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King and Emperor: A New Life of Charlemagne

King and Emperor: A New Life of Charlemagne

Janet L. Nelson

$55.00
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Charles, king of the Franks, is one of the most remarkable figures ever to rule a European super-state. That is why he is so often called by the French 'Charlemagne', and by the Germans 'Karl der Grosse'. His strength of character was felt to be remarkable from early in his long reign. Warfare and accident, vermin and weather have destroyed much of the evidence for his rule in the twelve centuries since his death, but a remarkable amount still survives.

Janet L. Nelson's wonderful new book brings together everything we know about Charlemagne and sifts through the evidence to come as close as we can to understanding the man and his motives. Nelson has an extraordinary knowledge of the sources and much of the book is a sort of detective story, prying into and interpreting fascinating material and often obdurate scraps, from prayerbooks to skeletons, gossip to artwork.

Above all, Charles's legacy lies in his deeds and their continuing resonance, as he shaped duchies and counties, rebuilt and founded towns and monasteries, and consciously set himself up not just as King of the Franks, but as the new 'Emperor governing the Roman Empire'. His successors - in some ways to the present day - have struggled to interpret, misinterpret, copy or subvert Charlemagne's legacy. Nelson gets us as close as we can ever hope to come to the real figure, as understood in his own time.
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Akhenaten: Egypt's False Prophet

Akhenaten: Egypt's False Prophet

Nicholas Reeves

$24.99
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One of the most compelling and controversial figures in history, Akhenaten has captured the imagination like no other Egyptian pharaoh. Known today as a heretic, Akhenaten sought to impose upon Egypt and its people the worship of a single god - the sun - and in so doing changed the country in every way.

In this immensely readable re-evaluation, Nicholas Reeves takes issue with the existing view of Akhenaten, presenting an entirely new perspective on the turbulent events of his seventeen-year reign. Reeves argues that, far from being the idealistic founder of a new faith, Akhenaten cynically used religion for purely political ends in a calculated attempt to reassert the authority of the king. Backed up by abundant archaeological and documentary evidence, Reeves's closely written narrative also provides many new insights into questions that have baffled scholars for generations - the puzzle of the body in Tomb 55 in the Valley of the Kings; the fate of Nefertiti, Akhenaten's beautiful wife, and the identity of the mysterious successor, Smenkhkare; and the theory that Tutankhamun, Akhenaten's son and true heir, was murdered.
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Kosciuszko: Two Men Lost in the Wilderness Who Captured the Imagination of a Nation

Kosciuszko: Two Men Lost in the Wilderness Who Captured the Imagination of a Nation

Nick Brodie

$29.99
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Australia's highest mountain, Mount Kosciuszko, is a dangerous place. Evan Hayes was an ordinary Australian battler. Hardworking, likable. Laurie Seaman was a world-wise American. Adventurous, affluent. When this athletic pair of cross-country skiers disappeared into the wilds of Kosciuszko they left a mystery, and became a sensation. Following their trail, Kosciuszko reveals the story of a young Australia between wars told by one of Australia's leading historical voices.

When Evan and Laurie went missing in August 1928, Australia's Snowy Mountains were remote. Traversing the globe from New York's Long Island to Siberia to Sydney and beyond Charlotte Pass, with shipboard romance and industrial strife along the way, this is the story of two very different people growing to manhood in a world of change. Accompanied by a diverse cast including motor car enthusiasts and aviators, bushmen and horsemen, trackers and journalists, this is the true story of a meeting of peoples and nations.

This is history in a land of legend. From the world-famous to the nearly-forgotten, Kosciuszko is more than a mountain, it is a collective heritage, part of Australia's sense of self. Evan and Laurie are guides to this vantage point, to a time and place that deserves to be better known. At Kosciuszko, Australians came together in peacetime. And they did so simply because two mates vanished.
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Paper Emperors: The rise of Australia's newspaper empires

Paper Emperors: The rise of Australia's newspaper empires

Sally Young

$39.99
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`A tour de force.' - Professor Rodney Tiffen Before newspapers were ravaged by the digital age, they were a powerful force, especially in Australia - a country of newspaper giants and kingmakers.

This magisterial book reveals who owned Australia's newspapers and how they used them to wield political power. A corporate and political history of Australian newspapers spanning 140 years, it explains how Australia's media system came to be dominated by a handful of empires and powerful family dynasties. Many are household names, even now: Murdoch, Fairfax, Syme, Packer. Written with verve and insight and showing unparalleled command of a vast range of sources, Sally Young shows how newspaper owners influenced policy-making, lobbied and bullied politicians, and shaped internal party politics.

The book begins in 1803 with Australia's first newspaper owner - a convict who became a wealthy bank owner - giving the industry a blend of notoriety, power and wealth from the start. Throughout the twentieth century, Australians were unaware that they were reading newspapers owned by secret bankrupts and failed land boomers, powerful mining magnates, Underbelly-style gangsters, bankers, and corporate titans. It ends with the downfall of Menzies in 1941 and his conviction that a handful of press barons brought him down. The intervening years are packed with political drama, business machinations and a struggle for readers, all while the newspaper barons are peddling power and influence.
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The Debatable Land: The Lost World Between Scotland and England

The Debatable Land: The Lost World Between Scotland and England

Graham Robb

$19.99
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The Debatable Land was an independent territory which used to exist between Scotland and England. It is the oldest detectable territorial division in Great Britain. At the height of its notoriety, it was the bloodiest region in the country, and preoccupied the monarchs and parliaments of England, Scotland, and France. After most of its population was slaughtered or deported, it became the last part of Great Britain to be conquered and brought under the control of a state. Today, it has vanished from the map and no one knows exactly where and what it was.

When Graham Robb moved to a lonely house on the very edge of England, he discovered that the river which almost surrounded his new home had once marked the Debatable Land's southern boundary. Under the powerful spell of curiosity, Robb began a journey - on foot, by bicycle and into the past - that would uncover lost towns and roads, shed new light on the Dark Age, reveal the truth about this maligned patch of land, and lead to more than one discovery of major historical significance.

For the first time - and with all of his customary charm, wit and literary grace - Graham Robb, prize-winning author of The Discovery of France, has written about his native country. The Debatable Land is an epic and energetic book that takes us from 2016 back to an age when neither England nor Scotland could be imagined to reveal a crucial, missing piece in the puzzle of British history.
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The Death of Democracy

The Death of Democracy

Benjamin Carter Hett

$24.99
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What caused the fall of the most progressive government in twentieth-century Europe, and the rise of the most terrifying?

In the 1930s, Germany was at a turning point, with many looking to the Nazi phenomenon as part of widespread resentment towards cosmopolitan liberal democracy and capitalism. This was a global situation that pushed Germany to embrace authoritarianism, nationalism and economic self-sufficiency, kick-starting a revolution founded on new media technologies, and the formidable political and self-promotional skills of its leader.

Based on award-winning research and recently discovered archival material, The Death of Democracy is a panoramic new survey of one of the most important periods in modern history, and a book with a resounding message for the world today.
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Lotharingia: A Personal History of Europe's Lost Country

Lotharingia: A Personal History of Europe's Lost Country

Simon Winder

$32.99
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From the bestselling author of Germania, Lotharinigia is the third installment in Simon Winder's personal history of Europe.

In 843 AD, the three surviving grandsons of the great emperor Charlemagne met at Verdun. After years of bitter squabbles over who would inherit the family land, they finally decided to divide the territory and go their separate ways. In a moment of staggering significance, one grandson inherited the area we now know as France, another Germany and the third received the piece in between: Lotharingia.

Lotharingia is a history of in-between Europe. It is the story of a place between places. In this beguiling, hilarious and compelling book, Simon Winder retraces the various powers that have tried to overtake the land that stretches from the mouth of the Rhine to the Alps and the might of the peoples who have lived there for centuries.
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The Map of Knowledge: How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found: A History in Seven Cities

The Map of Knowledge: How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found: A History in Seven Cities

Violet Moller

$35.99
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'An epic treasure hunt into the highways and byways of stored knowledge across faiths and continents.' John Agard, poet and playwright In The Map of Knowledge Violet Moller traces the journey taken by the ideas of three of the greatest scientists of antiquity - Euclid, Galen and Ptolemy - through seven cities and over a thousand years. In it, we follow them from sixth-century Alexandria to ninth-century Baghdad, from Muslim Cordoba to Catholic Toledo, from Salerno's medieval medical school to Palermo, capital of Sicily's vibrant mix of cultures, and - finally - to Venice, where that great merchant city's printing presses would enable Euclid's geometry, Ptolemy's system of the stars and Galen's vast body of writings on medicine to spread even more widely.

In tracing these fragile strands of knowledge from century to century, from east to west and north to south, Moller also reveals the web of connections between the Islamic world and Christendom, connections that would both preserve and transform astronomy, mathematics and medicine from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance.

Vividly told and with a dazzling cast of characters, The Map of Knowledge is an evocative, nuanced and vibrant account of our common intellectual heritage.
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Talking Sideways

Talking Sideways

Reg Dodd ,  Malcolm McKinnon

$32.95
'That's the way it is with us mob. We were brought up to talk kind of sideways. That's the respectful, true Aboriginal way.' Reg Dodd grew up at Finniss Springs, on striking desert country bordering South Australia's Lake Eyre. For the Arabunna and for many other Aboriginal people, Finniss Springs has been a homeland and a refuge. It has also been a cattle station, an Aboriginal mission, a battlefield, a place of learning and a living museum.

With his long-time friend and filmmaker Malcolm McKinnon, Dodd reflects on his upbringing in a cross-cultural environment that defied social conventions of the time. They also write candidly about the tensions surrounding power, authority and Indigenous knowledge that have defined the recent decades of this resource-rich area.

Talking Sideways is part history, part memoir and part cultural road-map. Together, Dodd and McKinnon reveal the unique history of this extraordinary place and share their concerns and their hopes for its future.
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Queen Victoria's Matchmaking: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe

Queen Victoria's Matchmaking: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe

Deborah Cadbury

$22.99
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A captivating exploration of the role in which Queen Victoria exerted most international power and influence: her role as matchmaking grandmother.

In the late nineteenth century, Queen Victoria had over thirty surviving grandchildren. To maintain power in Europe, she hoped to manoeuvre them into dynastic marriages with royalty across the world. Yet her grandchildren often had plans of their own, fuelled by strong wills and romantic hearts. Her matchmaking plans were further complicated by tumultuous international upheavals; revolution was in the air and after her death, her most carefully laid plans fell to ruin.

Queen Victoria's Matchmaking travels through the glittering palaces of Russia and Europe, weaving in scandals, political machinations and family tensions, to enthralling effect. It is at once an intimate portrait of the royal family and an examination of the conflict caused by the power, love and duty that shaped the marriages that Queen Victoria arranged. At the heart of it all is Queen Victoria herself: doting grandmother one moment, determined manipulator the next.
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A History of Britain in 12 Maps

A History of Britain in 12 Maps

Philip Parker

$45.00
A fascinating analysis of a dozen maps from critical points in British history over the last two thousand years, from the Celtic period when 'Britain' was just a patchwork of tribal kingdoms, to a century ago when the whole of Ireland, India, Australia, much of Africa, Asia and the Americas were marked as British.

Charting the assembling and disassembling of regions under British rule, this book features maps that teach us about the political, cultural evolution of the nation, and much of our past that we often forget. With current borders being disputed and, with them, identities challenged, this book will provide a reassuring insight into how our country's borders have always been, and always will be, in a state of flux.
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Maoism: A Global History

Maoism: A Global History

Julia Lovell

$35.00
For decades, the West has dismissed Maoism as an outdated historical and political phenomenon. Since the 1980s, China seems to have abandoned the utopian turmoil of Mao's revolution in favour of authoritarian capitalism. But Mao and his ideas remain central to the People's Republic and the legitimacy of its Communist government. With disagreements and conflicts between China and the West on the rise, the need to understand the political legacy of Mao is urgent and growing.

The power and appeal of Maoism have extended far beyond China. Maoism was a crucial motor of the Cold War- it shaped the course of the Vietnam War (and the international youth rebellions that conflict triggered) and brought to power the murderous Khmer Rouge in Cambodia; it aided, and sometimes handed victory to, anti-colonial resistance movements in Africa; it inspired terrorism in Germany and Italy, and wars and insurgencies in Peru, India and Nepal, some of which are still with us today - more than forty years after the death of Mao.

In this new history, Julia Lovell re-evaluates Maoism as both a Chinese and an international force, linking its evolution in China with its global legacy. It is a story that takes us from the tea plantations of north India to the sierras of the Andes, from Paris's fifth arrondissement to the fields of Tanzania, from the rice paddies of Cambodia to the terraces of Brixton.

Starting with the birth of Mao's revolution in northwest China in the 1930s and concluding with its violent afterlives in South Asia and resurgence in the People's Republic today, this is a landmark history of global Maoism.
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Francis I: The Maker of Modern France

Francis I: The Maker of Modern France

Leonie Frieda

$24.99
Francis I (1494-1547) was inconstant, amorous, hot-headed and flawed. Arguably he was also the most significant king that France ever had.

A contemporary of Henry VIII of England, Francis saw himself as the first Renaissance king. A courageous and heroic warrior, he was also a keen aesthete, an accomplished diplomat and an energetic ruler who turned his country into a force to be reckoned with. Bestselling historian Leonie Frieda's comprehensive and sympathetic account explores the life of the most human of all Renaissance monarchs - and the most enigmatic.
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Democracy on the Road: A 25-Year Journey Through India

Democracy on the Road: A 25-Year Journey Through India

Ruchir Sharma

$49.99
India is a country obsessed by politics. In early 2019, it faces national elections, and urgent questions present themselves- will India continue down a path of populism and increasingly strident Hindu nationalism or will it return to its postcolonial secular vision? Is the long-promised economic book finally at hand, or is some form of socialism part of India's DNA? Will the seemingly invincible Modi triumph again, or will India revert to its habit of throwing out incumbents? Bestselling author Ruchir Sharma has been on the road during Indian elections for twenty years and here distills the wisdom of his observations and experiences over that time in a deeply insightful book about the world's largest and most complex exercise in democracy.
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The Medici

The Medici

Mary Hollingsworth

$39.99
A fresh telling of the rise and fall of the House of Medici, the family that dominated political and cultural life in Florence for three centuries.

