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The Story of Greece and Rome

The Story of Greece and Rome

Tony Spawforth

$49.99
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The extraordinary story of the intermingled civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, spanning more than six millennia from the late Bronze Age to the seventh century

The magnificent civilization created by the ancient Greeks and Romans is the greatest legacy of the classical world. However, narratives about the “civilized” Greek and Roman empires resisting the barbarians at the gate are far from accurate. Tony Spawforth, an esteemed scholar, author, and media contributor, follows the thread of civilization through more than six millennia of history. His story reveals that Greek and Roman civilization, to varying degrees, was supremely and surprisingly receptive to external influences, particularly from the East.
 
From the rise of the Mycenaean world of the sixteenth century B.C., Spawforth traces a path through the ancient Aegean to the zenith of the Hellenic state and the rise of the Roman empire, the coming of Christianity and the consequences of the first caliphate. Deeply informed, provocative, and entirely fresh, this is the first and only accessible work that tells the extraordinary story of the classical world in its entirety.
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Plato's Alarm Clock: And Other Amazing Ancient Inventions

Plato's Alarm Clock: And Other Amazing Ancient Inventions

James M. Russell

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We all like to think we are pretty smart. New medical advances seem to come along every day; space travel suddenly doesn't seem so difficult; self-driving cars are no longer a thing of the future ... but if we were stranded on a desert island tomorrow, most of us wouldn't know how to catch a fish or start a fire, let alone rebuild all that extraordinary technology we now rely on.

The truth is that we're not necessarily more clever than our ancestors, we just have an accumulation of centuries of technological progress on which we can rely. As this book shows, many of the ancients were much more advanced than we realise - indeed there are recent inventions that had actually been discovered centuries earlier and then forgotten. And what about all those modern day devices and machines that rely on ancient inventions such as paper, levers and gears?

From brain surgery in the Stone Age to Chinese whisky from the 7th century BC, to Damascus steel - once the hardest metal in the world, which we no longer know how to make - this insightful book collects together the stories of hundreds of ancient devices, inventions and breakthroughs from around the world and across the centuries, giving us a fascinating glimpse into past eras that were far more technologically advanced than we sometimes realise.
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Rome: Eternal City

Rome: Eternal City

Ferdinand Addis

$59.99
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A portrait of the city at the heart of Western civilization, brought to life in twenty-two scenes from its 2,500-year history. A thrilling portrait of the city at the heart of Western civilization, brought to life in twenty-two scenes from its 2,500-year history.

Why does Rome continue to exert a hold on the world's imagination? Ferdinand Addis brings the myth of Rome alive by concentrating on vivid episodes from its long and unimaginably rich history. Each of his beautifully composed chapters is an evocative, self-contained narrative, whether it is the murder of Caesar; the near-destruction of the city by the Gauls in 387 BC; the construction of the Colosseum and the fate of the gladiators; Bernini's creation of the Baroque masterpiece that is St Peter's Basilica; the brutal crushing of republican dreams in 1849; the sinister degeneration of Mussolini's first state, or the magical, corrupt Rome of Fellini's La Dolce Vita .

This is an epic, kaleidoscopic history of a city indelibly associated with republicanism and dictatorship, Christian orthodoxy and its rivals, high art and low life in all its forms.
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Rome: A History in Seven Sackings

Rome: A History in Seven Sackings

Matthew Kneale

$24.99
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Nominated for the 2017 Pen Hessell-Tiltman Daily Telegraph's Best History Books of 2017 Sunday Times' Best History Books of 2017 A sweeping history of the city of Rome, seen through the eyes of its most significant sackings, from the Gauls to the Nazis and everything in between.

No city on earth has preserved its past as Rome has. Visitors can cross bridges that were crossed by Julius Caesar and explore temples visited by Roman emperors. These architectural survivals are all the more remarkable considering the city has been repeatedly ravaged by roving armies.

From the Gauls to the Nazis, Matthew Kneale tells the stories behind the seven most important of these attacks and reveals, with fascinating insight, how they transformed the city - and not always for the worse.

A meticulously researched, magical blend of travelogue, social and cultural history, Rome: A History in Seven Sackings is a celebration of the fierce courage, panache and vitality of the Roman people. Most of all, it is a passionate love letter to this incomparable city.
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Steam Australia: Locomotives that Galvanised the Nation

Steam Australia: Locomotives that Galvanised the Nation

Tim Fischer

$39.99
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If you are passionate about steam locomotives, or know someone who is, then Steam Australia is the perfect companion.

Tim Fischer takes readers into the fascinating and grand story of steam transportation over ten vital decades of transformation in Australia’s history. This book is so much more than a history or a set of lists, it is about the great tapestry of transport weaved by the steam locomotive, and Tim details how the nation was galvanised with economic growth delivered by steam. Fischer tracks key steam locomotives that traversed Australia during critical stages of our nation’s development and transported soldiers to fields of conflict as we fought in two world wars.

For a century, from 1850 to 1950, steam locomotive haulage dominated Australia’s various rail systems and, during that period, rail networks expanded from a few short routes in the big capital cities to huge networks reaching every corner of each state.  The book also covers the great named express trains hauled by steam locomotives over the decades: Puffing Billy, Robert Gordon Menzies, The Ghan. Special features include information on Albury’s ‘break of gauge’ platform (where two state track systems met), the Amiens branch line (running through Pozieres and Passchendaele stations in Queensland), the ‘garnishee’ order against the Spirit of Progress, some important characters such as C.Y. O’Connor and many, many more fascinating topics.
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For Valour: Australians Awarded the Victoria Cross

For Valour: Australians Awarded the Victoria Cross

Craig Blanch ,  Aaron Pegram

$79.99
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For Valour tells the remarkable stories of the 100 Australians who have been awarded the Victoria Cross for exceptional acts of bravery and self-sacrifice in battle. From Captain Neville Howse of the New South Wales Army Medical Corps in 1900 to Corporal Cameron Baird of the 2nd Commando Regiment in 2013, heroic actions in the Boer War appear alongside those from the First World War, North Russia, the Second World War, Vietnam and Afghanistan. Vivid descriptions of events on the battlefield are matched with biographical profiles of each of the recipients to provide insights into their lives outside wartime service.

With a foreword from Daniel Keighran VC, new archival research and striking photographs and artworks from the Australian War Memorial, For Valour commemorates the servicemen who have been awarded the military's highest honour.

'For Valour commemorates the extraordinary actions and character that the Victoria Cross honours. Vital leadership in times of mortal danger. Rescuing comrades at the risk of one's own life. Standing fast against overwhelming odds.' - Dame Quentin Bryce
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Nurses of Australia: The Illustrated Story

Nurses of Australia: The Illustrated Story

Deborah Burrows

$34.99
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From the First Nation caregivers who healed, birthed and nursed for millennia to the untrained and ill-equipped convict men and women who cared for the sick in the fledgling colony of New South Wales, nursing has been practised in Australia since the beginning.

It would take the arrival of a group of dedicated Irish nuns, followed by Florence Nightingale-trained nurses - and decades of constant and continuing campaigning - to transform nursing into what it is today: the most trusted profession in Australia.

Nurses have operated in hastily erected tents and vermin-ridden hospitals, out of the back of utes and in planes flying across remote corners of the country, under fire and under extreme pressure. In a time when medical knowledge was limited, they applied starch or mustard poultices, administered soap and water enemas and tranquilised patients with alcohol. Modern nurses process patient data, carry out research and make complex clinical decisions. But the core nursing values of kindness, compassion and courage have remained unchanged.

Nurses of Australia is beautifully illustrated with images of nurses in the wards; relaxing after a shift; interacting with patients; posing for the camera. Readers will see uniforms change, as veils and capes disappear, hemlines are shortened and then replaced by scrubs. Portraits of nursing's trailblazers and leaders show formidable women who took on archbishops, the medical fraternity, institutionalised racism and sexism - and won.
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The Nameless Names: Recovering the Missing Anzacs

The Nameless Names: Recovering the Missing Anzacs

Scott Bennett

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Bennett deftly tells the story of such missing Anzacs through the personal experience of three sets of brothers - the Reids, Pflaums, and Allens - whose names he selected from the Memorials to the Missing. Bennett traces their paths from small, peaceful towns to three devastating battlefields of the Great War - Gallipoli, Fromelles, and Ypres. He reveals the carnage that led to their disappearance, and their family's subsequent grief and endless search for elusive facts.

Bennett's unflinching account addresses many painful questions. What circumstances resulted in the disappearance of so many soldiers? Why did the Australian government fail in its solemn pledge to recover the missing? Why were so many families left without answers about the fate of their loved ones? Bennett sensitively lays bare the emotional toll inflicted upon families, describing those caught between clinging to hope and letting go, those who felt compelled to journey to distant battlefields for answers, and those who shunned conventional religion and resorted to spiritualism for solace.

This moving book delicately reveals the human faces and the devastating stories behind the names listed on the stone memorials.
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Henry VIII and the Men Who Made Him

Henry VIII and the Men Who Made Him

Tracy Borman

$32.99
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Henry VIII is well known for his tumultuous relationships with women, and he is often defined by his many marriages. But what do we see if we take a different look? When we see Henry through the men in his life, a new perspective on this famous king emerges...

Henry's relationships with the men who surrounded him reveal much about his beliefs, behaviour and character. They show him to be capable of fierce, but seldom abiding loyalty; of raising men only to destroy them later. He loved to be attended and entertained by boisterous young men who shared his passion for sport, but at other times he was more diverted by men of intellect, culture and wit. Often trusting and easily led by his male attendants and advisers during the early years of his reign, he matured into a profoundly suspicious and paranoid king whose favour could be suddenly withdrawn, as many of his later servants found to their cost. His cruelty and ruthlessness would become ever more apparent as his reign progressed, but the tenderness that he displayed towards those he trusted proves that he was never the one-dimensional monster that he is often portrayed as.

In this fascinating and often surprising new biography, Tracy Borman reveals Henry's personality in all its multi-faceted, contradictory glory.
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Hitler's British Traitors: The Secret History of Spies, Saboteurs and Fifth Columnists

Hitler's British Traitors: The Secret History of Spies, Saboteurs and Fifth Columnists

Tim Tate

$39.99
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Hitler's British Traitors is the first authoritative account of a well-kept secret: the British Fifth Column and its activities during the Second World War.

Drawing on hundreds of declassified official files - many of them previously unpublished - Tim Tate uncovers the largely unknown history of more than 70 British traitors who were convicted, mostly in secret trials, of working to help Nazi Germany win the war, and several hundred British Fascists who were interned without trial on evidence that they were working on behalf of the enemy. Four were condemned to death; two were executed.

This engrossing book reveals the extraordinary methods adopted by MI5 to uncover British traitors and their German spymasters, as well as two serious wartime plots by well-connected British fascists to mount a coup d'etat which would replace the government with an authoritarian pro-Nazi regime.

The book also shows how archaic attitudes to social status and gender in Whitehall and the courts ensured that justice was neither fair nor equitable. Aristocratic British pro-Nazi sympathizers and collaborators were frequently protected while the less-privileged foot soldiers of the Fifth Column were interned, jailed or even executed for identical crimes.
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The First Iron Lady: A Life of Caroline of Ansbach

The First Iron Lady: A Life of Caroline of Ansbach

Matthew Dennison

$22.99
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History has forgotten Caroline of Ansbach, yet in her lifetime she was compared frequently to Elizabeth I and considered by some as `the cleverest queen consort Britain ever had'.

History has forgotten Caroline of Ansbach and yet in her lifetime she was compared frequently to Elizabeth I and considered by some as `the cleverest Queen consort Britain ever had'.

The intellectual superior of her buffoonish husband George II, Caroline is credited with bringing the Enlightenment to Britain through her sponsorship of red-hot debates about science, religion, philosophy and the nature of the universe. Encouraged by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, she championed inoculation; inspired by her friend Leibniz and Samuel Clarke, she mugged up on Newtonian physics; she embraced a salon culture which promoted developments in music, literature and garden design; she was a regular theatre-goer who loved the opera, gambling and dancing. Her intimates marvelled at the breadth of her interests. She was, said Lord Egmont, 'curious in everything'.

Caroline acted as Regent four times whilst her husband returned to Hanover and during those periods she possessed power over all domestic matters. No subsequent royal woman has exercised power on such a scale. So why has history forgotten this extraordinary queen?

In this magnificent biography, the first for over seventy years, Matthew Dennison seeks to reverse this neglect. The First Iron Lady uncovers the complexities of Caroline's multifaceted life from child of a minor German princeling who, through intelligence, determination and a dash of sex appeal, rose to occupy one of the great positions of the world and did so with distinction, elan and a degree of cynical realism. It is a remarkable portrait of an 18th-century woman of great political astuteness and ambition, a radical icon of female power.
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Napoleon: The Man Behind the Myth

Napoleon: The Man Behind the Myth

Adam Zamoyski

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'Napoleon is an out and out masterpiece and a joy to read.' Sir Antony Beevor, author of Stalingrad

A landmark new biography that presents the man behind the many myths. The first writer in English to go back to the original European sources, Adam Zamoyski's portrait of Napoleon is historical biography at its finest. Napoleon inspires passionately held and often conflicting visions. Was he a god-like genius, Romantic avatar, megalomaniac monster, compulsive warmonger or just a nasty little dictator?

Whilst he displayed elements of these traits at certain times, Napoleon was none of these things. He was a man, and as Adam Zamoyski presents him in this landmark biography, a rather ordinary one at that. He exhibited some extraordinary qualities during some phases of his life but it is hard to credit genius to a general who presided over the worst (and self-inflicted) disaster in military history and who single-handedly destroyed the great enterprise he and others had toiled so hard to construct. A brilliant tactician, he was no strategist.

But nor was Napoleon an evil monster. He could be selfish and violent but there is no evidence of him wishing to inflict suffering gratuitously. His motives were mostly praiseworthy and his ambition no greater than that of contemporaries such as Alexander I of Russia, Wellington, Nelson, Metternich, Blucher, Bernadotte and many more. What made his ambition exceptional was the scope it was accorded by circumstance.

Adam Zamoyski strips away the lacquer of prejudice and places Napoleon the man within the context of his times. In the 1790s, a young Napoleon entered a world at war, a bitter struggle for supremacy and survival with leaders motivated by a quest for power and by self-interest. He did not start this war but dominated his life and continued, with one brief interruption, until his final defeat in 1815.

Based on primary sources in many European languages, and beautifully illustrated with portraits done only from life, this magnificent book examines how Napoleone Buonaparte, the boy from Corsica, became `Napoleon' how he achieved what he did, and how it came about that he undid it. It does not justify or condemn but seeks instead to understand Napoleon's extraordinary trajectory.
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The First Soldier: Hitler as Military Leader

The First Soldier: Hitler as Military Leader

Stephen Fritz

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A leading expert reexamines history to offer a stunningly original portrait of Hitler as a competent military commander and strategist.

After Germany's humiliating World War II defeat, numerous German generals published memoirs claiming that their country's brilliant military leadership had been undermined by the F hrer's erratic decision making. The author of three highly acclaimed books on the era, Stephen Fritz upends this characterization of Hitler as an ill-informed fantasist and demonstrates the ways in which his strategy was coherent and even competent.

That Hitler saw World War II as the only way to retrieve Germany's fortunes and build an expansionist Thousand-Year Reich is uncontroversial. But while his generals did sometimes object to Hitler's tactics and operational direction, they often made the same errors in judgment and were in agreement regarding larger strategic and political goals. A necessary volume for understanding the influence of World War I on Hitler's thinking, this work is also an eye-opening reappraisal of major events like the invasion of Russia and the battle for Normandy.
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Japan Story: In Search of a Nation, 1850 to the Present

Japan Story: In Search of a Nation, 1850 to the Present

Christopher Harding

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Japan Story is a fascinating, surprising account of Japan's culture, from the 'opening up' of the country in the mid 19th century to the present, through the eyes of people who always had their doubts about modernity - who greeted it not with the confidence and grasping ambition of Japan's familiar modernizers and nationalists, but with resistance, conflict, distress.

We encounter writers of dramas, ghost stories and crime novels where modernity itself is the tragedy, the ghoul and the bad guy; surrealist and avant-garde artists sketching their escape; rebel kamikaze pilots and the put-upon urban poor; hypnotists and gangsters; men in desperate search of the eternal feminine and feminists in search of something more than state-sanctioned subservience; Buddhists without morals; Marxist terror groups; couches full to bursting with the psychological fall-out of breakneck modernization.

These people all sprang from the soil of modern Japan, but their personalities and projects failed to fit. They were 'dark blossoms' - both East-West hybrids and home-grown varieties that wreathed, probed and sometimes penetrated the new masonry and mortar of mainstream Japan.
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Fallout: Conspiracy, Cover-Up and the Deceitful Case for the Atom Bomb

Fallout: Conspiracy, Cover-Up and the Deceitful Case for the Atom Bomb

Peter Watson

$32.99
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Between December 1943 and August 1944, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Winston Churchill ignited the Cold War, a superpower rivalry that would dominate the world over half a century, by building an atomic bomb and excluding their Russian allies.

Peter Watson tells the pulse-pounding story of how two atomic physicists tried to counter this in two very different ways. While Niels Bohr sought to convince President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill to share their nuclear knowledge with Joseph Stalin, nuclear scientist Klaus Fuchs, a German Communist emigre to Britain, was leaking atomic secrets to the Soviets in a rival attempt to ensure parity between the superpowers. Neither succeeded in preventing the World War II allies from unleashing the atom bomb on the world.

