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24 Hours in Ancient Egypt: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There

24 Hours in Ancient Egypt: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There

Donald P. Ryan

$24.99
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Spend 24 hours with the ancient Egyptians.

Ancient Egypt wasn't all pyramids, sphinxes and gold sarcophagi. For your average Egyptian, life was tough, and work was hard, conducted under the burning gaze of the sun god Ra.

During the course of a day in the ancient city of Thebes (modern-day Luxor), Egypt's religious capital, we meet 24 Egyptians from all strata of society - from the king to the bread-maker, the priestess to the fisherman, the soldier to the midwife - and get to know what the real Egypt was like by spending an hour in their company. We encounter a different one of these characters - all from different walks of life - every hour and every chapter, and through their eyes see what an average day in ancient Egypt was really like.

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Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World

Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World

Owen Rees

$52.99
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Naval warfare is the unsung hero of ancient Greek military history, often overshadowed by the more glorified land battles. Owen Rees looks to redress the balance, giving naval battles their due attention. This book presents a selection of thirteen naval battles that span a defining century in ancient Greek history, from the Ionian Revolt and Persian Invasion to the rise of external naval powers in the Mediterranean Sea, such as the Carthaginians. Each battle is set in context. The background, wider military campaigns, and the opposing forces are discussed, followed by a narrative and analysis of the fighting.

Finally, the aftermath of the battles are dealt with, looking at the strategic implications of the outcome for both the victor and the defeated. The battle narratives are supported by maps and tactical diagrams, showing the deployment of the fleets and the wider geographical factors involved in battle. Written in an accessible tone, this book successfully shows that Greek naval warfare did not start and end at the battle of Salamis.
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The Squatters: The Story of Australia's Pastoral Pioneers

The Squatters: The Story of Australia's Pastoral Pioneers

Barry Stone

$29.99
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'A very readable history of an important group of Australian pioneers' - Graham Seal, author of the bestselling Great Australian Stories

For the early settlers who came from Britain's crowded cities and tiny villages, it must have been extraordinarily liberating to pack their belongings onto a bullock dray and head beyond the reach of meddlesome authorities to claim new land for themselves.

Settlers spread out across inland Australia constructing windmills and fences, dry-stone walls and storehouses, livestock yards and droving routes, the traces of which can still be seen today. The fortunate and indomitable succeeded, while countless others succumbed to drought and flood. Those who were successful became a class all their own: the scrub aristocrats.

Barry Stone has scoured through diaries, journals and newspapers, and sorted myth from legend. He tells the stories of pioneers whose vision and hard work built pastoral empires running thousands of head of stock, providing meat for a growing colony and wool for export, a rural juggernaut that would lay the foundations of a prosperous nation.
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Hungary: A Short History

Hungary: A Short History

Norman Stone

$35.00
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Hungary has an unusually fascinating and complicated history. The nation was only created in 1918 at the end of the First World War from the collapse of the Hapsburg Empire, but it had long antecedents. Norman Stone, pre-eminent historian of central Europe in the 20th century, traces its roots to the nationalist movements of the 19th century, the revolutions of 1848, the booming economy of Buda and Pest, and the creaking collapse of the Austro-Hungarian empire.

When Hungary was born in 1918 it was only one-third the size of its former part in the twin-headed Austro-Hungarian empire and its history has not been a happy one. Like Germany it suffered economic collapse and impossible inflation in the immediate post-war years followed by horrible fascist dictatorships. They were only brought to an end by brutal Nazi occupation during the war. A brief moment of post-war optimism was ended when the Iron Curtain came down with its Soviet occupation and communist brutality. The lies of Soviet Communism were most clearly revealed by the tanks rolling into Budapest in 1956 to put down the entirely peaceable uprising. In 1989 the Berlin Wall fell - but only after the Hungarians had knocked down the Iron Curtain with such a gaping hole that the rest of the wall collapsed. Since then, a patchy story of economic growth, normalisation and democracy - though the future looks dodgy as the current Prime Minister turns himself into a dictator.

It is an extraordinary story, unique, like all nations, but also representative of the post-Soviet bloc and the of nations forged from former empires. It is told with aplomb, verve and great wit by the only man who could have written it
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Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

Michael Wolff

$22.99
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With extraordinary access to the Trump White House, Michael Wolff tells the inside story of the most controversial presidency of our time.

The first nine months of Donald Trump's term were stormy, outrageous - and absolutely mesmerising. Now, thanks to his deep access to the West Wing, bestselling author Michael Wolff tells the riveting story of how Trump launched a tenure as volatile and fiery as the man himself.