Having founded the bank that became the most powerful in Europe in the fifteenth century, the Medici gained political power in Florence, raising the city to a peak of cultural achievement and becoming its hereditary dukes. Among their number were no fewer than three popes and a powerful and influential queen of France. Their patronage brought about an explosion of Florentine art and architecture. Michelangelo, Donatello, Fra Angelico and Leonardo are among the artists with whom they were associated. Thus runs the 'received view' of the Medici. Mary Hollingsworth argues that the idea that they were wise rulers and enlightened fathers of the Renaissance is a fiction that has acquired the status of historical fact. In truth, the Medici were as devious and immoral as the Borgias - tyrants loathed in the city they illegally made their own and which they beggared in their lust for power.
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The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power

The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power

Shoshana Zuboff

$49.99
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An important book about technology and capitalism - and what our response should be when these two giants collide.

Society is at a turning point. The heady optimism that accompanied the advent of the Internet has gone, replaced with a deep unease as technology, capitalism and an unequal society combine to create the perfect storm. Tech companies are gathering our information online and selling it to the highest bidder, whether government or retailer. In this world of surveillance capitalism, profit depends not only on predicting but modifying our online behaviour. How will this fusion of capitalism and the digital shape the values that define our future?

Shoshana Zuboff shows that at this critical juncture we have a choice, the power to decide what kind of world we want to live in. We can choose whether to allow the power of technology to enrich the few and impoverish the many, or harness it for the wider distribution of capitalism's social and economic benefits. What we decide over the next decade will shape the rest of the twenty-first century.

Exploring the social, political, business and technological meaning of the changes taking place in our time, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism tackles the threat of an unprecedented power free from democratic oversight, and shows how we can protect ourselves and our communities. This is a deeply reasoned examination of the contests over the next chapter of capitalism that will decide the meaning of information civilization. The stark issue at hand is whether we will be masters of the digital, or its slaves.
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Thunderchief: The Complete History of the Republic F-105

Thunderchief: The Complete History of the Republic F-105

Dennis Jenkins ,  Mick Roth ,  Mike Machat

$108.95
Provides a level of detail unseen in any previous work on the F-105, including the complete history of this airplane in every sense of the term.

Reveals new recently declassified Air Force material about the F-105's unique and highly dangerous Wild Weasel missions during the Vietnam War. Authored by one of America's top aviation writers, this book continues the story of Republic's Mach-2 F-105 Thunderchief where previous books on this aircraft left off.

The Republic F-105 Thunderchief gained fame in the skies over Southeast Asia, carrying weapons it was not designed to use in a war it was not supposed to fight. It had been conceived to carry the new tactical nuclear weapons designed by the national laboratories during the early 1950s. Its target would be the Soviet Union during the height of the cold war, operating from well-equipped bases in Germany and Japan. Instead, it found itself in the jungles of Thailand, surrounded by heat and humidity, trying to fight a war as dictated by politicians 7,000 miles away. Too many missions were flown with only a few bombs per aircraft, simply so Washington could count sorties. Too many crews never came back. This is the complete history of the Republic F-105 Thunderchief, from its inception in the early 1950s to its retirement in the mid-1980s.

The F-105 holds the distinction of being the only American combat aircraft withdrawn from service simply because there were not enough of them remaining to be tactically useful. The Thunderchiefs flew 159,795 combat missions in Southeast Asia, resulting in the loss of 334 aircraft, most of them to North Vietnamese anti-aircraft fire. This was almost half the combat-capable F-105s built. One hundred fifty-six crewmembers were listed as killed in action or missing in action. Two pilots received the Medal of Honor.

After the Air Force withdrew them from Southeast Asia, leaving the war to the newer and more plentiful McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, the remaining Thuds settled into a quiet routine stateside until they were finally retired on 25 February 1984. By then, only 221 airframes were left of the 833 produced.

In 2018, there is not a single flyable Thunderchief, although at least 100 of them are in museums, available to be admired at one's leisure.
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The Hunt for Mh370

The Hunt for Mh370

Ean Higgins

$32.99
Somewhere deep beneath the wild seas of the southern Indian Ocean, perhaps in the eerie underwater canyons of Broken Ridge along the Seventh Arc satellite band, lies the answer to the world's greatest aviation mystery.

Why, on the night of 8 March 2014, did Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 suddenly U-turn, zig-zag up the Straits of Malacca, then vanish with 239 souls on board?

Was it an elaborate murder-suicide by a rogue pilot? A terrible accident such as onboard fire, rapid decompression or systems failure? A terrorist hijacking gone wrong? Or something else entirely?

Award-winning journalist Ean Higgins has led the world media's coverage of this incredible saga and draws on years of interviews with aviation experts, victims' families, air crash investigators and professional hunters across land, sea and sky to dissect the riddle of MH370's fate.
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The Spy in Moscow Station: A Counterspy's Hunt for a Deadly Cold War Threat

The Spy in Moscow Station: A Counterspy's Hunt for a Deadly Cold War Threat

Eric Haseltine

$29.99
Moscow in the late 1970s: one by one, CIA assets are disappearing. The perils of American arrogance, mixed with bureaucratic infighting, had left the country unspeakably vulnerable to ultra-sophisticated Russian electronic surveillance. The Spy In Moscow Station tells of a time when - much like today - Russian spycraft was proving itself far ahead of the best technology the U.S. had to offer. This is the true story of unorthodox, underdog intelligence officers who fought an uphill battle against their government to prove that the KGB had pulled off the most devastating and breathtakingly thorough penetration of U.S. national security in history. Incorporating declassified internal CIA memos and diplomatic cables, this suspenseful narrative reads like a thriller - but real lives were at stake, and every twist is true as the US and USSR attempt to wrongfoot each other in eavesdropping technology and tradecraft. The book also carries a chilling warning for the present: like the State and CIA officers who were certain their 'sweeps' could detect any threat in Moscow, we don't know what we don't know.
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Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment and the Rule of Law

Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment and the Rule of Law

Preet Bharara

$29.99
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Multi-million-dollar fraud. Terrorism. Mafia criminality. Russian espionage. For eight years Preet Bharara, United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, successfully prosecuted some of the most high-profile crimes in America. Along the way he gained notoriety as the `Sheriff of Wall Street', was banned from Russia by Vladimir Putin and earned the distinction of being one of the first federal employees fired by Trump.

In Doing Justice Bharara takes us into the gritty, tactically complex, often sensational world of America's criminal justice system. We meet the wrongly accused and those who have escaped scrutiny for too long, the fraudsters and mobsters, investigators and interrogators, snitches and witnesses. We learn what justice is and the basics of building a case, and how judgement must be delivered not only with toughness, but with calmness, care and compassion.

This is not just a book about the law. This is a book about integrity, leadership, decision-making and moral reasoning - and one that teaches us how to think and act justly in our own lives.
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How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States

How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States

Daniel Immerwahr

$35.00
For a country that has always denied having dreams of empire, the United States owns a lot of overseas territory.

America has always prided itself on being a champion of sovereignty and independence. We know it has spread its money, language and culture across the world - but we still think of it as a contained territory, framed by Canada above, Mexico below, and oceans either side. Nothing could be further from the truth.

How to Hide an Empire tells the story of the United States outside the United States - from nineteenth-century conquests like Alaska, Hawai'i, the Philippines and Puerto Rico, to the catalogue of islands, archipelagos and military bases dotted around the globe over which the Stars and Stripes flies. Many are thousands of miles from the mainland; all are central to its history.

But the populations of these territories, despite being subject to America's government, cannot vote for it; they have often fought America's wars, but they do not enjoy the rights of full citizens. These forgotten episodes cast American history, and its present, in a revealing new light. The birth control pill, chemotherapy, plastic, Godzilla, the Beatles, the name America itself - you can't understand the histories of any of thesewithout understanding territorial empire.

Full of surprises, and driven by an original conception of what empire and globalisation mean today, How to Hide an Empire is a major and compulsively readable work of history.
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We Need to Talk About Putin: Why the West gets him wrong, and how to get him right

We Need to Talk About Putin: Why the West gets him wrong, and how to get him right

Mark Galeotti

$22.99
'In fewer than 150 pithy pages, Galeotti sketches a bleak, but convincing picture of the man in the Kremlin and the political system that he dominates' The Times Meet the world's most dangerous man. Or is he?

Who is the real Vladimir Putin? What does he want? And what will he do next?

Despite the millions of words written on Putin's Russia, the West still fails to truly understand one of the world's most powerful politicians, whose influence spans the globe and whose networks of power reach into the very heart of our daily lives.

In this essential primer, Professor Mark Galeotti uncovers the man behind the myth, addressing the key misperceptions of Putin and explaining how we can decipher his motivations and next moves. From Putin's early life in the KGB and his real relationship with the USA to his vision for the future of Russia - and the world - Galeotti draws on new Russian sources and explosive unpublished accounts to give unparalleled insight into the man at the heart of global politics.
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History Day by Day: 366 Voices from the Past

History Day by Day: 366 Voices from the Past

Peter Furtado

$19.99
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`What a wonderful, eclectic daily diet of historical speech! Each entry - one for each day of the year - transports us back to hear the voices of the past, and gives us an empathic, learned, and fascinating insight into the thoughts and feelings of the people of history.' - Suzannah Lipscomb

MAKE EVERY DAY HISTORIC WITH THIS VIVID, DAY-BY-DAY PERSPECTIVE ON 2,500 YEARS OF HUMAN HISTORY.

Following the success of the bestselling Histories of Nations, Peter Furtado brings us 366 telling quotations that offer a window on the past, tying every day in the year to a momentous occasion and bringing it to life with eyewitness accounts and a chronicler's flair. Here are Joan of Arc and Julius Caesar, Galileo and Gandhi, JFK and MLK in their element: battles and treaties, revolutions and discoveries, the joyful ad the grief-stricken. Every day brings a new voice and fresh revelations, while Peter Furtado expertly places events in context to make this both an addictive anthology and a dazzling panorama of world history.
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The Royal Art of Poison: Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicines and Murder Most Foul

The Royal Art of Poison: Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicines and Murder Most Foul

Eleanor Herman

$32.99
The story of poison is the story of power....

For centuries, royal families have feared the gut-roiling, vomit-inducing agony of a little something added to their food or wine by an enemy. To avoid poison, they depended on tasters, unicorn horns and antidotes tested on condemned prisoners. Servants licked the royal family's spoons, tried on their underpants and tested their chamber pots.

Ironically, royals terrified of poison were unknowingly poisoning themselves daily with their cosmetics, medications and filthy living conditions. Women wore makeup made with lead. Men rubbed feces on their bald spots. Physicians prescribed mercury enemas, arsenic skin cream, drinks of lead filings and potions of human fat and skull, fresh from the executioner. Gazing at gorgeous portraits of centuries past, we don't see what lies beneath the royal robes and the stench of unwashed bodies; the lice feasting on private parts; and worms nesting in the intestines.

The Royal Art of Poison is a hugely entertaining work of popular history that traces the use of poison as a political - and cosmetic - tool in the royal courts of Western Europe from the Middle Ages to the Kremlin today.
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Paths to the Past: Encounters with Britain's Hidden Landscapes

Paths to the Past: Encounters with Britain's Hidden Landscapes

Francis Pryor

$22.99
Landscapes reflect and shape our behaviour. They make us who we are and bear witness to the shifting patterns of human life over the generations. Formed by a complex series of natural and human processes, they rarely yield their secrets readily.

Bringing to bear a lifetime's digging, Francis Pryor delves into England's hidden urban and rural landscapes, from Whitby Abbey to the navvy camp at Risehill in Cumbria, from Tintagel to Tottenham's Broadwater Farm. Scattered through fields, woods, moors, roads, tracks and towns, he reveals the stories of our physical surroundings and what they meant to the people who formed them, used them and lived in them. These landscapes, he stresses, are our common physical inheritance. If we can understand how to make them yield up their secrets, it will help us, their guardians, to maintain and shape them for future generations.
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Traces of War: The Archaeology of the First World War

Traces of War: The Archaeology of the First World War

Birger Stichelbaut

$69.99
At the end of the First World War, the landscape of the Western Front in Flanders had been transformed into a wasteland. After the war, the population returned, faced with the enormous challenge of rebuilding the region and making it inhabitable again. All traces of the war were wiped out, leaving only what was left in the ground - what is now the archaeological soil archive. Throughout the Westhoek, 30 centimetres beneath the ground and invisible to the naked eye, the archaeological remains of the war lie dormant. This book, the first of its kind, is a compendium of the findings of ten years of First World War archaeology in Belgium. Clearly written, it looks at many spectacular finds resulting from excavations at more than 150 sites in the front-line region, and also delves into the unexpected role of the landscape as the last witness of the war. These material remains from military camps, hospitals and trenches illustrate day-to-day life at the front, while also looking at the personal fates of several of the fallen soldiers - and many horses. The text is supported by a wealth of visual data, including photographs of excavated artefacts, maps, aerial photographs and other archive material.
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The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne: A Historical Archaeology

The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne: A Historical Archaeology

Tim Murray ,  Kristal Buckley ,  Ms Sarah Hayes ,  Geoff Hewitt

$45.00
For much of the 19th and 20th centuries, Melbourne's Little Lonsdale - locally known as `Little Lon' - was notorious as a foul slum and brothel district, occupied by the itinerant and the criminal. The stereotype of `slumdom' defined `Little Lon' in the minds of Melbournians, and became entrenched in Australian literature and popular culture.

The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne tells a different story. This ground-breaking book reports on almost three decades of excavations conducted on the Commonwealth Block - the area of central Melbourne bordered by Little Lonsdale, Lonsdale, Exhibition and Spring streets. Since the 1980s, archaeologists and historians have pieced together the rich and complex history of this area, revealing a working-class and immigrant community that was much more than just a slum. The Commonwealth Block, Melbourne delves into the complex social, cultural and economic history of this forgotten community.
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The Great Book of Ancient Egypt New Edition: In the Realm of the Pharaohs

The Great Book of Ancient Egypt New Edition: In the Realm of the Pharaohs

Zahi Hawass

$79.99
Brimming with close-up photographs of the statuary, stelae, sarcophagi, wall paintings, reliefs, artefacts, and, of course, the monuments, this volume offers an information-packed overview of the history of ancient Egypt.