Fallout proves that the atomic bomb was not needed, and was made as a result of a series of flawed decisions. The Americans did not tell the UK that the atomic research was compromised by Soviet spies; the British did not tell the Americans that in 1943 they knew for sure that Germany did not have a nuclear bomb program. Neither country admitted to the scientists developing the bomb that it would never be used to counter the (non-existent) German nuclear threat. Had the scientists known, many of them would have refused to complete work on the bomb.

This story shows how politicians fatally failed to understand the nature of atomic science and, in so doing, exposed the world needlessly to great danger, a danger that is still very much with us.
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New Jerusalem: The Short Life and Terrible Death of Christendom's Most Defiant Sect

New Jerusalem: The Short Life and Terrible Death of Christendom's Most Defiant Sect

Paul Ham

$45.00
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IN FEBRUARY 1534 a radical religious sect whose disciples were being persecuted throughout Europe seized the city of Münster, in the German-speaking land of Westphalia.

They were convinced that they were God’s Elect, specially chosen by the Almighty to be the first to ascend to Paradise on Judgement Day, as told in the Book of Revelation.

And it would all happen here, in ‘New Jerusalem’ (as they renamed the city), during Easter 1535, when God and Christ would descend and usher in the End Times.

But the ‘Melchiorites’, as they were called after their founding prophet, would be well-prepared for Apocalypse, swiftly turning the city into a Christian theocracy: They threw out the Catholics and Lutherans, ‘rebaptised’ their followers, destroyed all old religious icons, adopted a communist system of shared property, and imposed a new law of polygamy that compelled all women and girls who’d reached puberty to marry.

Because women outnumbered men about three times, many men had 3-5 wives. John of Leiden, who proclaimed himself ‘king’ of New Jerusalem, had 16 wives – all according to God’s exhortation in Genesis to ‘go forth and multiply’.

The backlash against the sect would be long and brutal. The Catholic and Lutheran powers were determined to make a terrible example of what they saw as a dangerous mob of crazed heretics.

And so began the siege of Munster. For 18 months, the city was shut off from the world, periodically attacked and then slowly starved. And yet, for most of this time, the sect clung to their faith with astonishing resilience, even as they descended into hellish suffering.

‘New Jerusalem: Judgement Day 1535’ is a story of religious obsession and persecution, of noble ideals trampled to dust, of slavish sexual surrender….all in the name of Christ.

It tells of one of the first violent revolts of the Reformation, which, together with the Peasants’ War of 1524-25, helped to ignite 110 years of religious conflict that ended with the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648.

The story holds a terrible fascination in our own time, on the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, scarred again by the return of religious wars, of hatred and slaughter, all in the name of a god or a faith.
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Duty Nobly Done: An Extraordinary Account of 11 Family Members in the Great War

Duty Nobly Done: An Extraordinary Account of 11 Family Members in the Great War

Adam Holloway

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This is the extraordinary true story of 11 young Australian men from one extended family and their experiences in the great adventure that would change their lives - the Great War.

Author Adam Holloway, a direct descendant, takes the reader into the lives of each of these men as they embark on a journey from which they are unlikely to return. These were young, confident men who revelled in the brash optimism of a young nation. They were desperate to prove themselves, eager to assert the justice of their cause and keen for a taste of the excitement and comradeship of battle. They were not expecting to be plunged into a lingering nightmare characterised by the stench of death and putrefaction, overwhelming fear and despair, and the gnawing uncertainty of survival.

Holloway uses personal letters, diaries and family memories to deftly recreate the nail-biting tension as each man experiences his own baptism of fire amid the utter horror of the sights and sounds of battle. From the craggy cliffs of Gallipoli to the insatiable maw of the Western Front, these brothers and cousins step forward to take their turn in a procession of courage, each determined to do his duty and to look after his battalion brothers.

This is a story that portrays the Great War on a personal level, describing in remarkable detail how it felt to fight in the worst conflict the world had known, a conflict that would change these young men and Australian society forever.
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A World on Edge: The End of the Great War and the Dawn of a New Age

A World on Edge: The End of the Great War and the Dawn of a New Age

Daniel Schoenpflug

$49.99
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A World on Edge reveals Europe in 1918, left in ruins by World War I. With the end of hostilities, a radical new start seems not only possible, but essential, even unavoidable. Unorthodox ideas light up the age like the comets that have recently passed overhead: new politics, new societies, new art and culture, new thinking. The struggle to determine the future has begun.

The sculptor Kathe Kollwitz, whose son died in the war, was translating sorrow and loss into art. Ho Chi Minh was working as a dishwasher in Paris and dreaming of liberating Vietnam, his homeland. Captain Harry S. Truman was running a men's haberdashery in Kansas City, hardly expecting that he was about to go bankrupt - and later become president of the United States. Professor Moina Michael was about to invent the 'remembrance poppy', a symbol of sacrifice that will stand for generations to come. Meanwhile Virginia Woolf had just published her first book and was questioning whether that sacrifice was worth it, while the artist George Grosz was so revolted by the violence on the streets of Berlin that he decides everything is meaningless. For rulers and revolutionaries, a world of power and privilege was dying - while for others, a dream of overthrowing democracy was being born.

With novelistic virtuosity, historian Daniel Schoenpflug describes this watershed year as it was experienced on the ground - open ended, unfathomable, its outcome unclear. Told from the vantage points of people, famous and ordinary, good and evil, who lived through the turmoil and combining a multitude of acutely observed details, Schoenpflug composes a brilliantly conceived panorama of a world suspended between enthusiasm and disappointment, and of a moment in which the window of opportunity was suddenly open, only to quickly close shut once again.
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Mephisto: Technology War and Remembrance

Mephisto: Technology War and Remembrance

Queensland Museum

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Mephisto: Technology, War and Remembrance is the latest addition to The Queensland Museum Discovery Guide series. The bloody battles of the First World War were fought with many new and increasingly destructive weapons. One of the most significant of these was the tank. Only a single type of German tank was used in action, the A7V Sturmpanzerwagen, and it was a formidable opponent for the Allied forces. 506 Mephisto, the world’s sole surviving A7V, was captured on the battlefields of France in 1918. Under cover of darkness, with gas shells falling around them, a small group of soldiers — Queenslanders and Tasmanians of the 26th Battalion — retrieved the tank from within sight of the German lines. This book tells the story of 506 Mephisto against a backdrop of conflict, technological change and the heroism of ordinary men. 358 pages.
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Alone: Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk: Defeat into Victory

Alone: Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk: Defeat into Victory

Michael Korda

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In an absorbing work peopled with world leaders, generals and ordinary citizens who fought on both sides of the Second World War, Alone brings to resounding life perhaps the most critical year of twentieth-century history. May 1940 was a month like no other, as the German war machine blazed into France while the supposedly impregnable Maginot Line crumbled, and Winston Churchill replaced Neville Chamberlain as prime minister in an astonishing political drama as Britain, isolated and alone, faced a triumphant Nazi Germany. Against this vast historical canvas, Michael Korda relates what happened and why, and also tells his own story, that of a six-year-old boy in a glamorous family who would himself be evacuated. Alone is a work that seamlessly weaves a family memoir into an unforgettable account of a political and military disaster redeemed by the evacuation of more than 300,000 men in four days-surely one of the most heroic episodes of the war.
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Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life

Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life

Robert Dallek

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Franklin D. Roosevelt is a towering figure in twentieth-century history. A masterful politician who would win an unprecedented four presidential terms, initiate landmark reforms that changed the American industrial system and transformed an isolationist country into an international superpower, he ranks among the country's greatest presidents, and his ability to unite a divided nation and generate consensus remains unsurpassed. Robert Dallek's biography is a remarkable portrait of a man dedicated entirely to public affairs - a statesman who found politics a far more interesting and fulfilling pursuit than the management of family fortunes or the indulgence of personal pleasure, and who skilfully used his office to advance an extraordinary agenda.

Dallek attributes Roosevelt's success to two remarkable political insights. First, unlike any other president, he understood that efficacy in the American political system depended on building a national consensus and commanding stable, long-term popular support. Second, he made the presidency the central, most influential institution in modern America. In addressing the country's international and domestic problems, Roosevelt recognized the vital importance of remaining closely attentive to the full range of public sentiment around policy-making decisions - perhaps his most enduring lesson in leadership. Dallek brings to Roosevelt's life all the rigour and incisiveness of his bestselling biographies.
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These Truths: A History of the United States

These Truths: A History of the United States

Jill Lepore

$56.95
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The American experiment rests on three ideas - these truths , Jefferson called them - political equality, natural rights and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a dedication to inquiry, fearless and unflinching , writes Jill Lepore in a ground-breaking investigation into the American past that places truth at the centre of the nation's history.

Telling the story of America, beginning in 1492, These Truths asks whether the course of events has proven the nation's founding truths or belied them. Finding meaning in contradiction, Lepore weaves American history into a tapestry of faith and hope, of peril and prosperity, of technological progress and moral anguish. This spellbinding chronicle offers an authoritative new history of a great, and greatly troubled, nation.
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Capitalism in America: A History

Capitalism in America: A History

Alan Greenspan ,  Adrian Wooldridge

$55.00
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Where does innovation come from and how does it spread through a society? And why do some eras see the fruits of innovation spread more democratically, while others see the opposite?

In Capitalism in America, Alan Greenspan distils a lifetime of grappling with these questions into a reckoning with the decisive drivers of the US economy over the course of its history. In partnership with journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge, he unfolds a tale spanning vast landscapes, titanic figures, triumphant breakthroughs, enlightenment ideals and profound moral failings.

Every crucial debate is addressed - from the role of slavery in the antebellum Southern economy to the real impact of Roosevelt's New Deal and America's violent mood swings in its openness to global trade.

At heart, the authors argue, America's genius has been its tolerance for the effects of creative destruction, the ceaseless churn of the old giving way to the new, driven by new people and new ideas.

At a time when productivity growth has again stalled, stirring up populist furies, and continued American pre-eminence seems increasingly uncertain, this makes for urgent reading.
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Richard Nixon: The Life

Richard Nixon: The Life

John A. Farrell

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In Richard Nixon, award-winning biographer John A. Farrell examines the life and legacy of one of America's most controversial political figures. Beginning in 1946, when young Navy lieutenant 'Nick' Nixon returned from the Pacific and set his cap at Congress, Farrell traces how this idealistic dreamer became the ruthless man we remember Nixon as today.

Within four years of that first win, Nixon would be a senator; within six, the vice president; and then president. His staff of bright young men devised forward-thinking reforms addressing health care, poverty, civil rights, and protection of the environment. It was a fine legacy, but Nixon cared little for it. He aspired to make his mark on the world stage instead, and his 1972 opening to China was the first great crack in the Cold War. But Nixon had another legacy - an America divided and polarised. It was Nixon who launched the McCarthy era, who set South against North, and who spurred the silent majority to despise and distrust the country's elite. Finally, in August 1974, after two years of the endless intrigue and scandal known as Watergate, Nixon became the only president to resign in disgrace.

Richard Nixon is a magisterial portrait of the man who embodied post-war American political cynicism - and was destroyed by it.
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Mutiny on the Bounty: A Saga of Sex, Sedition, Mayhem and Mutiny

Mutiny on the Bounty: A Saga of Sex, Sedition, Mayhem and Mutiny

Peter FitzSimons

$49.99  $39.99
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The mutiny on HMS Bounty, in the South Pacific on 28 April 1789, is one of history's truly great stories - a tale of human drama, intrigue and adventure of the highest order - and in the hands of Peter FitzSimons it comes to life as never before.

Commissioned by the Royal Navy to collect breadfruit plants from Tahiti and take them to the West Indies, the Bounty's crew found themselves in a tropical paradise. Five months later, they did not want to leave. Under the leadership of Fletcher Christian most of the crew mutinied soon after sailing from Tahiti, setting Captain William Bligh and 18 loyal crewmen adrift in a small open boat. In one of history's great feats of seamanship, Bligh navigated this tiny vessel for 3618 nautical miles to Timor.

Fletcher Christian and the mutineers sailed back to Tahiti, where most remained and were later tried for mutiny. But Christian, along with eight fellow mutineers and some Tahitian men and women, sailed off into the unknown, eventually discovering the isolated Pitcairn Island - at the time not even marked on British maps - and settling there.

This astonishing story is historical adventure at its very best, encompassing the mutiny, Bligh's monumental achievement in navigating to safety, and Fletcher Christian and the mutineers' own epic journey from the sensual paradise of Tahiti to the outpost of Pitcairn Island. The mutineers' descendants live on Pitcairn to this day, amid swirling stories and rumours of past sexual transgressions and present-day repercussions. Mutiny on the Bounty is a sprawling, dramatic tale of intrigue, bravery and sheer boldness, told with the accuracy of historical detail and total command of story that are Peter FitzSimons' trademarks.
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Picturing the Pacific: Joseph Banks and the Shipboard Artists of Cook and Flinders

Picturing the Pacific: Joseph Banks and the Shipboard Artists of Cook and Flinders

James Taylor

$49.99
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For over 50 years between the 1760s and the early 19th century, the pioneers who sailed from Europe to explore the Pacific brought back glimpses of this new world in the form of oil paintings, watercolours and drawings - a sensational view of a part of the world few would ever see. Today these works represent a fascinating and inspiring perspective from the frontier of discovery.

It was Sir Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society, who popularised the placement of professional artists on British ships of exploration. They captured striking and memorable images of everything they encountered: exotic landscapes, beautiful flora and fauna, as well as remarkable portraits of indigenous peoples. These earliest views of the Pacific, particularly Australia, were designed to promote the new world as enticing, to make it seem familiar, to encourage further exploration and, ultimately, British settlement.

Drawing on both private and public collections from around the world, this lavish book collects together oil paintings, watercolours, drawings, prints and other documents from those voyages, and presents a unique glimpse into an age where science and art became irrevocably entwined.
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Stalin, Vol. II: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941

Stalin, Vol. II: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941

Stephen Kotkin

$24.99
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Stalin's life is one of the most extraordinary of the modern era and Stephen Kotkin's new biography is the first to do full justice, both to the man himself and to the world which he both dominated and ruined. This second volume is the story of the 'mature' dictator - a figure who had no precedent in ability to shape the USSR and its people. It is the great achievement of this book that it places Stalin both in the context of his day-to-day life in the Kremlin and in the far wider Communist world of which he was the apex. The terror state, the industrial state and the ideological state were all brought together by Stalin and no account of the inter-war world will be complete now without Kotkin's book. It ends when the 'waiting for Hitler' finally came to an end, transforming the nature of the threat faced by both Stalin and the whole society he had shaped.
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The New Silk Roads: The Present and Future of the World

The New Silk Roads: The Present and Future of the World

Peter Frankopan

$27.99
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'All roads used to lead to Rome. Today, they lead to Beijing.' When The Silk Roads was published in 2015, it became an instant classic. A major reassessment of world history, it compelled us to look at the past from a different perspective. The New Silk Roads brings this story up to date, addressing the present and future of a world that is changing dramatically.

Following the Silk Roads eastwards, from Europe through to China, by way of Russia and the Middle East, The New Silk Roads provides a timely reminder that we live in a world that is profoundly interconnected. In an age of Brexit and Trump, the themes of isolation and fragmentation permeating the western world stand in sharp contrast to events along the Silk Roads since 2015, where ties have been strengthened and mutual cooperation established. With brilliant insight, Peter Frankopan takes a fresh look at the network of relationships being formed along the length and breadth of the Silk Roads today, assessing the global reverberations of these continual shifts in the centre of power - all too often absent from headlines in the West.

This important - and ultimately hopeful - book asks us to reread who we are and where we are in the world, illuminating the themes on which all our lives and livelihoods depend.
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Walls: A History of Civilization in Blood and Brick

Walls: A History of Civilization in Blood and Brick

David Frye

$39.99
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'This is history with all the eerie qualities of a short story by Borges: emperors wait for barbarians, labyrinthine complexes of walls are discovered in mysterious deserts. A haunting and brilliant achievement.' - Tom Holland, author of Rubicon and Persian Fire Historian David Frye presents a bold new thesis on how 'civilization' happens-the epic story of history's greatest manmade barriers, from ancient times to the medieval era and into the present.

At the dawn of humanity's ascent, there was only bloody conflict: nomadic tribes slashing at each other, and each man bred to a life of struggle and pillage. But then came the invention of the wall, dividing populations into two opposing groups. On one side were those who gained enough of a respite from the clash of arms to think, create, preserve, trade. On the other were the unwalled, warriors driven by the search for plunder.

In Walls, historian David Frye shows us what each side gained-and lost-with their decision about how to live. The stars of each chapter are the walls themselves-rising up in places as ancient and exotic as Mesopotamia, Babylon, Greece, China, Rome, Mongolia, Turkey, Afghanistan, Western Europe, and even Central and North America. As we journey across time and place, we discover thousand-mile-long walls in the desert wastes of Turkistan; learn of bizarre Spartan rituals; watch Genghis Khan drive his miles-long horde across the steppe; witness the epic siege of Constantinople; feel chilled at the extermination of French explorers of the lower Mississippi; inhale the gunpowder-scented air of France's Maginot Line; and visit some of the seventy border walls that have been erected in just the past decade.

With provocative insight, Walls charts the centuries-long uneasy tension between the walled and unwalled, showing that walls profoundly shape the human psyche. Creativity, vigour, hardiness, the urge to make one's mark-all depend heavily on whether one lives inside or outside a barrier. Frye's clarion call: walls make civilization possible, but if we depend on them too heavily, they also create a dangerous vulnerability.
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The Seven Culinary Wonders of the World: A History of Pork, Honey, Salt, Chilli, Rice, Cacao and Tomato

The Seven Culinary Wonders of the World: A History of Pork, Honey, Salt, Chilli, Rice, Cacao and Tomato

Jenny Linford

$35.00
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Over the course of millennia, people around the world have been preoccupied with food - the abundance or lack of it - but never more so than in the twenty-first century. Their everyday lives take shape around the possibilities that available foodstuffs have to offer and how to make best use of them. The Seven Culinary Wonders of the World transports you on an extraordinary culinary journey, exploring the origins and cultural history of seven familiar ingredients.

