentially relevant diagnoses to find a complex, if also dangerously mad, man.

Philip Zimbardo and Rosemary Sword, for instance, explain Trump's impulsivity in terms of "unbridled and extreme present hedonism." Craig Malkin writes on pathological narcissism and politics as a lethal mix. Gail Sheehy, on a lack of trust that exceeds paranoia. Lance Dodes, on sociopathy. Robert Jay Lifton, on the "malignant normality" that can set in everyday life if psychiatrists do not speak up.

His madness is catching, too. From the trauma people have experienced under the Trump administration to the cult-like characteristics of his followers, he has created unprecedented mental health consequences across our nation and beyond.

It's not all in our heads. It's in his.
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I Can't Breathe: The Killing that Started a Movement

I Can't Breathe: The Killing that Started a Movement

Matt Taibbi

$32.99
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The incredible story of the death of Eric Garner, the birth of the 'Black Lives Matter' movement and the new fault lines of race, protest, policing and the power of people.

On July 17, 2014, Eric Garner died in New York City after a police officer put him in what has been described as a "chokehold" during an arrest for selling "loosies," or single cigarettes. The final moments of his life were captured on video and seen by millions, sparking an international series of protests that built into the transformative "Black Lives Matter" movement. Weeks after Garner's death, two New York City police officers were killed by a young black man from Maryland, in what he claimed was revenge for Garner's death. Those killings in turn led to police protests, clashes with New York's new liberal mayor, and an eventual work slow-down.

Matt Taibbi, bestselling author and othe best polemic journalist in Americao explores the roots and aftermath of Eric Garner's death and tells a compelling story of the crime, the grand jury, the media circus, the murder of the police, and the protests from every side. The result is a riveting work of literary journalism that breaks new ground and provides a masterful narrative of urban America, the perversion of its policing and a brilliant examination of the racial tensions that threaten to tear it apart.
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Paradise in Chains: The Bounty Mutiny and the Founding of Australia

Paradise in Chains: The Bounty Mutiny and the Founding of Australia

Diana Preston

$35.00
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ABBEY'S BOOKSELLER PICK ----- This deeply researched book examines the First Contact history of Britain and the South Pacific (particularly Tahiti) and weaves the stories of the infamous mutiny on the Bounty with the establishment of the Port Jackson penal colony. It juxtaposes the reality of colonisation with the perceived romantic notion of the noble savage in paradise. Quoting extensively from primary sources, it traces Bligh’s adventures and misfortunes, the fate of the mutineers, as well as Arthur Phillip’s governorship, and Mary Bryant’s epic escape by open boat. A solid history. Lindy Jones

-----

Celebrated historian Diana Preston presents betrayals, escapes, and survival at sea in her account of the mutiny of the Bounty and the flight of convicts from the Australian penal colony.

The story of the mutiny of the Bounty and William Bligh and his men's survival on the open ocean for 48 days and 3,618 miles has become the stuff of legend. But few realise that Bligh's escape across the seas was not the only open-boat journey in that era of British exploration and colonisation. Indeed, 9 convicts from the Australian penal colony, led by Mary Bryant, also traveled 3,250 miles across the open ocean and some uncharted seas to land at the same port Bligh had reached only months before.

In this meticulously researched dual narrative of survival, acclaimed historian Diana Preston provides the background and context to explain the thrilling open-boat voyages each party survived and the Pacific Island nations each encountered on their journey to safety.

Through this deep-dive, readers come to understand the Pacific Islands as they were and as they were perceived, and how these seemingly utopian lands became a place where mutineers, convicts, and eventually the natives themselves, were chained.
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The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia

The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia

Masha Gessen

$32.99
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In The Future is History Masha Gessen follows the lives of four Russians, born as the Soviet Union crumbled, at what promised to be the dawn of democracy. Each came of age with unprecedented expectations, some as the children or grandchildren of the very architects of the new Russia, each with newfound aspirations of their own - as entrepreneurs, activists, thinkers and writers, sexual and social beings. Gessen charts their paths not only against the machinations of the regime that would seek to crush them all (censorship, intimidation, violence) but also against the war it waged on understanding itself, ensuring the unobstructed emergence of the old Soviet order in the form of today's terrifying and seemingly unstoppable mafia state. The Future is History is a powerful and urgent cautionary tale by contemporary Russia's most fearless inquisitor.
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Escaping Hitler: Stories of Courage and Endurance on the Freedom Trails

Escaping Hitler: Stories of Courage and Endurance on the Freedom Trails

Monty Halls

$32.99
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"I was on a train and a German soldier began shouting at me and poking me in the ribs with his machine gun. I just thought that was it, the game was up... "

Downed airman Bob Frost faced danger at every turn as he was smuggled out of France and over the Pyrenees. Prisoner of war Len Harley went on the run in Italy, surviving months in hiding, then a hazardous climb over the Abruzzo mountains, with German troops hot on his heels. These are just some of the stories told in heart-stopping detail as Monty Halls takes us along the freedom trails out of occupied Europe, from the immense French escape lines to lesser-known routes in Italy and Slovenia.

Escaping Hitler features spies and traitors, extraordinary heroism from those who ran the escape routes and offered shelter to escapees, and great feats of endurance. In Operation Galia, the SAS fought for 40 days behind enemy lines in Italy and then, exhausted and pursued by the enemy, exfiltrated across the Apennine mountains. And in Slovenia, Australian POW Ralph Churches and Briton Les Laws orchestrated the largest successful Allied escape of the entire war.

Mixing new research, interviews with survivors and his own experience of walking the trails, Monty brings the past to life in this dramatic and gripping slice of military history.
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1947: When now begins

1947: When now begins

Elisabeth Asbrink ,  Fiona Graham

$29.99
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Somewhere on the timeline, the war ends. Somewhere else, a new age begins - the one we call now.

The shift does not happen overnight, from one day to the next; instead, the world vibrates for a number of years. People try to find their way to homes no longer there. People run from their deeds, and most of them get away.

Among the millions in flight across Europe looking for a new home in 1947 are Elizabeth Asbrink's parents.

In 1947, production of the Kalashnikov rifle begins, Christian Dior creates the New Look, Simone de Beauvoir writes The Second Sex, the first computer bug is discovered, the CIA is set up, Hassan Al-Banna draws up the plan that remains the goal of jihadists to this day and a UN committee is given four months to find a solution to the problem of Palestine.

In 1947, Asbrink chronicles the creation of the world we now inhabit, as the forces that will go on to govern our lives during the next 70 years first make themselves known.
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Alone: Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk: Defeat Into Victory

Alone: Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk: Defeat Into Victory

Michael Korda

$42.95
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Combining epic history with rich family stories, Michael Korda chronicles the outbreak of World War II and the great events that led to Dunkirk.

In an absorbing work peopled with world leaders, generals, and ordinary citizens who fought on both sides of World War II, Alone brings to resounding life perhaps the most critical year of twentieth-century history. For, indeed, May 1940 was a month like no other, as the German war machine blazed into France while the supposedly impregnable Maginot Line crumbled, and Winston Churchill replaced Neville Chamberlain as prime minister in an astonishing political drama as Britain, isolated and alone, faced a triumphant Nazi Germany.

Against this vast historical canvas, Michael Korda relates what happened and why, and also tells his own story, that of a six-year-old boy in a glamorous movie family who would himself be evacuated. Alone is a work that seamlessly weaves a family memoir into an unforgettable account of a political and military disaster redeemed by the evacuation of more than 300,000 men in four days – surely one of the most heroic episodes of the war. Features 12 maps; 68 illustrations.
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Beneath Another Sky: A Global Journey into History

Beneath Another Sky: A Global Journey into History

Norman Davies

$69.99  $59.99
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Norman Davies's account of a global circumnavigation, of the places he visited and the history he found there, from Abu Dhabi to Singapore, the settlement of Tasmania to the short-lived Republic of Texas. 

As in Vanished Kingdoms, Davies's historical gaze penetrates behind the present to see how things became as they are, and how peoples came to tell themselves the stories which make up their identities. Everywhere, it seems, human beings have been travelling - pushing out others or arriving in terra nullius - since the beginning of recorded time.

To whom is a land truly native? As always, Norman Davies has his eye on the historical horizon as well as on what is close at hand, and brilliantly complicates our view of the past.
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Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Tell You Everything You Need to Know About Global Politics

Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Tell You Everything You Need to Know About Global Politics

Tim Marshall

$22.99
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ABBEY’S BOOKSELLER PICK —— Geopolitics is a fascinating concept, and this engaging book examines ten countries in terms of their geography to explain the politics of the lines drawn on the map of the world. Artificial borders do not always take account of physical features and even in a time of advanced technology, sometimes geography will be the greatest influence. Russia, China, USA, Western Europe, Africa, Middle East, India/Pakistan, Japan/Korea, Latin America and the Arctic are all analysed in clear and effortless prose – and what might have determined their past will still impact upon their future. Lindy Jones

——

THE INTERNATIONAL AND SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER; All leaders are constrained by geography. Their choices are limited by mountains, rivers, seas and concrete. Yes, to understand world events you need to understand people, ideas and movements... but if you don't know geography, you'll never have the full picture.

To understand Putin's actions, for example, it is essential to consider that, to be a world power, Russia must have a navy. And if its ports freeze for six months each year then it must have access to a warm water port - hence, the annexation of Crimea was the only option for Putin.

To understand the Middle East, it is crucial to know that geography is the reason why countries have logically been shaped as they are - and this is why invented countries (e.g. Syria, Iraq, Libya) will not survive as nation states.

Spread over ten chapters (covering Russia; China; the USA; Latin America; the Middle East; Africa; India and Pakistan; Europe; Japan and Korea; and Greenland and the Arctic), using maps, essays and occasionally the personal experiences of the widely travelled author, Prisoners of Geography looks at the past, present and future to offer an essential guide to one of the major determining factors in world history.
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The Square and the Tower: Networks, Hierarchies and the Struggle for Global Power

The Square and the Tower: Networks, Hierarchies and the Struggle for Global Power

Niall Ferguson

$35.00
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Historians love to write about rulers — kings, emperors, presidents — or about vast social forces like migration, industrialisation. But what if they are all missing the point? 

Thinking about our own lives, isn't it clear that what makes the world go round are families, colleagues, teams, associations: in other words, networks? Many old Italian towns have the same central structure: a large square where people gather and a tower where the town's elite ruled from.

Throughout history you can express the battle between the two as a battle of networks - who knows who, who works with who: guilds, families, fellowships, clans, cabals all cooperating to make sometimes huge changes. Sometimes the power lies with those lurking in the tower and sometimes with those in the square. Access to information, to credit, to ideas, to news - all constantly shift.

Whether in the Renaissance or in the present day what makes the world work is an astonishing tangle of networks - and this was as true for the effort that went into discovering the New World as it is now for fighting elections or just talking to friends online.

In his enormously enjoyable new book, Niall Ferguson celebrates the myriad ways in which the battle between rival networks makes history happen.
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Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything

Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything

Lydia Kang ,  Nate Pedersen

$44.99
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Journey back to a time when doctors tried to jolt your paralysed muscles awake with a strychnine-laced enema. When a physician wrote you a prescription for the mercury-based 'Thunderclapper' pill to relieve your constipation. When surgeons promised to improve your virility with goat-testicle implants.

A tour of medicine's most outlandish misfires, Quackery dives into 67 'treatments,' exploring their various uses and why they thankfully fell out of favour - some more recently than you might think.
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New Views: The World Mapped Like Never Before

New Views: The World Mapped Like Never Before

Alastair Bonnett

$49.99
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Modern satellite and geographical technology has enabled the world to be researched in new and incredible detail. From measuring species diversity to monitoring land shifts, our physical and sociological world is mapped like never before. New Views includes 50 specially commissioned maps that examine our world in a beautifully visual and fascinating way. Alastair Bonnett accompanies each map with a vivid essay that provides detailed insight into how the planet has changed and what it may look like in the future. From examining new deserts and charting airspace, to revealing emerging lands and measuring each continent's natural treasures. Each map showcases an important part of our world's history, sociology and of course, geography. New Views is an exciting, insightful and beautiful exploration of our world.
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The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: A History of Now

The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: A History of Now

Michael Burleigh

$32.99
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In the decades since the end of the Second World War, it has been widely assumed that the western model of liberal democracy and free trade is the way the world should be governed. However, events in the early years of the twenty-first century – first, the 2003 war with Iraq and its chaotic aftermath and, second, the financial crash of 2008 – have threatened the general acceptance that continued progress under the benign (or sometimes not so benign) gaze of the western powers is the only way forwards. And as America turns inwards and Europe is beset by austerity politics and populist nationalism, the post-war consensus looks less and less secure. But is this really the worst of times?

In a forensic examination of the world we now live in, acclaimed historian Michael Burleigh sets out to answer that question. Who could have imagined that China would champion globalization and lead the battle on climate change? Or that post-Soviet Russia might present a greater threat to the world’s stability than ISIS? And while we may be on the cusp of still more dramatic change, perhaps the risks will – in time – bring not only change but a wholly positive transformation.

Incisive, robust and always insightful, The Best of Times, The Worst of Times is both a dazzling tour d’horizon of the world as it is today and a surprisingly optimistic vision of the world as it might become.
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100 Nasty Women of History: Brilliant, badass and completely fearless women everyone should know

100 Nasty Women of History: Brilliant, badass and completely fearless women everyone should know

Hannah Jewell

$32.99
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100 fascinating and brilliantly written stories about history's bravest, baddest but little known 'nasty' women from across the world. In the final debate of the 2016 US presidential election, Donald Trump leaned into the microphone as Hillary Clinton spoke about social security and called his opponent 'such a nasty woman'. The phrase has stuck around and has since become something of a badge of honour for women around the world. What better time than now, then, for us to look back and learn a thing or two from the 'nasty' women of the past? Compiled and written by BuzzFeed writer Hannah Jewell, 100 Nasty Women of History contains profiles of women from across every century, race and continent, united in the fact that they were all a bit 'nasty'. From 3rd-century Japanese Empress Jingu to 20th-century British social reformer Octavia Hill, these are the women who were bold and powerful, but maybe put people (men's) backs up by being so. 100 Nasty Women of History is an accessible, intelligent, hilarious (and sometimes sweary) guide to the history-making women whom you probably don't know - but definitely should.
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Tanked

Tanked

Eamon Evans

$29.99
We tend to think of the past as a boring, sober place. But what if we told you that the some of the great turning points of history were as substance-fuelled as a nineteen-year-old at Stereosonic?

Yes indeed, from Joseph Banks and his marijuana harvest to rampaging Vikings on magic mushrooms, the Nazis' penchant for meth to alcohol's influence on the Australian accent, many an historical tuning point has had an illicit little secret behind it.