In the beginning of the book the authors - distinguished Egyptology experts - present an invaluable chronology, and introduce readers to the gods and to the explorers who sought their tombs. Then, from Alexandria to the Monastery of St. Catherine, from the pyramids of Giza to Abu Simbel, the book traces the major archaeological sites, detailing the monuments and major discoveries in each location
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Armies of the Medieval Italian Wars 1125-1325

Armies of the Medieval Italian Wars 1125-1325

Gabriele Esposito ,  Giuseppe Rava

$24.99
The great powers of medieval Europe fought continuously in the Italian peninsula between the 12th and 14th centuries as they sought to expand their territory. Invading armies from Germany - the Holy Roman Empire - saw the creation of the defensive Lombard League of northern Italian city-states. These struggles resulted in conflicts between rival confederacies, which in turn proved to be the catalysts for developments in organisation and tactics. Italian urban militias became better organised and equipped, the Imperial armies went from being mostly German to multi-national forces, and both sides became reliant on mercenary forces to prosecute their wars.

After the 1260s, France, relying mainly on armoured cavalry, and Spain, with their innovative light infantry, vied for control of southern Italy. On the seas, the great naval powers of Genoa, Pisa and Venice became fierce rivals, as they created great trading empires, bringing the treasures of the east into feudal Europe. Using detailed colour plates, this beautifully illustrated book describes the myriad of armies and navies that fought for control of Italy in the Middle Ages.
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Cyrus the Great: Life and Lore

Cyrus the Great: Life and Lore

M. Rahim Shayegan

$47.99
The edited volume Cyrus the Great: Life and Lore re-contextualizes Cyrus's foundational act and epoch in light of recent scholarship, while examining his later reception in antiquity and beyond. Among the many themes addressed in the volume are: the complex dossier of Elamo-Persian acculturation; the Mesopotamian antecedents of Cyrus's edict and religious policy; Cyrus's Baupolitik at Pasargadae, and the idiosyncratic genesis of Persian imperial art; the Babylonian exile, the Bible, and the First Return; Cyrus's exalted but conflicted image in the later Greco-Roman world; his reception and programmatic function in genealogical constructs of the Hellenistic and Arsacid periods; and finally Cyrus's conspicuous and enigmatic evanescence in the Sasanian and Muslim traditions.

The sum of these wide-ranging contributions assembled in one volume, as well as a new critical edition and English translation of the Cyrus Cylinder, allow for a more adequate evaluation of Cyrus's impact on his own age, as well as his imprint on posterity.
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My Longest Round

My Longest Round

Wally Carr ,  Gaele Sobot

$19.99
I've been fighting since the day I was born. No, I've been fighting from the time I was curled up inside my mother's belly. The day my father shot himself in the head, that's when my fight started. - Wally Carr The life story of Australian and Commonwealth champion boxer Wally Carr. A powerful biographical story about the journey of a young Wiradjuri boy, Wally Carr, escaping the dreaded Aboriginal Welfare Board - a journey from the heartbreak and crushing loneliness of childhood to the mean streets of Sydney's Redfern. From hunting goannas, Jimmy Sharman's boxing tents, rugby league, professional boxing and the first Aboriginal Tent Embassy, to present-day struggles and lifestyles, My Longest Round offers a vital snapshot of Aboriginal and Australian history.
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The Inside World: Contemporary Memorial Poles from Aboriginal Australia

The Inside World: Contemporary Memorial Poles from Aboriginal Australia

Henry F. Skerritt ,  Sally Salvesen ,  Howard Morphy ,  Diana Nawi

$90.00
Traditionally used in Aboriginal funeral ceremonies, memorial poles have been transformed into compelling contemporary artworks. The memorial pole is made from the trunk of the Eucalyptus tetradonta, hollowed naturally by termites. When the bones of the deceased were placed inside, it signified the moment when the spirit had finally returned home - when they had left the outside world, and become one with the inside world of the ancestral realm. Today, these works of art have become a powerful symbol of Aboriginal culture's significance around the globe. The artists featured in the book - including John Mawurndjul, Djambawa Marawili, and Nyapanyapa Yunupingu - are some of Australia's most acclaimed contemporary artists. Taking their inspiration from ancient clan insignia, the designs on these poles are transformed in new and personal ways that offer a powerful reminder of the resilience and beauty of Aboriginal culture. This book features dazzling color images and impeccable scholarship and includes essays from some of the leading scholars in the field of Aboriginal art.
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Songs from the Stations

Songs from the Stations

Myfany Turpin ,  Felicity Meakins ,  Erika Charola ,  Brenda L. Croft

$40.00
The Gurindji people of the Northern Territory are perhaps best-known for their walk-off of Wave Hill Station in 1966, protesting against mistreatment by the station managers. The strike would become the first major victory of the Indigenous land rights movement. Many discussions of station life are focused on the harsh treatment of Aboriginal workers.

Songs from the Stations portrays another side of life on Wave Hill Station. Amongst the harsh conditions and decades of mistreatment, an eclectic ceremonial life flourished during the first half of the 20th century. Constant travel between cattle stations by Indigenous workers across north-western and central Australia meant that Wave Hill Station became a cross-road of desert and Top End musical styles. As a result, the Gurindji people learnt songs from the Mudburra who came further east, the Bilinarra from the north, the Nyininy from the west, and the Warlpiri from the south.

This book is the first detailed documentation of wajarra, public songs performed by the Gurindji people in response to contemporary events in their community. Featuring five song sets known as Laka, Mintiwarra, Kamul, Juntara, and Freedom Day, it is an exploration of the cultural exchange between Indigenous communities that was fostered by their involvement in the pastoral industry.
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Heineken in Africa: A Multinational Unleashed

Heineken in Africa: A Multinational Unleashed

Olivier van Beemen

$49.95
For Heineken, `rising Africa' is already a reality: the profits it extracts there are almost 50 per cent above the global average, and beer costs more in some African countries than it does in Europe. Heineken claims its presence boosts economic development on the continent. But is this true?

Investigative journalist Olivier van Beemen has spent years seeking the answer, and his conclusion is damning: Heineken has hardly benefited Africa at all. On the contrary, there are some shocking skeletons in its African closet: tax avoidance, sexual abuse, links to genocide and other human rights violations, high-level corruption, crushing competition from indigenous brewers, and collaboration with dictators and pitiless anti-government rebels.

Heineken in Africa caused a political and media furore on publication in The Netherlands, and was debated in their Parliament. It is an unmissable expose of the havoc wreaked by a global giant seeking profit in the developing world.
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Rorke's Drift and Isandlwana: Great Battles

Rorke's Drift and Isandlwana: Great Battles

Ian F. W. Beckett

$38.95
The battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879, the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War, witnessed the worst single day's loss of British troops between the battle of Waterloo in 1815 and the opening campaigns of the First World War in August 1914. Moreover, decisive defeat at the hands of the Zulu came as an immense shock to a Victorian public that had become used to easy victories over less technologically advanced indigenous foes in an expanding empire.

The successful defence of Rorke's Drift, which immediately followed the encounter at Isandlwana (and for which 11 Victoria Crosses were awarded), averted military disaster and went some way to restore wounded British pride, but the sobering memory of defeat at Isandlwana lingered for many years, while the legendary tale of the defence of Rorke's Drift was re-awakened for a new generation in the epic 1964 film Zulu, starring Michael Caine.

In this new volume in the Great Battles series, Ian F. W. Beckett tells the story of both battles, investigating not only their immediate military significance but also providing the first overarching account of their continuing cultural impact and legacy in the years since 1879, not just in Britain but also from the once largely inaccessible and overlooked Zulu perspective.
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Congo Stories: Battling Five Centuries of Exploitation and Greed

Congo Stories: Battling Five Centuries of Exploitation and Greed

John Prendergast ,  Fidel Bafilemba ,  Soraya Aziz Souleymane ,  Dave Eggers

$39.99
Congo is one of the most complex countries in the world, yet it is the most overlooked. It is one of the wealthiest in Africa as a result of its natural endowments, but its people are some of the poorest in the world. Congolese culture is informed by the brutality of war. Over 5 million Congolese died at the beginning of the 21st century because of our demand for the minerals that power our cellphones and laptops. Billions of dollars are being siphoned out of the country while billions in humanitarian aid and peacekeeping are coming in to clean up the mess. Although the country has paid a price for over five centuries, progress has and continues to be made.

Wanting to learn more about this incredible land and history, Ryan Gosling and activist John Prendergast went to the Congo to learn first-hand how the prosperity of America and Europe has defined Congolese history for the last five centuries in a multitude of ways. CONGO STORIES introduces readers to the incredible men, women, and children whose lives have been upended by conflict. Filled with photos Gosling took during their trip, and Prendergast's and Bafilemba's meticulous research, CONGO STORIES is a stirring exploration of the Congo experience, an invitation for readers to connect with a vibrant but embattled part of the world, and a worthy call to action and engagement.
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Target Saigon: The Fall of South Vietnam: Volume 2: The Beginning of the End, January 1974 - March 1975

Target Saigon: The Fall of South Vietnam: Volume 2: The Beginning of the End, January 1974 - March 1975

Albert Grandolini

$54.95
Drawing on a wide range of Vietnamese-language sources, the author presents a detailed account of the continuing efforts of North Vietnam to invade the South, enlivened by a large number of previously unpublished photographs, and colour profiles for modellers. A year after the Paris peace accord had been signed, on 17 January 1973, peace had not been settled in Vietnam.

During that period, the North Vietnamese continued their attacks now that the United States had pulled out completely their forces, with the definitive conquest of South Vietnam as the goal. The South Vietnamese forces' erosion on the field increased in face of a series of concerted North Vietnamese offensives at Corps level. The drastic American aid reduction began to impact heavily on the South Vietnamese ability to wage war. Equally, Saigon could not respond to a Chinese invasion of the Paracel Islands after a brief naval battle, and if Hanoi had been bolstered by massive deliveries of equipment from Peking and Moscow, both the Chinese and the Soviet had withheld the delivery of sufficient ammunitions for the artillery and the tanks, to deter the North Vietnamese from attempting a new widescale offensive against the South.

It was with these constraints that the North Vietnamese leadership planned their new campaign, initially expecting it to take 2 to 3 years. A last test had to be done in order to assess the American intentions in case of an all-out North Vietnamese offensive against the South - if a South Vietnamese provincial capital was taken without American reaction, then Hanoi would begin the last campaign of the war. After the fall of Phuoc Long, the North Vietnamese decided to attack the strategic Central Highlands area where they hoped to destroy the greater part of an ARVN Corps. The battle of Ban Me Thuout would be the pivotal event leading to the rapid collapse of South Vietnam.

While the battle was going on, without taking advices from his generals, President Nguyen Van Thieu of South Vietnam decided to take radical measures by redeploying his forces. That meant abandoning no less than half of the country, in order to shorter his logistic communication lines and to concentrate his remaining depleted forces around Saigon and the Mekong Delta area. He probably also hoped that by aggravating the military situation he would force Washington to fulfil its promise that "in case of massive violation of the cease-fire", the Americans would resume their military aid and would send back the B-52s.

150 photographs, 5 maps, 18 colour profiles
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Chinese Battleship vs Japanese Cruiser: Yalu River 1894

Chinese Battleship vs Japanese Cruiser: Yalu River 1894

Benjamin Lai ,  Paul Wright ,  Alan Gilliland

$32.99
The 1894-95 war between China and Japan, known in the West as the First Sino-Japanese War, lasted only nine months, but its impact resonates today.

The Chinese Beiyang (Northern) Fleet was led by her flagship, Dingyuan, and her sister ship, Zhenyuan, which were the biggest in Asia; German-built armoured turret ships, they were armed with four 12in guns and two 6in guns, plus six smaller guns and three torpedo tubes. For their part the Japanese fleet, including the Matsushima and her sister ships Itsukushima and Hashidate, were each armed with a single 12.6in Canet gun and 11 or 12 4.7in guns, plus smaller guns and four torpedo tubes. The scene was set for a bloody confrontation that would stun the world and transform the relationship between China and Japan.

Fully illustrated with stunning artwork, this is the engrossing story of the Yalu River campaign, where Chinese and Japanese ironclads fought for control of Korea.
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The Australian War Memorial: A century on from the vision

The Australian War Memorial: A century on from the vision

Steve Gower

$60.00
In this book, Steve Gower, the highly successful director of the Australian War Memorial from 1996 to 2012, gives a comprehensive account of the development of the Memorial from its inception just over a century ago.

Official permission was given in 1917 for the collection of war relics for display in a proposed museum in Australia. It would honour and commemorate all those who had served, especially those who had lost their lives, and help Australians to understand what they had experienced. Essentially the vision of one man, official war correspondent Charles Bean, supported by the head of the Australian War Records Section, John Treloar and others, it led to the opening in 1941 of the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, now a 'must-visit' place for Australians and overseas visitors.

The book recounts the many challenges in establishing the Memorial and then in developing further its galleries and displays, the extensive collection, associated events and the overall supporting facilities. The Australian War Memorial: A century on from the vision also goes behind the scenes to provide insights into the many facets of a major, modern cultural institution.
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Stranded Nation: White Australia in an Asian Region

Stranded Nation: White Australia in an Asian Region

David Walker

$39.99
'David Walker's Stranded Nation is a recommended read for anyone, politicians and students alike, seeking to know the history of Australia's agonising over Asia; how it began, how it evolved and the passionate and colourful characters involved. Stranded Nation is told with authority, insight and wit, and the satisfying readability of a good novel, and that makes it great history.' - Stephen FitzGerald, writer, sinologist and Australia's first Ambassador to the People's Republic of China

For well over a century Australia's place in Asia has been at the forefront of public discussion and controversy. Stranded Nation is a searching examination of how a `white' nation, harbouring deep anxieties about rising Asia, sought to convince both itself and its neighbours that it belonged within the Asian region. This is the strange story of Australia's momentous turn to the East.

Stranded Nation draws on a wide range of sources - from archival records in Australia, the US, the UK, India and New Zealand to the personal stories of Asian visitors. It introduces a surprisingly varied cast of historical actors with opinions on Australia's place in Asia - writers, journalists, politicians, policy-makers, students and diplomats from within Australia and across the region. To that list we must add culturally illuminating fictional figures such as James Bigglesworth (airman, orientalist and hero to many young Australians).