In this explosive book, Wolff provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office. Among the revelations:

- What President Trump's staff really thinks of him
- What inspired Trump to claim he was wire-tapped by President Obama
- Why FBI director James Comey was really fired
- Why chief strategist Steve Bannon and Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner couldn't be in the same room
- Who is really directing the Trump administration's strategy in the wake of Bannon's firing
- What the secret to communicating with Trump is
- What the Trump administration has in common with the movie The Producers

Never before has a presidency so divided the American people. Brilliantly reported and astoundingly fresh, Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury shows us how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion.
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The Human Tide: How Population Shaped the Modern World

The Human Tide: How Population Shaped the Modern World

Paul Morland

$32.99
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Every phase since the advent of the industrial revolution - from the fate of the British Empire, to the global challenges from Germany, Japan and Russia, to America's emergence as a sole superpower, to the Arab Spring, to the long-term decline of economic growth that started with Japan and has now spread to Europe, to China's meteoric economy, to Brexit and the presidency of Donald Trump - can be explained better when we appreciate the meaning of demographic change across the world.

THE HUMAN TIDE is the first popular history book to redress the underestimated influence of population as a crucial factor in almost all of the major global shifts and events of the last two centuries - revealing how such events are connected by the invisible mutually catalysing forces of population.

This highly original history offers a brilliant and simple unifying theory for our understanding the last two hundred years: the power of sheer numbers. An ambitious, original, magisterial history of modernity, it taps into prominent preoccupations of our day and will transform our perception of history for many years to come.

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Olympia: The Story of the Ancient Olympic Games

Olympia: The Story of the Ancient Olympic Games

Robin Waterfield

$35.00
The story of the ancient Olympic Games, held in honour of Zeus at Olympia in the eastern Peloponnese, traditionally dated as starting in 776 BC, and held from the 8th century BCE to the 4th century CE. The victors of these ancient games may have been awarded crowns of olive leaves in recognition of their achievements, but these original Olympics were no graceful, idealistic celebration of the classical aesthetic of grace and beauty shared by all of the participating Greek city-states, but rather a bitterly contested struggle between political rivals.

Robin Waterfield paints a vivid picture of the reality of the ancient Olympic Games; outlines the events in which competitors took part; explores their purpose, rituals and politics; and charts their thousand-year history.
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Armies of the Late Roman Empire AD 284 to 476: History, Organization and Uniforms

Armies of the Late Roman Empire AD 284 to 476: History, Organization and Uniforms

Gabriele Esposito

$52.99
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This guide to the Late Roman Army focusses on the dramatic and crucial period that started with the accession of Diocletian and ended with the definitive fall of the Western Roman Empire. This was a turbulent period during which the Roman state and its armed forces changed.

Gabriele Esposito challenges many stereotypes and misconceptions regarding the Late Roman Army; for example, he argues that the Roman military machine remained a reliable and efficient one until the very last decades of the Western Empire. The author describes the organization, structure, equipment, weapons, combat history and tactics of Late Roman military forces. The comitatenses (field armies), limitanei (frontier units), foederati (allied soldiers), bucellarii (mercenaries), scholae palatinae (mounted bodyguards), protectores (personal guards) and many other kinds of troops are covered.

The book is lavishly illustrated in color, including the shield devices from the Notitia Dignitatum. The origins and causes for the final military fall of the Empire are discussed in detail, as well as the influence of the ‘barbarian’ peoples on the Roman Army.
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How Churchill Waged War: The Most Challenging Decisions of the Second World War

How Churchill Waged War: The Most Challenging Decisions of the Second World War

Allen Packwood

$65.99
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When Winston Churchill accepted the position of Prime Minister in May 1940, he insisted in also becoming Minister of Defence. He was not going to play the chairman's role, adjudicating between the competing claims of the ministers below him. He was going to get his hands dirty and take direct personal control of the day-to-day running of military policy. This, though, meant that he alone would be responsible for the success or failure of Britain's war effort. It also meant that he would be faced with many monumental challenges and utterly crucial decisions upon which the fate of Britain and the free world rested.

One of his first agonising decisions was how to respond to the collapse of France, and the danger posed to Britain's survival should the powerful French fleet fall into German hands. When he ordered Admiral Sommerville to sink the French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir, he knew that France might be turned against Britain, but that act demonstrated to the world that he was determined to wage war 'whatever the cost may be'.

With the limited resources available to the UK, Churchill had to decide where his country's priorities lay. Should he concentrate on the defence of the realm or take the war to the enemy - and where should any offensive action be focused? Should Egypt and the war in North Africa take precedence over Singapore and the UK's empire in the East? How much support should be offered to the Soviet Union? How much of the direction of the war could he allow to be dictated by the United States?