And there is nobody better placed to uncover these secrets than the ever-witty Eamon Evans. Substance by substance, Jober as a Sudge follows the surprising story of humanity's love affair with all things mind-altering, and how it shaped the world, and the Australia, we know today.
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Scythians: Warriors of Ancient Siberia

Scythians: Warriors of Ancient Siberia

St John Simpson ,  Svetlana Pankova

$108.95  $98.05
The Scythians were an ancient nomadic people who lived in the south Russian steppe from 900 to 200 BC. They established a rich nomadic culture originating in southern Siberia and extending to northern China and as far as the northern Black Sea. Mobility and mastery of local resources were central to their culture and their achievements. Forerunners of the Sarmatians, the Huns, the Turks, and the Mongols, the Scythians were feared adversaries and respected neighbors of the Assyrians, Persians, and ancient Greeks. They left no written records of their own and historians have previously relied on the descriptions by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus, but archaeological research now adds considerable new information about their origins and lifestyle.

This book offers unique insights into the life and funerary customs of the Scythians with exceptionally well preserved organic objects buried in conditions of permanent frost in the high Altai mountains. Some of the objects are from new excavations and others come from the famous Siberian Collection of Peter the Great. They include many rare finds of personal garments and possessions made from gold, leather, fur, and felt and reveal the impact and achievements of one of the earliest great nomadic peoples.
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Arabs and Empires before Islam

Arabs and Empires before Islam

Greg Fisher

$61.95
Arabs and Empires before Islam illuminates the history of the Arabs before the emergence of Islam, collating nearly 250 translated extracts from an extensive array of ancient sources. Drawn from a broad period between the eighth century BC and the Middle Ages, the sources include texts originally written in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Persian, and Arabic, inscriptions in a variety of languages and alphabets, and discussions of archaeological sites from across the Near East. More than twenty international experts from the fields of archaeology, classics and ancient history, linguistics and philology, epigraphy, and art history provide detailed commentary on and analysis of this diverse selection of material.

Richly illustrated with sixteen colour plates, fifteen maps, and over seventy in-text images, the volume provides a comprehensive, wide-ranging, and up-to-date examination of what ancient sources had to say about the politics, culture, and religion of the Arabs in the pre-Islamic period. It offers a full consideration of the traces which the Arabs have left in the epigraphic, literary, and archaeological records, and sheds light on their relationship with their often more-powerful neighbours: the states and empires of the ancient Near East. Arabs and Empires before Islam gathers together a host of material never before collected into a single volume - some of which appears in English translation for the very first time - and provides a single point of reference for a vibrant and dynamic area of research.
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Vikings: Raiders from the Sea

Vikings: Raiders from the Sea

Kim Hjardar

$24.95  $21.95
From the 9th to the 11th century, Viking ships landed on almost every shore in the Western world. Viking ravages united the Spanish kingdoms and stopped Charlemagne and the Franks' advance in Europe. Wherever Viking ships roamed, enormous suffering followed in their wake, but the encounter between cultures changed both European and Nordic societies. Employing sail technology and using unpredictable strategies, the Vikings could strike suddenly, attack with great force, then withdraw with stolen goods or captives. Viking society was highly militarised, honour was everything and losing one's reputation was worse than death. Offending another man's honour could only be resolved through combat or blood revenge. This short history of the Vikings discusses how they raided across Europe even reaching America, discussing their ships, weapons and armour, and unique way of life.
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The Vikings

The Vikings

Neil Price

$60.99
The Vikings provides a concise but comprehensive introduction to the complex world of the early medieval Scandinavians.

In the space of less than 300 years from the late eighth to the late eleventh centuries CE, people from what are now Norway, Sweden and Denmark left their homelands in unprecedented numbers to travel across the then-known world. Over the last half-century archaeology and its related disciplines have radically altered our understanding of this period, and beyond the stereotypical Viking raider we can now perceive a cosmopolitan mix of traders and warriors, craftsworkers and poets, explorers and colonists. Over the course of the Viking Age, their small-scale rural, tribal societies gradually became urbanised monarchies firmly emplaced on the stage of literate, Christian Europe. In the process they transformed the cultures of the North, created the modern Nordic nation states and left a far-flung diaspora with legacies that still resonate today.

This volume explores the society and economy, identity and world-views of the Scandinavian peoples, and their unique religious beliefs that are still of enduring interest a millennium later. The Viking expansion is discussed in detail, including analyses of its origin and consequences for a vast area stretching from the Asian steppe to North America, culminating in the long-term reshaping of Scandinavia itself. Written by one of the leading experts in the period, this book presents students with an unrivalled guide through this widely studied and fascinating subject, revealing the Vikings as a sophisticated civilisation of fundamental importance for the later course of European history.
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Greek Warriors: Hoplites and Heroes

Greek Warriors: Hoplites and Heroes

Carolyn Willekes

$24.95  $21.95
Thermopylae, Marathon: though fought 2,500 years ago in Ancient Greece, the names of these battles are more familiar to many than battles fought in the last half-century; but our concept of the men who fought in these battles may be more a product of Hollywood than Greece.

Shaped by the landscape in which they fought, the warriors of Ancient Greece were mainly heavy infantry. While Bronze Age Greeks fought as individuals, for personal glory, the soldiers of the Classical city states fought as hoplites, armed with long spears and large shields, in an organized formation called the phalanx.

As well as fighting among themselves, notably the thirty-year Peloponnesian War fought between Athens and Sparta and immortalized by Thucydides, the city states came together to fight outside threats. The Persian Wars lasted nearly half a century, and saw the Greek armies come together to fend off several massive Persian forces both on land and at sea.

This book sketches the change from heroic to hoplite warfare, and discusses the equipment and training of both the citizen soldiers of most Greek cities, and the professional soldiers of Sparta.
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Henry III: The Great King England Never Knew It Had

Henry III: The Great King England Never Knew It Had

Darren Baker

$49.99
Henry III (1207-72) reigned for 56 years, the longest-serving English monarch until the modern era. Although knighted by William Marshal, he was no warrior king like his uncle Richard the Lionheart. He preferred to feed the poor to making war and would rather spend time with his wife and children than dally with mistresses and lord over roundtables.

Henry sought to replace the dull projection of power imported by his Norman predecessors with a more humane and open-hearted monarchy. But his ambition led him to embark on bold foreign policy initiatives to win back the lands and prestige lost by his father King John. This set him at odds with his increasingly insular barons and clergy, now emboldened by the protections of Magna Carta.

In one of the great political duels of history, Henry struggled to retain the power and authority of the crown against radical reformers like Simon de Montfort. He emerged victorious, but at a cost both to the kingdom and his reputation among historians. Yet his long rule also saw extraordinary advancements in politics and the arts, from the rise of the parliamentary state and universities to the great cathedrals of the land, including Henry's own enduring achievement, Westminster Abbey.
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The Survival of the Princes in the Tower: Murder, Mystery and Myth

The Survival of the Princes in the Tower: Murder, Mystery and Myth

Matthew Lewis

$49.99
The murder of the Princes in the Tower is the most famous cold case in British history. Traditionally considered victims of a ruthless uncle, there are other suspects too often and too easily discounted. There may be no definitive answer, but by delving into the context of their disappearance and the characters of the suspects Matthew Lewis examines the motives and opportunities afresh as well as asking a crucial but often overlooked question: what if there was no murder? What if Edward V and his brother Richard, Duke of York survived their uncle's reign and even that of their brother-in-law Henry VII? There are glimpses of their possible survival and compelling evidence to give weight to those glimpses, which is considered alongside the possibility of their deaths to provide a rounded and complete assessment of the most fascinating mystery in history.
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The Nevills of Middleham: England's Most Powerful Family in the Wars of the Roses

The Nevills of Middleham: England's Most Powerful Family in the Wars of the Roses

K. L. Clark

$39.99
In 1465, the Nevills must have thought they'd reached the pinnacle of power and influence in England. Richard Nevill was the king's right-hand man and married to the richest woman in the kingdom; John Nevill was an accomplished soldier who'd done much to stabilise the new dynasty; and George Nevill was not only chancellor but newly enthroned as Archbishop of York.

The Nevill women were as active as their male counterparts. As sisters and wives, daughters and daughters-in-laws, they had the ears of the elite in England and were not afraid of wielding their influence. And they were not always on the same side.

Cracks in the stability of the most powerful family in England began to show. Rivalries led to serious conflict that worsened when King Edward IV impulsively married Elizabeth Wydeville, a choice of bride that did not please everyone. The Nevills had already lost a great deal for the Yorkist cause. Within six years, as the Wars of the Roses turned into one of the bloodiest periods of English history, they'd lose even more for the Lancastrians.
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Knights: Chivalry and Violence

Knights: Chivalry and Violence

John Sadler ,  Rosie Serdiville

$24.95  $21.95
Originally warriors mounted on horseback, knights became associated with the concept of chivalry as it was popularised in medieval European literature. Knights were expected to fight bravely and honourably and be loyal to their lord until death if necessary. Later chivalry came to encompass activities such as tournaments and hunting, and virtues including justice, charity and faith. The Crusades were instrumental in the development of the code of chivalry, and some crusading orders of knighthood, such as the Knights Templar, have become legend.

Boys would begin their knightly training at the age of seven, learning to hunt and studying academic studies before becoming assistants to older knights, training in combat and learning how to care for a knight’s essentials: arms, armour, and horses. After fourteen years of training, and when considered master of all the skills of knighthood, a squire was eligible to be knighted.

In peacetime knights would take part in tournaments. Tournaments were a major spectator sport, but also an important way for knights to practice their skills – knights were often injured and sometimes killed in melees.

Knights figured large in medieval warfare and literature. In the 15th century knights became obsolete due to advances in warfare, but the title of ‘knight’ has survived as an honorary title granted for services to a monarch or country, and knights remain a strong concept in popular culture.

This short history will cover the rise and decline of the medieval knights, including the extensive training, specific arms and armour, tournaments and the important concept of chivalry.
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The Medieval Calendar: Locating Time in the Middle Ages

The Medieval Calendar: Locating Time in the Middle Ages

Roger S. Wieck

$56.99
The intricacies of the medieval calendar are examined in this sumptuously illustrated volume, featuring many of the finest examples from The Morgan Library's unparalleled collection. The lucid and concise text explains the complexities of Vigils, octaves, Egyptian Days, Golden Numbers, Dominical Letters, movable feasts and the key role played by the saints days, including the colours in which they are written as well as their rankings and gradings. A royal thirteenth-century Breviary made for a French queen to use in the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris is fully reproduced, transcribed and analysed to reveal its true meaning. The author also shares his step-by-step method to localise a medieval calendar and discover its use; readers learn how to assess a calendar's roster of liturgical feasts as a key to revealing the place where it was destined to be used. Published to accompany a major exhibition, this volume provides a fascinating view into the mysteries of the Middle Ages.
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Roman Legionary 109-58 BC: The Age of Marius, Sulla and Pompey the Great

Roman Legionary 109-58 BC: The Age of Marius, Sulla and Pompey the Great

Ross Cowan ,  Sean O'Brogain

$21.99
The Roman centurion, holding the legionaries steady before the barbarian horde and then leading them forward to victory, was the heroic exemplar of the Roman world. This was thanks to the Marian reforms, which saw the centurion, although inferior in military rank and social class, superseding the tribune as the legion's most important officer. This period of reform in the Roman Army is often overlooked, but the invincible armies that Julius Caesar led into Gaul were the refined products of 50 years of military reforms. Using specially commissioned artwork and detailed battle reports, this new study examines the Roman legionary soldier at this crucial time in the history of the Roman Republic from its domination by Marius and Sulla to the beginning of the rise of Julius Caesar.
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Gladiators: Fighting to the Death in Ancient Rome

Gladiators: Fighting to the Death in Ancient Rome

M. C. Bishop

$19.99
The gladiator is one of the most enduring figures of Ancient Rome. Heroic, though of lowly status, they fought vicious duels in large arenas filled with baying crowds. The survivor could be either executed (the famous ‘thumbs down’ signal) or spared at the whim of the crowd or the Emperor. Few lasted more than a dozen fights, yet they were a valuable asset to their owners.

But how did they fight and how did their weapons and techniques develop? Who were they? This book gives an entertaining overview of the history of the gladiator, debunking some myths along the way. We learn about the different forms of combat, and the pairings which were designed to carefully balance the strengths and weaknesses of one against the other. The retiarii (with nets) were lightly armed but mobile, the secutores and murmillones were protected but weighed down by their armor. Gladiators also participated in simulated naval battles on large artificial lakes or even in the arena of the Colosseum.

Although their lives were brutal and short, gladiators often were admired for their bravery, endurance, and willingness to die. They were the celebrities of their day. This book reveals what we know and how we know it: ancient remains, contemporary literature, graffiti, modern attempts to reconstruct ancient fighting techniques and the astonishing discovery at Pompeii where a complete gladiator barracks was found alongside multiple skeletons, telling their story.
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Imperial Inquisitions: Prosecutors and Informants from Tiberius to Domitian

Imperial Inquisitions: Prosecutors and Informants from Tiberius to Domitian

Steven H. Rutledge

$82.99
Delatores (political informants) and accusatores (malicious prosecutors) were a major part of life in imperial Rome. Contemporary sources depict them as cruel and heartless mercenaries, who bore the main responsibility for institutionalising and enforcing the 'tyranny' of the infamous rulers of the early empire, such as Nero, Caligula and Domitian. Stephen Rutledge's study examines the evidence to ask if this is a fair portrayal.

Beginning with a detailed examination of the social and political status of known informants and prosecutors, he goes on to investigate their activities - as well as the rewards they could expect. The main areas covered are:

* checking government corruption and enforcing certain classes of legislation
* blocking opposition and resistance to the emperor in the Senate
* acting as a partisan player in factional strife in the imperial family
* protecting the emperor against conspiracy.

The book includes a comprehensive guide to every known political informant under the early empire, with their name, all the relevant primary and secondary sources, and an individual biography.
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The Good Country: The Djadja Wurrung the Settlers and the Protectors

The Good Country: The Djadja Wurrung the Settlers and the Protectors

Bain Attwood

$29.95
In this superbly researched book Bain Attwood eschews the generalisations of national and colonial history to provide a finely grained local history of the Djadja Wurrung people of Central Victoria.

Insisting on the importance of grappling with a history that involved a relationship between the people of this Aboriginal nation, the British settlers who invaded their country, and men appointed by the imperial and the colonial governments to protect the Aboriginal people, as well as a relationship between the Djadja Wurrung and their indigenous neighbours, Attwood not only tells the shocking story of the destruction, decimation, and dispossession of the Djadja Wurrung, he draws on an unusually rich historical record, and forgoes any reliance on historical concepts such as the frontier and resistance, to recover a good deal of the modus vivendi that the Djadja Wurrung reached with sympathetic protectors, pastoralists, and gold diggers, showing how they both adopted and adapted to these intruders and were thereby able to remain in their own country, at least for a time.

Drawing past and present together, Attwood closes this book with the remarkable story of the revival of the Djadja Wurrung in recent times as they have sought to become their own historians.
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The Australian Policy Handbook: A Practical Guide to the Policy Making Process

The Australian Policy Handbook: A Practical Guide to the Policy Making Process

Catherine Althaus ,  Catherine Althaus ,  Peter Bridgman

$55.00
Public policy permeates every aspect of our lives. It is the stuff of government, justifying taxes, driving legislation, and shaping our social services. Public policy gives us roads, railways and airports, emergency services, industry development, and natural resource management. While politicians make the decisions, public servants provide analysis and support for those choices.