This is a history of race, white prestige and belonging in a world shaken and transformed by decolonisation. These changes thrust the perplexing `mind of Asia' to the fore. The psychology of Asia was often seen as the elusive key to understanding the region, rather than social and economic circumstances. With Britain's withdrawal to Europe came a greater need for accommodation with Asia, leading to insistent calls for a better understanding of Asia and a new, more courteous racial etiquette. In response to these challenges, new image-building programs were created to make Australians appear an Asia-friendly people and not, as some critics in Asia claimed, arrogant white intruders.
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Working for the World: The Evolution of Australian Volunteers International

Working for the World: The Evolution of Australian Volunteers International

Peter Britton

$39.95
Since 1951 thousands of volunteers from all over Australia have worked in developing countries across the world.

This is the story of the organisation that made this possible, the Overseas Service Bureau later known as Australian Volunteers International. From its origins as a community-based association expressing solidarity with people in newly independent countries, it grew into a significant organisation managing a suite of international development programs.

The organisation’s activist impulses and principles were evident as it responded to the critical international issues of the times. It supported  opponents of apartheid in Southern Africa, worked in Cambodia when Australia had no diplomatic representation there and in Vietnam when Australian aid had been suspended, nurtured relationships with Indonesian NGOs during Suharto’s reign, supported civil society across the Pacific Islands, and provided significant and timely support for East Timor’s self-determination.

This book explores the organisation’s growth with increased government funding and the accompanying challenge of maintaining its own values and identity in an era when decolonisation presented increasingly complex demands.
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Outback Railwaymen: Life on the Commonwealth Railways

Outback Railwaymen: Life on the Commonwealth Railways

,Nick Anchen

$35.00
Central Australia Railway – North Australia Railway – Trans-australian Railway

"Outback Railwaymen – Life on the Commonwealth Railways" explores the life and times of three extraordinary railways, through the recollections and humorous stories of a selection of retired railwaymen and women.

These were the hardy souls who kept the trains running through some of the harshest and most forbidding landscapes on Earth – the railways in the great 'Back of Beyond.'

They endured appalling climatic conditions, with scorching summer temperatures, howling dust storms and raging floodwaters, along with the ever-present danger of accidents and derailments, and the overwhelming isolation and loneliness that is the Australian Outback.

3 x 12 page colour photo sections
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New Year's Day at the Hotel Australia

New Year's Day at the Hotel Australia

Lindsay Barrett

$25.00
In the late 1930s an apprentice potter made a solemn pledge with some of his young work mates to meet up on New Year's Day, in the year 2000, in the famous Long Bar of the Hotel Australia. But the reunion never took place because, while sixty years later the young man in question, the author's father, was still going strong, the venue was longer standing. The Hotel Australia, Sydney's premier hotel throughout much of the twentieth century, had been demolished in 1972 to make way for the MLC Centre, a concrete skyscraper which was at the cutting edge of the city's redevelopment as a global business hub.

Charting a course through modernist literature, popular fiction, rugby league, shopping centres, suburban kitsch and prefab concrete, this book looks at the impact of the ethic of progress on Australia in the middle of the twentieth century, and the way in which a particular version of masculinity - the self-made man - became enshrined as a new version of Australian identity. At a time when the average tradesman is now a media celebrity, and as property developers scour the urban landscape for profit as never before, New Year's Day at the Hotel Australia looks back at the heyday of the self-made man, and the world he was busy building, even as forces much more powerful than he could muster were in the process of redeveloping it into something much bigger, blander and more corporate.
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Our Corner of the Somme: Australian Army History Series

Our Corner of the Somme: Australian Army History Series

Romain Fathi

$59.95
By the time of the Armstice, Villers-Bretonneux - once a lively and flourishing French town - had been largely destroyed, and half its population had fled or died. From March to August 1918, Villers-Bretonneux formed part of an active front line, at which Australian troops were heavily involved. As a result, it holds a significant place in Australian history. Villers-Bretonneux has since become an open-air memorial to Australia's participation in the First World War. Successive Australian governments have valourised the Australian engagement, contributing to an evolving Anzac narrative that has become entrenched in Australia's national identity. Our Corner of the Somme provides an eye-opening analysis of the memorialisation of Australia's role on the Western Front and the Anzac mythology that so heavily contributes to Australians' understanding of themselves. In this rigorous and richly detailed study, Romain Fathi challenges accepted historiography by examining the assembly, projection and performance of Australia's national identity in northern France.
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Elizabeth's Sea Dogs

Elizabeth's Sea Dogs

Hugh Bicheno

$29.99
Elizabeth's Sea Dogs investigates the rise and fall of a unique group of adventurers - men like Francis Drake, John Hawkins, Martin Frobisher and Walter Raleigh. Seen by the English as heroes but by the Spanish as pirates, they were expert seafarers and controversial characters. This riveting new account reveals them for what they were: extremely tough men in extremely hard times. They sailed, fought, looted and whored their way across the globe; in the process, they established a lasting British presence in the Americas, defeated the Spanish Armada, and made Queen Elizabeth I very wealthy, if seldom grateful.

Author Hugh Bicheno sets the Sea Dogs in historical context and reveals their lives and exploits through diligent historical research incorporating contemporary testimony. With additional appendices, colour plates, the author's own maps and technical drawings, Elizabeth's Sea Dogs tells their vivid, extraordinary story as it was lived, in the author's trademark engaging style.
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How to Survive in the Georgian Navy: A Sailor's Guide

How to Survive in the Georgian Navy: A Sailor's Guide

Bruno Pappalardo

$19.99
Rigidly organised and harshly disciplined, the Georgian Royal Navy was an orderly and efficient fighting force which played a major role in Great Britain's wars of the 18th and early 19th centuries. This concise book explores what it was like to be a sailor in the Georgian Navy - focusing on the period from 1714 to 1820, this book examines the Navy within its wider historical, national, organisational and military context, and reveals exactly what it took to survive a life in its service. It looks at how a seaman could join the Royal Navy, including the notorious 'press gangs'; what was meant by 'learning the ropes'; and the severe punishments that could be levied for even minor misdemeanours as a result of the Articles of War. Military tactics, including manning the guns and tactics for fending off pirates are also revealed, as is the problem of maintaining a healthy diet at sea - and the steps that sailors themselves could take to avoid the dreaded scurvy. Covering other fascinating topics as wide-ranging as exploration, mutiny, storms, shipwrecks, and women on board ships, this `Sailor's Guide' explores the lives of the Navy's officers and sailors, using extracts from contemporary documents and writings to reconstruct their experiences in vivid detail.
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Cromwell's Women

Cromwell's Women

Julian Whitehead

$52.99
Oliver Cromwell, a pivotal and often contentious character, has long been the focus of many historical works that chart his meteoric rise from being a middle-aged farmer from East Anglia with no previous military experience, who rose to command the army and become one of England's greatest generals.

Like him or loath him, Oliver Cromwell is a giant of English history. With a deft hand and strong narrative, Whitehead guides us through the remarkable life and career of Oliver Cromwell from a unique perspective. He explores not only the effect the women in Cromwell's life had on him, but how his career in turn dramatically altered their lives. We learn of his close relationship with his mother, who lived with him throughout her long life, and of his deep attachment to his wife Elizabeth, who he married at 22 and without whom it is doubtful he would have achieved all he did.
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Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation

Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation

Roderick Beaton

$69.99
Greece has been brought under repeated scrutiny during the financial crises that have convulsed the country since 2010. The worldwide coverage has shown up how poorly we understand modern Greece. We think we know ancient Greece, the civilisation that shares the same name and gave us just about everything that defines 'western' culture today, in the arts, sciences, social sciences and politics.

This book sets out to understand the modern Greeks on their own terms.

How did Greece come to be so powerfully attached to the legacy of the ancients in the first place, and then define an identity for themselves that is at once Greek and modern? This book reveals the remarkable achievement, during the last 300 years, of building a modern nation on, sometimes literally, the ruins of a vanished civilisation. This is the story of the Greek nation-state but also, and perhaps more fundamentally, of the collective identity that goes with it. It is not only a history of events and high politics,it is also a history of culture, of the arts and of ideas.
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Heaven & Earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei

Heaven & Earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei

Cao Yin ,  Karyn Lai ,  National Palace Museum curators

$45.00
This publication presents some of the highest artistic achievements in Chinese history. Drawing on the exceptional collection of the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Heaven and earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei celebrates the rich heritage of Chinese culture through the ancient Chinese concept of tian ren he yi - unity or harmony between heaven, nature and humanity.

As expressed by Song dynasty scholar Zhang Zai (1020-77), who developed this concept of unity, `nature is the result of the fusion and intermingling of the vital forces (qi) that assume tangible forms. Mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, animals and human beings are all modalities of energy-matter, symbolising that the creative transformation of the Tao [Dao] is forever present.' Similar expressions of this unity are common to the three major philosophical and religious traditions of Daoism, Confucianism and Buddhism, which form the foundation of the Chinese belief system.

Heaven and earth in Chinese art includes over 80 artworks of outstanding beauty covering paintings, calligraphy, illustrated books, bronzes, ceramics, and jade and wood carvings.

The National Palace Museum in Taipei holds one of the finest selections of Chinese art in the world. Once held in imperial collections inside Beijing's Forbidden City, many of the treasures were transferred to Taiwan during the unrest of the 1940s, and have rarely travelledsince.
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The Existential Englishman: Paris Among the Artists

The Existential Englishman: Paris Among the Artists

Michael Peppiatt

$47.99
A love letter to Paris and a memoir of a life spent at its bohemian heart, rich with adventures, misadventures and the beauty of one of the most enduringly romantic cities in the world The Existential Englishman is both a memoir and an intimate portrait of Paris -- a city that can enchant, exhilarate and exasperate in equal measure. As Peppiatt remarks: `You reflect and become the city just as the city reflects and becomes you'. This, then, is one man's not uncritical love letter to Paris.

Intensely personal, candid and entertaining, The Existential Englishman chronicles Peppiatt's relationship with Paris in a series of vignettes structured around the half-dozen addresses he called home as a plucky young art critic. Having survived the tumultuous riots of 1968, Peppiatt traces his precarious progress from junior editor to magazine publisher, recalling encounters with a host of figures at the heart of Parisian artistic life - from Sartre, Beckett and Cartier-Bresson to Serge Gainsbourg and Catherine Deneuve. Peppiatt also takes us into the secret places that fascinate him most in this ancient capital, where memories are etched into every magnificent palace and humble cobblestone.

On the historic streets of Paris, where all life is on show and every human drama played out, Michael Peppiatt is the wittiest and wickedest of observers, capturing the essence of the city and its glittering cultural achievements.
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Under a Darkening Sky: The American Experience in Nazi Europe: 1939-1941

Under a Darkening Sky: The American Experience in Nazi Europe: 1939-1941

Robert Lyman

$43.95
A poignant and powerful portrait of Europe in the years between 1939 and 1941--as the Nazi menace marches toward the greatest man-made catastrophe the world has ever experienced--Under A Darkening Sky focuses on a diverse group of expatriate Americans. Told through the eyes and observations of these characters caught up in these seismic events, the story unfolds alongside a war that slowly drags a reluctant United States into its violent embrace.

This vibrant narrative takes these dramatic personalities and evokes the engagement between Europe and a reluctant America from the September 3rd, 1939--when Britain declares war--through the tragedy of Pearl Harbor in December 1941. In a distinctively energetic storyline, Robert Lyman brings together a wide range of encounters, conversations, and memories. It includes individuals from across the social spectrum, from Josephine Baker to the young Americans who volunteered to fight in the RAF, as part of the famous Eagle Squadrons.

Hundreds of young Americans--like the aces James Goodison, Art Donahue, and the wealthy playboy Billy Fiske, who was the first American volunteer in the RAF to die in action during the Battle of Britain--smuggled themselves into Canada so that they could volunteer for the cockpits of Spitfires and Hurricanes, as they flew against the deadly Luftwaffe over ever-darkening skies in London.
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The German New Right: AFD, PEGIDA and the Re-imagining of National Identity

The German New Right: AFD, PEGIDA and the Re-imagining of National Identity

Jay Julian Rosellini

$99.00
Contemporary Germany is a modern industrial democracy admired throughout the world. Many Germans believe that they live in the 'best Germany' that has ever existed. Yet there are dissenting voices: individuals and groups that reject cosmopolitanism, globalisation and multiculturalism, and yearn for the more homogeneous country of earlier times. They are part of a global movement, often characterised as populist, that values tradition over innovation or constant change. In Germany, such people are routinely portrayed as reactionary or even neo- fascist. The present study seeks to provide a portrait of these individuals and their organisations.

Very little has been written in English about the cultural figures who play a role in this movement. When the political side is discussed - whether in its manifestation as a party (the Alternative for Germany) or a citizens' group (PEGIDA) - the cultural dimension is usually ignored. Jay Julian Rosellini places the so-called New Right in the context of currents in German culture and history that differ from those in other countries. With Germany the dominant country in the European Union, economically and politically, this volume offers an essential view of its current conditions, future prospects and political particularities.
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The Promise of the East: Nazi Hopes and Genocide, 1939-43

The Promise of the East: Nazi Hopes and Genocide, 1939-43

Christian Ingrao ,  Andrew Brown

$52.95
How did the Nazis imagine their victory and the subsequent 'Thousand-Year Reich'?

Between 1939 and 1943, the Nazi imperial Utopia started to take shape in the conquered areas of Eastern Europe, brutally emptied of their inhabitants, who were displaced, reduced to slavery and, in the case of the Jews and a considerable number of Slavs, murdered. This Utopia had its engineers, its agencies and its pioneers (no fewer than 27,000 Germans, most of them young). It aroused fervent support. In the Thousand-Year Reich, with its borders extended by conquest, a racially pure community would soon live a life of peace and prosperity, in total harmony.

In this book, renowned historian Christian Ingrao draws on extensive archival material to shed new light on this movement and explain how it could prove so appealing, examining the coherence and the inner contradictions of the activities undertaken by the different institutions, the careers of the women and men who played a part in them, and the ambitious plans that were drawn up. Ingrao adopts a social anthropological point of view to investigate the emotions aroused by the Nazi dream, and describes not just the hatred and the anxieties it fed on but also the joys and expectations it created - two sides of a single reality. As we learn from the terrible violence unleashed across the region of Zamosc, on the border between Poland and Ukraine, the hopes of the Nazis became a nightmare for the native populations.