In this insightful investigation into Churchill's conduct during the Second World War, Allen Packwood, BA, MPhil (Cantab), FRHistS, the Director of the Churchill Archives Centre, enables the reader to share the agonies and uncertainties faced by Churchill at each crucial stage of the war. How Churchill responded to each challenge is analysed in great detail and the conclusions Mr Packwood draws are as uncompromising as those made by Britain's wartime leader as he negotiated his country through its darkest days.
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Hearts And Minds: The Untold Story of the Great Pilgrimage and How Women Won the Vote

Hearts And Minds: The Untold Story of the Great Pilgrimage and How Women Won the Vote

Jane Robinson

$24.99
Set against the colourful background of the entire campaign for women to win the vote, Hearts and Minds tells the remarkable and inspiring story of the suffragists' march on London.

1913: the last long summer before the war. The country is gripped by suffragette fever. These impassioned crusaders have their admirers; some agree with their aims if not their forceful methods, while others are aghast at the thought of giving any female a vote.

Meanwhile, hundreds of women are stepping out on to the streets of Britain. They are the suffragists: non-militant campaigners for the vote, on an astonishing six-week protest march they call the Great Pilgrimage. Rich and poor, young and old, they defy convention, risking jobs, family relationships and even their lives to persuade the country to listen to them.

This is a story of ordinary people effecting extraordinary change. By turns dangerous, exhausting and exhilarating, the Great Pilgrimage transformed the personal and political lives of women in Britain for ever. Jane Robinson has drawn from diaries, letters and unpublished accounts to tell the inside story of the march, against the colourful background of the entire suffrage campaign.

Fresh and original, full of vivid detail and moments of high drama, Hearts and Minds is both funny and incredibly moving, important and wonderfully entertaining.
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White King: The Tragedy of Charles I

White King: The Tragedy of Charles I

Leanda de Lisle

$22.99
Winner of the HWA Crown for Best Work of Historical Non-Fiction 2018Times Book of the YearLess than forty years after the golden age of Elizabeth I, England was at war with itself. At the head of this disintegrating kingdom was Charles I, who would change the face of the monarchy for ever. His reign is one of the most dramatic in history, yet Charles the man remains elusive. To his enemies he was the 'white tyrant of prophecy- to his supporters a murdered innocent. Today many myths still remain.

It is an epic story of glamour and strong women, of populist politicians and religious terror, of mass movements and a revolutionary new media- one that speaks to our own divided and dangerous times.'This is the most gripping piece of revisionist history I have read for a long time' - The Spectator
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Betraying Big Brother: The Rise of China's Feminist Resistance

Betraying Big Brother: The Rise of China's Feminist Resistance

Leta Hong Fincher

$29.99
On the eve of International Women 's Day in 2015, the Chinese government arrested five feminist activists and jailed them for 37 days. The Feminist Five became a global cause cel bre, with Hillary Clinton speaking out on their behalf, and activists inundating social media with #FreetheFive messages. But the Feminist Five are only symbols of a much larger feminist movement of civil rights lawyers, labor activists, performance artists and online warriors that is prompting an unprecedented awakening among China's urban, educated women. In Betraying Big Brother, journalist and scholar Leta Hong Fincher argues that the popular, broad-based movement poses the greatest threat to China's authoritarian regime today.

Through interviews with the Feminist Five and other leading Chinese activists, Hong Fincher illuminates both the challenges they face and their joy of betraying Big Brother, as Wei Tingting one of the Feminist Five wrote of the defiance she felt during her detention. Tracing the rise of a new feminist consciousness through online campaigns resembling #MeToo, and describing how the Communist regime has suppressed the history of its own feminist struggles, Betraying Big Brother is a story of how the movement against patriarchy could reconfigure China and the world.
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Napoleon: A Brilliant Leader Who Helped Shape the Modern World? Or a Brutal Tyrant?

Napoleon: A Brilliant Leader Who Helped Shape the Modern World? Or a Brutal Tyrant?

Adam Zamoyski

$19.99
Napoleon has long divided historians. In this short, graphic discussion of his life and influence, the well-known historian Adam Zamoyski offers his own verdict on one of history's most influential figures.