Drawing on their extensive practical experience, the authors outline the processes used in making public policy. They systematically explain the relationships between political decision-makers, public service advisers, other community participants, and those charged with implementing the programs that result.

The sixth edition of this widely used introduction is fully updated, and includes new material on the professionalisation of politicians, the role of opposition members, loss of corporate memory in the public service, addressing systemic policy failure, nudge economics and the impact of social media and the sharing economy on policy making and government.
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Australia: A Cultural History

Australia: A Cultural History

John Rickard

$39.95
John Rickard’s Australia: A Cultural History, first published in 1988, is still the only short history of Australia from a cultural perspective. It has also acquired a reputation as an introduction to the development of Australian society and was listed by the historian and public intellectual John Hirst in his ‘First XI: The best Australian history books’.

Although arranged chronologically, this book is not a chronicle, still less a laborious detailing of governors and governments: rather, it focuses on the transmission of values, beliefs, and customs amongst the diverse mix of peoples who are today’s Australians. The story begins with sixty thousand years of Aboriginal presence and their continuing material and spiritual relationship with the land, and takes the reader through the turbulent years of British colonisation and the emergence, through prosperity, war, and depression, of the cultural accommodations which have been distinctively Australian.

This third edition concludes with a critical review of the challenges facing contemporary Australia and warns readers that ‘we may get the future we deserve’.
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Africa: A Modern History

Africa: A Modern History

Guy Arnold

$69.99
A revised and updated edition of this magisterial and sweeping history of modern Africa.

The end of the Second World War signalled the rapid end of the European African empires. In 1945, only four African countries were independent; by 1963, thirty African states created the Organization of African Unity. Despite formidable problems, the 1960s were a time of optimism as Africans enjoyed their new independence, witnessed increases in prosperity and prepared to tackle their political and economic problems in their own way.

By the 1990s, however, the high hopes of the 1960s had been dashed. Dictatorship by strongmen, corruption, civil wars and genocide, widespread poverty and the interventions and manipulations of the major powers had all relegated Africa to the position of an aid 'basket case', the world's poorest and least-developed continent.

By exploring developments over the last fifteen years, including the impact of China, new IT technology and the Arab Spring, the rise of Nigeria as Africa's leading country and the recent refugee crisis, Guy Arnold brings his landmark history of modern Africa up to date and provides a fresh and insightful perspective on this troubled and misunderstood continent.
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American Freemasonry: Its Revolutionary History and Challenging Future

American Freemasonry: Its Revolutionary History and Challenging Future

Alain de Keghel ,  Arturo de Hoyos ,  Margaret C. Jacob

$54.95  $49.45
Freemasonry bears the imprint of the society in which it exists, and Freemasonry in North America is no exception. While keeping close ties to French lodges until 1913, American Freemasonry was also deeply influenced by the experiences of many early American political leaders, leading to distinctive differences from European lodges.

Offering an unobstructed view of the American system and its strengths and failings, Alain de Keghel, an elder of the Grand Orient de France and, since 1999, a lifetime member of the Scottish Rite Research Society (Southern U.S. jurisdiction), examines the history of Freemasonry in the United States from the colonial era to the Revolutionary War to the rise of the Scottish branch onward. He reveals the special relationship between the French Masonic hero, the Marquis de Lafayette, and the Founding Fathers, especially George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, including French Freemasonry’s role in the American Revolution. He also explores Franklin’s Masonic membership, including how he was Elder of the lodge of the Nine Sisters in Paris.

The author investigates the racial split in American Freemasonry between black lodges and white and how, unlike French lodges, women are ineligible to become Masons in the U.S. He examines how American Freemasonry has remained deeply religious across the centuries and forbids discussion of religious or social issues in its lodges, unlike some branches of French Freemasonry, which removed belief in God as a prerequisite for membership in 1877 and whose lodges operate in some respects as philosophical debating societies. Revealing the factors that have resulted in shrinking Masonic enrollment in America, the author explores the revitalization work done by the Grand Lodge of California and sounds the call to make Freemasonry and its principles relevant to America once again.
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The Frozen Chosen: The 1st Marine Division and the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir

The Frozen Chosen: The 1st Marine Division and the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir

Thomas McKelvey Cleaver

$19.99
In November 1950 The US 1st Marine Division was trapped in the Chosin Reservoir following the intervention of Red China in the Korean War. Fought during the worst blizzard in a century, the ensuing battle is considered by the United States Marine Corps to be 'the Corps' Finest Hour.' The soldiers who fought there would later become known as the `Frozen Chosen'.

Published now in paperback, this incredible story is based on first hand interviews from surviving veterans, telling of heroism and bravery in the face of overwhelming odds, as a handful of Marines fought desperately against wave after wave of Chinese forces. Sometimes forced into desperate hand to hand combat, the fighting retreat from Chosin marked one of the darkest moments for Western forces in Korea, but would go on to resonate with generations of Marines as a symbol of the Marine Corps' dogged determination, fighting skill, and never-say-die attitude on the battlefield.
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The Vietnam War: 1945-1975

The Vietnam War: 1945-1975

David Parsons  ,  Marci Reaven ,  Lily Wong

$36.99
An engaging and enlightening new account of the progression, impact, and legacy of the Vietnam War. The Vietnam War was the first major conflict to be televised, and the public's response to images beamed directly into their living rooms played an important role in the eventual outcome of the war and in the decisions of the American military command. Packed with photographs, posters and other images that evoke the period, this volume traces the history of American involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975. Six short essays and nearly 50 chronological entries highlight the places, people, key events and important questions of the era. More than 40 years have passed since the Vietnam War came to an end, but its far-reaching impact continues to reverberate today. Grounded in recent scholarship, The Vietnam War integrates multiple perspectives as it brings home the complexity of one of the momentous events of the twentieth century.
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Siam and World War I: An International History

Siam and World War I: An International History

Stefan Hell

$57.99
100 years ago Siam declared war on Germany. In the early morning hours of 22 July 1917, army units and gendarmerie called the roughly 200 completely unsuspecting German and Austro-Hungarian men in Bangkok out of their beds, presented them with the declaration of war and went on to arrest them. At the same time, marine units boarded the nine ocean going German ships anchored on the river, capturing what was considered by all to be the greatest prize. With these events began Siam's 17 months at war with two European powers.

The story of how these 17 months unfolded in Siam and in Europe is at the heart of this book. It is a complex tale interweaving political, diplomatic, military, cultural and social history. The book introduces adventurous and scared Thai soldiers on the battlefields of the Western Front, arrogant European politicians and diplomats convinced of their racial and cultural superiority, shrewd Thai officials beating the West at its own game of imperialism, princes rivalling over influence and power, German businessmen imprisoned by "Orientals", Thai students caught up in world events and submarine attacks, and the King of Siam himself.

Siam's participation in World War I was the single most important international event for contemporaries in the kingdom, its symbolism unmatched by any other occurrence of the times. The book is the first-ever extensively researched study of Siam and World War I in all its facets. By combining primary sources from Thailand, Germany, France, Great Britain, and Austria, the study describes local events in a global context and explains how world events manifested themselves in the royal palaces and on the streets of Bangkok. The legacy of the events a century ago is remarkably tangible even today, and the book connects the reader with this legacy.

The book is easily accessible to the non-specialist reader interested in history and political affairs, as it describes numerous colourful episodes and vignettes, and includes over 300 rare photographs and illustrations, reproduced in high-quality print. The book is published simultaneously in a Thai and an English-language version100 years ago Siam declared war on Germany. In the early morning hours of 22 July 1917, army units and gendarmerie called the roughly 200 completely unsuspecting German and Austro-Hungarian men in Bangkok out of their beds, presented them with the declaration of war and went on to arrest them. At the same time, marine units boarded the nine ocean going German ships anchored on the river, capturing what was considered by all to be the greatest prize. With these events began Siam's 17 months at war with two European powers.

The story of how these 17 months unfolded in Siam and in Europe is at the heart of this book. It is a complex tale interweaving political, diplomatic, military, cultural and social history. The book introduces adventurous and scared Thai soldiers on the battlefields of the Western Front, arrogant European politicians and diplomats convinced of their racial and cultural superiority, shrewd Thai officials beating the West at its own game of imperialism, princes rivalling over influence and power, German businessmen imprisoned by "Orientals", Thai students caught up in world events and submarine attacks, and the King of Siam himself.

Siam's participation in World War I was the single most important international event for contemporaries in the kingdom, its symbolism unmatched by any other occurrence of the times. The book is the first-ever extensively researched study of Siam and World War I in all its facets. By combining primary sources from Thailand, Germany, France, Great Britain, and Austria, the study describes local events in a global context and explains how world events manifested themselves in the royal palaces and on the streets of Bangkok. The legacy of the events a century ago is remarkably tangible even today, and the book connects the reader with this legacy.

The book is easily accessible to the non-specialist reader interested in history and political affairs, as it describes numerous colourful episodes and vignettes, and includes over 300 rare photographs and illustrations, reproduced in high-quality print. The book is published simultaneously in a Thai and an English-language version
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Pentridge: Voices from the Other Side

Pentridge: Voices from the Other Side

Rupert Mann

$49.99
Members of the last generation of inmates and staff return to the now-forgotten prison to tell the true and brutal story of Pentridge before developers bury it forever.

Rupert Mann has worked with the past all his life, and is interested in how we use, forget, and celebrate it today. This priceless work, completed over five years, is an attempt to hear the voices of the last generation who lived and worked at Pentridge Prison, now the only ones who can tell the tale before the site is redeveloped and its true history is lost.

Within the forgotten and decaying walls of this once shining fortress, fifteen people returned to their memories and to Pentridge — many for the first time since being released or having retired up to 60 years before — to bear witness to its end and to be photographed amongst the decay as a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

They include former prisoners, such as Jack Charles, Billy Longley, and Ray Mooney; former staff, such as Peter Norden and Pat Merlo; musicians who played there, such as Paul Kelly; and Brian Morley, a legal witness to Ronald Ryan's execution in 1967.

Pentridge was, for 146 years, a concentrated crossroads of disparate song lines and an integral if unwanted part of Melbourne’s identity. In its cells, corridors, and halls can be found the remnants of an endless litany of love, hate, loss, and discovery, friendship and conflict, political dealings and petty squabbles. There is no betrayal, affirmation, or epiphany that has not occurred there. And during all those years, life was messily split between jailer and prisoner by bluestone and iron. This is their collective story.
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In Search of Fish and Fortune: Along Australia's West Coast

In Search of Fish and Fortune: Along Australia's West Coast

Bill Leonard

$70.00
Australia’s extensive coastline has a rich and diverse maritime history. In Search of Fish and Fortune celebrates the history of fishing and pearling as some of the first commercial trades established following European settlement on the western coastline of Australia, offering an insight into the evolution of design, craftsmanship, skills, and technology of fishing craft.

The development of the fishing and pearling industries and the means by which fishers and boat-builders plied their trade is told through the stories of 15 significant vessels from Western Australia’s five principle fishing areas. Stretching as far back as 1875, these stories are about the grassroots fisher folk and the builders of their unique watercraft that took on the many challenges inherent in Australia’s western seas and rivers, to help pioneer the diverse and prosperous fisheries that exist today.

Showcasing over 60 magnificent line drawings executed with inimitable precision and beauty by master heritage shipwright Bill Leonard, In Search of Fish and Fortune features maps and classic photographs that illustrate the stories of the vessels and the generations of boat-builders, shipwrights, and fishermen that constructed, owned, and sailed them.
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Running out of Steam: & Catching Up with Diesels

Running out of Steam: & Catching Up with Diesels

David Burke

$29.95
This is a wonderful history of the steam era coming to an end and the rise of diesels.

Using contemporary advertising material, timetables, photographs and other printed ephemera, combined with primary source material the author has created a nostalgic journey of railways and those who worked there. Every state is covered as well as Commonwealth Railways. There are chapters on some of the great personalities who steered the railways into the era of diesel.
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The Crown: The Inside History

The Crown: The Inside History

Robert Lacey

$39.99
The official book to the critically acclaimed Netflix drama, The Crown, including additional material and exclusive images.

A fascinating exploration of Elizabeth II's early years as Princess and Queen, complete with extensive research, additional material and beautifully reproduced photographs.

'The things which I have here before promised, I will perform and keep. So help me God.'

Elizabeth Mountbatten never expected her father to die so suddenly, so young, leaving her with a throne to fill and a global institution to govern. Crowned at 25, she was already a wife and mother. Follow the journey of a woman learning to become a queen.

As Britain lifted itself out of the shadow of war, the new monarch faced her own challenges. Her mother doubted her marriage; her uncle-in-exile derided her abilities; her husband resented the sacrifice of his career and family name; while her rebellious sister embarked on a love aff air that threatened the centuries-old links between the Church and the Crown. This is the story of how Elizabeth II drew on every ounce of resolve to ensure that the Crown always came out on top.

Netflix's original series The Crown dramatised Peter Morgan's powerful portrayal of Britain's longest reigning monarch. Written by royal biographer Robert Lacey, The Crown: The Inside History adds expert and in-depth detail to the events of the series, painting an intimate portrait of life inside Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street. Here is Elizabeth II as we've never seen her before.
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Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth-Century Europe

Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth-Century Europe

Sarah Gristwood

$19.99
A BBC History magazine Book of the Year and an amazon.com Best Book of the Month Two childhood companions, now matriarchs of two opposing powers, calmly set their menfolk aside and declare that they, as women, are better equipped to organise a peace between their warring nations. An ambitious young woman, debarred by her sex from ascending the throne, nonetheless rules her country and turns her court into an academy where girls are taught how to rule.

A mother tells her daughter to face death rather than give up the sceptre that is her right to wield...As religion divided sixteenth-century Europe, an extraordinary group of women - queens, consorts and thinkers - rose to power. Despite finding themselves on opposing sides of power struggles both armed and otherwise, through their family ties and patronage they educated and supported each other in a brutal world where the price of failure was disgrace, exile or even death.

Theirs was a unique culture of feminine power that saw them run the continent for decades. And yet, as the sixteenth century waned and the Reformation left faultlines across the continent, the Virgin Queen of England was virtually alone as ruler - a queen surrounded by kings once more. From mother to daughter and mentor to protegee, Sarah Gristwood follows the passage of power from Isabella of Castile and Anne de Beaujeu through Anne Boleyn - the woman who tipped England into religious reform - and on to Elizabeth I and Jeanne d'Albret, heroine of the Protestant Reformation.

Unravelling a gripping historical narrative, she reveals the unorthodox practices adopted by these women in the face of challenges that retain an all-too familiar aspect today, and assesses their impact on the era that began the shaping of the modern world. Epic in scale, this game of queens is a remarkable spectacle of skill and ingenuity.
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Britain's 100 Best Railway Stations

Britain's 100 Best Railway Stations

Simon Jenkins

$49.99
It is the location of all our hopeful beginnings and intended ends; an institution with its own rituals and priests; and a long-neglected aspect of Britain's architecture- the railway station.