This important work reveals an aspect of Nazism that is often overlooked and greatly extends our understanding of the general framework in which the Holocaust was realized. It will find a wide audience among students and scholars of modern German history and among a broad general readership.
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Uneven Moments: Reflections on Japan's Modern History

Uneven Moments: Reflections on Japan's Modern History

Harry Harootunian

$69.00
Few scholars have done more than Harry Harootunian to shape the study of modern Japan. Incorporating Marxist critical perspectives on history and theoretically informed insights, his scholarship has been vitally important for the world of Asian studies. Uneven Moments presents a selection of Harootunian's essays on Japan's intellectual and cultural history from the late Tokugawa period to the present that span the many phases of his distinguished career and point to new directions for Japanese studies.

Uneven Moments begins with reflections on area studies as an academic field and how we go about studying a region. It then moves into discussions of key topics in modern Japanese history. Harootunian considers Japan's fateful encounter with capitalist modernity and the implications of uneven development, examining the combinations of older practices with new demands that characterized the twentieth century. The book examines the making of modern Japan, the transformations of everyday life, and the collision between the production of forms of cultural expression and new political possibilities. Finally, Harootunian analyzes Japanese political identity and its forms of reckoning with the past.

Exploring the shifting relationship among culture, the making of meaning, and politics in rich reflections on Marxism and critical theory, Uneven Moments presents Harootunian's intellectual trajectory and in so doing offers a unique assessment of Japanese history.
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The Art of Japanese Architecture

The Art of Japanese Architecture

D. Young ,  Michiko Young ,  Tan Hong Yew

$34.99
The Art of Japanese Architecture provides a unique overview of Japanese architecture in its historical and cultural context. The book begins with a discussion of early prehistoric dwellings and concludes with a description of works by important modern Japanese architects. Along the way it discusses the iconic buildings and building styles for which Japan is so justly famous - from elegant Shinden and Sukiya-style aristocratic villas like the Kinkakuji Golden Pavilion in Kyoto, to imposing Samurai castles like Himeji and Matsumoto, to tranquil Zen Buddhist gardens and tea houses - to rural Minka thatched-roof farmhouses and Shinto shrines.

Each period in the development of Japan's architecture is described in loving detail and the most important structures are shown and discussed - including dozens of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The aesthetic trends in each period are presented within the context of Japanese society at the time, providing a unique in-depth understanding of the way Japanese architectural styles and buildings have developed over time and the great variety that is visible today.

This book is profusely illustrated with hundreds of hand-drawn 3D watercolor illustrations and color photos as well as prints, maps and diagrams. The new edition features dozens of new photographs and a handy hardcover format that is perfect for travelers.
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A History of Tokyo 1867-1989: From EDO to SHOWA: The Emergence of the World's Greatest City

A History of Tokyo 1867-1989: From EDO to SHOWA: The Emergence of the World's Greatest City

Edward Seidensticker ,  Donald Richie ,  Paul Waley

$34.99
Edward Seidensticker's A History of Tokyo 1867-1989 tells the fascinating story of Tokyo's transformation from the Shogun's capital in an isolated Japan to the largest and the most modern city in the world. With the same scholarship and sparkling style that won him admiration as the foremost translator of great works of Japanese literature, Seidensticker offers the reader his brilliant vision of an entire society suddenly wrenched from an ancient feudal past into the modern world in a few short decades, and the enormous stresses and strains that this brought with it.

Originally published as two volumes, Seidensticker's masterful work is now available in a handy, single paperback volume. Whether you're a history buff or Tokyo-bound traveller looking to learn more, this insightful book offers a fascinating look at how the Tokyo that we know came to be. This edition contains an introduction by Donald Richie, the acknowledged expert on Japanese culture who was a close personal friend of the author, and a preface by geographer Paul Waley that puts the book into perspective for modern readers.
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Questions I Am Asked about the Holocaust

Questions I Am Asked about the Holocaust

Hedi Fried ,  Alice Olsson

$27.99
'There are no stupid questions, nor any forbidden ones, but there are some questions that have no answer.' Hedi Fried was nineteen when the Nazis snatched her family from their home in Eastern Europe and transported them to Auschwitz, where her parents were murdered and she and her sister were forced into hard labour until the end of the war.

Now ninety-four, she has spent her life educating young people about the Holocaust and answering their questions about one of the darkest periods in human history. Questions like, 'How was it to live in the camps?', 'Did you dream at night?', 'Why did Hitler hate the Jews?', and 'Can you forgive?'.
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Hunting the Truth: Memoirs of Beate and Serge Klarsfeld

Hunting the Truth: Memoirs of Beate and Serge Klarsfeld

Beate Klarsfeld ,  Serge Klarsfeld ,  Sam Taylor

$24.99
They were born on opposite sides of the Second World War: Beate grew up in the ruins of a defeated Weimar Germany, while Serge, a Jewish boy in France, was hiding in a cupboard when his father was arrested and sent to Auschwitz. They met on the Paris Metro and fell in love, and became famous when Beate slapped the face of the West German chancellor-a former Nazi-Kurt Georg Kiesinger.

For the past half century, Beate and Serge Klarsfeld have hunted, confronted, prosecuted, and exposed Nazi war criminals all over the world, tracking down the notorious torturer Klaus Barbie in Bolivia and attempting to kidnap the former Gestapo chief Kurt Lischka on the streets of Cologne. They have been sent to prison for their beliefs and have risked their lives protesting anti-Semitism behind the Iron Curtain in South America and in the Middle East. They have been insulted and exalted, assaulted and heralded; they've received honors from presidents and letter bombs from neo-Nazis. They have fought relentlessly not only for the memory of all those who died in the Holocaust but also for modern-day victims of genocide and discrimination across the world. And they have done it all while raising their children and sustaining their marriage.

Now, for the first time, in Hunting the Truth, a major memoir written in their alternating voices, Beate and Serge Klarsfeld tell the thrilling story of a lifetime dedicated to combating evil.
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Spies of No Country: Secret Lives at the Birth of Israel

Spies of No Country: Secret Lives at the Birth of Israel

Matti Friedman

$49.95
Award-winning writer Matti Friedman's tale of Israel's first spies has all the tropes of an espionage novel, including duplicity, betrayal, disguise, clandestine meetings, the bluff, and the double bluff--but it's all true.

The four spies at the center of this story were part of a ragtag unit known as the Arab Section, conceived during World War II by British spies and Jewish militia leaders in Palestine. Intended to gather intelligence and carry out sabotage and assassinations, the unit consisted of Jews who were native to the Arab world and could thus easily assume Arab identities. In 1948, with Israel's existence in the balance during the War of Independence, our spies went undercover in Beirut, where they spent the next two years operating out of a kiosk, collecting intelligence, and sending messages back to Israel via a radio whose antenna was disguised as a clothesline. While performing their dangerous work these men were often unsure to whom they were reporting, and sometimes even who they'd become. Of the dozen spies in the Arab Section at the war's outbreak, five were caught and executed. But in the end the Arab Section would emerge, improbably, as the nucleus of the Mossad, Israel's vaunted intelligence agency.

Spies of No Country is about the slippery identities of these young spies, but it's also about Israel's own complicated and fascinating identity. Israel sees itself and presents itself as a Western nation, when in fact more than half the country has Middle Eastern roots and traditions, like the spies of this story. And, according to Friedman, that goes a long way toward explaining the life and politics of the country, and why it often baffles the West. For anyone interested in real-life spies and the paradoxes of the Middle East, Spies of No Country is an intimate story with global significance.
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Desert Storm: Volume 1: The Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait & Operation Desert Shield 1990-1991

Desert Storm: Volume 1: The Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait & Operation Desert Shield 1990-1991

E. R. Hooton ,  Tom Cooper

$42.99
Early in the morning of 2 August 1990, aircraft of the Iraqi Air Force bombed Kuwaiti air bases, and then the Iraqi Republican Guards stormed into the country. Thus began what would be called the `Gulf War' - also the `II Gulf War', and sometimes the `II Persian Gulf War' - fought between January and March 1991.

Although encountering some problems, the Iraqi forces occupied Kuwait in a matter of few days. However, when President Saddam Hussein of Iraq unleashed his military upon Kuwait, little did he know what kind of reaction he would provoke from the Western superpowers, and what kind of devastation his country would suffer in return.

Concerned about the possibility of Iraq continuing its advance into Saudi Arabia, the USA - in coordination with Great Britain, France, and several local allies - reacted by deploying large contingents of their air-, land- and naval forces to the Middle East.

Months of fruitless negotiations and the continuous military build-up - Operation Desert Shield - followed, as tensions continued to increase. Determined to retain Kuwait, and despite multiple warnings from his own generals, Saddam Hussein rejected all demands to withdraw. The USA and its allies, `the Coalition', were as determined to drive out the invader and restore Kuwaiti independence. Gradually, they agreed this would have to be by force.

Following an authorisation from the United Nations, the Coalition launched the Operation Desert Storm, on 17 January 1991, opening one of the most intensive air campaigns in history. The last conventional war of the 20th Century saw the large, but essentially traditional, Iraqi Army overwhelmed by forces trained and equipped to exploit the latest technologies.

Desert Storm reveals the whole war fought between Iraq and an international coalition, from the start of this campaign to its very end. Largely based on data released from official archives, spiced with numerous interviews, and illustrated with over 100 photographs, 18 colour profiles and maps, it offers a refreshing insight into this unique conflict.
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Long Shot: My Life As a Sniper in the Fight Against ISIS

Long Shot: My Life As a Sniper in the Fight Against ISIS

Azad Cudi ,  Alex Perry

$32.99
As Syria imploded in civil war in 2011, Kurdish volunteers in the north rose up to free their homeland from centuries of repression and create a progressive sanctuary that they named Rojava. To the medievalists of ISIS, the emergence of a haven of tolerance and democracy on the frontier of their new caliphate was an affront. They amassed 12,000 men, heavy artillery, tanks, mortars and ranks of suicide bombers to crush the uprising. Against them stood 2,500 volunteer fighters armed with 40-year-old rifles. There was only one way for the Kurds to survive. They would have to kill the invaders one by one.

A decade earlier, as a 19-year-old conscript into the Iranian army, Azad Cudi had faced being forced to fight his own Kurdish people. Instead he had deserted, seeking asylum in Britain. Now, as he returned to his homeland to help build a new Kurdistan, he found he would have to pick up a gun once more. In September 2014, Azad became one of 17 snipers deployed when ISIS, trying to shatter the Kurds in a decisive battle, besieged the northern city of Kobani.

In LONG SHOT, Azad tells the inside story of how a group of activists and idealists withstood a ferocious assault and, street by street, house by house, took back their land in a victory that was to prove the turning point in the war against ISIS. By turns devastating, inspiring and lyrical, this is an unique account of modern war and of the incalculable price of victory as a few thousand men and women achieved the impossible and kept their dream of freedom alive.
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The Battle of Lys: April 1918

The Battle of Lys: April 1918

Colin Mattey

$19.99
In the wave of devastating German offensives launched in the spring of 1918, it is Operation Michael that has captured most attention, characterised by astonishing advances and their potentially shattering impact on the British Expeditionary Force's (BEF) Third and Fifth armies. While this offensive eventually petered out, albeit tantalisingly close to the BEF's crucial logistic hub of Amiens, German General Ludendorff redirected the German effort north to Flanders to launch Operation Georgette. In Flanders, the BEF front line lay alarmingly close to the vital channel ports, and the main German thrust posed a direct threat to the town of Hazebrouck, the BEF's second key logistic hub. After four years of grinding and horrific war, all that stood between the Germans and victory was the 1st Australian Division, hastily recalled to defend the town.

This volume describes the battle to save Hazebrouck - part of what was to become the Battle of the Lys - and focuses on the role of the 1st Australian Division in halting the surging German thrust towards the town. While often neglected by history, this action was critical to the survival of the BEF and the Allied war effort in 1918 and deserves far greater recognition. The Battle of the Lys also brings the performance of the BEF divisions during Operation Georgette into sharper focus while providing a unique opportunity to reassess BEF and German performances at what was a decisive point in the First World War.
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The Birth of the RAF, 1918: The World's First Air Force

The Birth of the RAF, 1918: The World's First Air Force

Richard Overy

$22.99
The dizzying pace of technological change in the early 20th century meant that it took only a little over ten years from the first flight by the Wright Brothers to the clash of fighter planes in the Great War. A period of terrible, rapid experiment followed to gain a brief technological edge. By the end of the war the British had lost an extraordinary 36,000 aircraft and 16,600 airmen.

The RAF was created in 1918 as a revolutionary response to this new form of warfare - a highly contentious decision (resisted fiercely by both the army and navy, who had until then controlled all aircraft) but one which had the most profound impact, for good and ill, on the future of warfare.

Richard Overy's superb new book shows how this happened, against the backdrop of the first bombing raids against London and the constant emergency of the Western Front. The RAF's origins were as much political as military and throughout the 1920s still provoked bitter criticism.

Published to mark the centenary of its founding this is an invaluable book, filled with new and surprising material on this unique organization.
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Armenian Genocide: The Great Crime of World War I

Armenian Genocide: The Great Crime of World War I

David Charlwood

$34.99
Crammed into cattle trucks and deported to camps, shot and buried in mass graves, or force-marched to death, over 1.5 million Armenians were murdered by the Turkish state, twenty years before the start of Hitler's Holocaust. The United States' government called it a crime against humanity and Turkey was condemned by Russia, France and Great Britain. But two decades later the genocide had been conveniently forgotten. Hitler justified his Polish death squads by asking in 1939: 'Who after all is today speaking about the destruction of the Armenians?' Armenian Genocide is a new, gripping account that tells the story of the 'Megh Yeghern' - the Great Crime - against the Armenians through the stories of the men and women who died, the few who survived, and the diplomats who tried to intervene.
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SAS in Italy 1943-1945: Raiders in Enemy Territory

SAS in Italy 1943-1945: Raiders in Enemy Territory

Malcolm Tudor

$44.99
This is the story of Britain's elite special force in Italy during the Second World War. In the summer of 1943 the SAS came out of Africa to carry the fight to the Germans and Fascists in Sicily and the mainland. On the Italian Armistice and Surrender in September 1943 the originator of the SAS, Scots Guards lieutenant David Stirling, was a prisoner at the high-security prisoner of war camp five at Gavi in Piedmont, north-western Italy, after being captured in January in Tunisia. He eventually ended up as a prisoner at Colditz Castle in Germany, but his work continued. The idea of small groups of parachute-trained soldiers operating behind enemy lines to gain intelligence, destroy enemy aircraft, and attack their supply and reinforcement routes, was realised in the many daring missions carried out in Italy by the men of 2nd SAS Regiment and the Special Raiding Squadron. The famous SAS motto of `Who dares wins,' was swiftly translated into the Italian `Chi osa vince.' This book reveals how words were turned into deeds.
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Bomber Squadron: Men Who Flew with XV Squadron

Bomber Squadron: Men Who Flew with XV Squadron

Martyn R. Ford-Jones

$55.00
During the Second World War, thousands of young men volunteered for service with the Royal Air Force. Some of these became fighter pilots, but a great many more were destined to be trained as members of bomber aircrew; pilots, navigators, wireless operators, bomb aimers, air gunners and flight engineers. On completion of their training a number of these men were posted to XV Squadron, a highly regarded frontline bomb squadron which had been formed during the First World War.