Born in Corsica, and a brilliant military leader during the French revolution, Napoleon became Emperor in 1804 and dominated European and indeed global affairs for the next ten years, leading France against a series of coalitions in what were later called the Napoleonic wars. His victories are the stuff of legend, as is his famous invasion of Russia in 1812, disastrous and shattering retreat from Moscow two years later, and final defeat by Britain and its allies at Waterloo in 1815. So how great a military leader was Napoleon? And how skilled a political operator? Why are his relationships with women, and especially his Empress, Josephine, so famous? And what of his legacy – in particular, how important was the so-called Napoleonic Code?

'The ideas that underpin our modern world - meritocracy, equality before the law, property rights, religious toleration, modern secular education, sound finances, and so on - were championed, consolidated, codified and geographically extended by Napoleon,' says Andrew Roberts. 'To them he added a rational and efficient local administration, an end to rural banditry, the encouragement of science and the arts, the abolition of feudalism and the greatest codification of laws since the fall of the Roman Empie.'

Zamoyski assesses this verdict of Napoleon and gives his own view of the greatness and legacy of one of history’s most compelling figures.
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Hannah's Dress: Berlin 1904 - 2014

Hannah's Dress: Berlin 1904 - 2014

Pascale Hugues ,  C. Jon Delogu ,  Nick Somers

$26.95
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Hannah's Dress tells the dizzying story of Berlin's modern history. Curious to learn more about the city she has lived in for over twenty years, journalist Pascale Hugues investigates the lives of the men, women and children who have occupied her ordinary street during the course of the last century. We see the street being built in 1904 and the arrival of the first families of businessmen, lawyers and bankers. We feel the humiliation of defeat in 1918, the effects of economic crisis, and the rise of Hitler's Nazi party. We tremble alongside the Jewish families, whose experience is so movingly captured in the story of two friends, Hannah and Susanne. When only Hannah is able to escape the horrors of deportation, the dress made for her by Susanne becomes a powerful reminder of all that was lost.

In 1945 the street is all but destroyed; the handful of residents left want to forget the past altogether and start afresh. When the Berlin Wall goes up, the street becomes part of West Berlin and assumes a rather suburban identity, a home for all kinds of petite bourgeoisie, insulated from the radical spirit of 1968. However, this quickly changes in the 1970s with the arrival of its most famous resident, superstar David Bowie. Today, the street is as tranquil and prosperous as in the early days, belying a century of eventful, tumultuous history.

This engrossing account of a single street, awarded the prestigious 2014 European Book Prize, sheds new light on the complex history not only of Berlin but of an entire continent across the twentieth century.
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The Third Reich: All You Need To Know

The Third Reich: All You Need To Know

Caroline Sharples

$19.99
A compelling account of how Hitler used the democratic process to seize power in Germany and create a violent and racist regime responsible for the Holocaust and the most destructive war in history.

Between 1933 and 1945, Germany was under the grip of the Third Reich. Headed by Adolf Hitler, this National Socialist state endeavoured to control every aspect of the nation's political, social, economic, religious and cultural life, and indoctrinate every German citizen in its ideology. This intrinsically racist regime also embarked on an expansionist foreign policy that, at its peak, brought most of continental Europe under Nazi control. The resulting war - and genocide - killed millions of soldiers and civilians and its effects continue to be felt to this day. Nazism, it has been suggested, was 'the ultimate embodiment of evil', and historians have grappled with one fundamental question since 1945: how was any of this possible in a modern, cultured nation in the heart of 20th century Europe?

There is no easy way to sum up the Third Reich, but in this short book Caroline Sharples tells the story of Hitler's rise to power and looks at the arguments which have raged about the Third Reich, in particular the argument about how much power Hitler actually had. Was he, as some believe, an omnipotent leader with clear ideological goals and a clear programme for implementing them? Or was the Third Reich much more confused, with ad hoc decision making and intense power rivalries generating a 'cumulative radicalism' which eventually brought it down?
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Mary Queen of Scots (Film Tie-In)

Mary Queen of Scots (Film Tie-In)

John Guy

$24.99
Now a major film, this is a dramatic reinterpretation of the life of Mary Queen of Scots by one of the leading historians of this period.

Who was the real Mary Queen of Scots? The most enigmatic ruler of England lived a life of incredible drama and turmoil: crowned Queen of Scotland at nine months old, and Queen of France at sixteen years, she grew up in the crosshairs of Europe's political battles to become Queen Elizabeth's arch rival.

This book tells the story of the fraught and dangerous relationship between these two women of incredible charisma and power - a relationship that began with both seeking a political settlement, but which led them down a path of danger, from which only one could emerge victorious.