Bestselling historian Simon Jenkins has travelled the length and breadth of the country to select this joyous celebration of our social history. With his usual insight and authority, he describes the history, geography, design and significance of each of these glories; explores their role in the national imagination; champions the engineers, architects and rival companies that made them possible; and tells the story behind the development, triumphs and follies of these very British creations.

From Waterloo to Whitby, St Pancras to Stirling, these are the marvellous, often undersung places that link our nation. All aboard!
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Elizabeth I (Penguin Monarchs): A Study in Insecurity

Elizabeth I (Penguin Monarchs): A Study in Insecurity

Helen Castor

$29.99
In the popular imagination, as in her portraits, Elizabeth I is the image of monarchical power. The Virgin Queen ruled over a Golden Age- the Spanish Armada was defeated and England's enemies scattered; English explorers reached almost to the ends of the earth; a new Church of England rose from the ashes of past conflict, and the English Renaissance bloomed in the genius of Shakespeare, Spenser and Sidney. But the image is also armour.

In this illuminating new account of Elizabeth's reign, Helen Castor shows how England's iconic queen was shaped by profound and enduring insecurity-an insecurity which was both a matter of practical political reality and personal psychology. From her precarious upbringing at the whim of a brutal, capricious father and her perilous accession after his death, to the religious division that marred her state and the failure to marry that threatened her line, Elizabeth lived under constant threat. But, facing down her enemies with a compellingly inscrutable public persona, the last and greatest of the Tudor monarchs would become a timeless, fearless queen.
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The Trials of the King of Hampshire: Madness, Secrecy and Betrayal in Georgian England

The Trials of the King of Hampshire: Madness, Secrecy and Betrayal in Georgian England

Elizabeth Foyster

$19.99
A Guardian best history book of 2016 Eccentric, shy aristocrat ... or mad, bad and dangerous to know

?Neighbour Jane Austen found the 3rd earl of Portsmouth a model gentleman and Lord Byron maintained that, while the man was a fool, he was certainly no madman. Behind closed doors, though, Portsmouth delighted in pinching his servants so that they screamed, asked dairy-maids to bleed him with lancets and was obsessed with attending funerals. After he'd lived this way for years, in 1823 his own family set out to have him declared insane. Still reeling from the madness of King George, society could not tear itself away from what would become the longest, costliest and most controversial insanity trial in British history.
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Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey

Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey

Nicola Tallis

$19.99
Good people, I am come hither to die, and by a law I am condemned to the same. These were the words uttered by the seventeen-year-old Lady Jane Grey as she stood on the scaffold awaiting death on a cold February morning in 1554. Forced onto the throne by the great power players at court, Queen Jane reigned for just thirteen tumultuous days before being imprisoned in the Tower, condemned for high treason and executed. In this dramatic retelling of an often misread tale, historian and researcher Nicola Tallis explores a range of evidence that has never before been used in a biography to sweep away the many myths and reveal the moving, human story of an extraordinarily intelligent, independent and courageous young woman.
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House of Spies: St Ermin's Hotel, the London Base of British Espionage

House of Spies: St Ermin's Hotel, the London Base of British Espionage

Peter Matthews

$24.99
St Ermin’s Hotel has been at the centre of British intelligence since the 1930s, when it was known to MI6 as ‘The Works Canteen’. Intelligence officers such as Ian Fleming and Noel Coward were to be found in the hotel’s Caxton Bar, along with other less well-known names. Winston Churchill allegedly conceived the idea of the Special Operations Executive there over a glass (or two) of his favourite champagne in the early days of the Second World War, and the operation was started up in three gloomy rooms on the hotel’s second floor, with the traitorous Cambridge Spies among its founders.

When Stalin’s Russia turned to a peacetime enemy in the Cold War that followed, Kim Philby and Guy Burgess handed over intelligence to their Russian counterparts in the dark corners of the hotel, while MI6 man George Blake operated as a Soviet double agent just across the road in Artillery Mansions. Meanwhile, St Ermin’s proximity to government offices ensured its continued use by both domestic and foreign secret agents.

In this paperback edition of the first book on St Ermin’s, Peter Matthews, a witness to the intelligence battle for supremacy between MI5, MI6 and the KGB, explores this remarkable true history that is more riveting than any spy novel.
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Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History

Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History

Roy A. Adkins

$55.00
An epic page-turner filled with tales of courage, desperation, endurance and intrigue, brought to life by eyewitness accounts and expert research. br>
For over three and a half years, from 1779 to 1783, the tiny territory of Gibraltar was besieged and blockaded, on land and at sea, by the overwhelming forces of Spain and France. It became the longest siege in British history, and the obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies in the War of Independence.

Located between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, on the very edge of Europe, Gibraltar was a place of varied nationalities, languages, religions and social classes. During the siege, thousands of soldiers, civilians and their families withstood terrifying bombardments, starvation and diseases. Very ordinary people lived through extraordinary events, from shipwrecks and naval battles to an attempted invasion of England and a daring sortie out of Gibraltar into Spain. Deadly innovations included red-hot shot, shrapnel shells and a barrage from immense floating batteries.

This is military and social history at its best, a story of soldiers, sailors and civilians, with royalty and rank-and-file, workmen and engineers, priests, prisoners-of-war, spies and surgeons, all caught up in a struggle for a fortress located on little more than two square miles of awe-inspiring rock. Gibraltar: the Greatest Siege in British History is an epic page-turner, rich in dramatic human detail - a tale of courage, endurance, intrigue, desperation, greed and humanity. The everyday experiences of all those involved are brought vividly to life with eyewitness accounts and expert research.
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Craftsmen of the Army

Craftsmen of the Army

$73.95
The Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME) provides the Army s integral repair and recovery capability. Its soldiers are deployed at the front line and have to be capable of switching instantly from a technical role to fighting alongside those they support, as their many awards for gallantry demonstrate. This, the third, volume of REME s distinguished history covers the period from post-Cold War drawdown to the end of UK combat operations in Afghanistan, during which time REME was continuously involved in operations. The narrative knits together personal accounts of front line experiences with an explanation the political and military background, with a particular focus on equipment support issues. It explains how REME operates and deals with broader issues related to the procurement and support of equipment, and the changing organisations delivering these vital services, within which members of REME have frequently played key enabling roles.
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Terms & Conditions: Life in Girls' Boarding Schools, 1939-1979

Terms & Conditions: Life in Girls' Boarding Schools, 1939-1979

Ysenda Maxtone Graham

$22.99
When I asked a group of girls who had been at Hatherop Castle in the 1960s whether the school had had a lab in those days they gave me a blank look. 'A laboratory?' I expanded, hoping to jog their memories. 'Oh that kind of lab!' one of them said. 'I thought you meant a Labrador.''The cruel teachers. The pashes on other girls. The gossip. The giggles. The awful food. The homesickness. The friendships made for life. The shivering cold. Games of lacrosse, and cricket.'The girls' boarding school! What a ripe theme for the most observant verbal artist in our midst today - the absurdly undersung Ysenda Maxtone Graham, who has the beadiness and nosiness of the best investigative reporter, the wit of Jane Austen and a take on life which is like no one else's. This book has been my constant companion ever since it appeared'A. N. Wilson, Evening Standard'A wonderful book'Craig Brown, Mail on Sunday
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Tudor Church Militant: Edward VI and the Protestant Reformation

Tudor Church Militant: Edward VI and the Protestant Reformation

Diarmaid MacCulloch

$24.99
Edward VI died a teenager in 1553, yet his brief reign would shape the future of the nation, unleashing a Protestant revolution that propelled England into the heart of the Reformation. This dramatic account takes a fresh look at one of the most significant and turbulent periods in English history. 'A challenging, elegant and persuasive biography of an unjustly neglected king' Jerry Brotton, author of This Orient Isle'MacCulloch puts the young Edward at the centre of the action ... as this excellent and lively study shows, his ghost continues to haunt the history of Anglicanism' Sunday Times 'This is Reformation history as it should be written, not least because it resembles its subject matter: learned, argumentative, and, even when mistaken, never dull' Eamon Duffy, author of The Stripping of the Altars'One of the best historians writing in English today' Sunday Telegraph
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English Electric/BAC Lightning Manual: 1954 to 1988 (All Marks and Models)

English Electric/BAC Lightning Manual: 1954 to 1988 (All Marks and Models)

Ian Black

$39.99
Enjoying continuous frontline service with the RAF for nearly 30 years, the supersonic English Electric Lightning jet was the Spitfire of its era and the last of a special breed of fighter aircraft: single-seat, all-British, magnificently overpowered and possessing delightful handling qualities. During its lifetime it became the favourite mount for jet fighter pilots and thrilled the crowds at countless air displays with its spectacular speed and awesome performance. Former Lightning pilot Ian Black brings a level of level of insight into operating the Lightning that is second to none
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Chitral 1895: An Episode of the Great Game

Chitral 1895: An Episode of the Great Game

Mark Simner

$55.00
In 1895, a small Indian Army garrison, commanded by Surgeon-Major Sir George Scott Robertson and Captain Charles Vere Ferrers Townshend, was besieged by a joint Chitrali and Pathan army at the fort of Chitral. Despite the odds being heavily stacked against them, Robertson's beleaguered little garrison held out for forty-eight days until a relief expedition was able to fight its way through to the rescue. The siege and subsequent relief is a story of valour and sheer determination in the face of a stubborn adversary and extreme weather conditions, all played out on the often-mountainous terrain of the north-western border of British India. Robertson described events in Chitral as a 'minor siege', but the siege and subsequent relief should be viewed as an important episode in Britain's 'Great Game' with Russia, which would have serious consequences for the British several years later. Indeed, the retention of Chitral by the Indian Government would be a contributing factor to the mass uprisings along the North-West Frontier of India during late 1897. In reality, it was anything but a minor siege.
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The Last Governor

The Last Governor

Jonathan Dimbleby

$34.99
1 July 1997 marked the end of British rule of Hong Kong, whereby this territory was passed into the hands of the People s Republic of China. In 1992, Chris Patten, former chairman of the Conservative Party, was appointed Hong Kong's last governor, and was the man to oversee the handover ceremony of this former British colony. Within the last five years of British rule, acclaimed journalist Jonathan Dimbleby was given unique access to the governor which enabled him to document the twists and turns of such an extraordinary diplomatic, political and personal drama. As Governor, Patten encouraged the necessary expansion of Hong Kong's social welfare system, striving to reconcile the basic rights and freedom of over 6 million people with the unpredictable imperatives of Beijing. Drawing on the insights of a host of senior figures, the author places the crisis in both its human and historical contexts, and presents some startling arguments about the conduct of British foreign policy on Hong Kong before and during Patten's tenure.
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Uncharted Territory: Culture and Commerce in Hong Kong's Art World: Penguin Specials

Uncharted Territory: Culture and Commerce in Hong Kong's Art World: Penguin Specials

Magnus Renfrew

$9.99
Hong Kong has the once in a generation opportunity to assert itself as the creative and cultural hub of Asia, and to rival the established centres of New York and London. In providing an angle unique to the city, Hong Kong could play a pivotal role in redefining the concept of a 'global' art world. But, is it ready to take on the challenge? Magnus Renfrew, art expert and one of the driving forces behind the city's ascent in the art world, outlines the recent past and paints the future of Hong Kong's creative scene, all while reflecting on his own experiences and the new buzz around Hong Kong's endless possibilities.
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Dear Hong Kong: An Elegy For A City: Penguin Specials

Dear Hong Kong: An Elegy For A City: Penguin Specials

Xu Xi

$9.99
Xu Xi's body of work witnesses her turbulent love affair with her home-city of Hong Kong. In this probing memoir, she unravels her recently finalised decision to leave the city for good. She critiques a Hong Kong that has, in her eyes, lost its way. And yet, it is only out of the city's enduring presence in her life, both in the form of memory and periodic homecomings, that she has carved out a personal and literary identity. Dear Hong Kong is a profound reflection on the life of Hong Kong, personified and interrogated by one of its most lucid writers.
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City of Protest: A Recent History of Dissent in Hong Kong: Penguin Specials

City of Protest: A Recent History of Dissent in Hong Kong: Penguin Specials

Antony Dapiran

$9.99
From the turbulent 1960s until today, Hong Kong has been a city shaped by civil disobedience. The latest wave of protests in Hong Kong's long history of public dissent culminated in the Occupy Central movement of 2014. What emerges from these grassroots movements is a unique Hong Kong identity, one shaped neither by Britain nor China. An insightful exploration of the historical and social stimuli and implications of civil disobedience, City of Protest offers a compelling look at the often-fraught relationship between politics and belonging, and a city's struggle to assert itself.
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Codename Suzette: An extraordinary story of resistance and rescue in Nazi Paris

Codename Suzette: An extraordinary story of resistance and rescue in Nazi Paris

Anne Nelson

$29.99
Codename Suzette is one of the untold stories of the Holocaust, an account of extraordinary courage in the face of evil.

Suzanne Spaak was born into the Belgian Catholic ruling class and married into the country's leading political family. Her brother-in-law was the Foreign Minister and her husband Claude was a playwright and patron of the painter Renee Magritte. Having moved to Paris in the late 1930s she appeared to part of the elite. Her neighbour was Collette, France's most famous living writer, and Jean Cocteau was part of her circle of intimates. But Suzanne was living a double life. Her friendship with a Polish Jewish refugee led her to her life's purpose. When France fell and the Nazis occupied Paris, she joined the Resistance. She used her fortune and social status to enlist allies among wealthy Parisians and church groups.

Under the eyes of the Gestapo, Suzanne and women from the Jewish and Christian resistance groups 'kidnapped' hundreds of Jewish children to save them from the gas chambers.

In the final year of the Occupation Suzanne was caught in the Gestapo dragnet that was pursuing a Soviet agent she had aided. She was executed shortly before the liberation of Paris. Suzanne Spaak is honoured in Israel as one of the Righteous Among Nations.
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The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution

The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution

Timothy Tackett

$44.99
Between 1793 and 1794, thousands of French citizens were imprisoned and hundreds sent to the guillotine by a powerful dictatorship that claimed to be acting in the public interest. Only a few years earlier, revolutionaries had proclaimed a new era of tolerance, equal justice, and human rights. How and why did the French Revolution's lofty ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity descend into violence and terror?

The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution offers a new interpretation of this turning point in world history. Timothy Tackett traces the inexorable emergence of a culture of violence among the Revolution's political elite amid the turbulence of popular uprisings, pervasive subversion, and foreign invasion. Violence was neither a preplanned strategy nor an ideological imperative but rather the consequence of multiple factors of the Revolutionary process itself, including an initial breakdown in authority, the impact of the popular classes, and a cycle of rumors, denunciations, and panic fed by fear - fear of counterrevolutionary conspiracies, fear of anarchy, fear of oneself becoming the target of vengeance. To comprehend the coming of the Terror, we must understand the contagion of fear that left the revolutionaries themselves terrorized.