Bomber Squadron: Men Who Flew with XV relates the personal stories of a small number of these men, giving an insight to their anxious moments when flying on operational sorties, staring death in the face in the form of enemy night-fighters and ground fire, and relaxing with them during their off-duty hours. The book also reveals the motivations, emotions and personal attitudes of these men, who flew into combat on an almost nightly basis. Their stories encompass the whole six years of the war, over which period XV Squadron flew a range of different bomber aircraft including Fairey Battles, Bristol Blenheims, Vickers Wellingtons, Short Stirlings and Avro Lancasters.
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Northrop Flying Wings

Northrop Flying Wings

Peter E. Davies ,  Adam Tooby

$32.99
Half a century before the 'flying wing' B-2 stealth bomber entered service, John K. `Jack' Northrop was already developing prototypes of a large 'flying wing' strategic bomber, which would have been the most radical bombers of their age.

World War II brought a need for very long-range bombers and Northrop received a contract for a 172-ft span bomber, the B-35. Several of these were built, gradually evolving into the definitive XB-35 configuration. Testing revealed that the aircraft was invisible to radar, but engineers struggled to overcome the design challenges and several pilots were lost in crashes. While the program was cancelled in the 1950s, the concept extended into other highly innovative areas, such as the XP-56 and MX-324 Rocket Wing prototype fighters. But the greatest legacy was the first operational flying wing - the Northrop Grumman B-2 stealth bomber, which used much of the hard-won experience from the pioneering programs of half a century before.
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Japan 1944-45: LeMay's B-29 strategic bombing campaign

Japan 1944-45: LeMay's B-29 strategic bombing campaign

Mark Lardas ,  Paul Wright ,  Adam Tooby

$32.99
The air campaign that incinerated Japan's cities was the first and only time that independent air power has won a war.

As the United States pushed Imperial Japan back towards Tokyo Bay, the US Army Air Force deployed the first of a new bomber to the theater. The B-29 Superfortress was complex, troubled, and hugely advanced. It was the most expensive weapons system of the war, and formidably capable. But at the time, no strategic bombing campaign had ever brought about a nation's surrender. Not only that, but Japan was half a world away, and the US had no airfields even within the extraordinary range of the B-29.

This analysis explains why the B-29s struggled at first, and how General LeMay devised radical and devastating tactics that began to systematically incinerate Japanese cities and industries and eliminate its maritime trade with aerial mining. It explains how and why this campaign was so uniquely successful, and how gaps in Japan's defences contributed to the B-29s' success.
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Stormbird

Stormbird

Hermann Buchner

$29.95
Bomber pilots who become fighter pilots are rare, but Hermann Buchner was one. The author, a Luftwaffe NCO pilot and Knight’s Cross holder gives a riveting account of his training with the pre-war Austrian air force, instructing with the Luftwaffe then the terrifying ground attack operations on the Eastern Front trying to stop the Russian juggernaut. Despite being shot down twice, Buchner himself targeted Il 2s, Yak 9s and Boston bombers who fell victims to his eagle eye.

Later tasked with opposing the Allied daylight bombing raids into the heart of Germany, Buchner laboured to protect his homeland. Serving alongside many well-known aces and sometimes taking off from his home airfield while under Soviet shellfire, he paints a picture of a man surviving against incredible odds, who became one of the elite with JG7 and learnt that the important thing with the Me 262 was to land near a convenient foxhole.

Illustrated with many photographs, mostly from the author’s personal collection together with colour profiles of his aircraft and opponents, Stormbird presents a remarkable insight into the life of a Luftwaffe pilot in WWII.
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Spitfire: A Test Pilot's Story

Spitfire: A Test Pilot's Story

Jeffrey Quill

$29.95
This is the story of an exceptional test pilot and RAF and Fleet Air Arm pilot, Jeffrey Quill, who took charge of some of the most important military aircraft of his time.

Jeffrey Quill, was commissioned in the RAF in 1931. He joined Vickers Aviation in 1936, and rose to become Chief Test Pilot at Supermarine. Best Remembered for his work on the Spitfire, with which his name is inextricably linked, he played a major part in the testing of the prototype and the entire development of the aircraft. Starting with lively descriptions of the Royal Air Force in the mid 1930s, Jeffrey Quill moves on to cover his fascinating test flying experiences where he took charge of some of the most important military aircraft of that time. He flight-tested every variant of the immortal Spitfire, from its experimental, prototype stage in 1936 when he worked with its chief designer, R J Mitchell, to the end of its production in 1948.

Using his first-hand experience of combat conditions fighting with 65 Squadron at the height of the Battle of Britain, Jeffrey Quill helped to turn this elegant flying machine into a deadly fighter aeroplane.
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Wing Leader

Wing Leader

Air Vice Marshall 'Jonnie' Johnson

$24.95
The thrilling story of the top-scoring Allied fighter pilot of the 2nd World War ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, who served with Fighter Command squadrons throughout the war, scoring his 38th and final victory in September 1944.

From the moment the author joins his first operational Spitfire squadron in August 1940, the reader is taken on an epic journey through the great aerial fighter actions of the war.

The events in which Johnson participated included the Battle of Britain, sweeps across the Channel and over France, the unsuccessful Allied raid on Dieppe, the D-Day landings in Normand and finally operations across the Rhine and into  the heart of Germany itself which led to the final victory over the Nazi regime.
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Sky Tiger: The Story of Sailor Malan

Sky Tiger: The Story of Sailor Malan

Norman Franks

$19.95
This is the biography of the renowned WWII South African Spitfire pilot Adolf (Sailor) Malan. The book recounts how he rose in less than 15 months to be acknowledged as Britain’s premier fighter pilot.

A born leader, a superb shot and an exceptional tactician, Malan honed his skills in the air battles over Dunkirk and later in his Spitfire during the Battle of Britain.

He escorted Horsa Gliders carrying some of the first British units into action during the D-Day landings and later became Station Commander at Biggin Hill.

Malan was a larger than life and heroic figure in an era which had more than its fair share of such men. He finished the war with the reputation both as one of the RAF’s great fighter pilots and one of the leading tactical thinkers on the use of fighter aircraft in conflict.
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Nine Lives

Nine Lives

Alan C Deere

$22.95
This is the autobiography of Alan Deere, New Zealand’s most famous RAF pilot who saw action from the Munich Crisis to the invasion of France in 1944.

Al Deere experienced the drama of the early days of the Battle of Britain while serving with Spitfire squadrons based at Hornchurch and Manston, and his compelling story tells of the successes and frustrations of those critical weeks.

Deere’s nine lives are the accounts of his fantastic luck in escaping from seemingly impossible situations. During the Battle of Britain he parachuted from stricken aircraft on three occasions and once was blown up by a bomb whilst taking off from Hornchurch during an attack on the airfield.

In March 1943 Deere was appointed Wing Commander of the famous Biggin Hill Wing and by the end of the war, his distinguished ‘score’ was destroyed twenty-two, probables ten and damaged eighteen.
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Rear Gunner Pathfinder

Rear Gunner Pathfinder

Ron Smith

$22.95
This is a gripping narrative of what it was like to serve and fight with Bomber Command in World War 2 told by a participant in the struggle and one which offers a very unusual personal perspective on the conflict.

Ron Smith was a rear gunner in a Lancaster who flew 65 operations, flying firstly with 626 Squadron and later with156 Pathfinder Squadron.

The writing is exceptionally powerful, involving the reader in the events being described in a way that few World War 2 aviation memoirs have achieved;

‘Suddenly we were over the Big City... after long hours of searching the night sky from the coast, to be suddenly propelled into the brilliant hell over Berlin produced a freezing of the mind…flak sliced up through the broken illuminated clouds, ascending gracefully to stream past the turret. A Lancaster slid across at right angles with a single fighter just behind it, as if attached by an invisible thread… the city far below was bubbling and boiling, splashes of fire opening out as the blockbusters pierced this terrible brew.’

He vividly recalls the fear and intensity of what it was like to be a part of this epic struggle in the isolation of being cocooned in his lonely gun turret.
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Apocalypse 1692: Empire, Slavery and the Great Port Royal Earthquake

Apocalypse 1692: Empire, Slavery and the Great Port Royal Earthquake

Ben Hughes

$44.99
Built on sugar, slaves, and piracy, Jamaica's Port Royal was the jewel in England's quest for empire until a devastating earthquake sank the city beneath the sea.

A haven for pirates and the center of the New World's frenzied trade in slaves and sugar, Port Royal, Jamaica, was a notorious cutthroat settlement where enormous fortunes were gained for the fledgling English empire. But on June 7, 1692, it all came to a catastrophic end. Drawing on research carried out in Europe, the Caribbean, and the United States, Apocalypse 1692: Empire, Slavery, and the Great Port Royal Earthquake by Ben Hughes opens in a post-Glorious Revolution London where two Jamaica-bound voyages are due to depart.

A seventy-strong fleet will escort the Earl of Inchiquin, the newly appointed governor, to his residence at Port Royal, while the Hannah, a slaver belonging to the Royal African Company, will sail south to pick up human cargo in West Africa before setting out across the Atlantic on the infamous Middle Passage. Utilising little-known first-hand accounts and other primary sources, Apocalypse 1692 intertwines several related themes: the slave rebellion that led to the establishment of the first permanent free black communities in the New World; the raids launched between English Jamaica and Spanish Santo Domingo; and the bloody repulse of a full-blown French invasion of the island in an attempt to drive the English from the Caribbean.

The book also features the most comprehensive account yet written of the massive earthquake and tsunami which struck Jamaica in 1692, resulting in the deaths of thousands, and sank a third of the city beneath the sea. From the misery of everyday life in the sugar plantations, to the ostentation and double-dealings of the plantocracy; from the adventures of former-pirates-turned-treasure-hunters to the debauchery of Port Royal, Apocalypse 1692 exposes the lives of the individuals who made late seventeenth-century Jamaica the most financially successful, brutal, and scandalously corrupt of all of England's nascent American colonies.
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Underground

Underground

Will Hunt

$32.99
'A mesmerizingly fascinating tale, one astonishing adventure after another. I could not stop reading this beautifully written book.' Michael Finkel, author of The Stranger in the Woods

'A unique history of a culturally and scientifically important netherworld most people barely know exists.' Booklist 'An unusual and intriguing travel book ... A vivid illumination of the dark and an effective evocation of its profound mystery.'Kirkus (starred review)

When Will Hunt was sixteen years old, he discovered an abandoned tunnel that ran beneath his house in Providence, Rhode Island. His first tunnel trips inspired a lifelong fascination with exploring underground worlds, from the derelict subway stations and sewers of New York City to sacred caves, catacombs, tombs, bunkers and ancient underground cities in more than twenty countries around the world. Underground is both a personal exploration of Hunt's obsession and a panoramic study of how we are all connected to the underground, how caves and other dark hollows have frightened and enchanted us through the ages.

In a narrative spanning continents and epochs, Hunt follows a cast of subterraneaphiles who have dedicated themselves to investigating underground worlds. He tracks the origins of life with a team of NASA microbiologists a mile beneath the Black Hills, camps out for three days with urban explorers in the catacombs and sewers of Paris, descends with an Aboriginal family into a 35,000-year-old mine in the Australian outback, and glimpses a sacred sculpture moulded by Paleolithic artists in the depths of a cave in the Pyrenees.

Each adventure is woven with findings in mythology and anthropology, natural history and neuroscience, literature and philosophy - this is a graceful meditation on the allure of darkness, the power of mystery, and our eternal desire to connect with what we cannot see.
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Liberators Over the Atlantic

Liberators Over the Atlantic

Jack Colman ,  Richard Colman

$49.99
An informative and personal account of a young man's flying experiences during WW2. Growing up in York, shaped by the threat of war-Jack Colman achieves his long held desire to become a pilot, joining the RAF in October 1940 just after his 21st birthday. He is sent to Canada to learn to fly and becomes intrigued by the technical and practical aspects of flying and navigation. Becoming a Pilot/Navigator, he joins Costal Command on Liberators based in Iceland. The practical difficulties of flying over the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans protecting the convoys and hunting U-boats are relived as he battles with atrocious weather and navigational uncertainties. His brushes with death whether due to mechanical failure, hitting the sea, U-boat gun fire or running out of fuel, in an ever changing hostile environment are described realistically and calmly (often with humour), situations helped by a confidence in the good advice given by others, his knowledge, skills and a trust in his crew. When training he hears about the death of his father, on leave he finds time to fall in love and marry.
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The Great Escape from Stalag Luft III: The Memoirs of Bram Vanderstok

The Great Escape from Stalag Luft III: The Memoirs of Bram Vanderstok

Bram Van Der Stok

$29.99
I am one of those lucky ones who survived the war, and I can remember my emotional experiences, and those of my friends, as if they had happened yesterday. For many of us the horror, the injustice, and the cruelty can never be forgotten or forgiven; but I have tried to write without too much bitterness - Bob van der Stok On the night of 24th March 1944, Bob van der Stok was number 18 of 76 men who crawled beyond the barbed wire fence of Stalag Luft III in Zagan, Poland. The 1963 film, The Great Escape, was largely based on this autobiography but - with van der Stoks agreement -filmmakers chose to turn his story into an Australian character name Sedgewick, played by James Coburn.

His memoir sets down his wartime adventures before being incarcerated in Stalag Luft III and then - with extraordinary detail - describes various escape attempts which culminated with the famous March breakout. After escaping Bram van der Stok roamed Europe for weeks, passing through Leipzig, Utrecht, Brussels, Paris, Dijon and Madrid, before making it back to England. He reported to the Air Ministry and two months after escaping, on 30 May 1944 he returned to the British no.91 Squadron. In the following months he flew almost every day to France escorting bombers and knocking down V1 rockets.