But which seven, and why?

The seven ingredients are all ones that are taken for granted, consumed every day without a second thought, but each has its own fascinating history and purpose. Rice is a staple. Salt is essential to our bodies. Honey satisfies our craving for sweetness. Pork, the most widely eaten meat worldwide, yet taboo in some cultures, is a major source of protein. The tomato, used in cuisine's around the world, is extremely versatile. Chile offers a unique kick, so essential to dishes such as curries and piquant salsas. And cacao is used to make chocolate. The 'magnificent seven' have rich and diverse cultural stories to tell, from the magical, aphrodisiac powers associated with cacao in the Mesoamerican culture, to the introduction of tomatoes to Europe by the Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century, and the earliest cultivation of rice in the Pearl Valley in China.

The Seven Culinary Wonders of the World equips you with everything you need to know about these wonderful foodstuffs and provides a number of traditional and innovative recipes - with one of the ingredients in the starring role, of course - for you to enjoy.
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A Short History of Europe: From Pericles to Putin

A Short History of Europe: From Pericles to Putin

Simon Jenkins

$35.00
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Europe is an astonishingly successful place. In this dazzling new history, bestselling author Simon Jenkins grippingly tells the story of its evolution from warring peoples to peace, wealth and freedom - a story that twists and turns from Greece and Rome, through the Dark Ages, the Reformation and the French Revolution, to the Second World War and up to the present day.

Jenkins takes in leaders from Julius Caesar and Joan of Arc, to Wellington and Angela Merkel, as well as cultural figures from Aristotle to Shakespeare and Picasso. He brings together the transformative forces and dominant eras into one chronological tale - all with his usual insight, colour and authority.

Despite the importance of Europe's politics, economy and culture, there has not been - until now - a concise book to tell this story. Covering the key events, themes and individuals, Jenkins' portrait of the continent could not be more timely - or masterful.
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Seven Deadly Sins and One Very Naughty Fruit

Seven Deadly Sins and One Very Naughty Fruit

Mikey Robins

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ABBEY'S BOOKSELLER PICK ----- History with a liberal serving of wit and humour. For Abbey's readers who, like me, really enjoy the envigorated historical retellings by Stephen Fry (Mythos and Heroes) and David Hunt (Girt and True Girt) - and there are a lot of you - here is another tasty morsel. Take a fascinating meander around culinary and cultural oddities with one of Australia's masters of funny banter. Craig Kirchner

 

 

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In this irreverent romp through the history of food via the Seven Deadly Sins, Mikey Robins uncovers the most bizarre food-related stories of all time. From the Ancient Egyptians to the Romans, from the medieval monarchs to our current obsession with celebrity chefs, our forebears have left their mark on our habits and social mores, our plates and our palates, telling us one truth above all: where there is food, there is folly.

On the topic of GLUTTONY, Mikey exposes our obsession with outlandish overconsumption and the thrill of competitive eating. PRIDE reveals some of the most arrogant dinner hosts in history, and how the once humble chef has now achieved rock-god status. LUST sheds light on our aphrodisiac fixations and the most desired foods through time. SLOTH charts the curious evolution of the fork and the etiquette of flatulence. WRATH tells of sausage duels and poisonous spite, while GREED will make you blush at the indulgences of the rich and famous. And who hasn't experienced ENVY when your dining companion's plate sings while yours sputters?

Mikey Robins is your personal guide down history's gullet and into the underbelly of our wildest desires, darkest fears and guiltiest pleasures.

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Histories of the Unexpected: How Everything Has a History

Histories of the Unexpected: How Everything Has a History

Dr Sam Willis ,  Professor James Daybell

$39.99
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In this fascinating and original new book, Sam Willis and James Daybell lead us on a journey of historical discovery that tackles some of the greatest historical themes - from the Tudors to the Second World War, from the Roman Empire to the Victorians - but via entirely unexpected subjects.

You will find out here how the history of the beard is connected to the Crimean War; how the history of paperclips is all about the Stasi; how the history of bubbles is all about the French Revolution. And who knew that Heinrich Himmler, Tutankhamun and the history of needlework are linked to napalm and Victorian orphans?

Taking the reader on an enthralling and extraordinary journey through thirty different topics that are ingeniously linked together, Histories of the Unexpected not only presents a new way of thinking about the past, but also reveals the everyday world around us as never before.
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Seapower States: Maritime Culture, Continental Empires and the Conflict That Made the Modern World

Seapower States: Maritime Culture, Continental Empires and the Conflict That Made the Modern World

Andrew Lambert

$49.99
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Andrew Lambert, author of The Challenge: Britain Against America in the Naval War of 1812 - winner of the prestigious Anderson Medal - turns his attention to Athens, Carthage, Venice, the Dutch Republic, and Britain, examining how their identities as seapowers informed their actions and enabled them to achieve success disproportionate to their size.

Lambert demonstrates how creating maritime identities made these states more dynamic, open, and inclusive than their lumbering continental rivals. Only when they forgot this aspect of their identity did these nations begin to decline. Recognizing that the United States and China are modern naval powers - rather than seapowers - is essential to understanding current affairs, as well as the long-term trends in world history.

This volume is a highly original big think analysis of five states whose success - and eventual failure - is a subject of enduring interest, by a scholar at the top of his game.
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On This Day in History

On This Day in History

Dan Snow

$32.99
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On which day was history's shortest war waged and won (in roughly 40 minutes)? How was Napoleon bested by a group of rabbits in 1807? Why did a dispute about beer in an Oxford pub lead to over 100 deaths and 470 years of penance? Why in 1752 did Britain go to bed on 2nd September and wake up on the 14th? How did a women's march in 1917 set off the Russian Revolution?

On This Day in History brings to life a key event that happened on each day of the year.

From the most important British battle that you've never heard of (20 May 685) to the first meeting of Lennon and McCartney (6 July 1957), and from why Julius Caesar should have been wary of the Ides of March (15 March 44BC) to the day Jeanne de Clisson became a pirate and single-handedly declared war on the King of France (2 August 1343), history is full of unlikely heroes and fascinating turning points.

In this book Dan Snow shows us how each day offers a different and unexpected insight into our past. And story by gripping story, this year grows into a vivid, very human history of the world.
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The Golden Atlas: The Greatest Explorations, Quests and Discoveries on Maps

The Golden Atlas: The Greatest Explorations, Quests and Discoveries on Maps

Edward Brooke-Hitching

$45.00
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`A fabulous book, good enough to eat with a spoon! Marvellous.' John Lloyd, creator of QI The Golden Atlas is a spectacular visual history of exploration and cartography, a treasure chest of adventures from the chronicles of global discovery, illustrated with a selection of the most beautiful maps ever created.

The book reveals how the world came to be known, featuring a magnificent gallery of exceptionally rare hand-coloured antique maps, paintings and engravings, many of which can only be found in the author's collection. Arranged chronologically, the reader is taken on a breathtaking expedition through Ancient Babylonian geography and Marco Polo's journey to the Mongol Khan on to buccaneers ransacking the Caribbean and the voyages of seafarers such as Captain Cook and fearless African pathfinders.

Their stories are told in an engaging and compelling style, bringing vividly to life a motley collection of heroic explorers, treasure-hunters and death-dealing villains - all of them accompanied by eye-grabbing illustrations from rare maps, charts and manuscripts.

The Golden Atlas takes you back to a world of darkness and peril, placing you on storm-lashed ships, frozen wastelands and the shores of hostile territories to see how the lines were drawn to form the shape of the modern world. The author's previous book, The Phantom Atlas, was a critically acclaimed international bestseller, described by Jonathan Ross as 'a spectacular, enjoyable and eye-opening read' and this new book is sure to follow suit.
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Miyamoto Musashi's Book of Five Rings: A Definitive Translation of the Timeless Masterpiece of Japan's Greatest Samurai

Miyamoto Musashi's Book of Five Rings: A Definitive Translation of the Timeless Masterpiece of Japan's Greatest Samurai

Miyamoto Musashi ,  Alexander Bennett

$19.99
Miyamoto Musashi (1584–1645) is the most famous Samurai who ever lived. His magnum opus, the Go-Rin-Sho or Book of Five Rings is a classic that is still read by tens of thousands of people each year - Japanese and foreigners alike.

Alex Bennett's groundbreaking new translation of The Book of Five Rings reveals the true meaning of this text for the first time. Like Sun Tzu's The Art of War, Musashi's book offers unique insights, not just for warriors, but for anyone wanting to apply the Zen Buddhist principle of awareness to achieve success in their endeavors. This book sheds new light on Japanese history and on the philosophical meaning of Bushido - the ancient "code of the Japanese warrior."

Unlike other translations that are based on incomplete and inaccurate versions of Musashi's work, Bennett's is the first to be based on a careful reconstruction of the long-lost original manuscript. Capturing the subtle nuances of the original Japanese classic, the result is a far more accurate and meaningful English version of The Book of Five Rings text.

Richly annotated and with an extensive introduction to Musashi's life, this version includes a collection of his other writings - translated into English for the first time. A respected scholar, as well as a skilled martial artist, Bennett's understanding of Musashi's life and work is unparalleled.

This book will be widely read by students of Japanese culture, history, military strategy, and martial arts. It sets a new standard against which all other translations will be measured.
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Carthage at War: Punic Armies c. 814-146 BC

Carthage at War: Punic Armies c. 814-146 BC

Joshua Hall

$52.99
The Carthaginians are well known as Rome's great enemy of the three Punic wars and Hannibal, their greatest general, is a household name. While narrative histories of the Punic wars (especially the second) and biographies of Hannibal abound, there have been few studies dedicated to detailed analysis of Carthaginian armies and warfare throughout the city-state's entire existence.

Joshua Hall puts that right with this in-depth study of their tactics, equipment, unit organization, army composition and operational effectiveness. Discussion of Carthage's navy is also included.  A section on naval warfare is also included. Importantly, while the Second Punic War is rightly given prominence, this is not at the expense of the many earlier wars Carthage waged as she built and then defended her empire.

Drawing on all the available archaeological and literary evidence, the author shows the development of Carthage's forces and methods of warfare from the ninth century BC to the city's demise. The result is the most in-depth portrait of the Carthaginian military available in English.
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Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology

Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology

Adrienne Mayor

$59.99
The fascinating untold story of how the ancients imagined robots and other forms of artificial life - and even invented real automated machines.

The first robot to walk the earth was a bronze giant called Talos. This wondrous machine was created not by MIT Robotics Lab, but by Hephaestus, the Greek god of invention. More than 2,500 years ago, long before medieval automata, and centuries before technology made self-moving devices possible, Greek mythology was exploring ideas about creating artificial life - and grappling with still-unresolved ethical concerns about biotechne, "life through craft." In this compelling, richly illustrated book, Adrienne Mayor tells the fascinating story of how ancient Greek, Roman, Indian, and Chinese myths envisioned artificial life, automata, self-moving devices, and human enhancements - and how these visions relate to and reflect the ancient invention of real animated machines.

As early as Homer, Greeks were imagining robotic servants, animated statues, and even ancient versions of Artificial Intelligence, while in Indian legend, Buddha's precious relics were defended by robot warriors copied from Greco-Roman designs for real automata. Mythic automata appear in tales about Jason and the Argonauts, Medea, Daedalus, Prometheus, and Pandora, and many of these machines are described as being built with the same materials and methods that human artisans used to make tools and statues. And, indeed, many sophisticated animated devices were actually built in antiquity, reaching a climax with the creation of a host of automata in the ancient city of learning, Alexandria, the original Silicon Valley.

A groundbreaking account of the earliest expressions of the timeless impulse to create artificial life, Gods and Robots reveals how some of today's most advanced innovations in robotics and AI were foreshadowed in ancient myth - and how science has always been driven by imagination. This is mythology for the age of AI.
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Legion versus Phalanx: The Epic Struggle for Infantry Supremacy in the Ancient World

Legion versus Phalanx: The Epic Struggle for Infantry Supremacy in the Ancient World

Myke Cole

$39.99
From the time of Ancient Sumeria, the heavy infantry phalanx dominated the battlefield. Armed with spears or pikes, standing shoulder to shoulder with shields interlocking, the men of the phalanx presented an impenetrable wall of wood and metal to the enemy. Until, that is, the Roman legion emerged to challenge them as masters of infantry battle.

Covering the period in which the legion and phalanx clashed (280-168 BC), Myke Cole delves into their tactics, arms and equipment, organization and deployment. Drawing on original primary sources to examine six battles in which the legion fought the phalanx - Heraclea (280 BC), Asculum (279 BC), Beneventum (275 BC), Cynoscephalae (197 BC), Magnesia (190 BC), and Pydna (168 BC) - he shows how and why the Roman legion, with its flexible organization, versatile tactics and iron discipline, came to eclipse the hitherto untouchable Hellenistic phalanx and dominate the ancient battlefield.
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Daily Life in Late Antiquity

Daily Life in Late Antiquity

Kristina Sessa

$41.95
Daily Life in Late Antiquity is the first comprehensive study of lived experience in the Late Roman Empire, from c.250-600 CE. Each of the six topical chapters highlight historical 'everyday' people, spaces, and objects, whose lives operate as windows into the late ancient economy, social relations, military service, religious systems, cultural habits, and the material environment. However, it is nevertheless grounded in late ancient primary sources - many of which are available in accessible English translations - and the most recent, cutting-edge scholarship by specialists in fields such as archaeology, social history, religious studies, and environmental history. From Manichean rituals to military service, gladiatorial combat to garbage collection, patrician households to peasant families, Daily Life in Late Antiquity introduces readers to the world of late antiquity from the bottom up.
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Three Stones Make a Wall: The Story of Archaeology

Three Stones Make a Wall: The Story of Archaeology

Eric H. Cline ,  Glynnis Fawkes

$35.95
In 1922, Howard Carter peered into Tutankhamun's tomb for the first time, the only light coming from the candle in his outstretched hand. Urged to tell what he was seeing through the small opening he had cut in the door to the tomb, the Egyptologist famously replied, I see wonderful things. Carter's fabulous discovery is just one of the many spellbinding stories told in Three Stones Make a Wall. Written by Eric Cline, an archaeologist with more than thirty seasons of excavation experience, this book traces the history of archaeology from an amateur pursuit to the cutting-edge science it is today by taking the reader on a tour of major archaeological sites and discoveries. Along the way, it addresses the questions archaeologists are asked most often: How do you know where to dig? How are excavations actually done? How do you know how old something is? Who gets to keep what is found? Taking readers from the pioneering digs of the eighteenth century to today's exciting new discoveries, Three Stones Make a Wall is a lively and essential introduction to the story of archaeology.
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Inside the Neolithic Mind: Consciousness, Cosmos and the Realm of the Gods

Inside the Neolithic Mind: Consciousness, Cosmos and the Realm of the Gods

David Lewis-Williams ,  David Pearce

$24.99
This fascinating book continues the story begun in the bestselling and critically acclaimed book The Mind in the Cave. Drawing on the latest research and recent discoveries, the authors skilfully link material on human consciousness, imagery and belief systems to propose provocative new theories about the causes of an ancient revolution in cosmology, the origins of social complexity and even the drive behind the domestication of plants and animals. In doing so they create a fascinating neurological bridge to the mysterious thought-lives of the past and reveal the essence of a momentous period in human history.
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Hagia Sophia: Sound, Space, and Spirit in Byzantium

Hagia Sophia: Sound, Space, and Spirit in Byzantium

Bissera V. Pentcheva

$64.00
Experiencing the resonant acoustics of the church of Hagia Sophia allowed the Byzantine participants in its liturgical rituals to be filled with the Spirit of God, and even to become his image on earth. Bissera Pentcheva's vibrant analysis examines how these sung rites combined with the church's architectural space to make Hagia Sophia a performative place of worship representative of Byzantine religious culture in all its sensory richness.

Coupling digital acoustic models and video with a close examination of liturgical texts and melodic structures, Pentcheva applies art-historical, philosophical, archeoacoustical, and anthropological methodologies to provide insight into the complementary ways liturgy and location worked to animate worshippers in Byzantium. Rather than focus on the architectural form of the building, the technology of its construction, or the political ideology of its decoration, Pentcheva delves into the performativity of Hagia Sophia and explains how the icons of sound created by the sung liturgy and architectural reverberation formed an aural experience that led to mystical transcendence for worshippers, opening access to the imagined celestial sound of the angelic choirs.

Immersive, deeply researched, and beautifully illustrated, this exploration of Hagia Sophia sheds new light on sacred space, iconicity, and religious devotion in Byzantium. Scholars of art and architectural history, religious studies, music and acoustics, and the medieval period will especially appreciate Pentcheva's field-advancing work.
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King Arthur's Wars

King Arthur's Wars

Jim Storr

$49.99
King Arthur's Wars describes one of the biggest archaeological finds of our times; yet there is nothing new to see. There are secrets hidden in plain sight. We speak English today, because the Anglo-Saxons took over most of post-Roman Britain. How did that happen? There is little evidence: not much little archaeology, and even less written history. There is, however, a huge amount of speculation. King Arthur's Wars brings an entirely new approach to the subject. The answers are out there, in the countryside, waiting to be found.

Months of field work and map study allow us to understand, for the first time, how the Anglo-Saxons conquered England; county by county and decade by decade.