Tackett recreates the sights, sounds, and emotions of the Revolution through the observations of nearly a hundred men and women who experienced and recorded it firsthand. Penetrating the mentality of Revolutionary elites on the eve of the Terror, he reveals how suspicion and mistrust escalated and helped propel their actions, ultimately consuming them and the Revolution itself.
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Danish Volunteers of the Waffen-SS: Freikorps Danmark 1941-43

Danish Volunteers of the Waffen-SS: Freikorps Danmark 1941-43

Jens Pank Bjerregaard ,  Lars Larsen

$160.95  $144.85
The book Danish Volunteers of the Waffen-SS tells the story of Freikorps Danmark in pictures from 1941-1943. Freikorps Danmark was established as a Danish corps which had to fight communism and, from its beginning, it was controlled from Denmark and put under the control of the SS-Division Totenkopf and 1. SS-Brigade during its efforts on the Eastern Front. It was a relatively small corps, which almost entirely consisted of Danish volunteers; during their two efforts on the Eastern Front, they suffered heavy casualties. In 1943, the High Command of Waffen-SS decided to abolish Freikorps Danmark and the personnel had to enter a new German division, which was directly controlled by Waffen-SS. The source of material for this book has been gathered from the photo collections of the old volunteers, which means that many of the photos have never been seen before.
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The First Nazi: Erich Ludendorff

The First Nazi: Erich Ludendorff

Will Brownell ,  Denise Drace-Brownell

$21.99
General Erich Ludendorff was one of the most important military commanders of the last century, yet today, is one of the least known. One of the top two German generals of the First World War, Ludendorff dominated not only his superior - General Paul von Hindenburg - but also Kaiser Wilhelm II.

For years, he was the de facto military dictator of Germany. Ludendorff not only controlled all aspects of the First World War, he refused any opportunity to make peace; he antagonised the Americans until they declared war; he sent Lenin into Russia to forge a revolution in order to shut down the Russian front; and then he pushed for total military victory in 1918, in a rabid slaughter known as 'The Ludendorff Offensive'. Shortly after Germany lost the war in 1918, Ludendorff created the murderous legend that Germany had lost only because Jews had conspired on the home front.

He soon forged an alliance with Hitler, endorsed the Nazis and wrote manically about how Germans needed a new world war to redeem the Fatherland. This savage man had staggering designs to build a gigantic state that would dwarf even the British Empire. Ludendorff quite simply wanted the world – and changed the 20th century beyond recognition.
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The Nazi Titanic: The Incredible Untold Story of a Doomed Ship in World War II

The Nazi Titanic: The Incredible Untold Story of a Doomed Ship in World War II

Robert Watson

$24.99
The little-known story of the most intriguing ship ever to set sail.

Built in 1927, the German ocean liner SS Cap Arcona was the greatest ship since the RMS Titanic and one of the most celebrated luxury liners in the world. When the Nazis seized control in Germany, she was stripped down for use as a floating barracks and troop transport. Later, during the war, Hitler's minister, Joseph Goebbels, cast her as the "star" in his epic propaganda film about the sinking of the legendary Titanic.

Following the film's enormous failure, the German navy used the Cap Arcona to transport German soldiers and civilians across the Baltic, away from the Red Army's advance. In the Third Reich's final days, the ill-fated ship was packed with thousands of concentration camp prisoners. Without adequate water, food, or sanitary facilities, the prisoners suffered as they waited for the end of the war. Just days before Germany surrendered, the Cap Arcona was mistakenly bombed by the British Royal Air Force, and nearly all of the prisoners were killed in the last major tragedy of the Holocaust and one of history's worst maritime disasters.

Although the British government sealed many documents pertaining to the ship's sinking, Robert P. Watson has unearthed forgotten records, conducted many interviews, and used over 100 sources, including diaries and oral histories, to expose this story. As a result, The Nazi Titanic is a riveting and astonishing account of an enigmatic ship that played a devastating role in World War II and the Holocaust.
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Architects of Death: The Men Who Engineered the Holocaust

Architects of Death: The Men Who Engineered the Holocaust

Karen Bartlett

$39.99
For five years the gas chambers and crematoria of Auschwitz had been the engine of the holocaust, facilitating the murder and incineration of more than one million people, most of them Jews. Yet such a spectacularly evil feat of engineering was designed not by the Nazi SS, but by a small respectable firm of German engineers: the owners and engineers of J. A. Topf and Sons. These were not Nazi sadists, but men who were playboys and the sons of train drivers. They were driven not by ideology, but by love affairs, personal ambition, and bitter personal rivalries to create the ultimate human killing and disposal machines - even at the same time as their company sheltered Nazi enemies from the death camps. The intense conflagration of their very ordinary motives created work that surpassed in its inhumanity even the demands of the SS. In order to fulfil their own `dreams' they created the ultimate human nightmare.
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Coromandel: A Personal History of South India

Coromandel: A Personal History of South India

Charles Allen

$65.00
Coromandel was the name given by European traders to India's south-eastern seaboard, a corruption of the Tamil Cholamandalam, after the temple-building Chola kings who ruled the southern peninsula for centuries prior to the Islamic invasions.

Indian history tends to focus on Northern India, but Coromandel will journey south, exploring the less well-known, often neglected and very different history and identity of the oldest India in the pre-Aryan Dravidian south. Highly acclaimed historian Charles Allen explores the astonishing Buddhist and Jain civilisations that flourished all along India's eastern seaboard before Hinduism became the established religion.

In Coromandel, Allen continues his investigation into early Indian history, begun in Ashoka. At each point in his journey through the Indian south he meets local historians, gurus, politicians and other colourful personalities, and with their help uncovers some extraordinary stories about the past. This is a traveller's tale, and as Allen moves through contemporary India, he discovers as much about the present as he does about the past.
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Lampedusa: Gateway to Europe

Lampedusa: Gateway to Europe

Pietro Bartolo ,  Chenxin Jiang ,  Lidia Tilotta

$26.99
The moving and essential testimony of an Italian doctor who has worked for twenty-five years on the front line of perhaps the largest mass migration in human history.

It is common to think of the refugee crisis as a recent phenomenon, but Dr Pietro Bartolo, who runs the clinic on the Italian island of Lampedusa, has been caring for its victims - both the living and the dead - for a quarter of a century.

Situated some 200 km off Italy's Southern coast, Lampedusa has hit the world headlines in recent years as the first port of call for hundreds of thousands of African and Middle Eastern migrants hoping to make a new life in Europe.

The shipwrecks began in 1992. Before the Arab Spring, they came from Africa, but now they come from across the Arab world as well. And the death toll is staggering. On Christmas Eve, 1996, 286 bodies were recovered; on the night of October 3, 2003, 366 out of 500 migrants died after a shipwreck nearby.

For the past twenty-five years, Doctor Bartolo has been rescuing, welcoming, helping, and providing medical assistance to those who survived. But, above all, he has been listening to them. Tales of pain and hope, stories of those who didn't make it, who died at sea, their bodies washed up on shore; stories of those who lost their loved ones, of babies that never had a chance to be born.
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Venice and its Jews: 500 Years Since the Founding of the Ghetto

Venice and its Jews: 500 Years Since the Founding of the Ghetto

Donatella Calabi ,  Lenore Rosenberg

$29.99
500 years ago in Venice, the first ghetto was born. It was the first of many 'Jewish enclosures' ordained by political powers, such as the Venetian senate. A place to confine, it soon became an important cosmopolitan and commercial centre of the Republic. The architectural structure of its housing, which became extraordinarily high to accommodate the increasing number of inhabitants, is strictly interlaced with Venetian history, economy and culture. As one of the main Jewish centres in Italy and the Mediterranean, Venice played a crucial role in the Jewish world. The Venetian word 'geto' (from 'gettare', to throw away) originated from the sector of Venice where scrap metal accumulated from foundries. This was the area assigned to the Jews. Thus the word, over the course of time, has become a synonym for segregation. Venice, the Jews, and Europe exhibition runs in Venice until November 13 2016. Dontatella Calabi will be promoting his book at the 'Beyond the Ghetto' symposium in New York, hosted by the Center for Jewish History, on 18-19 September 2016.
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The Man Who Created the Middle East: A Story of Empire, Conflict and the Sykes-Picot Agreement

The Man Who Created the Middle East: A Story of Empire, Conflict and the Sykes-Picot Agreement

Christopher Simon Sykes

$24.99
At the age of only 36, Sir Mark Sykes was signatory to the Sykes-Picot agreement, one of the most reviled treaties of modern times. A century later, Christopher Sykes' lively biography of his grandfather reassesses his life and work, and the political instability and violence in the Middle East attributed to it.

The Sykes-Picot agreement was drawn by the eponymousBritish and French diplomats in 1916 to determine the divideof the collapsing empire in the event of an allied victory inWorld War I. Excluding Arab involvement, it negated theirearlier guarantee of independence made by the British -and controversy has raged around it ever since.

But who was Mark Sykes?

A century on, Christopher Simon Sykes reveals new facetsof a misremembered diplomatic giant. Using previouslyundisclosed family letters and cartoons by his grandfather,he delivers a comprehensive and humbling account of the man behind one of the most impactful policies in the Middle East.
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Israel / Palestine

Israel / Palestine

Alan Dowty

$37.95
What explains the peculiar intensity and evident intractability of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Of all the "hot spots" in the world today, the apparently endless clash between Jews and Arabs in the Middle East seems unique in its longevity and resistance to resolution. Is this conflict really different from other ethnic and nationalist confrontations, and if so, in what way?

In this fully revised and expanded fourth edition of his highly respected introductory text, Alan Dowty demystifies the conflict by putting it in broad historical perspective, identifying its roots, and tracing its evolution up to the current impasse. His account offers a clear analytic framework for understanding transformations over time, and in doing so, punctures the myths of an "age-old" conflict with an unbridgeable gap between the two sides. Rather than simply reciting historical detail, this book presents a clear overview that serves as a road map through the thicket of conflicting claims.

Updated to include recent developments, such as the clashes in the Gaza Strip and the latest diplomatic initiatives, the new edition presents in full the opposed perspectives of the two sides, leaving readers to make their own evaluations of the issues. The book thus expresses fairly and objectively the concerns, hopes, fears, and passions of both sides, making it clear why this conflict is waged with such vehemence – and how, for all that, the gap between the two sides has narrowed over time.
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A Revolution of Feeling: The Decade that Forged the Modern Mind

A Revolution of Feeling: The Decade that Forged the Modern Mind

Rachel Hewitt

$49.99
A captivating history of the dramatic collapse of the Enlightenment and the emotional revolution it incorporated, told through the lives of those who lived through the turbulent 1790s.

In the 1790s, Britain underwent what the politician Edmund Burke called 'the most important of all revolutions...a revolution in sentiments'. Inspired by the French Revolution, British radicals concocted new political worlds to enshrine healthier, more productive, human emotions and relationships. The Enlightenment's wildest hopes crested in the utopian projects of such optimists - including the young poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the philosophers William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, the physician Thomas Beddoes and the first photographer Thomas Wedgwood - who sought to reform sex, education, commerce, politics and medicine by freeing desire from repressive constraints.

But by the middle of the decade, the wind had changed. The French Revolution descended into bloody Terror and the British government quashed radical political activities. In the space of one decade, feverish optimism gave way to bleak disappointment, and changed the way we think about human need and longing.

A Revolution of Feeling is a vivid and absorbing account of the dramatic end of the Enlightenment, the beginning of an emotional landscape preoccupied by guilt, sin, failure, resignation and repression, and the origins of our contemporary approach to feeling and desire. Above all, it is the story of the human cost of political change, of men and women consigned to the 'wrong side of history'. But although their revolutionary proposals collapsed, that failure resulted in its own cultural revolution - a revolution of feeling - the aftershocks of which are felt to the present day.
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Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life

Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life

Robert Dallek

$69.99
Franklin D. Roosevelt is a towering figure in twentieth-century history. A masterful politician who would win an unprecedented four presidential terms, initiate landmark reforms that changed the American industrial system and transformed an isolationist country into an international superpower, he ranks among the country's greatest presidents, and his ability to unite a divided nation and generate consensus remains unsurpassed. Robert Dallek's biography is a remarkable portrait of a man dedicated entirely to public affairs - a statesman who found politics a far more interesting and fulfilling pursuit than the management of family fortunes or the indulgence of personal pleasure, and who skilfully used his office to advance an extraordinary agenda.

Dallek attributes Roosevelt's success to two remarkable political insights. First, unlike any other president, he understood that efficacy in the American political system depended on building a national consensus and commanding stable, long-term popular support. Second, he made the presidency the central, most influential institution in modern America. In addressing the country's international and domestic problems, Roosevelt recognized the vital importance of remaining closely attentive to the full range of public sentiment around policy-making decisions - perhaps his most enduring lesson in leadership. Dallek brings to Roosevelt's life all the rigour and incisiveness of his bestselling biographies.
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True Believer: Stalin's Last American Spy

True Believer: Stalin's Last American Spy

Kati Marton

$24.99
True Believer reveals the life of Noel Field, once a well-meaning and privileged American who spied for Stalin during the 1930s and forties. Later, a pawn in Stalin’s sinister master strategy, Field was kidnapped and tortured by the KGB and forced to testify against his own Communist comrades.

How does an Ivy League-educated, US State Department employee, deeply rooted in American culture and history, become a hardcore Stalinist? The 1930s, when Noel Field joined the secret underground of the International Communist Movement, were a time of national collapse. Communism promised the righting of social and political wrongs and many in Field’s generation were seduced by its siren song. Few, however, went as far as Noel Field in betraying their own country.
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Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

Gordon S. Wood

$59.95
From the great historian of the American Revolution, New York Times-bestselling and Pulitzer-winning Gordon Wood, comes a majestic dual biography of two of America's most enduringly fascinating figures, whose partnership helped birth a nation, and whose subsequent falling out did much to fix its course.

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams could scarcely have come from more different worlds, or been more different in temperament. Jefferson, the optimist with enough faith in the innate goodness of his fellow man to be democracy's champion, was an aristocratic Southern slaveowner, while Adams, the overachiever from New England's rising middling classes, painfully aware he was no aristocrat, was a skeptic about popular rule and a defender of a more elitist view of government. They worked closely in the crucible of revolution, crafting the Declaration of Independence and leading, with Franklin, the diplomatic effort that brought France into the fight. But ultimately, their profound differences would lead to a fundamental crisis, in their friendship and in the nation writ large, as they became the figureheads of two entirely new forces, the first American political parties. It was a bitter breach, lasting through the presidential administrations of both men, and beyond.

But late in life, something remarkable happened: these two men were nudged into reconciliation. What started as a grudging trickle of correspondence became a great flood, and a friendship was rekindled, over the course of hundreds of letters. In their final years they were the last surviving founding fathers and cherished their role in this mighty young republic as it approached the half century mark in 1826. At last, on the afternoon of July 4th, 50 years to the day after the signing of the Declaration, Adams let out a sigh and said, "At least Jefferson still lives." He died soon thereafter. In fact, a few hours earlier on that same day, far to the south in his home in Monticello, Jefferson died as well.