In August 1944 he finally returned to his home. He learned that his two brothers were killed in concentration camps after being arrested for resistance work. His father had been tortured and blinded by the Gestapo during interrogation. He had never betrayed his son.
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The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines

The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines

Kara Dixon Vuic

$64.99
The story of the intrepid young women who volunteered to help and entertain American servicemen fighting overseas, from World War I through the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The emotional toll of war can be as debilitating to soldiers as hunger, disease, and injury. Beginning in World War I, in an effort to boost soldiers' morale and remind them of the stakes of victory, the American military formalized a recreation program that sent respectable young women and famous entertainers overseas.

Kara Dixon Vuic builds her narrative around the young women from across the United States, many of whom had never traveled far from home, who volunteered to serve in one of the nation's most brutal work environments. From the Lassies in France and mini-skirted coeds in Vietnam to Marlene Dietrich and Marilyn Monroe, Vuic provides a fascinating glimpse into wartime gender roles and the tensions that continue to complicate American women's involvement in the military arena. The recreation-program volunteers heightened the passions of troops but also domesticated everyday life on the bases. Their presence mobilized support for the war back home, while exporting American culture abroad. Carefully recruited and selected as symbols of conventional femininity, these adventurous young women saw in the theater of war a bridge between public service and private ambition.

This story of the women who talked and listened, danced and sang, adds an intimate chapter to the history of war and its ties to life in peacetime.
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Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors and the Drug Company that Addicted America

Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors and the Drug Company that Addicted America

Beth Macy

$22.99
Beth Macy reveals the disturbing truth behind America's opioid crisis and explains how a nation has become enslaved to prescription drugs. This powerful and moving story explains how a large corporation, Purdue, encouraged small town doctors to prescribe OxyContin to a country already awash in painkillers. The drug's dangerously addictive nature was hidden, whilst many used it as an escape, to numb the pain of of joblessness and the need to pay the bills. Macy tries to answer a grieving mother's question - why her only son died - and comes away with a harrowing tale of greed and need.
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Operation Chaos: The Vietnam Deserters Who Fought the CIA, the Brainwashers, and Themselves

Operation Chaos: The Vietnam Deserters Who Fought the CIA, the Brainwashers, and Themselves

Matthew Sweet

$19.99
From a political cult to the heart of the Washington establishment - the bizarre and untold story of how the CIA tried to infiltrate a radical group of U.S. military deserters during the Cold War

Stockholm, 1968. A thousand American deserters and draft-resisters are arriving to escape the war in Vietnam. They’re young, they’re radical, and they want to start a revolution. The Swedes treat them like pop stars?but the CIA is determined to stop all that.

It’s a job for the deep-cover men of Operation Chaos and their allies?agents who know how to infiltrate organizations and destroy them from inside. Within months, the GIs have turned their fire on one another, and the group dissolves into interrogations and recriminations.

When Matthew Sweet began investigating this story, he thought the madness was over. He was wrong. Instead, he became the confidant of an eccentric and traumatized group of survivors?each with his own intricate theory about the traitors in their midst.

All Sweet has to do is discover the truth...and stay sane.

Reminiscent of Jon Ronson's The Men who Stare at Goats and as compellingly as Ben McIntyre's Agent Zigzag, in Operation Chaos Michael Sweet's fascinating journey of discovery sheds new light on one of the great untold tales of the Cold War, where the facts are wilder than any work of fiction.
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Tired of Winning: A Chronicle of American Decline

Tired of Winning: A Chronicle of American Decline

Richard Cooke

$27.99
Polarised, enraged and spiritually bereft, America under Donald Trump seems to be on the brink of failure.

In this dazzling debut, award-winning Australian writer Richard Cooke takes a close-up look at the state of the United States. From the theology of opioids to the aftermath of a mass shooting, from #MeToo to the paintings of George W. Bush, Cooke's reporting takes him from an East Coast ravaged by climate change to the dangerous world of the US-Mexico border.

This is not another diner-hopping week in Trump country- it's a radical effort to capture dissonant and varied Americas, across more than twenty states. In brilliantly rendered accounts of poets, politicians and poisoned cities, Cooke finds a nation splintering under the weight of alienation - but showing resilience and hope in the most unexpected ways.

Entertaining and terrifying in equal measure, Tired of Winning reveals the schisms and the clamour of contemporary America.
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Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974

Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974

Kevin M. Kruse ,  Julian E. Zelizer

$45.95
If you were asked when America became polarized, your answer would likely depend on your age: you might say during Barack Obama's presidency, or with the post-9/11 war on terror, or the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s, or the Reagan Revolution and the the rise of the New Right. For leading historians Kevin M. Kruse and Julian E. Zelizer, it all starts in 1974. In that one year, the nation was rocked by one major event after another: The Watergate crisis and the departure of President Richard Nixon, the first and only U.S. President to resign; the winding down of the Vietnam War and rising doubts about America's military might; the fallout from the OPEC oil embargo that paralyzed America with the greatest energy crisis in its history; and the desegregation busing riots in South Boston that showed a horrified nation that our efforts to end institutional racism were failing. In the years that followed, the story of our own lifetimes would be written. Longstanding historical fault lines over income inequality, racial division, and a revolution in gender roles and sexual norms would deepen and fuel a polarized political landscape. In Fault Lines, Kruse and Zelizer reveal how the divisions of the present day began almost five decades ago, and how they were widened thanks to profound changes in our political system as well as a fracturing media landscape that was repeatedly transformed with the rise of cable TV, the internet, and social media. How did the United States become so divided? Fault Lines offers a richly told, wide-angle history view toward an answer.
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The Alphabet Bomber: A Lone Wolf Terrorist Ahead of His Time

The Alphabet Bomber: A Lone Wolf Terrorist Ahead of His Time

Jeffrey D. Simon

$54.95
On August 6, 1974, a bomb exploded at Los Angeles International Airport, killing three people and injuring thirty-five others. It was the first time an airport had been bombed anywhere in the world. A few days later, police recovered a cassette tape containing a chilling message: This first bomb was marked with the letter A, which stands for Airport, said a voice. The second bomb will be associated with the letter L, the third with the letter I, etc., until our name has been written on the face of this nation in blood.

In The Alphabet Bomber: A Lone Wolf Terrorist Ahead of His Time, internationally renowned terrorism expert Jeffrey D. Simon tells the gripping tale of Muharem Kurbegovic, a bright but emotionally disturbed Yugoslav immigrant who single-handedly brought Los Angeles to a standstill during the summer of 1974. He had conjured up the fictitious group Aliens of America, but it was soon discovered that he acted alone in a one-man war against government and society.

The story of the Alphabet Bomber is about an extraordinary manhunt to find an elusive killer, a dogged prosecutor determined to bring him to justice, a pioneering female judge, and a devious mastermind whose heinous crimes foreshadowed the ominous threats we face today from lone wolf terrorists.
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Landing on the Edge of Eternity: Twenty-Four Hours at Omaha Beach

Landing on the Edge of Eternity: Twenty-Four Hours at Omaha Beach

Robert Kershaw

$43.95
Before World War II, Normandy's Plage d'Or coast was best known for its sleepy villages and holiday destinations. Early in 1944, German commander Field Marshal Erwin Rommel took one look at the gentle, sloping sands and announced They will come here! He was referring to Omaha Beach --the prime American D-Day landing site. The beach was subsequently transformed into three miles of lethal, bunker-protected arcs of fire, with seaside chalets converted into concrete strongpoints, fringed by layers of barbed wire and mines. The Germans called it the Devil's Garden.

When Company A of the US 116th Regiment landed on Omaha Beach in D-Day's first wave on 6th June 1944, it lost 96% of its effective strength. Sixteen teams of US engineers arriving in the second wave were unable to blow the beach obstacles, as first wave survivors were still sheltering behind them. This was the beginning of the historic day that Landing on the Edge of Eternity narrates hour by hour--rom midnight to midnight--tracking German and American soldiers fighting across the beachhead.

Mustered on their troop transport decks at 2am, the American infantry departed in landing craft at 5am. Skimming across high waves, deafened by immense broadsides from supporting battleships and weak from seasickness, they caught sight of land at 6.15. Eleven minutes later, the assault was floundering under intense German fire. Two and a half hours in, General Bradley, commanding the landings aboard USS Augusta, had to decide if to proceed or evacuate. On June 6th there were well over 2,400 casualties on Omaha Beach - easily D-Day's highest death toll.

The Wehrmacht thought they had bludgeoned the Americans into bloody submission, yet by mid-afternoon, the American troops were ashore. Why were the casualties so grim, and how could the Germans have failed? Juxtaposing the American experience--pinned down, swamped by a rising tide, facing young Wehrmacht soldiers fighting desperately for their lives, Kershaw draws on eyewitness accounts, memories, letters, and post-combat reports to expose the true horrors of Omaha Beach.

These are stories of humanity, resilience, and dark humor; of comradeship and a gritty patriotism holding beleaguered men together. Landing on the Edge of Eternity is a dramatic historical ride through an amphibious landing that looked as though it might never succeed.
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Operation Linebacker I 1972: The first high-tech air war

Operation Linebacker I 1972: The first high-tech air war

Marshall Michel III ,  Adam Tooby ,  Adam Tooby

$32.99
Following the failure of Rolling Thunder US aircraft were now armed with new technologies such as new laser-guided bombs and electronic warfare capabilities. The Air Force now had the fearsome AC-130 gunship and a new generation of Wild Weasel anti-radar aircraft, and the US Navy aviators now had much better dog-fighting training thanks to the new TOPGUN fighter school.

As the Paris peace talks floundered in early 1972 and the US began to disengage from Vietnam, it was clear that the North Vietnamese were conducting a major build up for an attack into South Vietnam. Screened by bad weather and heavy air defenses in the north, the attack advanced quickly but the US pushed back with an air campaign named Operation Linebacker. Their objective: defeat the invasion, preserve the government of South Vietnam and bring the North Vietnamese back to the Paris peace talks.

Fully illustrated with stunning full colour artwork, this is the fascinating story of arguably the world's first 'modern' air campaign.
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The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South

The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South

Radley Balko ,  Tucker Carrington ,  John Grisham

$36.95
After two three-year-old girls were raped and murdered in rural Mississippi, law enforcement pursued and convicted two innocent men: Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks. Together they spent a combined thirty years in prison before finally being exonerated in 2008. Meanwhile, the real killer remained free.

The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist recounts the story of how the criminal justice system allowed this to happen and of how two men, Dr. Steven Hayne and Dr. Michael West, built successful careers on the back of that structure. For nearly two decades, Hayne, a medical examiner, performed the vast majority of Mississippi's autopsies, while his friend Dr. West, a local dentist, pitched himself as a forensic jack-of-all-trades. Together they became the go-to experts for prosecutors and helped put countless Mississippians in prison. But then some of those convictions began to fall apart.

Here, Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington tell the haunting story of how the courts and Mississippi's death investigation system--a relic of the Jim Crow era--failed to deliver justice for its citizens. The authors argue that bad forensics, structural racism, and institutional failures are at fault, raising sobering questions about our ability and willingness to address these crucial issues.
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A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy

A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy

Nancy L. Rosenblum ,  Russell Muirhead

$44.99
How the new conspiracists are undermining democracy--and what can be done about it Conspiracy theories are as old as politics. But conspiracists today have introduced something new--conspiracy without theory. And the new conspiracism has moved from the fringes to the heart of government with the election of Donald Trump. In A Lot of People Are Saying, Russell Muirhead and Nancy Rosenblum show how the new conspiracism differs from classic conspiracy theory, why so few officials speak truth to conspiracy, and what needs to be done to resist it.

Classic conspiracy theory insists that things are not what they seem and gathers evidence--especially facts ominously withheld by official sources--to tease out secret machinations. The new conspiracism is different. There is no demand for evidence, no dots revealed to form a pattern, no close examination of shadowy plotters. Dispensing with the burden of explanation, the new conspiracism imposes its own reality through repetition (exemplified by the Trump catchphrase a lot of people are saying ) and bare assertion ( rigged! ).

The new conspiracism targets democratic foundations--political parties and knowledge-producing institutions. It makes it more difficult to argue, persuade, negotiate, compromise, and even to disagree. Ultimately, it delegitimates democracy.

Filled with vivid examples, A Lot of People Are Saying diagnoses a defining and disorienting feature of today's politics and offers a guide to responding to the threat.
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The Politics of Losing: Trump, the Klan, and the Mainstreaming of Resentment

The Politics of Losing: Trump, the Klan, and the Mainstreaming of Resentment

Rory McVeigh ,  Kevin Estep

$63.00
The Ku Klux Klan has peaked three times in American history: after the Civil War, around the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, and in the 1920s, when the Klan spread farthest and fastest. Recruiting millions of members even in non-Southern states, the Klan’s nationalist insurgency burst into mainstream politics. Almost one hundred years later, the pent-up anger of white Americans left behind by a changing economy has once again directed itself at immigrants and cultural outsiders and roiled a presidential election.

In The Politics of Losing, Rory McVeigh and Kevin Estep trace the parallels between the 1920s Klan and today’s right-wing backlash, identifying the conditions that allow white nationalism to emerge from the shadows. White middle-class Protestant Americans in the 1920s found themselves stranded by an economy that was increasingly industrialized and fueled by immigrant labor. Mirroring the Klan’s earlier tactics, Donald Trump delivered a message that mingled economic populism with deep cultural resentments. McVeigh and Estep present a sociological analysis of the Klan’s outbreaks that goes beyond Trump the individual to show how his rise to power was made possible by a convergence of circumstances. White Americans’ experience of declining privilege and perceptions of lost power can trigger a political backlash that overtly asserts white-nationalist goals.

The Politics of Losing offers a rigorous and lucid explanation for a recurrent phenomenon in American history, with important lessons about the origins of our alarming political climate.
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The Woman's Hour

The Woman's Hour

Elaine Weiss

$24.99
Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have ratified the Nineteenth Amendment, twelve have rejected or refused to vote, and one last state is needed. It all comes down to Tennessee, the moment of truth for the suffragists, after a seven-decade crusade. The opposing forces include politicians with careers at stake, liquor companies, railroad magnates, and a lot of racists who don't want black women voting. And then there are the Antis --women who oppose their own enfranchisement, fearing suffrage will bring about the moral collapse of the nation. They all converge in a boiling hot summer for a vicious face-off replete with dirty tricks, betrayals and bribes, bigotry, Jack Daniel's, and the Bible.