King Arthur's Wars exposes what the landscape and the place names tell us. As a result, we can now know far more about this `Dark Age'. What is so special about Essex? Why is Buckinghamshire an odd shape? Why is the legend of King Arthur so special to us? Why don't Cumbrian farmers use English numbers, when they count sheep? Why don't we know where Camelot was? Why did the Romano-British stop eating oysters?

King Arthur's Wars tells that story.
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Pharaoh Seti I: Father of Egyptian Greatness

Pharaoh Seti I: Father of Egyptian Greatness

Nicky Nielsen

$52.99
Pharaoh Seti I ruled Egypt for only 11 years (1290-1279 BC), but his reign marked a revival of Egyptian military and economic power, as well as cultural and religious life. Seti was born the son of a military officer in northern Egypt, far from the halls of power in Memphis and Thebes. However, when the last king of the 18th Dynasty, Horemheb, died without an heir, Seti's father was named king. He ruled for only two years before dying of old age, leaving Seti in charge of an ailing superpower. Seti set about rebuilding Egypt after a century of dynastic struggles and religious unrest. He reasserted Egypt's might with a series of campaigns across the Levant, Libya and Nubia. He despatched expeditions to mine for copper, gold, and quarry for stone in the deserts, laying the foundations for one of the most ambitious building projects of any Egyptian Pharaoh and his actions allowed his son, Ramesses the Great to rule in relative peace and stability for 69 years, building on the legacy of his father.
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Unearthing Ancient Nubia: Photographs from the Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition

Unearthing Ancient Nubia: Photographs from the Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition

Lawrence M. Berman

$55.00
Digging for a lost civilization in the Nile Valley.

Specially trained Egyptian photographers were an integral part of the pioneering Harvard-MFA expedition during the first half of the 20th century. Over the course of some 40 years, their photographs documented the excavations with thousands of images as the riches of a great ancient civilization in northern Sudan were uncovered. George A. Reisner, the leader of the expedition, was keenly aware of the challenges of creating photographs under these conditions: "In judging the photographs, remember that the statues had to be photographed in the glaring light of the tropics under great difficulties owing to the weight and size of the objects which made it nearly impossible to put the statues together."

The best of these photographs bring to life the dramatic landscapes of the Nile Valley, the excitement of archaeological discovery and the artistry of the photographers who recorded it all. Unearthing Ancient Nubia reveals the origins of the single most important collection of ancient Nubian art outside of Khartoum.
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Ancient Egyptian Imperialism

Ancient Egyptian Imperialism

Ellen Morris

$62.95
Offers a broad and unique look at Ancient Egypt during its long age of imperialism.

Written for enthusiasts and scholars of pharaonic Egypt, as well as for those interested in comparative imperialism, this book provides a look at some of the most intriguing evidence for grand strategy, low-level insurgencies, back-room deals, and complex colonial dynamics that exists for the Bronze Age world. It explores the actions of a variety of Egypt’s imperial governments from the dawn of the state until 1069 BCE as they endeavored to control fiercely independent mountain dwellers in Lebanon, urban populations in Canaan and Nubia, highly mobile Nilotic pastoralists, and predatory desert raiders. The book is especially valuable as it foregrounds the reactions of local populations and their active roles in shaping the trajectory of empire. With its emphasis on the experimental nature of imperialism and its attention to cross-cultural comparison and social history, this book offers a fresh perspective on a fascinating subject.

Organized around central imperial themes - which are explored in depth at particular places and times in Egypt’s history - Ancient Egyptian Imperialism covers: Trade Before Empire - Empire Before the State (c. 3500-2686); Settler Colonialism (c. 2400-2160); Military Occupation (c. 2055-1775); Creolization, Collaboration, Colonization (c. 1775-1295); Motivation, Intimidation, Enticement (c. 1550-1295); Organization and Infrastructure (c. 1458-1295); Outwitting the State (c. 1362-1332); Conversions and Contractions in Egypt’s Northern Empire (c. 1295-1136); and Conversions and Contractions in Egypt’s Southern Empire (c. 1550-1069).

    * Offers a wider focus of Egypt’s experimentation with empire than is covered by general Egyptologists
    * Draws analogies to tactics employed by imperial governments and by dominated peoples in a variety of historically documented empires, both old world and new
    * Answers questions such as “how often and to what degree did imperial blueprints undergo revisions?”

Ancient Egyptian Imperialism is an excellent text for students and scholars of history, comparative history, and ancient history, as well for those interested in political science, anthropology, and the Biblical World.
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Battles and Battlefields of Ancient Greece: A Guide to their History, Topography and Archaeology

Battles and Battlefields of Ancient Greece: A Guide to their History, Topography and Archaeology

C. Jacob Butera ,  Matthew A. Sears

$65.99
Greece was the scene of some of the most evocative and decisive battles in the ancient world. This volume brings together the ancient evidence and modern scholarship on twenty battlefields throughout Greece. It is a handy resource for visitors of every level of experience, from the member of a guided tour to the veteran military historian.

The introductory chapter outlines some of the most pressing and interesting issues in the study of Ancient Greek battles and battlefields and offers a crash course on ancient warfare. Twenty lively chapters explore battlefields selected for both their historical importance and their inspiring sites. In addition to accessible overviews of each battle, this book provides all the information needed for an intellectually and aesthetically rewarding visit, including transport and travel details, museum overviews, and further reading.
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Studies of Homeric Greece

Studies of Homeric Greece

Jan Bouzek

$61.00
Studies of Homeric Greece is a comprehensive companion to the archaeology and history of Late Mycenaean to Geometric Greece and the koine of Early Iron Age Geometric styles in Europe and Upper Eurasia, circa 1300-700 BC, in relation to their Near Eastern neighbors. Jan Bouzek discusses this pivotal period of human history - the transition from Bronze to Iron Age, from the pre-philosophical to philosophical mind, from myth to logos - in an attempt to combine archaeological evidence with the words of Homer and Hesiod, and the first Phoenician and Greek trading ventures. In doing so, Bouzek surveys the birth of autonomous Greek city-states, their art, and their free citizenry. Featuring numerous maps, drawings, and photographs, Studies of Homeric Greece is the capstone of a luminary in the field.
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Chaucer's People: Everyday Lives in the Middle Ages

Chaucer's People: Everyday Lives in the Middle Ages

Liza Picard

$24.99
'A holiday in the complex, joyful, indelicate medieval world' John Higgs, author of Watling Street

Chaucer's People is an absorbing and revealing guide to the Middle Ages, populated with Chaucer's pilgrims from The Canterbury Tales. These are lives spent at the pedal of a loom, maintaining the ledgers of an estate or navigating the high seas. Drawing on contemporary experiences of a vast range of subjects including trade, religion, toe-curling remedies and hair-raising recipes, bestselling historian Liza Picard recreates the medieval world in glorious detail.
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The Book of Durrow

The Book of Durrow

Trinity College Library, Dublin ,  Rachel Moss

$29.99
The Book of Durrow is among the earliest surviving decorated manuscripts in north-western Europe, dating to the late seventh century AD. A masterpiece of Celtic art, it is believed to be the oldest fully decorated Insular Gospel that survives, pre-dating the Book of Kells by more than a century. Created in a monastery associated with the Irish saint Colum Cille (St Columba), its text and artwork reflect the formative years of a `golden age' of artistic production in Ireland and Britain. This richly decorated introductory guide explores the manuscript's distinctive artwork and tells the extraordinary story of its preservation in the Irish monastery at Durrow - first as sacred text then as relic - and its acquisition in the seventeenth century by the Library of Trinity College Dublin.
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Tiber: Eternal River of Rome

Tiber: Eternal River of Rome

Bruce Ware Allen

$63.95
In this rich history of Italy's Tiber River, Bruce Ware Allen charts the main currents, mythic headwaters, and hidden tributaries of one of the world's most storied waterways. He considers life along the river, from its twin springs high in the Apennines all the way to its mouth at Ostia, and describes the people who lived along its banks and how they made the Tiber work for them.

The Tiber has served as the realm of protomythic creatures and gods, a battleground for armies and navies, a livelihood for boatmen and fishermen, the subject matter for poets and painters, and the final resting place for criminals and martyrs. Tiber: Eternal River of Rome is a highly readable history and a go-to resource for information about Italy's most storied river.
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Papunya: A Place Made After the Story

Papunya: A Place Made After the Story

Geoffrey Bardon ,  James Bardon

$79.99
Papunya: A Place Made After the Story is a first-hand account of the Papunya Tula artists and their internationally significant works emanating from the central Western Desert.

This momentous movement began in 1971 when Geoffrey Bardon, a hopeful young art teacher, drove the long lonely road from Alice Springs to the settlement at Papunya in the Northern Territory. He left only eighteen months later, defeated by hostile white authority, but a lasting legacy was the emergence of the Western Desert painting style. It started as an exercise to encourage local children to record their sand patterns and games, and grew to include tribal men and elders painting depictions of their ceremonial lives onto scraps of discarded building materials.

With Bardon's support, they preserved their traditional Dreamings and stories in paint. The artistic energy unleashed at Papunya spread through Central Australia to achieve international acclaim. These works are now regarded as some of Australia?s most treasured cultural, historical and artistic items. The publication of this material is an unprecedented achievement. Bardon's exquisitely recorded notes and drawings reproduced here document the early stages in this important art group.

This landmark book features more than five hundred paintings, drawings and photographs from Bardon's personal archive. It tells the story of the catalyst for a powerfully modern expression of an ancient indigenous way of seeing the world.
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Rattling Spears: A History of Indigenous Australian Art

Rattling Spears: A History of Indigenous Australian Art

Ian McLean

$39.99
Large, bold and colourful, Indigenous Australian art has made an indelible impression on the contemporary imagination. But it is controversial, dividing the stakeholders from those who smell a scam.

Whether the artists are victims or victors, there is no denying their impact in the media and on the art world and collectors worldwide. How did Australian art become the most successful indigenous form in the world? How did its artists escape the ethnographic and souvenir markets to become players in an art world to which they had previously been denied access?

Finely illustrated, and now available in paperback, this full historical account makes you question everything you were taught about contemporary art.
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Katanga 1960-63: Mercenaries, Spies and the African Nation that Waged War on the World

Katanga 1960-63: Mercenaries, Spies and the African Nation that Waged War on the World

Christopher Othen

$27.99
In King Leopold II’s infamous Congo ‘Free’ State at the turn of the century, severed hands became a form of currency. But the Belgians don’t seem to have a sense of historical shame, as they connived for an independent Katanga state in 1960 to protect Belgian mining interests. What happened next was extraordinary.

Katanga 1960-63 tells, for the first time, the full story of the Congolese province that declared independence and found itself at war with the world. The Congo had no intention of allowing the renegade region to secede, and neither did the CIA, the KGB, or the United Nations.

It was a fantastically uneven battle. The UN fielded soldiers from twenty nations, America paid the bills, and the Soviets intrigued behind the scenes. Yet to everyone’s surprise the new nation’s rag-tag army of local gendarmes, jungle tribesmen and, controversially, European mercenaries, refused to give in. For two and a half years Katanga, the scrawniest underdog ever to fight a war, held off the world with guerrilla warfare, two-faced diplomacy, and some shady financial backing. It even looked as if the Katangese might win.
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Consuming ANZAC: The History of Australia's Most Powerful Brand

Consuming ANZAC: The History of Australia's Most Powerful Brand

Jo Hawkins

$29.99
In the years after the Great War, Australian memorials were often engraved with a simple request, `Let silent contemplation be your offering'. Today, remembrance is fuelled by a booming Anzac industry. Luxury cruises to far-flung battlegrounds, commemorative sporting contests, blockbuster books, newspaper liftouts, souvenirs, mass-produced Anzac biscuits, and VC winners spruiking beer brands.

Australians have been consuming Anzac for a century. While commemoration and commerce have never been entirely separate they have become increasingly intertwined. How does the Anzac Industry shape the way we remember war? And why do marketers seek to align their brands with a failed military campaign?

Consuming Anzac reveals how consumer culture has proved central to the contemporary resurgence and proliferation of the Anzac tradition. In probing the ways in which war memory has been produced, marketed and sold since 1915, it offers new insights into the dynamic commercial world and mutually beneficial relationships that underpin the commemoration of war in the twenty-first century.
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Back from the Brink, 1997-2001: The Howard Government, Vol II

Back from the Brink, 1997-2001: The Howard Government, Vol II

Tom Frame

$39.99
The years 1997-2001 were eventful ones for the Howard Government. This second volume of the Howard Government series explores these tumultuous years.

In Back from the Brink politicians, commentators and scholars including Michael Wesley, Hugh White, Peter Costello, Phillipa McGuinness and Tom Frame and take a critical look at the Howard Government's performance, and analyse landmark events -- Wik and native title, a succession of ministerial resignations, the Patrick Corporation waterfront dispute, the Coalition's near defeat at the 1998 election, the response to post-independence violence in East Timor, and the introduction of the GST.
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The Last Wild West: The saga of Northern Territory cattle stations, racial violence, wild horses and the supernatural

The Last Wild West: The saga of Northern Territory cattle stations, racial violence, wild horses and the supernatural

Neil H. Atkinson

$29.99
The story of a man wanting to move forward by travelling back to where he was born, the Northern Territory. Finding himself on a merciless cattle station where you weren't taught to be a stockman but broken to fit into the mould, he is caught in the middle of race wars and deadly violence between white station managers and Aboriginal traditional land owners. As black power surges, his sympathy grows for an Indigenous elder and his besieged community...

It was like reading parts of Alex Haley's Roots, only it happened in Australia. The tale of brutality and injustice in an indifferent country.

Geoff McDonald, author of Red Over Black The writer looked death in the face to protect his Aboriginal friends, we owe it to put our hands up and support his story. Made me angry, sad and proud but couldn't put it down. A must read for all Australian's as it exposes a dark, mostly unknown part of our race relations most people would rather not know, but need to see to remind them standing up to racism demands constant vigil. Reggie Jobuda, Council of Aboriginal Elders and Indigenous Advancement.
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The Thousand Doors: Australian Doctors at War Part Five: The Middle East and Far East 1939-1942

The Thousand Doors: Australian Doctors at War Part Five: The Middle East and Far East 1939-1942

Colonel Robert Liekman

$65.00
Illustrated biographies of doctors who served during the Second World War. The fifth volume in the series Australian Doctors at War, covers the Allied campaigns in North Africa and Syria until the Battle of Alamein, operations in Malaya until the Fall of Singapore, and the expeditionary forces sent by Australia to New Britain, New Ireland, Timor, Ambon, New Caledonia, Nauru and Ocean Island. Contains over 700 biographies of medical officers who signed up for the Australian Armed Forces from 1939-1942.
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Margaret Tudor: The Life of Henry VIII's Sister

Margaret Tudor: The Life of Henry VIII's Sister

Melanie Clegg

$52.99
When the thirteen year old Margaret Tudor, eldest daughter of Henry VII and his wife Elizabeth of York, married King James IV of Scotland in a magnificent proxy ceremony held at Richmond Palace in January 1503, no one could have guessed that this pretty, redheaded princess would go on to have a marital career as dramatic and chequered as that of her younger brother Henry VIII.

Left widowed at the age of just twenty three after her husband was killed by her brother's army at the battle of Flodden, Margaret was made Regent for her young son and was temporarily the most powerful woman in Scotland - until she fell in love with the wrong man, lost everything and was forced to flee the country. In a life that foreshadowed that of her tragic, fascinating granddaughter Mary Queen of Scots, Margaret hurtled from one disaster to the next and ended her life abandoned by virtually everyone: a victim both of her own poor life choices and of the simmering hostility between her son, James V and her brother, Henry VIII.
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Black Tudors: The Untold Story

Black Tudors: The Untold Story

Miranda Kaufmann

$19.99
Shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2018

A Book of the Year for the Evening Standard and the Observer

A black porter publicly whips a white Englishman in the hall of a Gloucestershire manor house. A Moroccan woman is baptised in a London church. Henry VIII dispatches a Mauritanian diver to salvage lost treasures from the Mary Rose. From long-forgotten records emerge the remarkable stories of Africans who lived free in Tudor England...

They were present at some of the defining moments of the age. They were christened, married and buried by the Church. They were paid wages like any other Tudors. The untold stories of the Black Tudors, dazzlingly brought to life by Kaufmann, will transform how we see this most intriguing period of history.
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Victorian Maps of England: The county and city maps of Thomas Moule

Victorian Maps of England: The county and city maps of Thomas Moule

Thomas Moule ,  John Lee

$59.99
The most beautiful Victorian maps of England's counties and cities by one of Britain's great cartographer's Thomas Moule.

For the first time in a generation, the maps of the mid-19th century are reproduced to a very high standard in a large-format book. The maps are fascinating, decorative and hugely informative of an England in transformation with industrialization and the burgeoning railways. The 60 maps cover the counties of England plus key cities and are accompanied by contemporary descriptions as well as extracts on the counties from the Victorian age. It explores and explains Moule's career and development as a mapmaker and positions him alongside fellow celebrated Victorian pioneers including Brunel, Wedgewood, Bradshaw, Turner, Pugin, Blake, Scott and Wordsworth.