Arguably no relationship in this country's history carries as much freight as that of John Adams of Massachusetts and Thomas Jefferson of Virginia. Gordon Wood has more than done justice to these entwined lives and their meaning; he has written a magnificent new addition to America's collective story.
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The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition

The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition

Linda Gordon

$51.95
A new Ku Klux Klan arose in the early 1920s, a less violent but equally virulent descendant of the relatively small, terrorist Klan of the 1870s. Unknown to most Americans today, this "second Klan" largely flourished above the Mason-Dixon Line--its army of four-to-six-million members spanning the continent from New Jersey to Oregon, its ideology of intolerance shaping the course of mainstream national politics throughout the twentieth century.

As prize-winning historian Linda Gordon demonstrates, the second Klan's enemies included Catholics and Jews as well as African Americans. Its bigotry differed in intensity but not in kind from that of millions of other WASP Americans. Its membership, limited to white Protestant native-born citizens, was entirely respectable, drawn from small businesspeople, farmers, craftsmen, and professionals, and including about 1.5 million women. For many Klanspeople, membership simultaneously reflected a protest against an increasingly urban society and provided an entree into the new middle class.

Never secret, this Klan recruited openly, through newspaper ads, in churches, and through extravagant mass "Americanism" pageants, often held on Independence Day. These "Klonvocations" drew tens of thousands and featured fireworks, airplane stunts, children's games, and women's bake-offs--and, of course, cross-burnings. The Klan even controlled about one hundred and fifty newspapers, as well as the Cavalier Motion Picture Company, dedicated to countering Hollywood's "immoral"--and Jewish--influence. The Klan became a major political force, electing thousands to state offices and over one hundred to national offices, while successfully lobbying for the anti-immigration Reed-Johnson Act of 1924.

As Gordon shows, the themes of 1920s Klan ideology were not aberrant, but an indelible part of American history: its "100% Americanism" and fake news, broadcast by charismatic speakers, preachers, and columnists, became part of the national fabric. Its spokespeople vilified big-city liberals, "money-grubbing Jews," "Pope-worshipping Irish," and intellectuals for promoting jazz, drinking, and cars (because they provided the young with sexual privacy).

The Klan's collapse in 1926 was no less flamboyant, done in by its leaders' financial and sexual corruption, culminating in the conviction of Grand Dragon David Stephenson for raping and murdering his secretary, and chewing up parts of her body. Yet the Klan's brilliant melding of Christian values with racial bigotry lasted long after the organization's decline, intensifying a fear of diversity that has long been a dominant undercurrent of American history.

Documenting what became the largest social movement of the first half of the twentieth century, The Second Coming of the Ku Klux Klan exposes the ancestry and helps explain the dangerous appeal of today's welter of intolerance.
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The Ghosts of Langley: Into the CIA's Heart of Darkness

The Ghosts of Langley: Into the CIA's Heart of Darkness

John Prados

$63.95
From the writer Kai Bird calls a "wonderfully accessible historian," the first major history of the CIA in a decade, published to tie in with the seventieth anniversary of the agency's foundingDuring his first visit to Langley, the CIA's Virginia headquarters, President Donald Trump told those gathered, "I am so behind you... there's nobody I respect more, " hinting that he was going to put more CIA operations officers into the field so the CIA could smite its enemies ever more forcefully. But while Trump was making these promises, behind the scenes the CIA was still reeling from blowback from the very tactics that Trump touted-including secret overseas prisons and torture-that it had resorted to a decade earlier during President George W. Bush's war on terror. Under the latest regime it seemed that the CIA was doomed to repeat its past failures rather than put its house in order.

The Ghosts of Langley is a provocative and panoramic new history of the Central Intelligence Agency that relates the agency's current predicament to its founding and earlier years, telling the story of the agency through the eyes of key figures in CIA history, including some of its most troubling covert actions around the world. It reveals how the agency, over seven decades, has resisted government accountability, going rogue in a series of highly questionable ventures that reach their apotheosis with the secret overseas prisons and torture programs of the war on terror.

Drawing on mountains of newly declassified documents, the celebrated historian of national intelligence John Prados throws fresh light on classic agency operations from Poland to Hungary, from Indonesia to Iran-Contra, and from the Bay of Pigs to Guantanamo Bay. The halls of Langley, Prados persuasively argues, echo with the footsteps of past spymasters, to the extent that it resembles a haunted house. Indeed, every day that the militarization of the CIA increases, the agency drifts further away from classic arts of espionage and intelligence analysis-and its original mission, while pushing dangerously beyond accountability.

The Ghosts of Langley will be essential reading for anyone who cares about the next phase of American history-and the CIA's evolution-as its past informs its future and a president of impulsive character prods the agency toward new scandals and failures.
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Andrew Jackson And The Miracle Of New Orleans: The Underdog Army That Defeated An Empire

Andrew Jackson And The Miracle Of New Orleans: The Underdog Army That Defeated An Empire

Brian Kilmeade ,  Don Yaeger

$49.95
Another history pageturner from the authors of the #1 bestsellers George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates.

The War of 1812 saw America threatened on every side. Encouraged by the British, Indian tribes attacked settlers in the West, while the Royal Navy terrorized the coasts. By mid-1814, President James Madison’s generals had lost control of the war in the North, losing battles in Canada. Then British troops set the White House ablaze, and a feeling of hopelessness spread across the country.

Into this dire situation stepped Major General Andrew Jackson. A native of Tennessee who had witnessed the horrors of the Revolutionary War and Indian attacks, he was glad America had finally decided to confront repeated British aggression. But he feared that President Madison’s men were overlooking the most important target of all: New Orleans.

If the British conquered New Orleans, they would control the mouth of the Mississippi River, cutting Americans off from that essential trade route and threatening the previous decade’s Louisiana Purchase. The new nation’s dreams of western expansion would be crushed before they really got off the ground.

So Jackson had to convince President Madison and his War Department to take him seriously, even though he wasn’t one of the Virginians and New Englanders who dominated the government. He had to assemble a coalition of frontier militiamen, French-speaking Louisianans,Cherokee and Choctaw Indians, freed slaves, and even some pirates. And he had to defeat the most powerful military force in the world—in the confusing terrain of the Louisiana bayous.

In short, Jackson needed a miracle. The local Ursuline nuns set to work praying for his outnumbered troops. And so the Americans, driven by patriotism and protected by prayer, began the battle that would shape our young nation’s destiny.

As they did in their two previous bestsellers, Kilmeade and Yaeger make history come alive with a riveting true story that will keep you turning the pages. You’ll finish with a new understanding of one of our greatest generals and a renewed appreciation for the brave men who fought so that America could one day stretch “from sea to shining sea.”
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100 Amazing Facts about the Negro

100 Amazing Facts about the Negro

Henry Louis Gates

$69.95
The first edition of Joel Augustus Rogers’s now legendary '100 Amazing Facts About the Negro with Complete Proof', published in 1957, was billed as 'A Negro ‘Believe It or Not.' Rogers’s little book was priceless because he was delivering enlightenment and pride, steeped in historical research, to a people too long starved on the lie that they were worth nothing. For African Americans of the Jim Crow era, Rogers’s was their first black history teacher. But Rogers was not always shy about embellishing the 'facts' and minimizing ambiguity; neither was he above shock journalism now and then.
 
With élan and erudition - and with winning enthusiasm - Henry Louis Gates, Jr. gives us a corrective yet loving homage to Roger’s work. Relying on the latest scholarship, Gates leads us on a romp through African, diasporic, and African-American history in question-and-answer format. Among the one hundred questions: Who were Africa’s first ambassadors to Europe? Who was the first black president in North America? Did Lincoln really free the slaves? Who was history’s wealthiest person? What percentage of white Americans have recent African ancestry? Why did free black people living in the South before the end of the Civil War stay there? Who was the first black head of state in modern Western history? Where was the first Underground Railroad? Who was the first black American woman to be a self-made millionaire? Which black man made many of our favorite household products better?
 
Here is a surprising, inspiring, sometimes boldly mischievous - all the while highly instructive and entertaining - compendium of historical curiosities intended to illuminate the sheer complexity and diversity of being 'Negro' in the world.
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The Three Lives of James Madison: Genius, Partisan, President

The Three Lives of James Madison: Genius, Partisan, President

Noah Feldman

$63.95
A surprisingly controversial look at how James Madison redefined the United States in each of his three political lives James Madison is revered as the Father of the Constitution but rarely described as a radical. Yet Madison fundamentally changed the United States no fewer than three times. As a founder, he invented the Constitution and wrote the Bill of Rights. As a partisan, he co-founded the Democratic-Republican Party and transformed the face of American political rivalry. And as the first wartime president, Madison took the United States to war and won--and also invented economic sanctions as a political weapon along the way. Now Noah Feldman, author of critically acclaimed books on the Supreme Court and U.S.-China relations, presents this Founding Father in a brand-new light.
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Nashville 1864: From the Tennessee to the Cumberland

Nashville 1864: From the Tennessee to the Cumberland

Mark Lardas ,  Adam Hook  ,  Nikolai Bogdanovic

$29.99
In September 1864, the Confederate army abandoned Atlanta and were on the verge of being driven out of the critical state of Tennessee. In an attempt to regain the initiative, John Bell Hood launched an attack on Union General Sherman's supply lines, before pushing north in an attempt to retake Tennessee's capital Nashville.

This fully illustrated book examines the three-month campaign that followed, one that confounded the expectations of both sides. Instead of fighting Sherman's Union Army of the Tennessee, the Confederates found themselves fighting an older and more traditional enemy: the Army of the Cumberland. This was led by George R. Thomas, an unflappable general temperamentally different than either the mercurial Hood or Sherman. The resulting campaign was both critical and ignored, despite the fact that for eleven weeks the fate of the Civil War was held in the balance.
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We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution

We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution

George William Van Cleve

$54.99
In 1783, as the Revolutionary War came to a close, Alexander Hamilton resigned in disgust from the Continental Congress after it refused to consider a fundamental reform of the Articles of Confederation. Just four years later, that same government collapsed, and Congress grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Philadelphia Constitutional Convention, which altered the Articles beyond recognition. What occurred during this remarkably brief interval to cause the Confederation to lose public confidence and inspire Americans to replace it with a dramatically more flexible and powerful government? We Have Not a Government is the story of this contentious moment in American history.

In George William Van Cleve’s book, we encounter a sharply divided America. The Confederation faced massive war debts with virtually no authority to compel its members to pay them. It experienced punishing trade restrictions and strong resistance to American territorial expansion from powerful European governments. Bitter sectional divisions that deadlocked the Continental Congress arose from exploding western settlement. And a deep, long-lasting recession led to sharp controversies and social unrest across the country amid roiling debates over greatly increased taxes, debt relief, and paper money. Van Cleve shows how these remarkable stresses transformed the Confederation into a stalemate government and eventually led previously conflicting states, sections, and interest groups to advocate for a union powerful enough to govern a continental empire.

Touching on the stories of a wide-ranging cast of characters—including John Adams, Patrick Henry, Daniel Shays, George Washington, and Thayendanegea—Van Cleve makes clear that it was the Confederation’s failures that created a political crisis and led to the 1787 Constitution. Clearly argued and superbly written, We Have Not a Government is a must-read history of this crucial period in our nation’s early life.
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An Argument Open to All: Reading  The Federalist  in the 21st Century

An Argument Open to All: Reading The Federalist in the 21st Century

Sanford Levinson

$44.99
From one of America's most distinguished constitutional scholars, an intriguing exploration of America's most famous political tract and its relevance to today's politics In An Argument Open to All, renowned legal scholar Sanford Levinson takes a novel approach to what is perhaps America's most famous political tract. Rather than concern himself with the authors as historical figures, or how The Federalist helps us understand the original intent of the framers of the Constitution, Levinson examines each essay for the political wisdom it can offer us today. In eighty-five short essays, each keyed to a different essay in The Federalist, he considers such questions as whether present generations can rethink their constitutional arrangements; how much effort we should exert to preserve America's traditional culture; and whether The Federalist's arguments even suggest the desirability of world government.
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American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804

American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804

Alan Taylor

$28.95
The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the nation its democratic framework. Alan Taylor, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history. The American Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain's colonies, fueled by local conditions and resistant to control. Emerging from the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, the revolution pivoted on western expansion as well as seaboard resistance to British taxes. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. The war exploded in set battles like Saratoga and Yorktown and spread through continuing frontier violence. The discord smoldering within the fragile new nation called forth a movement to concentrate power through a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of We the People, the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But it was Jefferson's expansive empire of liberty that carried the revolution forward, propelling white settlement and slavery west, preparing the ground for a new conflagration.37 illustrations; 10 maps
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Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson

Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson

Christina Snyder

$35.95
In Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson, prize-winning historian Christina Snyder reinterprets the history of Jacksonian America. Most often, this drama focuses on whites who turned west to conquer a continent, extending "liberty" as they went. Great Crossings also includes Native Americans from across the continent seeking new ways to assert anciently-held rights and people of African descent who challenged the United States to live up to its ideals. These diverse groups met in an experimental community in central Kentucky called Great Crossings, home to the first federal Indian school and a famous interracial family.

Great Crossings embodied monumental changes then transforming North America. The United States, within the span of a few decades, grew from an East Coast nation to a continental empire. The territorial growth of the United States forged a multicultural, multiracial society, but that diversity also sparked fierce debates over race, citizenship, and America's destiny. Great Crossings, a place of race-mixing and cultural exchange, emerged as a battleground. Its history provides an intimate view of the ambitions and struggles of Indians, settlers, and slaves who were trying to secure their place in a changing world.

Through deep research and compelling prose, Snyder introduces us to a diverse range of historical actors: Richard Mentor Johnson, the politician who reportedly killed Tecumseh and then became schoolmaster to the sons of his former foes; Julia Chinn, Johnson's enslaved concubine, who fought for her children's freedom; and Peter Pitchlynn, a Choctaw intellectual who, even in the darkest days of Indian removal, argued for the future of Indian nations. Together, their stories demonstrate how this era transformed colonizers and the colonized alike, sowing the seeds of modern America.
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Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America

Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America

Patrick Phillips

$22.95
A gripping tale of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, and a harrowing testament to the deep roots of racial violence in America.

Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. Many black residents were poor sharecroppers, but others owned their own farms and the land on which they’d founded the county's thriving black churches.

But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white "night riders" launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. In the wake of the expulsions, whites harvested the crops and took over the livestock of their former neighbors, and quietly laid claim to "abandoned" land. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten.

National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and '80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth "all white" well into the 1990s.