Following a handful of remarkable women who led their respective forces into battle, along with appearances by Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding, Frederick Douglass, and Eleanor Roosevelt, THE WOMAN'S HOUR is an inspiring story of activists winning their own freedom in one of the last campaigns forged in the shadow of the American Civil War, and the beginning of the great twentieth-century battles for civil rights.
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Ku-Klux: The Birth of the Klan during Reconstruction

Ku-Klux: The Birth of the Klan during Reconstruction

Elaine Frantz Parsons

$64.00
The first comprehensive examination of the nineteenth-century Ku Klux Klan since the 1970s, Ku-Klux pinpoints the group's rise with startling acuity. Historians have traced the origins of the Klan to Pulaski, Tennessee, in 1866, but the details behind the group's emergence have long remained shadowy. By parsing the earliest descriptions of the Klan, Elaine Frantz Parsons reveals that it was only as reports of the Tennessee Klan's mysterious and menacing activities began circulating in northern newspapers that whites enthusiastically formed their own Klan groups throughout the South. The spread of the Klan was thus intimately connected with the politics and mass media of the North.

Shedding new light on the ideas that motivated the Klan, Parsons explores Klansmen's appropriation of images and language from northern urban forms such as minstrelsy, burlesque, and business culture. While the Klan sought to retain the prewar racial order, the figure of the Ku-Klux became a joint creation of northern popular cultural entrepreneurs and southern whites seeking, perversely and violently, to modernize the South. Innovative and packed with fresh insight, Parsons' book offers the definitive account of the rise of the Ku Klux Klan during Reconstruction.
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The American Civil War: The story you must understand to make sense of modern America

The American Civil War: The story you must understand to make sense of modern America

Adam Smith

$19.99
The war in North America between 1861 and 1865 cost around three quarters of a million lives. Few societies in world history have lost a higher percentage of their military-aged men in battle than did the white South. Unsurprisingly, its scars lie deep on the American soul – especially so in the former Confederacy.

Yet the war’s historical significance is based on more than just the scale of the violence. It is the great American story. “I am large, I contain multitudes,” wrote Walt Whitman, the great poet of American democracy, but the war through which he lived, nursing devastatingly injured soldiers, contains even more “multitudes” than him. It is a story that can be told in a million different voices; it contains heroism and cowardice, craven injustice and heart-warming redemption; above all, it is the great American story because it seems to matter so much. It was “the crossroads of our being”, in the words of one popular historian.

One of the world’s leading experts on the period, Dr Adam Smith, tells the story of a war which is vital to any understanding of the great struggles and big historical forces that have shaped the modern world. And he looks at the great issues of the war: the morality of slavery, the leadership of Abraham Lincoln, the importance of freedom. If the Civil War is the crossroads of America’s being, it is also, in a different sense, one of the major crossroads over which the world has travelled in its journey to the present.
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Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia

Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia

Christina Thompson

$54.95
A blend of Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel and Simon Winchester's Pacific, a thrilling intellectual detective story that looks deep into the past to uncover who first settled the islands of the remote Pacific, where they came from, how they got there, and how we know.

For more than a millennium, Polynesians have occupied the remotest islands in the Pacific Ocean, a vast triangle stretching from Hawaii to New Zealand to Easter Island. Until the arrival of European explorers they were the only people to have ever lived there. Both the most closely related and the most widely dispersed people in the world before the era of mass migration, Polynesians can trace their roots to a group of epic voyagers who ventured out into the unknown in one of the greatest adventures in human history.

How did the earliest Polynesians find and colonize these far-flung islands How did a people without writing or metal tools conquer the largest ocean in the world This conundrum, which came to be known as the Problem of Polynesian Origins, emerged in the eighteenth century as one of the great geographical mysteries of mankind.

For Christina Thompson, this mystery is personal: her Maori husband and their sons descend directly from these ancient navigators. In Sea People, Thompson explores the fascinating story of these ancestors, as well as those of the many sailors, linguists, archaeologists, folklorists, biologists, and geographers who have puzzled over this history for three hundred years. A masterful mix of history, geography, anthropology, and the science of navigation, Sea People combines the thrill of exploration with the drama of discovery in a vivid tour of one of the most captivating regions in the world.

Sea People includes an 8-page photo insert, illustrations throughout, and 2 endpaper maps.
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Keepers of History: New Zealand Centenarians Tell Their Stories

Keepers of History: New Zealand Centenarians Tell Their Stories

Renee Hollis

$39.99
In 2017, Renee Hollis interviewed 120 people over the age of 100, living in every region of New Zealand. Along the way, she had the privilege of interviewing 23 World War II veterans. Her goal in compiling the book was to preserve New Zealand history by sharing the stories and memories of our eldest citizens. She wants all people to value the elderly and to read and appreciate their stories and contribution to our society. Most importantly, she wants to ensure that that they are not forgotten and do not become invisible in our communities, but instead are honoured and celebrated. In this collection of interviews, we meet opera singers and farmers, a politician and a racing car driver, a nun and a freedom fighter with Gandhi, and even a member of Hip Operation - the oldest hip-hop group in the world! They have witnessed momentous global events and technological innovations that have changed our world. From the everyday to the extraordinary, these are the stories of people who have lived through history and whose message of resilience and making the best of things has so much to offer the generations that have followed them.
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Kulikovo 1380: The battle that made Russia

Kulikovo 1380: The battle that made Russia

Mark Galeotti ,  Darren Tan ,  Paul Kime

$32.99
The 14th-century Mongol conquest of the Rus' - the principalities of Russia - was devastating and decisive. Cities were lain waste, new dynasties rose and for a hundred years the Russians were under unquestioned foreign rule. However, the Mongols were conquerors rather than administrators and they chose to rule through subject princes. This allowed the Rurikid dynastic princes of Moscow to rise with unprecedented speed.

With the famed `Mongol Yoke' loosening, Grand Prince Dmitri of Moscow saw in this an unparalleled opportunity to rebel. On 7 September 1380 his 60,000 troops crossed the Don to take the battle to Mamai's 125,000, which included Armenian and Cherkessk auxiliaries and Genoese mercenaries. Using specially commissioned artwork, this is the engrossing story of the victory that heralded the birth of Russian statehood.
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Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future

Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future

Kate Brown

$45.00
Governments and journalists tell us that though Chernobyl was the worst nuclear disaster in history, a reassuringly small number of people died (44), and nature recovered. Yet, drawing on a decade of fine-grained archival research and interviews in Ukraine, Russia, and Belarus, Kate Brown uncovers a much more disturbing story, one in which radioactive isotypes caused hundreds of thousands of casualties.

Scores of Soviet scientists, bureaucrats, and civilians documented stunning increases in cases of birth defects, child mortality, cancers, and a multitude of prosaic diseases, which they linked to Chernobyl. Worried that this evidence would blow the lid on the effects of massive radiation release from weapons testing during the Cold War, international scientists and diplomats tried to bury or discredit it. A haunting revelation of how political exigencies shape responses to disaster, Manual for Survival makes clear the irreversible impact on every living thing not just from Chernobyl, but from eight decades of radiation from nuclear energy and weaponry.
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The Putin System: An Opposing View

The Putin System: An Opposing View

Grigory Yavlinsky

$53.99
A quarter century after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia once again looms large over world affairs, from Ukraine to Syria to the 2016 U.S. election. Yet how power works in present-day Russia - how Vladimir Putin came to power and maintains his rule - remains opaque and often misunderstood. In The Putin System, Russian economist and opposition leader Grigory Yavlinsky explains his country’s politics from a unique perspective, voicing a Russian liberal critique of the post-Soviet system that is vital for the West to hear.

Combining the firsthand experience of a practicing politician with academic expertise, Yavlinsky gives unparalleled insights into the sources of Putin’s power and what might be next. He argues that Russia’s dysfunction is neither the outcome of one man’s iron-fisted rule nor a deviation from the supposedly natural development of Western-style political institutions. Instead, Russia’s peripheral position in the global economy has fundamentally shaped the regime’s domestic and foreign policy, nourishing authoritarianism while undermining its opponents. The quasi-market reforms of the 1990s, the bureaucracy’s self-perpetuating grip on power, and the Russian elite’s frustration with its secondary status have all combined to enable personalized authoritarian rule and corruption.

Ultimately, Putin is as much a product of the system as its creator. In a time of sensationalism and fear, The Putin System is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how power is wielded in Russia.
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Up Against the Wall: The KGB and Latvia

Up Against the Wall: The KGB and Latvia

Vincent Hunt

$62.99
A hard-hitting history of the Soviet security police and Latvia over a century of oppression - with Latvians as both oppressors and oppressed.

Up Against the Wall details the methods of a brutal totalitarian regime and the bloody twists and turns of Latvia's long and complicated relationship with the Soviet security police. This is not for the squeamish.

At the KGB headquarters in Riga - the Corner House, or Stura Maja - suspects were processed, questioned and even executed during the periods of Soviet rule in 1940-41 and then 1944-1991. The author presents harrowing personal testimonies of those imprisoned, tortured and deported to Siberian gulags by the KGB, drawing from museum archives and interviews translated into English for this book as well as from de-classified CIA files, KGB records and his own research in Latvia. He interviews human rights activists, partisans, KGB experts and those who led Latvia to independence in the 1990s and explores the role of Latvian KGB double agents in defeating anti-Soviet partisan groups and the West's Cold War spying missions.

Ironically it was the feared Latvian Riflemen who helped crush the Bolsheviks' political rivals after the 1917 Revolution and defeat the British-backed White generals in the vicious Civil War of 1918-22, while Latvia itself became independent. Their reward was top jobs in the Soviet regime, including in the Cheka security police, the forerunner to the NKVD and KGB. But Stalin turned on the Latvians in the 1930s and mercilessly purged the old guard. When the Baltics were carved up by Hitler and Stalin, the Red Army killed or deported anyone opposing Soviet power in a period known as the `Year of Terror'. Fifty years of occupation followed WWII as through the Cold War and into the late 1980s Latvian society was in the grip of the KGB. Even more than 25 years after the regime collapsed, its secrets have still not been revealed.
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A Brief History of Spain

A Brief History of Spain

Jeremy Black

$22.99
Despite being relatively brief, this very readable history covers environmental, political, social, economic, cultural and artistic elements, and is very open to regional variations and to the extent that the history of the peninsula and of its political groupings was far from inevitable. Its tone is accessible, supported by boxes providing supplemental information, and is perfect for travellers to Spain.
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Empires of the Weak: The Real Story of European Expansion and the Creation of the New World Order

Empires of the Weak: The Real Story of European Expansion and the Creation of the New World Order

Jason Sharman

$52.99
How the rise of the West was a temporary exception to the predominant world order What accounts for the rise of the state, the creation of the first global system, and the dominance of the West? The conventional answer asserts that superior technology, tactics, and institutions forged by Darwinian military competition gave Europeans a decisive advantage in war over other civilizations from 1500 onward. In contrast, Empires of the Weak argues that Europeans actually had no general military superiority in the early modern era. J. C. Sharman shows instead that European expansion from the late fifteenth to the late eighteenth centuries is better explained by deference to strong Asian and African polities, disease in the Americas, and maritime supremacy earned by default because local land-oriented polities were largely indifferent to war and trade at sea.

Europeans were overawed by the mighty Eastern empires of the day, which pioneered key military innovations and were the greatest early modern conquerors. Against the view that the Europeans won for all time, Sharman contends that the imperialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was a relatively transient and anomalous development in world politics that concluded with Western losses in various insurgencies. If the twenty-first century is to be dominated by non-Western powers like China, this represents a return to the norm for the modern era.

Bringing a revisionist perspective to the idea that Europe ruled the world due to military dominance, Empires of the Weak demonstrates that the rise of the West was an exception in the prevailing world order.
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Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War

Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War

Paul Scharre

$35.95
The era of autonomous weapons has arrived. Today around the globe, at least thirty nations have weapons that can search for and destroy enemy targets all on their own. Paul Scharre, a leading expert in next-generation warfare, describes these and other high tech weapons systems--from Israel's Harpy drone to the American submarine-hunting robot ship Sea Hunter--and examines the legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. A smart primer to what's to come in warfare (Bruce Schneier), Army of None engages military history, global policy, and cutting-edge science to explore the implications of giving weapons the freedom to make life and death decisions. A former soldier himself, Scharre argues that we must embrace technology where it can make war more precise and humane, but when the choice is life or death, there is no replacement for the human heart.
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War Bows: Longbow, crossbow, composite bow and Japanese yumi

War Bows: Longbow, crossbow, composite bow and Japanese yumi

Mike Loades

$49.99
War bows dominated battlefields across the world for centuries. In their various forms, they allowed trained archers to take down even well-armoured targets from great distances, and played a key role in some of the most famous battles in human history. The composite bow was a versatile and devastatingly effective weapon, on foot, from chariots and on horseback for over a thousand years, used by cultures as diverse as the Hittites, the Romans, the Mongols and the Ottoman Turks. The Middle Ages saw a clash between the iconic longbow and the more technologically sophisticated crossbow, most famously during the Hundred Years War, while in Japan, the samurai used the yumi to deadly effect, unleashing bursts of arrows from their galloping steeds.

Historical weapons expert Mike Loades reveals the full history of these four iconic weapons that changed the nature of warfare. Complete with modern ballistics testing, action recreations of what it is like to fire each bow and a critical analysis of the technology and tactics associated with each bow, this book is a must-have for anyone interested in ancient arms.
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Ships of the Silk Road: The Bactrian Camel in Chinese Jade

Ships of the Silk Road: The Bactrian Camel in Chinese Jade

Angus Forsyth

$79.99
For hundreds of years the Bactrian camel ploughed a lonely furrow across the vast wilderness of Asia. This bizarre-looking, temperamental yet hardy creature here came into its own as the core goods vehicle, resolutely and reliably transporting to China - over huge and unforgiving distances - fine things from the West while taking treasures out of the Middle Kingdom in return. Where the chariot, wagon and other wheeled conveyances proved useless amidst the shifting desert dunes, the surefooted progress of the camel - archetypal `ship of the Silk Road' - now reigned supreme. The Bactrian camel was a subject that appealed particularly to Chinese artists because of its association with the exotic trade to mysterious Western lands. In his lavishly illustrated volume, Angus Forsyth explores diverse jade pieces depicting this iconic beast of burden. Almost one hundred separate objects are included, many of which have not been seen in print before. At the same time the author offers the full historical background to his subject. The book will have a strong appeal to collectors and art historians alike.
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