Thomas Moule (1784-1851) is the finest Victorian mapmaker and is regarded as the true follower of John Speed in the cartographic history of Britain. Moule's beautifully observed county and city maps present a minutely detailed record of nineteenth-century England whilst also celebrating its 'ancientness' and history through pastoral or monument views all of which are framed within the cartouches, festoons and architecural ornament of the time. All, however, also show the progress of the Industrial revolution. The maps have remained most influential and highly collectable in both original and as reproductions.
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Convicts in the Colonies: Transportation Tales from Britain to Australia

Convicts in the Colonies: Transportation Tales from Britain to Australia

Lucy Williams

$52.99
In the eighty years between 1787 and 1868 more than 160,000 men, women and children convicted of everything from picking pockets to murder were sentenced to be transported 'beyond the seas'. These convicts were destined to serve out their sentences in the empire's most remote colony: Australia. Through vivid real-life case studies and famous tales of the exceptional and extraordinary, Convicts in the Colonies narrates the history of convict transportation to Australia - from the first to the final fleet.

Using the latest original research, Convicts in the Colonies reveals a fascinating century-long history of British convicts unlike any other. Covering everything from crime and sentencing in Britain and the perilous voyage to Australia, to life in each of the three main penal colonies - New South Wales, Van Diemen's Land, and Western Australia - this book charts the lives and experiences of the men and women who crossed the world and underwent one of the most extraordinary punishments in history.
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Spying for Wellington: British Military Intelligence in the Peninsular War

Spying for Wellington: British Military Intelligence in the Peninsular War

Huw J. Davies

$71.95
Intelligence is often the critical factor in a successful military campaign. This was certainly the case for Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, in the Peninsular War. In this book, author Huw J. Davies offers the first full account of the scope, complexity, and importance of Wellington's intelligence department, describing a highly organized, multifaceted series of networks of agents and spies throughout Spain and Portugal - an organization that was at once a microcosm of British intelligence at the time and a sophisticated forebear to intelligence developments in the twentieth century.

Spying for Wellington shows us an organization that was, in effect, two parallel networks: one made up of Foreign Office agents run by British ambassadors in Spain and Portugal, the other comprising military spies controlled by Wellington himself. The network of agents supplied strategic intelligence, giving the British army advance warning of the arrival, destinations, and likely intentions of French reinforcements. The military network supplied operational intelligence, which confirmed the accuracy of the strategic intelligence and provided greater detail on the strengths, arms, and morale of the French forces. Davies reveals how, by integrating these two forms of intelligence, Wellington was able to develop an extremely accurate and reliable estimate of French movements and intentions not only in his own theater of operations but also in other theaters across the Iberian Peninsula. The reliability and accuracy of this intelligence, as Davies demonstrates, was central to Wellington's decision-making and, ultimately, to his overall success against the French.

Correcting past, incomplete accounts, this is the definitive book on Wellington's use of intelligence. As such, it contributes to a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of Wellington at war and of his place in the history of British military intelligence.
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A British Profession of Arms: The Politics of Command in the Late Victorian Army

A British Profession of Arms: The Politics of Command in the Late Victorian Army

Ian F. W. Beckett

$71.95
You offer yourself to be slain, General Sir John Hackett once observed, remarking on the military profession. This is the essence of being a soldier. For this reason as much as any other, the British army has invariably been seen as standing apart from other professions - and sometimes from society as a whole. A British Profession of Arms effectively counters this view. In this definitive study of the late Victorian army, distinguished scholar Ian F. W. Beckett finds that the British soldier, like any other professional, was motivated by considerations of material reward and career advancement.

Within the context of debates about both the evolution of Victorian professions and the nature of military professionalism, Beckett considers the late Victorian officer corps as a case study for weighing distinctions between the British soldier and his civilian counterparts. Beckett examines the role of personality, politics, and patronage in the selection and promotion of officers. He looks, too, at the internal and external influences that extended from the press and public opinion to the rivalry of the so-called rings of adherents of major figures such as Garnet Wolseley and Frederick Roberts. In particular, he considers these processes at play in high command in the Second Afghan War (1878-81), the Anglo-Zulu War (1879), and the South African War (1899-1902).

Based on more than thirty years of research into surviving official, semiofficial, and private correspondence, Beckett's work offers an intimate and occasionally amusing picture of what might affect an officer's career: wealth, wives, and family status; promotion boards and strategic preferences; performance in the field and diplomatic outcomes. It is a remarkable depiction of the British profession of arms, unparalleled in breadth, depth, and detail.
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Votes for Women: Voices of the Suffragettes

Votes for Women: Voices of the Suffragettes

$19.99
A century after the first women were given the vote in Britain, this remarkable book presents a wealth of observations by and about the leading protagonists of the suffrage movement, beautifully illustrated with their portraits from the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Combining the portraits of, and statements by, the leading figures on either side of the suffrage movement, this book brings to life the story of women's fight for the vote. Drawn from the wealth of written, recorded and published material relating to the suffragists and the suffragettes, a broad selection of quotations by early campaigners such as Barbara Bodichon, John Stuart Mill and Anne Knight illustrate the beginnings of the movement, while extracts from impassioned speeches and writings by the Pankhursts and their contemporaries shed light on the campaign as it progressed. Also crucial to the story are those who objected to the emancipation of women, many of whom are also featured here. The writer Hilaire Belloc, for example, disagreed fervently with his own mother, while Herbert Asquith, Liberal Prime Minister from 1908 to 1916, similarly rejected calls to grant women the vote.

Reproductions of pamphlets and cartoons, as well as documents from the National Portrait Gallery's own archive, provide additional context to the story in this informative and highly illustrated publication.
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Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits

Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits

David Cannadine

$55.00
The Collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London, embraces over 500 years of British history, more than 60,000 sitters and explores ideas of social change, power and influence. Arguably as powerful and influential as any individual are the heads of state and empire, whose portraits are among the most popular in the Gallery's Collection.

For the exhibition that accompanies this book, the portraits of kings, queens, statesmen and stateswomen featured will go on tour for the first time, providing international audiences with the opportunity to encounter these famous historical and contemporary personalities face to face. The publication traces major events in British history and examines the ways in which royal portraiture has reflected individual sitters' personalities and wider social, cultural and historical change. Works are arranged chronologically in sections, each of which is prefaced by an introductory text and timeline providing context to the period in question. Particularly significant portraits from each period are ac companied by extended captions that provide key information on the sitter and the artist. Tudors to Windsors also considers how each dynasty has been perceived and interpreted subsequently, with reference to popular culture and contemporary sources.

A number of features on topics such as Royal Favourites, Royal Weddings, Satire, Royals at War, and Royal Fashion and Jewellery provide insights into particular aspects of royal portraiture and trends within the genre.

The publication includes a foreword by the Gallery's Director, a fully illustrated introductory essay discussing royal patronage and key artists in royal portraiture, and an essay by David Cannadine on the historical role of the monarchy in Britain.
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High-Speed Empire: Chinese Expansion and the Future of Southeast Asia

High-Speed Empire: Chinese Expansion and the Future of Southeast Asia

Will Doig

$24.99
The story of the world's most audacious infrastructure project.

Less than a decade ago, China did not have a single high-speed train in service. Today, it owns a network of 14,000 miles of high-speed rail, far more than the rest of the world combined. Now, China is pushing its tracks into Southeast Asia, reviving a century-old colonial fantasy of an imperial railroad stretching to Singapore; and kicking off a key piece of the One Belt One Road initiative, which has a price tag of $1 trillion and, reaches inside the borders of more than 60 countries.

The Pan-Asia Railway portion of One Belt One Road could transform Southeast Asia, bringing shiny Chinese cities, entire economies, and waves of migrants where none existed before. But if it doesn't succeed, that would be a cautionary tale about whether a new superpower, with levels of global authority unimaginable just a decade ago, can pull entire regions into its orbit simply with tracks, sweat, and lots of money. Journalist Will Doig traveled to Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore to chronicle the dramatic transformations taking place -- and to find out whether ordinary people have a voice in this moment of economic, political, and cultural collision.
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Emperors' Treasures: Chinese Art from the National Palace Museum, Taipei

Emperors' Treasures: Chinese Art from the National Palace Museum, Taipei

Jay Xu ,  Li He

$49.99
Emperors' Treasures examines each ruler's distinct contribution to the arts and how each developed his or her aesthetic and connoisseurship.

This Chinese art book book features artworks from the renowned National Palace Museum, Taipei. It encompasses paintings, calligraphy, bronzes, ceramics, lacquer ware, jades, and textiles exemplifying the finest craftsmanship and imperial taste.

Emperors' Treasures explores the identities of eight Chinese rulers-seven emperors and one empress-who reigned from the early 12th through early 20th centuries. They are portrayed in a story line that highlights artworks of their eras, from the dignified Song to the coarse yet subtle Yuan, and from the brilliant Ming until the final, dazzling Qing period.
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The Invisible Emperor: Napoleon on Elba

The Invisible Emperor: Napoleon on Elba

Mark Braude

$39.99
Few historical figures are as well-known as Napoleon Bonaparte, and yet the Emperor's ten-month exile on the small island of Elba is virtually unexplored. Now, for the first time, we have a window into this critical moment when the most powerful man on earth turns defeat into one final challenge.

A close character study mixed with a world-shaking drama, The Invisible Emperor will show Napoleon as he's never before been seen: as heart-broken husband, civil engineer, interior decorator, gardener and spy master. It will show a man at his nadir rise up against the global odds to build a miniature island empire, turn his two greatest foes into his closest confidantes, and return to France without firing a single shot.
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May 1968: At the Heart of the Student Revolt in France

May 1968: At the Heart of the Student Revolt in France

Philippe Tesson ,  Bruno Barbery

$35.00
The media played a major role in the events of May 1968, both for the government and the demonstrators. While the popular posters of the times depicted the CRS (French riot police) manning the microphones at the ORTF (French broadcasting service), the papers and the radio stations took up the defence of the student protestors.

Bruno Barbey of the Magnum Agency covered the events until mid-June. He captured the daily life of the protesters, students and factory workers, immortalising key moments. He recorded nights full of violence and confrontation over the course of these months whose events reverberated to the very heart of State power. From the very beginning of the protests, the entire press corps seized upon the events, but only the daily newspaper Combat, created during the Second World War, was on the side of the young or at least until the violence erupted.

Philippe Tesson, who was Editor-in-Chief at the time, relates his memories of the time in an account never before published. May 68: at the Heart of the Student Revolt brings together the contemporary eye of Barbey and the pen of Tesson who, fifty years later, reflects upon those few weeks that shook France to its core.
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The Third Reich is Listening: Inside German codebreaking 1939-45

The Third Reich is Listening: Inside German codebreaking 1939-45

Christian Jennings

$39.99
The success of the Allied codebreakers at Bletchley Park was one of the iconic intelligence achievements of World War II, immortalised in films such as The Imitation Game and Enigma. But cracking Enigma was only half of the story. Across the Channel, German intelligence agencies were hard at work breaking British and Allied codes.

The Third Reich is Listening is a gripping blend of modern history and science, and describes the successes and failures of Germany's codebreaking and signals intelligence operations from 1935 to 1945. The first mainstream book that takes an in-depth look at German cryptanalysis in World War II, it tells how the Third Reich broke the ciphers of Allied and neutral countries, including Great Britain, France, Russia and Switzerland.

This book offers a dramatic new perspective on one of the biggest stories of World War II, using declassified archive material and colourful personal accounts from the Germans at the heart of the story, including a former astronomer who worked out the British order of battle in 1940, a U-Boat commander on the front line of the Battle of the Atlantic, and the German cryptanalyst who broke into and read crucial codes of the British Royal Navy.
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The Battleship Bismarck

The Battleship Bismarck

Stefan Draminski

$59.99
The Bismarck is perhaps the most famous - and notorious - warship ever built. Completed in 1941, the 45,000-ton German battleship sunk HMS Hood, the pride of the British Navy, during one of the most sensational encounters in naval history. Following the sinking, Bismarck was chased around the North Atlantic by many units of the Royal Navy. She was finally dispatched with gunfire and torpedoes on 27 May, less than five months after her completion. Her wreck still lies where she sank, 4,800m down and 960km off the west coast of France.

Drawing on new research and technology, this edition is the most comprehensive examination of Bismarck ever published. It includes a complete set of detailed line drawings with fully descriptive keys and full-colour 3D artwork, supported by technical details, photographs and text on the building of the ship and a record of the ship's service history.
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How History Gets Things Wrong: The Neuroscience of our Addiction to Stories

How History Gets Things Wrong: The Neuroscience of our Addiction to Stories

Alex Rosenberg

$59.99
Why we learn the wrong things from narrative history, and how our love for stories is hard-wired.

To understand something, you need to know its history. Right? Wrong, says Alex Rosenberg in How History Gets Things Wrong. Feeling especially well-informed after reading a book of popular history on the best-seller list? Don't. Narrative history is always, always wrong. It not just incomplete or inaccurate but deeply wrong, as wrong as Ptolemaic astronomy. We no longer believe that the earth is the center of the universe. Why do we still believe in historical narrative? Our attachment to history as a vehicle for understanding has a long Darwinian pedigree and a genetic basis. Our love of stories is hard-wired. Neuroscience reveals that human evolution shaped a tool useful for survival into a defective theory of human nature.

Stories historians tell, Rosenberg continues, are not only wrong but harmful. Israel and Palestine, for example, have dueling narratives of dispossession that prevent one side from compromising with the other. Henry Kissinger applied lessons drawn from the Congress of Vienna to American foreign policy with disastrous results. Human evolution improved primate mind reading - the ability to anticipate the behavior of others, whether predators, prey, or cooperators - to get us to the top of the African food chain. Now, however, this hard-wired capacity makes us think we can understand history - what the Kaiser was thinking in 1914, why Hitler declared war on the United States - by uncovering the narratives of what happened and why. In fact, Rosenberg argues, we will only understand history if we don't make it into a story.
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Railways and The Raj: How the Age of Steam Transformed India

Railways and The Raj: How the Age of Steam Transformed India

Christian Wolmar

$24.99
India was the jewel in the crown of the British Empire, an Empire that needed a rail network to facilitate its exploitation and reflect its ambition. But, by building India's railways, Britain radically changed the nation and unwittingly planted the seed of independence. As Indians were made to travel in poor conditions and were barred from the better paid railway jobs a stirring of resentment and nationalist sentiment grew.

The Indian Railways network remains one of the largest in the world, serving over 25 million passengers each day. In this expertly told history, Christian Wolmar reveals the full story, from the railway's beginnings to the present day, and examines the chequered role this institution has played in Indian history and the creation of today's modern state.
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The Scottish Clearances: A History of the Dispossessed, 1600-1900

The Scottish Clearances: A History of the Dispossessed, 1600-1900

T. M. Devine

$49.99
Eighteenth-century Scotland is famed for generating many of the enlightened ideas which helped to shape the modern world. But there was in the same period another side to the history of the nation. Many of Scotland's people were subjected to coercive and sometimes violent change- traditional and customary relationships were overturned and replaced by the 'rational' exploitation of land use. The Scottish Clearances is a superb and highly original account of this sometimes terrible process, which changed the Lowland countryside forever, as it also did, more infamously, the old society of the Highlands.

Based on an extensive use of original sources, this pioneering book is the first to chart this tumultuous saga in one volume, with due attention to evictions and loss of land in both north and south of the Highland line. In the process, old myths are exploded and familiar assumptions undermined. With many fascinating details and the sense of an epic human story, The Scottish Clearances is an evocative memorial to all whose lives were irreparably changed in the interests of economic efficiency.

The result created the landscape of Scotland as we know it today, but that came at a price. This is a story of forced clearance, of the destruction of entire communities and of large-scale emigration. Some winners were able to adapt and exploit the new opportunities, but there were also others who lost everything.
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The Great Famine: Irish Perspectives

The Great Famine: Irish Perspectives

John Gibney

$34.99
The Irish potato famine of the 1840s - the 'Great Famine' or 'An gorta mor' - is one of the defining events in modern Irish history. Over a five-year period a population of 8.2 million was reduced to 6.5 million through starvation, disease and emigration. The famine permanently changed one of the constituent parts of the United Kingdom as it then stood and its legacies of depopulation, socio-economic and cultural change, political resentment, and the expansion through mass emigration of an Irish 'diaspora' in Britain, North America and the British Empire still have a resonance today.

Now, in the first installment of a new collaboration between Pen and Sword and History Ireland magazine, some of the world's leading experts on the Great Famine explore the crisis from a range of perspectives. From the importance of the potato in Irish history, to food exports, political change, the provision of charity, the impact of disease, the role of the authorities, the experience of emigration and the changing interpretation of the famine, this volume explores how this seminal event in Irish, British and world history still has a relevance to the globalised world of the twenty-first century.
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The Art of the Samurai: The New Illustrated Edition of the Classic Japanese Warrior Code

The Art of the Samurai: The New Illustrated Edition of the Classic Japanese Warrior Code

Yamamoto Tsunetomo ,  Barry D. Steben

$29.99
In today's times, with it's plethora of quick-fix self help books, which for the most part seem to excel in non-directive, mundane advice, it is a pleasure to read a book that reaches back through the centuries to offer sound advice on how to live your life. It is this particular aspect that places it above Sun Tzu's 'Art of War' and Musashi's 'Book of Five Rings', all fine books, but more designed for group or individual warfare tactics.

This masterpiece of the former samurai Yamamoto Tsunetomo is a treatise written 300 years ago, preserved for generations in northern Kyushu by warrior chiefs as moral and practical instruction for themselves and their samurai retainers. Closely guarded as secret teachings and shown only to a chosen few, the manuscript became generally available only in the postsamurai Meiji era (1868 onwards). The Hagakure offers a fascinating insight into Japanese warrior-ness . This was a culture in which death was embraced rather than feared. Yamamoto tells his readers how to foster courage, how to serve selflessly, how to become a skilled master of your own destiny, and how to infuse life with beauty while acknowledging its transience. Yamamoto's penetrating insights and profound aphorisms reflect important moral principles that still apply to us today.