Blood at the Root is a sweeping American tale that spans the Cherokee removals of the 1830s, the hope and promise of Reconstruction, and the crushing injustice of Forsyth's racial cleansing. With bold storytelling and lyrical prose, Phillips breaks a century-long silence and uncovers a history of racial terrorism that continues to shape America in the twenty-first century. 36 illustrations.
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Silent Witness: The Civil War through Photography and its Photographers

Silent Witness: The Civil War through Photography and its Photographers

Ron Field

$49.99
The Civil War changed America forever. It shaped its future and determined its place in history. For the first time in military history, the camera was there to record these seismic events, from innovations in military and naval warfare, to the battles themselves; from commanders at critical moments in the battle, to the ordinary soldier tentatively posing for his first ever portrait on the eve of battle. Displaying many rare images unearthed by the author, an acclaimed Civil War historian, this beautiful volume explores how the camera bore witness to the dramatic events of the Civil War. It reveals not only how the first photographers plied their trade, but also how photography helped shape the outcome of the war and how it was reported to anxious families across the North and South.
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Along the Lines of Devotion: The Bloodstained Field of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863

Along the Lines of Devotion: The Bloodstained Field of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863

James Smith

$34.99
The fighting on July 1, 1863 built the foundation to what would become known as the bloodiest battle fought on American soil. Yet, it remains one of the most overlooked locations ofthe battlefield. Cast into the shadows of much more scenic locations, such as Little Round Top, Devil's Den, and the Wheatfield, it is easy to drive right through one of the most iconic locations of the battlefield. This comprehensive and reader-friendly narrative works to shine some light onto a portion of the battlefield that is so often overlooked. Beginning on June 9 and taking the reader through to July 1, James Smith II goes through great lengths to explain the movement of troops, human interest stories, humorous accounts, and detailed descriptions of the men present for the battle, in a close examination of the harrowing deeds it took to preserve a nation during the American Civil War.
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Scandinavians: In Search of the Soul of the North

Scandinavians: In Search of the Soul of the North

Robert Ferguson

$19.99
The Scandinavians are regarded as Europe's most tolerant and peace-loving people. So how was it that one of the worst acts of political terror ever witnessed on this continent was committed by a Norwegian - against his fellow countrymen? Scandinavia is the epitome of cool: we fill our homes with cheap but stylish Nordic furniture; we envy their health-giving outdoor lifestyle; we glut ourselves on their crime fiction; even their strangely attractive melancholia seems to express a stoic, common-sensical acceptance of life's many vicissitudes. But how valid is this outsider's view of Scandinavia, and how accurate our picture of life in Scandinavia today? Robert Ferguson digs down through two millennia of history to tell stories of extraordinary events, people and objects - from Norwegian Death Metal to Vidkun Quisling, from Agnetha Faltskog to Greta Garbo, from Lurpak butter to the Old Norse rune stones - that richly illuminate our understanding of modern Scandinavia, its society, politics, culture and temperament.
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Lithuanian History Through 50 Objects: Trees, Roots, and Wings

Lithuanian History Through 50 Objects: Trees, Roots, and Wings

Egidijus Aleksandravicius ,  Irena B. Chambers ,  Karile Vaitkute ,  Rita Janz

$24.99
The Civil War changed America forever. It shaped its future and determined its place in history. For the first time in military history, the camera was there to record these seismic events, from innovations in military and naval warfare, to the battles themselves; from commanders at critical moments in the battle, to the ordinary soldier tentatively posing for his first ever portrait on the eve of battle. Displaying many rare images unearthed by the author, an acclaimed Civil War historian, this beautiful volume explores how the camera bore witness to the dramatic events of the Civil War. It reveals not only how the first photographers plied their trade, but also how photography helped shape the outcome of the war and how it was reported to anxious families across the North and South.
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Mesa of Sorrows: A History of the Awatovi Massacre

Mesa of Sorrows: A History of the Awatovi Massacre

James F. Brooks

$25.95
The Hopi community of Awat'ovi existed peacefully on Arizona's Antelope Mesa for generations until one bleak morning in the fall of 1700--raiders from nearby Hopi villages descended on Awat'ovi, slaughtering their neighboring men, women, and children. While little of the pueblo itself remains, five centuries of history lie beneath the low rises of sandstone masonry, and theories about the events of that night are as persistent as the desert winds. The easternmost town on Antelope Mesa, Awat'ovi was renowned for its martial strength, and had been the gateway to the entire Hopi landscape for centuries. Why did kinsmen target it for destruction?

Drawing on oral traditions, archival accounts, and extensive archaeological research, James Brooks unravels the story and its significance. Mesa of Sorrows follows the pattern of an archaeological expedition, uncovering layer after layer of evidence and theories. Brooks questions their reliability and shows how interpretations were shaped by academic, religious and tribal politics. Piecing together three centuries of investigation, he offers insight into why some were spared--women, mostly, and taken captive--and others sacrificed. He weighs theories that the attack was in retribution for Awat'ovi having welcomed Franciscan missionaries or for the residents' practice of sorcery, and argues that a perfect storm of internal and external crises revitalized an ancient cycle of ritual bloodshed and purification.

A haunting account of a shocking massacre, Mesa of Sorrows is a probing exploration of how societies confront painful histories, and why communal violence still plagues us today.
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Dampier, the Dutch and the Great South Land: The story of how Dutch sailors found Australia and an English pirate almost beat Captain Cook

Dampier, the Dutch and the Great South Land: The story of how Dutch sailors found Australia and an English pirate almost beat Captain Cook

Rob Mundle

$24.99
The extraordinary story of how Dutch sailors found Australia and an English pirate almost beat Captain Cook

Rob Mundle is back on the water with another sweeping and powerful account of Australian maritime history. It is the story of 17th-century European mariners - sailors, adventurers and explorers - who became transfixed by the idea of the existence of a Great South Land: ‘Terra Australis Incognita'. Rob takes you aboard the tiny ship, Duyfken, in 1606 when Dutch navigator and explorer, Willem Janszoon, and his 20-man crew became the first Europeans to discover Australia – on the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria.

In the decades that followed, more Dutch mariners, like Hartog, Tasman, and Janszoon (for a second time), discovered and mapped the majority of the coast of what would become Australia. Yet, incredibly, the Dutch made no effort to lay claim to it, or establish any settlements. This process began with British explorer and former pirate William Dampier on the west coast in 1688, and by the time Captain Cook arrived in 1770, all that was to be done was chart the east coast and claim what the Dutch had discovered.
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The Russian Civil War

The Russian Civil War

Evan Mawdsley

$34.99
The Russian Civil War of 1917-1920, out of which the Soviet Union was born, was one of the most significant events of the twentieth century. The collapse of the Tsarist regime and the failure of the Kerensky Provisional Government nearly led to the complete disintegration of the Russian state. This book, however, is not simply the story of that collapse and the rebellion that accompanied it, but of the painful and costly reconstruction of Russian power under a Soviet regime. Evan Mawdsley's lucid account of this vast and complex subject explains in detail the power struggles and political manoeuvres of the war, providing a balanced analysis of why the Communists were victors. This edition includes illustrations, a new preface and an extensively updated bibliography.
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German Soldier vs Soviet Soldier: Stalingrad 1942-43

German Soldier vs Soviet Soldier: Stalingrad 1942-43

Chris McNab ,  Johnny Shumate

$27.99
By the end of the first week of November 1942, the German Sixth Army held about 90 per cent of Stalingrad. Yet the Soviets stubbornly held on to the remaining parts of the city, and German casualties started to reach catastrophic levels. In an attempt to break the deadlock, Hitler decided to send additional German pioneer battalions to act as an urban warfare spearhead. These combat engineers were skilled in all aspects of city fighting, especially in the use of demolitions and small arms to overcome defended positions and in the destruction of armoured vehicles. Facing them were hardened Soviet troops who had perfected the use of urban camouflage, concealed and interlocking firing positions, close quarters battle, and sniper support. This fully illustrated book explores the tactics and effectiveness of these opposing troops during this period, focusing particularly on the brutal close-quarters fight over the Krasnaya Barrikady (Red Barricades) ordnance factory.
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Leningrad 1941-42: Morality in a City under Siege

Leningrad 1941-42: Morality in a City under Siege

Sergey Yarov ,  John Barber ,  Arch Tait

$78.95
This book recounts one of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century: the siege of Leningrad. It is based on the searing testimony of eyewitnesses, some of whom managed to survive, while others were to die in streets devastated by bombing, in icy houses, or the endless bread queues. All of them, nevertheless, wanted to pass on to us the story of the torments they endured, their stoicism, compassion and humanity, and of how people reached out to each other in the nightmare of the siege.

Though the siege continues to loom large in collective memory, an overemphasis on the heroic endurance of the victims has tended to distort our understanding of events. In this book, which focuses on the "Time of Death", the harsh winter of 1941-42, Sergey Yarov adopts a new approach, demonstrating that if we are to truly appreciate the nature of this suffering, we must face the full realities of people's actions and behaviour. Many of the documents published here – letters, diaries, memoirs and interviews not previously available to researchers or retrieved from family archives – show unexpected aspects of what it was like to live in the besieged city. Leningrad changed, and so did the morals, customs and habits of Leningraders. People wanted at all costs to survive. Their notes about the siege reflect a drama which cost a million people their lives. There is no spurious cheeriness and optimism in them, and much that we might like to pass over. But we must not. We have a duty to know the whole, bitter truth about the siege, the price that had to be paid in order to stay human in a time of brutal inhumanity.
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The Berlin Airlift: The Relief Operation that Defined the Cold War

The Berlin Airlift: The Relief Operation that Defined the Cold War

Barry Turner

$39.99
Berlin, 1948 - a divided city in a divided country in a divided Europe. The ruined German capital lay 120 miles inside Soviet-controlled eastern Germany. Stalin wanted the Allies out; the Allies were determined to stay, but had only three narrow air corridors linking the city to the West. Stalin was confident he could crush Berlin's resolve by cutting off food and fuel.

In the USA, despite some voices still urging 'America first', it was believed that a rebuilt Germany was the best insurance against the spread of communism across Europe.

And so over eleven months from June 1948 to May 1949, British and American aircraft carried out the most ambitious airborne relief operation ever mounted, flying over 2 million tons of supplies on almost 300,000 flights to save a beleaguered Berlin.

With new material from American, British and German archives and original interviews with veterans, Turner paints a fresh, vivid picture the airlift, whose repercussions - the role of the USA as global leader, German ascendancy, Russian threat - we are still living with today.
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Passchendaele: Requiem for Doomed Youth

Passchendaele: Requiem for Doomed Youth

Paul Ham

$34.99
The intervening century, the most violent in human history, has not disarmed these pictures of their power to shock. At the very least they ask us, on the 100th anniversary of the battle, to see and to try to understand what happened here. Yes, we commemorate the event. Yes, we adorn our breasts with poppies. But have we seen? Have we understood? Have we dared to reason why?

What happened at Passchendaele was the expression of the 'wearing-down war', the war of pure attrition at its most spectacular and ferocious.

Paul Ham’s Passchendaele: Requiem for Doomed Youth shows how ordinary men on both sides endured this constant state of siege, with a very real awareness that they were being gradually, deliberately, wiped out. Yet the men never broke: they went over the top, when ordered, again and again and again. And if they fell dead or wounded, they were casualties in the 'normal wastage', as the commanders described them, of attritional war. Only the soldier’s friends at the front knew him as a man, with thoughts and feelings. His family back home knew him as a son, husband or brother, before he had enlisted. By the end of 1917 he was a different creature: his experiences on the Western Front were simply beyond their powers of comprehension.

A century later, this is what 'Passchendaele' has come to mean in the public mind: a struggle that, even by the standards of the Great War, entered the realm of the abominable, infernal and monumentally futile. Humans, animals, ordnance and pouring rain were thrown together in a maelstrom of steel and flesh in the name of a strategy that prescribed casualty lists in the hundreds of thousands. Such huge losses were not some epic blunder. Casualties on this scale were planned and, in the context of the time, expected, in the minds of commanders captive to an offensive they were helpless to avert.

Paul Ham distinguishes his book from other 'mud and blood' accounts by setting the soldiers' experiences in the context of the military and political power that controlled him. He shines a light in particular on the fraught relationship between David Lloyd George, the British Prime Minister, and Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig, commander-in-chief of the British (and Dominion forces) on the Western Front, to show how their poisonous relationship influenced the outcome of the battle. Lloyd George had pledged never to fight another Somme, another 'Haig' war. But Haig, short of the political will to stop the war, believed he had no choice other than to keep battering away at the German lines. Their relationship degenerated into a state of mutual loathing that had a direct impact on the tragedy of Passchendaele.

Paul Ham’s Passchendaele: Requiem for Doomed Youth tells the story of ordinary men in the grip of a political and military power struggle that determined their fate and has foreshadowed the destiny of the world for a century. Passchendaele lays down a powerful challenge to the idea of war as an inevitable expression of the human will, and examines the culpability of governments and military commanders in a catastrophe that destroyed the best part of a generation.
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Hitler in Los Angeles: How Jews Foiled Nazi Plots Against Hollywood and America

Hitler in Los Angeles: How Jews Foiled Nazi Plots Against Hollywood and America

Steven J. Ross

$32.99
The chilling, little-known story of the rise of Nazism in Los Angeles, and the Jewish leaders and spies they recruited who stopped it.

No American city was more important to the Nazis than Los Angeles, home to Hollywood, the greatest propaganda machine in the world. The Nazis plotted to kill the city 's Jews and to sabotage the nation 's military installations- plans existed for hanging twenty prominent Hollywood figures such as Al Jolson, Charlie Chaplin, and Samuel Goldwyn; for driving through Boyle Heights and machine-gunning as many Jews as possible; and for blowing up defense installations and seizing munitions from National Guard armories along the Pacific Coast.

U.S. law enforcement agencies were not paying close attention--preferring to monitor Reds rather than Nazis--and only Leon Lewis and his daring ring of spies stood in the way. From 1933 until the end of World War II, attorney Leon Lewis, the man Nazis would come to call "the most dangerous Jew in Los Angeles," ran a spy operation comprised of military veterans and their wives who infiltrated every Nazi and fascist group in Los Angeles. Often rising to leadership positions, this daring ring of spies uncovered and foiled the Nazi 's disturbing plans for death and destruction.

Featuring a large cast of Nazis, undercover agents, and colorful supporting players, Hitler in Los Angeles, by acclaimed historian Steven J. Ross, tells the story of Lewis 's daring spy network in a time when hate groups had moved from the margins to the mainstream.
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SAS Ghost Patrol: The Ultra-Secret Unit That Posed As Nazi Stormtroopers

SAS Ghost Patrol: The Ultra-Secret Unit That Posed As Nazi Stormtroopers

Damien Lewis

$29.99
The Ultra-Secret Unit That Posed As Nazi StormtroopersThe Most Daring Mission Ever UndertakenSAS Ghost Patrol is the explosive true story of the day in 1942 when the SAS donned Nazi uniforms to perpetrate the most audacious and daring mission of the war. Beyond top secret, deniable in the extreme (and of course enjoying Churchill's enthusiastic blessing), this is one of the most remarkable stories of wartime lawlessness, eccentricity and raw courage in the face of impossible odds - a thoroughly British undertaking.