This illustrated edition of the ancient classic will enlighten anyone with an interest in Japanese culture and world literature.
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Catch-67: The Left, the Right, and the Legacy of the Six-Day War

Catch-67: The Left, the Right, and the Legacy of the Six-Day War

Micah Goodman ,  Eylon Levy

$44.99
A controversial examination of the internal Israeli debate over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from a best-selling Israeli author.

Since the Six-Day War, Israelis have been entrenched in a national debate over whether to keep the land they conquered or to return some, if not all, of the territories to Palestinians. In a balanced and insightful analysis, Micah Goodman deftly sheds light on the ideas that have shaped Israelis' thinking on both sides of the debate, and among secular and religious Jews about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Contrary to opinions that dominate the discussion, he shows that the paradox of Israeli political discourse is that both sides are right in what they affirm-and wrong in what they deny. Although he concludes that the conflict cannot be solved, Goodman is far from a pessimist and explores how instead it can be reduced in scope and danger through limited, practical steps. Through philosophical critique and political analysis, Goodman builds a creative, compelling case for pragmatism in a dispute where a comprehensive solution seems impossible.
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Beyond Survival: A Holocaust Memoir

Beyond Survival: A Holocaust Memoir

Kenneth Arkwright

$27.50
"I am a Jew. Between 1933 and 1945 I lived in Germany, the country of my birth, with the many who perished and with the few who survived the Holocaust."

With these bald statements Ken Arkwright commences the story of his life. There have been countless stories written by and about Holocaust survivors, and each one has its own perspective, each being a witness statement, an eye-witness account - and each deserves to be told.

This particular book has the interesting provenance of having first been published in German, where it aroused considerable interest. Now Hybrid Publishers is proud to release a revised and updated English edition, with fascinating material about Arkwright's life and times.

For decades the author resisted telling his story. As he comments, "Many years of reflecting on these events had to take place to make me feel the need to write about this journey."

He feels an urgency to tell his story, as otherwise his unique life experiences and the life stories of some of the people he met and who perished in the Holocaust will die with him.

Now in his ninetieth year, Ken Arkwright writes with clarity and in great detail - and with a remarkable lack of bitterness - about the progress of his life through the Great Depression, the rise of the Nazis, and the Second World War.

It is indeed a story beyond survival.
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Enemies and Neighbours: Arabs and Jews in Palestine and Israel, 1917-2017

Enemies and Neighbours: Arabs and Jews in Palestine and Israel, 1917-2017

Ian Black

$24.99
Ever since the Ottoman Empire was defeated and British colonial rule began in 1917, Jews and Arabs have struggled for control of the Holy Land. Israel's independence in 1948 in the wake of the Holocaust was a triumph for the Zionist movement but a catastrophe - 'nakba' in Arabic - for the native Palestinian majority.

In Enemies and Neighbours, Ian Black has written a gripping, lucid and timely account of what was doomed to be an irreconcilably hostile relationship from the beginning. It traces how, half a century after the watershed of the 1967 war, hopes for a two-state solution and an end to occupation have all but disappeared.

The author, a veteran Guardian journalist, draws on deep knowledge of the region and decades of his own reporting to create a uniquely vivid and valuable book.
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Bethlehem: Biography of a Town

Bethlehem: Biography of a Town

Nicholas Blincoe

$22.99
The town of Bethlehem carries so many layers of meaning - some ancient, some mythical, some religious - that it feels like an unreal city, even to the people who call it home. Today, the city is hemmed in by a wall and surrounded by forty-one Israeli settlements and hostile settlers and soldiers. The population is undergoing such enormous strains it is close to falling apart. Any town with an eleven-thousand-year history has to be robust, but Bethlehem may soon go the way of Salonica or Constantinople: the physical site might survive, but the long thread winding back to the ancient past will have snapped, and the city risks losing everything that makes it unique.

Still, for many, Bethlehem remains the little town of the Christmas song. Nicholas Blincoe will tell the history of the famous little town, through the visceral experience of living there, taking readers through its stone streets and desert wadis, its monasteries, aqueducts and orchards, showing the city from every angle and era. Inevitably, a portrait of Bethlehem will shed light on one of the world's most intractable political problems. Bethlehem is a much-loved Palestinian city, a source of pride and wealth but also a beacon of co-existence in a region where hopelessness, poverty and violence has become the norm. Bethlehem could light the way to a better future, but if the city is lost then the chances of an end to the Israel-Palestine conflict will be lost with it.
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Daesh: Islamic State's Holy War

Daesh: Islamic State's Holy War

Anthony Tucker-Jones

$34.99
Anthony Tucker-Jones is only too familiar with the modern architects of terror. For the past decade and a half he has worked as the terrorism and security correspondent for the highly respected intersec-The Journal of International Security. During that time he has written extensively on al Qaeda and Daesh. This book draws on his experience to assess Islamic State's brutal Holy War that has brought terror and mayhem to the four corners of the globe.

The emergence of terror group Islamic State, or Daesh, has created one of the greatest threats to global security in the twenty-first century. Spawned from the conflicts in Iraq and Syria, it carved out an Islamic caliphate straddling both failed countries. Since then it has wantonly despoiled world heritage sites, engaged in regional genocide and conducted regular terror attacks against capital cities across the world, killing irrespective of race, colour, creed, gender or age.

Like its predecessor, al Qaeda, Daesh's most potent and insidious weapon is franchise terrorism. It has inspired clutches of deadly wannabee terrorists who have carried out a wave of what can be best described as war crimes, killing innocent civilians. In this perceptive assessment Tucker-Jones highlights how the West has become caught up in what is essentially a civil war between Shia and Sunni Islam, with deadly results.
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Lawrence And The Arabs

Lawrence And The Arabs

Robert Graves ,  Dale Maharidge

$29.99
The story of the Middle East in the early 20th century - through the eyes of two of that period's greatest Englishmen - Robert Graves and Lawrence of Arabia.

Beginning his life-long affair with the Middle East, T.E. Lawrence - Lawrence of Arabia - made his first journey to the region, a four-month walking tour of Syria studying the Crusaders' castles, while still a student at Oxford. He later returned to the area as an archeologist and at the outbreak of World War I was attached to British army intelligence in Egypt. In 1916 he set out on his greatest adventure. With no backing, Lawrence joined Arab forces facing almost insurmountable odds in a rebellion against Turkish domination. His brilliance as a desert war strategist made him a hero among the Arabs, a legendary figure throughout the world, and earned him the moniker Lawrence of Arabia. Lawrence, though, had a near-pathological dislike of publicity and, at the writing of this book, had begun a life of self-imposed obscurity as T.E. Shaw, an anonymous soldier in the RAF.

First published in 1927, Robert Graves's biography remains a unique study of T.E. Lawrence. As a close friend (Lawrence had earlier saved the aspiring poet from bankruptcy), Graves was the only biographer to write with Lawrence's permission and cooperation and did so with understanding and insight that enabled him to separate the man from the myth.
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X, Y & Z: The Real Story of How Enigma Was Broken

X, Y & Z: The Real Story of How Enigma Was Broken

Dermot Turing

$49.99
December, 1932 In the bathroom of a Belgian hotel, a French spymaster photographs top-secret documents - the operating instructions of the cipher machine, Enigma. A few weeks later a mathematician in Warsaw begins to decipher the coded communications of the Third Reich and lays the foundations for the code-breaking operation at Bletchley Park. The co-operation between France, Britain and Poland is given the cover-name `X, Y & Z'.

December, 1942 It is the middle of World War Two. The Polish code-breakers have risked their lives to continue their work inside Vichy France, even as an uncertain future faces their homeland. Now they are on the run from the Gestapo. People who know the Enigma secret are not supposed to be in the combat zone, so MI6 devises a plan to exfiltrate them. If it goes wrong, if they are caught, the consequences could be catastrophic for the Allies.

Based on original research and newly released documents, X, Y & Z is the exhilarating story of those who risked their lives to protect the greatest secret of World War Two.
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Angels in the Trenches: Spiritualism, Superstition and the Supernatural during the First World War

Angels in the Trenches: Spiritualism, Superstition and the Supernatural during the First World War

Leo Ruickbie

$35.00
The mechanised slaughter of the First World War brought a sudden and concentrated interest in life after death. This book explores the role of spiritualism, superstition and the supernatural during and after that war.

After a miraculous escape from the German military juggernaut in the small Belgian town of Mons in 1914, the first major battle that the British Expeditionary Force would face in the First World War, the British really believed that they were on the side of the angels.

Indeed, after 1916, the number of spiritualist societies in the United Kingdom almost doubled, from 158 to 309. As Arthur Conan Doyle explained, 'The deaths occurring in almost every family in the land brought a sudden and concentrated interest in the life after death. People not only asked the question, "If a man die, shall he live again?" but they eagerly sought to know if communication was possible with the dear ones they had lost.' From the Angel of Mons to the popular boom in spiritualism as the horrors of industrialised warfare reaped their terrible harvest, the paranormal - and its use in propaganda - was one of the key aspects of the First World War.

Angels in the Trenches takes us from defining moments, such as the Angel of Mons on the Front Line, to spirit communication on the Home Front, often involving the great and the good of the period, such as aristocrat Dame Edith Lyttelton, founder of the War Refugees Committee, and the physicist Sir Oliver Lodge, Principal of Birmingham University. We see here people at every level of society struggling to come to terms with the ferocity and terror of the war, and their own losses: soldiers looking for miracles on the battlefield; parents searching for lost sons in the seance room. It is a human story of people forced to look beyond the apparent certainties of the everyday - and this book follows them on that journey.
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Mapping The First World War: Battlefields of the Great Conflict from Above

Mapping The First World War: Battlefields of the Great Conflict from Above

Simon Forty

$39.99
The Great War was so devastating - eight million lives were lost globally - that in its aftermath a horrified world expected it to be the final chapter in armed conflict.

Mapping The First World War provides a uniquely different perspective on the `war to end all wars'. An introduction details the causes and progress of the war and is followed by over a hundred maps and charts that show the broad sweep of events, from Germany's 1914 war goals to the final positions of the troops. There are maps depicting movements and battles as well as related documents, such as those on levels of conscription and numbers of weapons. As in all wars, maps were vital to the military organization of all sides during World War I. Before each military event there was the planning, the reconnaissance, and the conjecture as to enemy positions. After the event there would be debriefing, analysis of success and failure, and a redrawing of maps to show new troop positions and boundaries.

All of the maps featured in this book have been drawn from the extensive collection held by the National Archives at Kew in west London. Providing a fascinating and unique insight into the planning and organization of military campaigns, Mapping The First World War is essential for anyone interested in military history.
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Europe in Flames: The Crisis of the Thirty Years War

Europe in Flames: The Crisis of the Thirty Years War

John Matusiak

$49.99
'War,' wrote Cardinal Richelieu, 'is one of the scourges with which it has pleased God to afflict men'. Yet the prelate's mournful observation scarcely begins to encapsulate the full complexity and unspeakable horror of the greatest man-made calamity to befall Europe before the twentieth century. Claiming far more lives proportionately than either the First or Second World Wars, it was a contest involving all the major powers of Europe, in which vast mercenary armies extracted an incalculable toll upon helpless civilian populations as their commanders and the men who equipped them frequently grew rich on the profits. Swedish troops alone are said to have destroyed some 2,000 German castles, 18,000 villages and 1,500 towns, while other vast armies in the pay of Spain, France, the Holy Roman Emperor and a host of pettier princelings brought death to as many as 8 million souls. Rarely has such a perplexing tale been more in need of a new account that is both compelling and informed, and no less comprehensible than comprehensive.
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A Supernatural War: Magic, Divination, and Faith during the First World War

A Supernatural War: Magic, Divination, and Faith during the First World War

Owen Davies

$40.95
It was a commonly expressed view during the First World War that the conflict had seen a major revival of 'superstitious' beliefs and practices.

Churches expressed concerns about the wearing of talismans and amulets, the international press paid considerable interest to the pronouncements of astrologers and prophets, and the authorities in several countries periodically clamped down on fortune tellers and mediums due to concerns over their effect on public morale. Out on the battlefields, soldiers of all nations sought to protect themselves through magical and religious rituals, and, on the home front, people sought out psychics and occult practitioners for news of the fate of their distant loved ones or communication with their spirits. Even away from concerns about the war, suspected witches continued to be abused and people continued to resort to magic and magical practitioners for personal protection, love, and success.

Uncovering and examining beliefs, practices, and contemporary opinions regarding the role of the supernatural in the war years, Owen Davies explores the broader issues regarding early twentieth-century society in the West, the psychology of the supernatural during wartime, and the extent to which the war cast a spotlight on the widespread continuation of popular belief in magic. A Supernatural War reveals the surprising stories of extraordinary people in a world caught up with the promise of occult powers.
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Dornier Do 335

Dornier Do 335

Robert Forsyth ,  Wiek Luijken ,  Adam Tooby ,  Simon Schatz

$29.99
The Dornier Do 335 was conceived as a high-speed, all-weather fighter, and represented the pinnacle of piston-engined aircraft design. The Do 335 was a big aircraft, weighing just over 10,000kg when laden with fuel, equipment, and pilot, yet powered by two Daimler-Benz DB 603 engines, it was capable of reaching a maximum speed of 750km/h at 6400 meters, making it the fastest piston engine aircraft produced in Germany during World War II.

Some forty aircraft were built between late 1943 and the end of the war, and it was intended to deploy the type as a day fighter, bomber, night fighter, bad weather interceptor, and reconnaissance aircraft, all of which were intended to incorporate the latest armament, bomb sights, communications, and radar equipment, as well as an ejector seat. Featuring archive photography and specially commissioned artwork, this is the full story of the aircraft that the Luftwaffe hoped would turn the tide of the war.
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Chinese Soldier vs Japanese Soldier: China 1937-38

Chinese Soldier vs Japanese Soldier: China 1937-38

Benjamin Lai ,  Johnny Shumate

$29.99
In July 1937, the Marco Polo Bridge Incident sparked a bloody conflict between Chinese and Japanese forces that would rage across China and beyond for more than eight years.

The two sides' forces brought very different strengths and limitations to the conflict. In 1937 China was divided into factions, each controlled by warlords with independent forces, and there was no unified Chinese army. In order to fight the Japanese Chiang Kai-shek, the nominal leader of Nationalist China, was compelled to do deals with these regional powers. For their part, the Japanese employed ground forces broadly comparable to those fielded by Western powers, including modern artillery and tanks.

Featuring specially commissioned artwork and drawing upon an array of sources, this study investigates the origins, training, doctrine and armament of the Chinese and Japanese forces who fought in the opening stages of the Second Sino-Japanese War.
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The Great Halifax Explosion: A World War I Story of Treachery, Tragedy, and Extraordinary Heroism

The Great Halifax Explosion: A World War I Story of Treachery, Tragedy, and Extraordinary Heroism

John U. Bacon

$33.95
The riveting, tick-tock account of the largest manmade explosion in history prior to the atomic bomb, and the equally astonishing tales of survival and heroism that emerged from the ashes, from acclaimed New York Times bestselling author John U. Bacon

After steaming out of New York City on December 1, 1917, laden with a staggering three thousand tons of TNT and other explosives, the munitions ship Mont-Blanc fought its way up the Atlantic coast, through waters prowled by enemy U-boats. As it approached the lively port city of Halifax, Mont-Blanc's deadly cargo erupted with the force of 2.9 kilotons of TNT - the most powerful explosion ever visited on a human population, save for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Mont-Blanc was vaporized in one fifteenth of a second; a shockwave leveled the surrounding city. Next came a thirty-five-foot tsunami. Most astounding of all, however, were the incredible tales of survival and heroism that soon emerged from the rubble.

This is the unforgettable story told in John U. Bacon's The Great Halifax Explosion: a ticktock account of fateful decisions that led to doom, the human faces of the blast's 11,000 casualties, and the equally moving individual stories of those who lived and selflessly threw themselves into urgent rescue work that saved thousands.

The shocking scale of the disaster stunned the world, dominating global headlines even amid the calamity of the First World War. Hours after the blast, Boston sent trains and ships filled with doctors, medicine, and money. The explosion would revolutionize pediatric medicine; transform U.S.-Canadian relations; and provide physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who studied the Halifax explosion closely when developing the atomic bomb, with history's only real-world case study demonstrating the lethal power of a weapon of mass destruction.

Mesmerizing and inspiring, Bacon's deeply-researched narrative brings to life the tragedy, brvery, and surprising afterlife of one of the most dramatic events of modern times.
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Air Power in the Malayan Emergency: The RAF and Allied Air Forces in Malaya 1948 - 1960

Air Power in the Malayan Emergency: The RAF and Allied Air Forces in Malaya 1948 - 1960

$49.95
As early as the 1920s Communist Soviet and then Chinese agents had been infiltrating Malaya and in 1929 the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) was formed with the intention of overthrowing the Malayan Administration and establishing a Communist-controlled democratic republic.

When Japan invaded China, support for the MCP grew and, ironically, following the Japanese occupation of Malaya in 1941, it was the MCP which received backing from Britain as the principle force capable of mounting guerrilla operations against the invaders. After the end of the Second World War, the MCP revived its original aims through peaceful means but found little popular support amongst the Malayans. So the Communists turned to violence, with a program of murders and sabotage.

By the summer of 1948 the scale of insurrection was such that Emergency Powers were invoked by the Federal Government on 16 June and the military authorities were called in to assist the civil administration in restoring law and order - and this included squadrons of the RAF, RAAF, RNZAF, and the local auxiliary and national air forces.

The difficulties of operating in a country the size of England and Wales, of which 80 per cent is dense jungle, against a mobile force of less than 10,000 were immense. Yet over the course of the Emergency a highly-effective system of rapid response to guerrilla attacks and planned offensive strikes was developed.

Though never amounting to more than six or seven squadrons, typically equipped with Spitfires, Beaufighters, Tempests, Lincolns and Sunderlands, and later with Vampires and Venoms, the RAF and Commonwealth crews helped the British and Malayan authorities defeat the insurgents.

The book features 16 illustrations.
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Facing Empire: Indigenous Experiences in a Revolutionary Age

Facing Empire: Indigenous Experiences in a Revolutionary Age

Kate Fullagar ,  Michael A. McDonnell ,  Daniel K. Richter

$79.00
The contributors to Facing Empire reimagine the Age of Revolution from the perspective of indigenous peoples. Rather than treating indigenous peoples as distant and passive players in the political struggles of the time, this book argues that they helped create and exploit the volatility that marked an era while playing a central role in the profound acceleration in encounters and contacts between peoples around the world.

Focusing in particular on indigenous peoples' experiences of the British Empire, this volume takes a unique comparative approach in thinking about how indigenous peoples shaped, influenced, redirected, ignored, and sometimes even forced the course of modern imperialism. The essays demonstrate how indigenous-shaped local exchanges, cultural relations, and warfare provoked discussion and policymaking in London as much as it did in Charleston, Cape Town, or Sydney.

Facing Empire charts a fresh way forward for historians of empire, indigenous studies, and the Age of Revolution and shows why scholars can no longer continue to exclude indigenous peoples from histories of the modern world. These past conflicts over land and water, labor and resources, and hearts and minds have left a living legacy of contested relations that continue to resonate in contemporary politics and societies today. Covering the Indian and Pacific Oceans, Australia, and West and South Africa, as well as North America, this book looks at the often misrepresented and underrepresented complexity of the indigenous experience on a global scale.

Contributors: Tony Ballantyne, Justin Brooks, Colin G. Calloway, Kate Fullagar, Bill Gammage, Robert Kenny, Shino Konishi, Elspeth Martini, Michael A. McDonnell, Jennifer Newell, Joshua L. Reid, Daniel K. Richter, Rebecca Shumway, Sujit Sivasundaram, Nicole Ulrich
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The Sunken Gold: First World War Espionage and the Greatest Treasure Salvage in History

The Sunken Gold: First World War Espionage and the Greatest Treasure Salvage in History

Joseph A. Williams

$49.99
On 25 January 1917, HMS Laurentic struck two German mines off the coast of Ireland and sank. The ship was carrying 44 tons of gold bullion to the still-neutral United States in order to finance the war effort for Britain and its allies. Britain desperately needed that sunken treasure, but any salvage had to be secret since the British government dared not alert the Germans to the presence of the gold. Lieutenant Commander Guybon Damant was the most qualified officer to head the risky mission. Wild gales turned the operation into a multiyear struggle of man versus nature. As the war raged on, Damant was called off the salvage to lead a team of covert divers to investigate and search through the contents of recently sunk U-boats for ciphers, minefield schematics, and other secrets. The information they obtained proved critical towards Allied efforts to defeat the U-boats and win the war. But Damant had become obsessed with completing his long-deferred mission. The Sunken Gold is a story of human persistence, bravery, and patriotism.
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We Were Eight Years in Power

We Were Eight Years in Power

Ta-Nehisi Coates

$22.99
From 2008-2016, the leader of the free world was a black man. Obama's presidency was a watershed moment in American history. In those eight years, the political conversation around race, gender, class and wealth shifted drastically - inspiring hope but also attracting criticism and breeding discontent. That discontent ultimately led to a shocking backlash in the election of Donald Trump.

In this essential book, Ta-Nehisi Coates takes stock of Obama's eight years in power, brilliantly navigating the intersections of political, ideological and cultural perspectives. And he reflects on his own journey through these years, weaving the public with the private to create a startlingly intimate and piercingly relevant memoir.
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The Mayflower Generation: The Winslow Family and the Fight for the New World

The Mayflower Generation: The Winslow Family and the Fight for the New World

Rebecca Fraser

$22.99
Selected by The Times as a History Book of the Year 2017 and The Tablet as a Book of the Year 2017

The voyage of the Mayflower and the founding of Plymouth Colony is one of the seminal events in world history. But the poorly-equipped group of English Puritans who ventured across the Atlantic in the early autumn of 1620 had no sense they would pass into legend. They had eighty casks of butter and two dogs but no cattle for milk, meat, or ploughing. They were ill-prepared for the brutal journey and the new land that few of them could comprehend. But the Mayflower story did not end with these Pilgrims' arrival on the coast of New England or their first uncertain years as settlers. Rebecca Fraser traces two generations of one ordinary family and their extraordinary response to the challenges of life in America.

Edward Winslow, an apprentice printer born in Worcestershire, fled England and then Holland for a life of religious freedom and opportunity. Despite the intense physical trials of settlement, he found America exotic, enticing, and endlessly interesting. He built a home and a family, and his remarkable friendship with King Massassoit, Chief of the Wampanoags, is part of the legend of Thanksgiving. Yet, fifty years later, Edward's son Josiah was commanding the New England militias against Massassoit's son in King Philip's War.

The Mayflower Generation is an intensely human portrait of the Winslow family written with the pace of an epic. Rebecca Fraser details domestic life in the seventeenth century, the histories of brave and vocal Puritan women and the contradictions between generations as fathers and sons made the painful decisions which determined their future in America.
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The Oath and the Office: A Guide to the Constitution for Future Presidents

The Oath and the Office: A Guide to the Constitution for Future Presidents

Corey Brettschneider

$32.95
Can the president launch a nuclear attack without congressional approval? Is it ever a crime to criticize the president? Can states legally resist a president's executive order? In today's fraught political climate, it often seems as if we must become constitutional law scholars just to understand the news from Washington, let alone make a responsible decision at the polls.

The Oath and the Office is the book we need, right now and into the future, whether we are voting for or running to become president of the United States. Constitutional law scholar and political science professor Corey Brettschneider guides us through the Constitution and explains the powers - and limits - that it places on the presidency. From the document itself and from American history's most famous court cases, we learn why certain powers were granted to the presidency, how the Bill of Rights limits those powers, and what we the people can do to influence the nation's highest public office-including, if need be, removing the person in it. In these brief yet deeply researched chapters, we meet founding fathers such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton, as well as key figures from historic cases such as Brown v. Board of Education and Korematsu v. United States.

Brettschneider breathes new life into the articles and amendments that we once read about in high school civics class, but that have real impact on our lives today. The Oath and the Office offers a compact, comprehensive tour of the Constitution, and empowers all readers, voters, and future presidents with the knowledge and confidence to read and understand one of our nation's most important founding documents.
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Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America's Origin

Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America's Origin

Joseph Kelly

$39.99
For readers of Nathaniel Philbrick's Mayflower, a groundbreaking history that makes the case for replacing Plymouth Rock with Jamestown as America's founding myth.

We all know the great American origin story. It begins with an exodus. Fleeing religious persecution, the hardworking, pious Pilgrims thrived in the wilds of New England, where they built their fabled city on a hill. Legend goes that the colony in Jamestown was a false start, offering a cautionary tale. Lazy louts hunted gold till they starved, and the shiftless settlers had to be rescued by English food and the hard discipline of martial law.

Neither story is true. In Marooned, Joseph Kelly reexamines the history of Jamestown and comes to a radically different and decidedly American interpretation of these first Virginians.

In this gripping account of shipwrecks and mutiny in America's earliest settlements, Kelly argues that the colonists at Jamestown were literally and figuratively marooned, cut loose from civilization, and cast into the wilderness. The British caste system meant little on this frontier: those who wanted to survive had to learn to work and fight and intermingle with the nearby native populations. Ten years before the Mayflower Compact and decades before Hobbes and Locke, they invented the idea of government by the people. 150 years before Jefferson, they discovered the truth that all men were equal.

The epic origin of America was not an exodus and a fledgling theocracy. It is a tale of shipwrecked castaways of all classes marooned in the wilderness fending for themselves in any way they could - a story that illuminates who we are today.
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Grant

Grant

Ron Chernow

$27.99
A portrait of one of America's most compelling generals and presidents, Ulysses S. Grant, by Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Chernow.

As late as April 1861, when the American Civil War broke out, Ulysses S. Grant was a dismal failure. A competent officer in the war against Mexico, he had resigned from the army over his drinking and had sunk into poverty as a civilian, losing all his money in hopeless investments. He had failed to secure the command of a volunteer unit and was about to return to his abject life working in his family's leather-goods store when he was offered the colonelcy of an Illinois regiment.

Less than four years later he was the commanding general of the victorious Union armies and was hailed as a military genius. He later served two terms as President of the United States. This is the epic biography of a very unheroic American hero, a modest, reticent and principled man who surprised the world and changed it for the better.
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How the Right Lost Its Mind

How the Right Lost Its Mind

Charles J. Sykes

$24.99
In March 2016, Wisconsin's #1 conservative talk radio host Charles Sykes did the unthinkable: He ferociously challenged Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump in a live interview. Afterward, Sykes alone among conservative media figures continued to denounce Trump, and extended his attack to include the larger right-wing media and other politicians that enabled his rise.

Now, in How the Right Lost Its Mind, Sykes presents an impassioned, regretful, and deeply thoughtful account of how the American conservative movement came to lose its values. How did a movement that was defined by its belief in limited government, individual liberty, free markets, traditional values, and civility find itself embracing bigotry, political intransigence, demagoguery, and falsehood? Mainstream conservatives now find themselves in need of a broad and introspective evaluation of what went wrong - and how to move forward and regain their core principles.

How the Right Lost its Mind addresses: *Why are so many voters so credulous and immune to factual information reported by responsible media? *Why did conservatives decide to overlook, even embrace, so many of Trump's outrages, gaffes, conspiracy theories, falsehoods, and smears? *Can conservatives govern? Or are they content to merely rage? *How can the right recover its traditional values and persuade a new generation of their worth?
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The Pine Barrens

The Pine Barrens

John McPhee

$22.99
Most people think of the American state of New Jersey as a suburban-industrial corridor that sits just west of New York City. But in the centre of the state lies a vast wilderness - larger than most national parks - which has been known since the seventeenth century as the Pine Barrens.

In The Pine Barrens, McPhee uses his uncanny skills as a journalist to explore the history of the region and to describe the people - and their distinctive folklore - who call it home. Including one who can navigate the immensely dense woods by sheer memory, and another who responds to McPhee's knock on his door with a pork chop in one hand, a raw onion in the other, and the greeting 'Come in. Come in. Come on the hell in.' With a new foreword by Iain Sinclair
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Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics

Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics

Lawrence O'Donnell

$33.95
From the host of MSNBC’s The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell, an important and enthralling new account of the presidential election that changed everything, the race that created American politics as we know it today

The 1968 U.S. Presidential election was the young Lawrence O’Donnell’s political awakening, and in the decades since it has remained one of his abiding fascinations.  For years he has deployed one of America’s shrewdest political minds to understanding its dynamics, not just because it is fascinating in itself, but because in it is contained the essence of what makes America different, and how we got to where we are now. Playing With Fire represents O’Donnell’s master class in American electioneering, embedded in the epic human drama of a system, and a country, coming apart at the seams in real time.

Nothing went according to the script. LBJ was confident he'd dispatch with Nixon, the GOP frontrunner; Johnson's greatest fear and real nemesis was RFK. But Kennedy and his team, despite their loathing of the president, weren't prepared to challenge their own party’s incumbent. Then, out of nowhere, Eugene McCarthy shocked everyone with his disloyalty and threw his hat in the ring to run against the president and the Vietnam War. A revolution seemed to be taking place, and LBJ, humiliated and bitter, began to look mortal. Then RFK leapt in, LBJ dropped out, and all hell broke loose. Two assassinations and a week of bloody riots in Chicago around the Democratic Convention later, and the old Democratic Party was a smoldering ruin, and, in the last triumph of old machine politics, Hubert Humphrey stood alone in the wreckage.

Suddenly Nixon was the frontrunner, having masterfully maintained a smooth façade behind which he feverishly held his party’s right and left wings in the fold, through a succession of ruthless maneuvers to see off George Romney, Nelson Rockefeller, Ronald Reagan, and the great outside threat to his new Southern Strategy, the arch-segregationist George Wallace.  But then, amazingly, Humphrey began to close, and so, in late October, Nixon pulled off one of the greatest dirty tricks in American political history, an act that may well meet the statutory definition of treason.  The tone was set for Watergate and all else that was to follow, all the way through to today.
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President McKinley: Architect of the American Century

President McKinley: Architect of the American Century

Robert W. Merry

$31.95
Acclaimed historian Robert Merry resurrects the presidential reputation of William McKinley in a measured, insightful biography that seeks to set the record straight...a deft character study of a president (The New York Times Book Review) whose low place in the presidential rankings does not reflect the stamp he put on America's future role in the world.

Republican President William McKinley transformed America during his two terms as president (1897 - 1901). Although he does not register large in either public memory or in historians' rankings, in this revealing account, Robert W. Merry offers a fresh twist on the old tale...a valuable education on where America has been and, possibly, where it is going (The National Review).

McKinley settled decades of monetary controversy by taking the country to a strict gold standard; in the Spanish-American war he kicked Spain out of the Caribbean and liberated Cuba from Spain; in the Pacific he acquired Hawaii and the Philippines; he developed the doctrine of fair trade ; forced the Open Door to China; forged our special relationship with Great Britain. He expanded executive power and managed public opinion through his quiet manipulation of the press. McKinley paved the way for the bold and flamboyant leadership of his famous successor, Teddy Roosevelt, who built on his accomplishments (and got credit for them).

Merry writes movingly about McKinley's admirable personal life, from his simple Midwestern upbringing to his Civil War heroism to his brave comportment just moments before his death by assassination. As this splendid revisionist narrative makes plain....

The presidency is no job for a political amateur. Character counts, sometimes even more than charisma (The Wall Street Journal). Lively, definitive, and eye-opening, President McKinley resurrects this overlooked president and places him squarely on the list of one of the most important.
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Bobby Kennedy: A Raging Spirit

Bobby Kennedy: A Raging Spirit

Chris Matthews

$31.95
In Chris Matthews's New York Times bestselling portrait of Robert F. Kennedy, Readers witness the evolution of Kennedy's soul. Through tragedy after tragedy we find the man humanized (Associated Press). With his bestselling biography Jack Kennedy, Chris Matthews profiled of one of America's most beloved Presidents and the patriotic spirit that defined him. Now, with Bobby Kennedy, Matthews provides insight into [Bobby's] spirit and what drove him to greatness (New York Journal of Books) in his gripping, in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at one of the great figures of the American twentieth century.

Overlooked by his father, and overshadowed by his war-hero brother, Bobby Kennedy was a perpetual underdog. When he had the chance to become a naval officer like his older brother, Bobby turned it down, choosing instead to join the Navy as a common sailor. It was a life-changing experience that led him to connect with voters from all walks of life: young and old, black and white, rich and poor. They were the people who turned out for him in his 1968 campaign. RFK would prove himself to be the rarest of politicians--both a pragmatist who knew how to get the job done and an unwavering idealist who could inspire millions.

Drawing on extensive research and interviews, Matthews pulls back the curtain on the private world of Robert Francis Kennedy. Matthew illuminates the important moments of his life: from his early years and his start in politics, to his crucial role as attorney general in his brother's administration and, finally, his tragic run for president. This definitive book brings Bobby Kennedy to life like never before.
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Andrew Jackson And The Miracle Of New Orleans

Andrew Jackson And The Miracle Of New Orleans

Brian Kilmeade ,  Don Yaeger

$31.95
The War of 1812 saw America threatened on every side. Encouraged by the British, Indian tribes attacked settlers in the West, while the Royal Navy terrorized the coasts. By mid-1814, President James Madison?s generals had lost control of the war in the North, losing battles in Canada. Then British troops set the White House ablaze, and a feeling of hopelessness spread across the country.

Into this dire situation stepped Major General Andrew Jackson. A native of Tennessee who had witnessed the horrors of the Revolutionary War and Indian attacks, he was glad America had finally decided to confront repeated British aggression. But he feared that President Madison?s men were overlooking the most important target of all- New Orleans.

If the British conquered New Orleans, they would control the mouth of the Mississippi River, cutting Americans off from that essential trade route and threatening the previous decade?s Louisiana Purchase. The new nation?s dreams of western expansion would be crushed before they really got off the ground.

So Jackson had to convince President Madison and his War Department to take him seriously, even though he wasn?t one of the Virginians and New Englanders who dominated the government. He had to assemble a coalition of frontier militiamen, French-speaking Louisianans,Cherokee and Choctaw Indians, freed slaves, and even some pirates. And he had to defeat the most powerful military force in the world-in the confusing terrain of the Louisiana bayous.

In short, Jackson needed a miracle. The local Ursuline nuns set to work praying for his outnumbered troops. And so the Americans, driven by patriotism and protected by prayer, began the battle that would shape our young nation?s destiny.