What unfolded - the longest mission ever undertaken by Allied special forces - was an epic of daring, courage, tragedy and survival that remains unrivalled to this day, and which rightly became a foundation stone of Special Forces legend. Written with Lewis's signature authenticity and dramatic verve, SAS Ghost Patrol is peopled by a cast of the utterly maverick and the extraordinary. In its quirky eccentricities and outrageous rule-breaking, this is a story that only the British could have authored, and with such panache and aplomb. It may read like the stuff of impossible myth or folklore, but every single word is true.
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Somme: Into the Breach

Somme: Into the Breach

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore

$22.99
No conflict better encapsulates all that went wrong on the Western Front during World War I than the Battle of the Somme in 1916. The tragic loss of life and stoic endurance by troops who walked towards their death is an iconic image - but this critically-acclaimed bestseller, on the four months of battle, shows the extent to which the Allied armies were in fact able to break through the German front lines again and again. In eight years of research, Hugh Sebag-Montefiore - the author of Dunkirk - has found extraordinary new material from Australians, New Zealanders, Canadians, and the British - from heartbreaking diaries and letters to hitherto unseen Red Cross files - recounting their experiences amid the horror of war. It has been hailed as the best book about the battle, which, though not an Allied victory, was the beginning of the slide towards German defeat.
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Flying into the Storm: RAF Bombers at War 1939-1942

Flying into the Storm: RAF Bombers at War 1939-1942

Chris Sams

$60.95  $54.85
From the lessons of the First World War, the RAF developed a fleet of modern monoplane aircraft in time for hostilities in 1939; a force that consisted of Hampdens, Whitleys, Wellingtons, Blenheims, and Battles. These aircraft and their crews were pitted against the German war machine from day one-flying into storms of flak shells and swarms of Messerschmitt fighters in their flimsy, and often poorly armed, bombers. From theatres as far apart as Norway and Syria, Java and France, the crews and their aircraft were at the front of every military operation without adequate fighter escorts and with poor equipment against stiff opposition. They were the few who bravely went on 'one way ticket' missions, that saw operational life expectancy as only a matter of hours, without hesitation or complaint.
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The Hindenburg Line 1918: Haig's forgotten triumph

The Hindenburg Line 1918: Haig's forgotten triumph

Alistair McCluskey ,  Peter Dennis

$29.99
From 26 September until 8 October 1918, the Allied armies in France launched their largest ever combined offensive on the Western Front of World War I. The British, French, American and Belgian armies launched four attacks in rapid succession across a 250km front between the Argonne and Flanders. At the centre of this huge assault the British, First, Third and Fourth Armies, led by Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig, breached the formidable Hindenburg Line defences and drove the Kairser's Army from its last fully prepared defensive position west of the German border. The impact of this defeat had a shattering effect on the Germans with their army admitting for the first time that an armistice was required to save it from annihilation. Although these decisive results were to a large extent consequences of the battle of the Hindenburg Line, the subsequent controversies over the conduct of the war meant that it went unheralded and has remained Haig's forgotten triumph.
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The British Army of the Rhine After the First World War

The British Army of the Rhine After the First World War

M. Foley

$53.95  $48.55
When the First World War ended British troops crossed the Rhine into Germany and entered a country torn by violence and unrest where revolution threatened and civil war seemed more likely every day. There was also a threat of the war resuming if Germany refused to accept allied terms. The British forces were plunged into the turmoil of a defeated country and had to face not only the political unrest but the German public who they expected to be in a hostile mood as they faced the victorious British and allied forces taking over their country. The British troops not only faced this difficult situation but were disillusioned with their continued service. The majority of them had expected to be demobbed as soon as the war was won. This then was the situation they found themselves in, looking forward to going home and instead forced into a hostile country where the war may break out again at any time. This book looks at how the British troops coped with their situation. How they became the most popular members of the occupation force and how Britain and the world faced the growth of German unrest that led to the Second World War.
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European Counter-Terrorist Units 1972-2017

European Counter-Terrorist Units 1972-2017

Leigh Neville ,  Adam Hook

$21.99
The Munich Olympics massacre in 1972 was a shock awakening to the public. In the decades since, European countries have faced a wide range of threats from Palestinian and home-grown terrorists, to the more recent world-wide jihadists. The threats they pose are widespread from aircraft hi-jacking and political assassinations to urban warfare against security forces, and murderous attacks on civilian crowd targets, forcing governments have had to invest ever-greater efforts in countering these threats.

This book traces the evolution of police (and associated military) counter-terrorist forces across Europe over the past 45 years. Using specially commissioned artwork and contemporary photographs, it details their organization, missions, specialist equipment, and their growing cross-border co-operation.
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Armageddon and Paranoia: The Nuclear Confrontation

Armageddon and Paranoia: The Nuclear Confrontation

Sir Rodric Braithwaite

$49.99
Nuclear weapons exist and so does the possibility of worldwide annihilation. How did we reach this terrifying reality?

In 1945, the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and old ideas of warfare came to an end. This book tells how the power of the atom was harnessed to produce weapons capable of destroying human civilisation.

There were few villains in the story. On both sides of the Iron Curtain, dedicated scientists cracked the secrets of nature, dutiful military men planned to use the bomb in war, politicians contemplated with a potentially intolerable decision. Patriotic citizens acquiesced in the idea that their country needed the ultimate means of defence. Some tried to grapple with the unanswerable question: what end could possibly be served by such a fearsome means? Those who protested went unheard. None wanted to start a nuclear war, but all were paranoid. The danger of war by accident or misjudgement was never entirely absent.

Rodric Braithwaite, author of bestsellers Moscow 1941 and Afgantsy, paints a vivid and thought-provoking portrait of this intense period in history. Its implications are as relevant today as they ever were, as ignorant and thoughtless talk about nuclear war begins to spread once more.
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The `Broomhandle' Mauser

The `Broomhandle' Mauser

Jonathan Ferguson

$27.99
At a time when most handguns were limited to six rounds, the ten-shot Mauser caught the attention of the world for its unprecedented firepower and formidable high-velocity 7.63x25mm cartridge. This saw its ultimate expression in the first-ever select-fire handgun - the `Schnellfeuer' machine pistol, fed by a detachable magazine and offering both full-automatic and single-shot modes

.The C 96 was the first semi-automatic pistol to see combat, arming both sides in the Second Anglo-Boer War, and seeing service with the German, Russian, Chinese and other militaries. Widely purchased commercially, it was carried by none other than Winston Churchill in the Sudan and South Africa, became prized by the Irish Republican Army and Soviet revolutionaries, and even armed Han Solo in the `Star Wars' movies

.Featuring full-colour artwork and an array of revealing photographs, this is the engrossing story of the C 96 Broomhandle Mauser, the ground-breaking semi-automatic pistol that armed a generation of military personnel, adventurers and revolutionaries at the turn of the 20th century.
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Japan, South Korea, and the United States Nuclear Umbrella: Deterrence After the Cold War

Japan, South Korea, and the United States Nuclear Umbrella: Deterrence After the Cold War

Terence Roehrig

$55.99
For close to sixty years, the United States has maintained alliances with Japan and South Korea that have included a nuclear umbrella, guaranteeing their security as part of a strategy of extended deterrence. Yet questions about the credibility of deterrence commitments have always been an issue, especially when nuclear weapons are concerned. Would the United States truly be willing to use these weapons to defend an ally?

In this book, Terence Roehrig provides a detailed and comprehensive look at the nuclear umbrella in northeast Asia in the broader context of deterrence theory and U.S. strategy. He examines the role of the nuclear umbrella in Japanese and South Korean defense planning and security calculations, including the likelihood that either will develop its own nuclear weapons. Roehrig argues that the nuclear umbrella is most important as a political signal demonstrating commitment to the defense of allies and as a tool to prevent further nuclear proliferation in the region. While the role of the nuclear umbrella is often discussed in military terms, this book provides an important glimpse into the political dimensions of the nuclear security guarantee.

As the security environment in East Asia changes with the growth of North Korea's capabilities and China's military modernization, as well as Donald Trump's early pronouncements that cast doubt on traditional commitments to allies, the credibility and resolve of U.S. alliances will take on renewed importance for the region and the world.
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On Board RMS Titanic: Memories of the Maiden Voyage

On Board RMS Titanic: Memories of the Maiden Voyage

George Behe

$65.00
In this moving book, Titanic's passengers and crewmen are permitted to tell the story of that lamentable disaster entirely in their own words. Included are letters, postcards, diary entries and memoirs that were written before, during and immediately after the maiden voyage itself. Many of the pre-sailing documents were composed by people who later lost their lives in the sinking and represent their last communications with their friends and loved ones at home. The subsequent letters and postcards give an unparalleled description of the events that occurred during the five days that Titanic was at sea, and the correspondence by survivors after the tragedy describes the horror of the disaster itself and the heartbreak they experienced at the loss of those they loved. This poignant compilation, by Titanic expert George Behe, also contains brief biographies of the passengers and crewmen - victims, as well as survivors - who wrote the documents in question.
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1917: War, Peace, and Revolution

1917: War, Peace, and Revolution

David Stevenson (Professor of International History, London School of Economics & Political Science)

$61.95
1917 was a year of calamitous events, and one of pivotal importance in the development of the First World War. In 1917: War, Peace, and Revolution, leading historian of World War One, David Stevenson, examines this crucial year in context and illuminates the century that followed. He shows how in this one year the war was transformed, but also what drove the conflict onwards and how it continued to escalate.

Two developments in particular — the Russian Revolution and American intervention — had worldwide repercussions. Offering a close examination of the key decisions, David Stevenson considers Germany's campaign of 'unrestricted' submarine warfare, America's declaration of war in response, and Britain's frustration of German strategy by adopting the convoy system, as well as why (paradoxically) the military and political stalemate in Europe persisted.

Focusing on the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II, on the disastrous spring offensive that plunged the French army into mutiny, on the summer attacks that undermined the moderate Provisional Government in Russia and exposed Italy to national humiliation at Caporetto, and on the British decision for the ill-fated Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele), 1917 offers a truly international understanding of events. The failed attempts to end the war by negotiation further clarify the underlying forces that kept it going.

David Stevenson also analyses the global consequences of the year's developments, showing how countries such as Brazil and China joined the belligerents, Britain offered 'responsible government' to India, and the Allies promised a Jewish national home in Palestine. Blending political and military history, and moving from capital to capital and between the cabinet chamber and the battle front, the book highlights the often tumultuous debates through which leaders entered and escalated the war, and the paradox that continued fighting could be justified as the shortest road towards regaining peace.
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The Battle of Britain: A Ladybird Expert Book (WW2 #1)

The Battle of Britain: A Ladybird Expert Book (WW2 #1)

James Holland ,  Keith Burns

$19.99
Part of the new Ladybird Expert series, Battle of Britain is an accessible, insightful and authoritative account of the most famous aerial battle in history.

Historian, author and broadcaster James Holland draws on the latest research and interviews with participants to bring colour, detail and a fresh perspective to the story.

Inside, you'll discover how tactics, organisation and new technologies were brought to bear, about the different challenges faced by both the RAF and the Luftwaffe, and, above all, the skill, bravery and endurance of the airmen engaged in a contest that was of critical importance to the outcome of the war.

Written by the leading lights and most outstanding communicators in their fields, the Ladybird Expert books provide clear, accessible and authoritative introductions to subjects drawn from science, history and culture.

Other books currently available in the Ladybird Expert series include:

    * Climate Change
    * Quantum Mechanics
    * Evolution
    * Shackleton

For an adult readership, the Ladybird Expert series is produced in the same iconic small hardback format pioneered by the original Ladybirds. Each beautifully illustrated book features the first new illustrations produced in the original Ladybird style for nearly forty years.
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Battle for the Channel: The First Month of the Battle of Britain 10 July-10 August 1940

Battle for the Channel: The First Month of the Battle of Britain 10 July-10 August 1940

Brian Cull

$40.74
This volume carries on where FIRST OF THE FEW finished, in the same style and format. 10 July-the official first day of the Battle of Britain-witnessed increased aerial activity over the Channel and along the eastern and southern seaboards of the British coastline. The main assaults by ever-increasing formations of Luftwaffe bombers, escorted by Bf109s and Bf110s, were initially aimed at British merchant shipping convoys plying their trade of coal and other materials from the north of England to the southern ports. These attacks by the Germans often met with increasing success although RAF Spitfires and Hurricanes endeavoured to repel the Heinkels, Dorniers and Ju88s, frequently with ill-afforded loss in pilots and aircraft. Within a month the Channel was effectively closed to British shipping. Only a change in the Luftwaffe's tactics in mid-August, when the main attack changed to the attempted destruction of the RAF's southern airfields, allowed small convoys to resume sneaking through without too greater hindrance.
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One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps

One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps

Andrea Pitzer

$42.99
A groundbreaking, haunting, and profoundly moving history of modernity's greatest tragedy: concentration camps

For over 100 years, at least one concentration camp has existed somewhere on Earth. First used as battlefield strategy, camps have evolved with each passing decade, in the scope of their effects and the savage practicality with which governments have employed them. Even in the twenty-first century, as we continue to reckon with the magnitude and horror of the Holocaust, history tells us we have broken our own solemn promise of "never again."

In this harrowing work based on archival records and interviews during travel to four continents, Andrea Pitzer reveals for the first time the chronological and geopolitical history of concentration camps. Beginning with 1890s Cuba, she pinpoints concentration camps around the world and across decades. From the Philippines and Southern Africa in the early twentieth century to the Soviet Gulag and detention camps in China and North Korea during the Cold War, camp systems have been used as tools for civilian relocation and political repression. Often justified as a measure to protect a nation, or even the interned groups themselves, camps have instead served as brutal and dehumanizing sites that have claimed the lives of millions.

Drawing from exclusive testimony, landmark historical scholarship, and stunning research, Andrea Pitzer unearths the roots of this appalling phenomenon, exploring and exposing the staggering toll of the camps: our greatest atrocities, the extraordinary survivors, and even the intimate, quiet moments that have also been part of camp life during the past century.
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The Age of the Horse: An Equine Journey through Human History

The Age of the Horse: An Equine Journey through Human History

Susanna Forrest

$24.99
Man has always been fascinated by Equus caballus, recasting horse power into many forms: a hunk of meat, an industrial and agricultural machine, a luxury good, a cherished dancer, a comrade in arms and a symbol of a mythical past. From the wild tarpans sought by the Nazis to jade-laden treasure steeds in Ancient China, broken-down nags recycled into sausages and furniture stuffing, stallions that face fighting bulls and brewery horses that charmed the founder of the Sikh Empire, The Age of the Horse knits the history of the horse into that of humans, through revolution, war, social change and uneasy peace. It also uncovers new roles for the horse in the twenty-first century as a tool in the fight against climate change and as a therapist for soldiers damaged in unwinnable conflicts.

In this captivating book, Susanna Forrest takes a journey through time and around the world, from the Mongolian steppes to a mirrored manege at Versailles, an elegant polo club in Beijing and a farm, a fort and an auction house in America, exploring the horse's crucial role and revealing how our culture and economy were generated, nourished and shaped by horse power and its gifts and limits.
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Mapping Naval Warfare: A visual history of conflict at sea

Mapping Naval Warfare: A visual history of conflict at sea

Jeremy Black

$55.00
Naval operations and warfare were, and remain, a key element for mapping. Maps were vital for commanders in drawing up plans of attack, and their detail and usefulness have increased over the centuries as the science of mapping has developed

.This beautiful book examines stunning original maps from a series of key conflicts from the Spanish Armada, the American Wars of Independence, and the Napoleonic wars to twentieth century conflicts from the First World War to Vietnam, and explains how they were represented through mapping and how the maps produced helped naval commanders to plan their strategy.
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