As they did in their two previous bestsellers, Kilmeade and Yaeger make history come alive with a riveting true story that will keep you turning the pages. You?ll finish with a new understanding of one of our greatest generals and a renewed appreciation for the brave men who fought so that America could one day stretch from sea to shining sea.
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Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

Gordon S. Wood

$29.99
Thomas Jefferson and John Adams could scarcely have come from more different worlds, or been more different in temperament. Jefferson, the optimist with enough faith in the innate goodness of his fellow man to be democracy's champion, was an aristocratic Southern slaveowner, while Adams, the overachiever from New England's rising middling classes, painfully aware he was no aristocrat, was a skeptic about popular rule and a defender of a more elitist view of government. They worked closely in the crucible of revolution, crafting the Declaration of Independence and leading, with Franklin, the diplomatic effort that brought France into the fight. But ultimately, their profound differences would lead to a fundamental crisis, in their friendship and in the nation writ large, as they became the figureheads of two entirely new forces, the first American political parties. It was a bitter breach, lasting through the presidential administrations of both men, and beyond. But late in life, something remarkable happened- these two men were nudged into reconciliation. What started as a grudging trickle of correspondence became a great flood, and a friendship was rekindled, over the course of hundreds of letters. In their final years they were the last surviving founding fathers and cherished their role in this mighty young republic as it approached the half century mark in 1826. At last, on the afternoon of July 4th, 50 years to the day after the signing of the Declaration, Adams let out a sigh and said, At least Jefferson still lives. He died soon thereafter. In fact, a few hours earlier on that same day, far to the south in his home in Monticello, Jefferson died as well. Arguably no relationship in this country's history carries as much freight as that of John Adams of Massachusetts and Thomas Jefferson of Virginia. Gordon Wood has more than done justice to these entwined lives and their meaning; he has written a magnificent new addition to America's collective story.
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Heirs of the Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, the Second Generation of American Giants

Heirs of the Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, the Second Generation of American Giants

H. W. Brands

$49.99
From New York Times bestselling historian H. W. Brands comes the riveting story of how America's second generation of political giants - Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and John Calhoun - battled to complete the unfinished work of the Founding Fathers and decide the shape of our democracy.

In the early days of the nineteenth century, three young men strode onto the national stage, elected to Congress at a moment when the Founding Fathers were beginning to retire to their farms. Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, a champion orator known for his eloquence, spoke for the North and its business class. Henry Clay of Kentucky, as dashing as he was ambitious, embodied the hopes of the rising West. South Carolina's John Calhoun, with piercing eyes and an even more piercing intellect, defended the South and slavery.

Together this second generation of American founders took the country to war, battled one another for the presidency, and tasked themselves with finishing the work the Founders had left undone. Above all, they sought to remedy the two glaring flaws in the Constitution: its fudge on where authority ultimately rested, with the states or the nation; and its unwillingness to address the essential incompatibility of republicanism and slavery. They wrestled with these issues for four decades, arguing bitterly and hammering out political compromises that held the union together, but only just. Then, in 1850, when California moved to join the union as a free state, "the three great men of America" had one last chance to save the country from the real risk of civil war. But by then they were never further apart.

Thrillingly and authoritatively, H. W. Brands narrates the little-known drama of the dangerous early years of our democracy.
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Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery

Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery

Calvin Schermerhorn

$34.95
Written as a narrative history of slavery within the United States, Unrequited Toil details how an institution that seemed to be disappearing at the end of the American Revolution rose to become the most contested and valuable economic interest in the nation by 1850. Calvin Schermerhorn charts changes in the family lives of enslaved Americans, exploring the broader processes of nation-building in the United States, growth and intensification of national and international markets, the institutionalization of chattel slavery, and the growing relevance of race in the politics and society of the republic. In chapters organized chronologically, Schermerhorn argues that American economic development relied upon African Americans' social reproduction while simultaneously destroying their intergenerational cultural continuity. He explores the personal narratives of enslaved people and develops themes such as politics, economics, labor, literature, rebellion, and social conditions.
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The Second Creation: Fixing the American Constitution in the Founding Era

The Second Creation: Fixing the American Constitution in the Founding Era

Jonathan Gienapp

$74.99
Americans widely believe that the United States Constitution was almost wholly created when it was drafted in 1787 and ratified in 1788. But in a shrewd rereading of the founding era, Jonathan Gienapp upends this long-held assumption, recovering the unknown story of American constitutional creation in the decade after its adoption-a story with explosive implications for current debates over constitutional originalism and interpretation.

When the Constitution first appeared, it was shrouded in uncertainty. Not only was its meaning unclear, but so too was its essential nature. Was the American Constitution a written text, or something else? Was it a legal text? Was it finished or unfinished? What rules would guide its interpretation? Who would adjudicate competing readings? As political leaders put the Constitution to work, none of these questions had answers. Through vigorous debates they confronted the document's uncertainty, and-over time-how these leaders imagined the Constitution radically changed. They had begun trying to fix, or resolve, an imperfect document, but they ended up fixing, or cementing, a very particular notion of the Constitution as a distinctively textual and historical artifact circumscribed in space and time. This means that some of the Constitution's most definitive characteristics, ones which are often treated as innate, were only added later and were thus contingent and optional.

By offering a stunning revision of the founding document's evolving history, The Second Creation forces us to confront anew the question that animated the founders so long ago: What is our Constitution?
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The Jamestown Brides: The untold story of England's 'maids for Virginia'

The Jamestown Brides: The untold story of England's 'maids for Virginia'

Jennifer Potter

$39.99
In 1621, fifty-seven women undertook a three-month journey to Jamestown after responding to an advert placed by the Virginia Company of London calling for maids 'young and uncorrupt' to make wives for its planters in the New Colony.

Although the women travelled of their own free will, the Company was in effect selling them at a profit, having set a bride price of 150lbs of tobacco for each woman sold. The colony was then less than fifteen years old and the Company hoped to root its settlers to the land with ties of family and children. But what did the women want from the enterprise? Why did they agree to make the dangerous Atlantic crossing to a wild and dangerous land, where six out of seven European settlers died within their first few years, from dysentery, typhoid, salt poisoning and periodic skirmishes with the native population?

Using original research, including company records and contemporary accounts, Jennifer Potter gives voice to these women and takes the reader on a journey alongside the brides as they travel into a perilous and uncertain future.
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A Fierce Glory: Antietam - The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery

A Fierce Glory: Antietam - The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery

Justin Martin

$39.99
September 17, 1862, was America's bloodiest day. When it ended, 3,654 soldiers lay dead on the land surrounding Antietam Creek in Western Maryland. The battle fought there was as deadly as the stakes were high.

For the first time, the Rebels had taken the war into Union territory. A Southern victory would have ended the war and split the nation in two. Instead, the North managed to drive the Confederate army back into Virginia. Emboldened by victory, albeit by the thinnest of margins, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves and investing the war with a new, higher purpose.

In this vivid, character-rich narrative, acclaimed author Justin Martin reveals why this battle was the Civil War's tipping point. The battle featured an unusually rich cast of characters and witnessed important advances in medicine and communications. But the impact of the battle on politics and society was its most important legacy. Had the outcome been different, Martin argues, critical might-have-beens would have rippled forward to the present, creating a different society and two nations.

A Fierce Glory is an engaging account of the Civil War's most important battle.
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Gorbachev: The Man and His Era

Gorbachev: The Man and His Era

Prof. William Taubman

$29.99
SHORTLISTED FOR THE PUSHKIN HOUSE BOOK PRIZE 2018

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Khrushchev: The Man and his Era

'A phenomenally researched life of the man who did more than any other to change Europe and the world in the last half of the 20th century'. Jonathan Steele, The Guardian

'An engaging, poignant portrayal of one of the most significant of Russian leaders' Kirkus review

'...deeply penetrating history and engrossing psychological study.' Robert Legvold, Foreign Affairs Magazine

'Impressive...full of fascinating detail' Peter Conradi, Sunday Times

'Comprehensive and immensely readable' The Economist

'Superb...an extraordinary story of one man and history in a tense wrestling match' The Washington Post

This is the definitive biography on one of the most important and controversial figures of the 20th century. Drawing on interviews with Gorbachev himself, transcripts and documents from the Russian archives, and interviews with Kremlin aides and adversaries, as well as foreign leaders, Taubman's intensely personal portrait extends to Gorbachev's remarkable marriage to a woman he deeply loved, and to the family that they raised together. Nuanced and poignant, yet unsparing and honest, this sweeping account has all the amplitude of a great Russian novel.

When Mikhail Gorbachev became its leader in March 1985, the USSR was still one of the world's two superpowers. By the end of his tenure six years later, the Communist system was dismantled, the cold war was over and, on 25th December 1991, the Soviet Union itself ceased to exist. While not solely responsible for this remarkable upheaval, he set decisive changes in motion. Assessments of Gorbachev could not be more polarised. In the West, he is regarded as a hero. In Russia, he is widely hated by those who blame him for the collapse of the USSR. Admirers marvel at this vision and courage. Detractors, including many of his Kremlin comrades, have accused him of everything from naivete to treason.
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The Hermitage: The Biography of a Great Museum

The Hermitage: The Biography of a Great Museum

Geraldine Norman

$59.99
The Hermitage Musuem in St Petersburg is possibly the greatest museum in the world. It began as a showcase for the art treasures of the Tsars and reflects their legendary extravagance. Imperial romances, marriages and murders all had an impact on the collection, as did the byzantine bartering of international politics. Nationalised by the Bolsheviks in 1917, the museum expanded to fill the imperial family's Winter Palace and the three riverside pavilions that were built onto the palace in the late eighteenth century. Vast, confiscated collections came the way of the museum as a result of the Revolution - the finest treasures of the Russian nobility, as well as two great merchant collections of Gauguin, Matisse and modern masters.

The courage and devotion to scholarship of its curators have helped the museum survive the terrible trials of the twentieth century: the exile, imprisonment and execution of many staff during Stalin's purges, and extremities of hunger during the siege of Leningrad - when 2,000 people lived in a makeshift bomb shelter in the museum cellars. With the 1990s has come a new battle, as the Hermitage struggles to survive amidst the economic chaos of post- Communist Russia.

The Hermitage is the first full history of this great museum in any language. It highlights the human adventures involved in the creation and preservation of one of the finest art collections in the world, and reveals the hitherto unchronicled dramas of the Communist years. It provides an unusual perspective on Russia's troubled history.
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Maps of War: Mapping Conflict Through the Centuries

Maps of War: Mapping Conflict Through the Centuries

Jeremy Black

$59.99
There is little documented mapping of conflict prior to the Renaissance period, but, from the 17th century onwards, military commanders and strategists began to document the wars in which they were involved and later, to use mapping to actually plan the progress of a conflict. Using contemporary maps, this sumptuous new volume covers the history of the mapping of war on land and shows the way in which maps provide a guide to the history of war.

Content includes:

The beginnings of military mapping up to 1600 including the impact of printing and the introduction of gunpowder.

The seventeenth century: The focus is on maps to illustrate war, rather than as a planning tool and the chapter considers the particular significance of maps of fortifications.

The eighteenth century: The growing need for maps on a world scale reflects the spread of European power and of transoceanic conflict between Europeans. This chapter focuses in particular on the American War of Independence.

The nineteenth century: Key developments included contouring and the creation of military surveying. Subjects include the Napoleonic Wars and the American Civil War.

The twentieth century including extended features on the First and Second World Wars including maps showing trench warfare and aerial reconnaissance. Much of the chapter focuses on the period from 1945 to the present day including special sections on the Vietnam War and the Gulf Wars.
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Atlas of the Unexpected: Haphazard discoveries, chance places and unimaginable destinations

Atlas of the Unexpected: Haphazard discoveries, chance places and unimaginable destinations

Travis Elborough

$39.99
A voyage to places both infamous and unknown that have, often by chance or by haphazard means, been destinations of discovery that make up our world today.

From the fortuitous discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, to the savvy invention of Vaseline at an American oil rig, Atlas of the Unexpected uncovers the most astounding and bizarre discoveries which have been unearthed on our planet. Spanning centuries and reaching all around the globe, each entry provides key information, wittily observed, and is accompanied by specially-drawn maps that illuminate the geographical oddities of each discovery.
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Fishing: How the Sea Fed Civilization

Fishing: How the Sea Fed Civilization

Brian Fagan

$32.99
Humanity's last major source of food from the wild, and how it enabled and shaped the growth of civilization In this history of fishing-not as sport but as sustenance-archaeologist and best-selling author Brian Fagan argues that fishing was an indispensable and often overlooked element in the growth of civilization. It sustainably provided enough food to allow cities, nations, and empires to grow, but it did so with a different emphasis. Where agriculture encouraged stability, fishing demanded movement. It frequently required a search for new and better fishing grounds; its technologies, centered on boats, facilitated movement and discovery; and fish themselves, when dried and salted, were the ideal food-lightweight, nutritious, and long-lasting-for traders, travelers, and conquering armies. This history of the long interaction of humans and seafood tours archaeological sites worldwide to show readers how fishing fed human settlement, rising social complexity, the development of cities, and ultimately the modern world.
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Whatever it Takes: The Price of Power, the Cost of Creativity

Whatever it Takes: The Price of Power, the Cost of Creativity

Peter Deakin

$29.95
Peter Deakin works as a barrister, one of Sydney's best known and respected Queen's Counsel. His real enthusiasm is historical scholarship, and years of research, world travel and contemplation brought him to write this work, taking advantage of deep knowledge that will surprise many readers.
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Energy and Civilization: A History

Energy and Civilization: A History

Vaclav Smil

$37.95
A comprehensive account of how energy has shaped society throughout history, from pre-agricultural foraging societies through today's fossil fuel-driven civilization.

I wait for new Smil books the way some people wait for the next 'Star Wars' movie. In his latest book, Energy and Civilization: A History, he goes deep and broad to explain how innovations in humans' ability to turn energy into heat, light, and motion have been a driving force behind our cultural and economic progress over the past 10,000 years. -Bill Gates, Gates Notes, Best Books of the Year Energy is the only universal currency; it is necessary for getting anything done. The conversion of energy on Earth ranges from terra-forming forces of plate tectonics to cumulative erosive effects of raindrops. Life on Earth depends on the photosynthetic conversion of solar energy into plant biomass. Humans have come to rely on many more energy flows-ranging from fossil fuels to photovoltaic generation of electricity-for their civilized existence. In this monumental history, Vaclav Smil provides a comprehensive account of how energy has shaped society, from pre-agricultural foraging societies through today's fossil fuel-driven civilization.

Humans are the only species that can systematically harness energies outside their bodies, using the power of their intellect and an enormous variety of artifacts-from the simplest tools to internal combustion engines and nuclear reactors. The epochal transition to fossil fuels affected everything: agriculture, industry, transportation, weapons, communication, economics, urbanization, quality of life, politics, and the environment. Smil describes humanity's energy eras in panoramic and interdisciplinary fashion, offering readers a magisterial overview. This book is an extensively updated and expanded version of Smil's Energy in World History (1994). Smil has incorporated an enormous amount of new material, reflecting the dramatic developments in energy studies over the last two decades and his own research over that time.
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Lost Maps of the Caliphs

Lost Maps of the Caliphs

Yossef Rapoport ,  Emilie Savage-Smith

$99.99
About a millennium ago, in Cairo, someone completed a large and richly illustrated book. In the course of thirty-five chapters, our unknown author guided the reader on a journey from the outermost cosmos and planets to Earth and its lands, islands, features and inhabitants. This treatise, known as The Book of Curiosities, was unknown to modern scholars until a remarkable manuscript copy surfaced in 2000.

Lost Maps of the Caliphs provides the first general overview of The Book of Curiosities and the unique insight it offers into medieval Islamic thought. Opening with an account of the remarkable discovery of the manuscript and its purchase by the Bodleian Library, the authors use The Book of Curiosities to re-evaluate the development of astrology, geography and cartography in the first four centuries of Islam. Early astronomical `maps' and drawings demonstrate the medieval understanding of the structure of the cosmos and illustrate the pervasive assumption that almost any visible celestial event had an effect upon life on Earth. Lost Maps of the Caliphs also reconsiders the history of global communication networks at the turn of the previous millennium.

Not only is The Book of Curiosities one of the greatest achievements of medieval map-making, it is also a remarkable contribution to the story of Islamic civilization.
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Atlas of Empires: The World's Civilizations from Ancient Times to Today

Atlas of Empires: The World's Civilizations from Ancient Times to Today

Peter Davidson

$29.99
Atlas of Empires tells the story of how and why the great empires of history came into being, operated and ultimately declined, and discusses the future of the empire in today's globalized world. Featuring 60 beautiful and detailed maps of the empires' territories at different stages of their existence and organized thematically to reflect the different driving forces behind empires throughout history (such as faith, nomadic culture, nationhood and capitalism), each section discusses the rise and fall of the empires that existed in a region: their government and society, wealth and technology, war and military force, and religious beliefs. From the earliest empires of the Sumerians and the Pharaohs to the modern empires of the USSR and the European Union, this is a story that reveals how empires are created and organized, how later empires resolve the problems of governance faced by earlier empires, and how the political and cultural legacies of ancient empires are still felt today.
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The Bedroom: An Intimate History

The Bedroom: An Intimate History

Michelle Perrot ,  Lauren Elkin

$49.99
An erudite and highly enjoyable exploration of the most intriguing of personal spaces, from Greek and Roman antiquity through today.

The winner of France's prestigious Prix Femina Essai (2009), this imaginative and captivating book explores the many dimensions of the room in which we spend so much of our lives - the bedroom. Eminent cultural historian Michelle Perrot traces the evolution of the bedroom from the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans to today, examining its myriad forms and functions, from royal king's chamber to child's sleeping quarters to lovers' trysting place to monk's cell. The history of women, so eager for a room of their own, and that of prisons, where the principal cause of suffering is the lack of privacy, is interwoven with a reflection on secrecy, walls, the night and its mysteries.

Drawing from a wide range of sources, including architectural and design treatises, private journals, novels, memoirs, and correspondences, Perrot's engaging book follows the many roads that lead to the bedroom - birth, sex, illness, death - in its endeavor to expose the most intimate, nocturnal side of human history.
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