Previously published as `My Heart is My Own'.
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A Revolution of Feeling: The Decade that Forged the Modern Mind

A Revolution of Feeling: The Decade that Forged the Modern Mind

Rachel Hewitt

$24.99
In the 1790s, Britain underwent what the politician Edmund Burke called 'the most important of all revolutions ... a revolution in sentiments'. Inspired by the French Revolution, British radicals concocted new political worlds to enshrine healthier, more productive, human emotions and relationships. The Enlightenment's wildest hopes crested in the utopian projects of such optimists - including the young poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the philosophers William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, the physician Thomas Beddoes and the first photographer Thomas Wedgwood - who sought to reform sex, education, commerce, politics and medicine by freeing desire from repressive constraints.

But by the middle of the decade, the wind had changed. The French Revolution descended into bloody Terror and the British government quashed radical political activities. In the space of one decade, feverish optimism gave way to bleak disappointment, and changed the way we think about human need and longing.

A Revolution of Feeling is a vivid and absorbing account of the dramatic end of the Enlightenment, the beginning of an emotional landscape preoccupied by guilt, sin, failure, resignation and repression, and the origins of our contemporary approach to feeling and desire. Above all, it is the story of the human cost of political change, of men and women consigned to the 'wrong side of history'. But although their revolutionary proposals collapsed, that failure resulted in its own cultural revolution - a revolution of feeling - the aftershocks of which are felt to the present day.
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The Last Battle: Endgame on the Western Front, 1918

The Last Battle: Endgame on the Western Front, 1918

Peter Hart

$24.99
By August 1918, the outcome of the Great War was not in doubt: the Allies would win. But what was unclear was how this defeat would play out - would the Germans hold on, prolonging the fighting deep into 1919, with the loss of hundreds of thousands more young lives, or could the war be won in 1918? In The Last Battle, Peter Hart, author of Gallipoli and The Great War, and oral historian at the Imperial War Museum, brings to life the dramatic final weeks of the war, as men fought to secure victory, with survival seemingly only days, or hours away.

Drawing on the experience of both generals and ordinary soldiers, and dwelling with equal weight on strategy, tactics and individual experience, this is a powerful and detailed account of history's greatest endgame.
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The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner

The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner

Daniel Ellsberg

$22.99
Shortlisted for the 2018 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction

From the legendary Pentagon Papers whistle-blower, an eyewitness expos of America's Top Secret, seventy-year nuclear policy that continues to this day.

Here, for the first time, former high-level defense analyst Daniel Ellsberg reveals his shocking firsthand account of America's nuclear program in the 1960s. From the remotest air bases in the Pacific Command, where he discovered that the authority to initiate use of nuclear weapons was widely delegated, to the secret plans for general nuclear war under Eisenhower, which, if executed, would cause the near-extinction of humanity, Ellsberg shows that the legacy of this most dangerous arms buildup in the history of civilization - and its proposed renewal under the Trump administration - threatens our very survival. No other insider with high-level access has written so candidly of the nuclear strategy of the late Eisenhower and early Kennedy years, and nothing has fundamentally changed since that era.

Framed as a memoir - a chronicle of madness in which Ellsberg acknowledges participating - this gripping expos reads like a thriller and offers feasible steps we can take to dismantle the existing doomsday machine and avoid nuclear catastrophe, returning Ellsberg to his role as whistle-blower. The Doomsday Machine is thus a real-life Dr. Strangelove story and an ultimately hopeful - and powerfully important - book about not just our country, but the future of the world.
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The Normans: How William the Conqueror changed Britain forever

The Normans: How William the Conqueror changed Britain forever

Daniel Gerrard

$19.99
The success of the Norman Conquest of Britain turned on one lucky break. For months, William of Normandy waited for an opportunity to cross the Channel and invade. But he needed favourable weather and the wind refused to co-operate. The Anglo Saxon King Harold, meanwhile, waited with his army and might well have defeated him. But only weeks before the wind changed, Harold received shattering news. The King of Norway had invaded Yorkshire with a huge Viking army and 300 ships. Harold had to race north at breakneck speed to defeat him and then, on hearing that William was finally crossing the Channel, race back down the length of England with his exhausted and depleted army to counter the Norman threat. Despite this, the Battle of Hastings was a close run thing ; Harold's war-weary army very nearly won it. As we know, that didn't happen, and Harold's eventual defeat had the most dramatic effect of any defeat in the high Middle Ages. In a few short months, the ruler of northern France became the master of Britain and within a year or two had made his government effective across the whole country. It was a staggering military success, on a par with the First Crusade which followed it 30 years later.

In this short, highly entertaining book, Daniel Gerrard tells the story of Britain before, during and after the Conquest, and explains how the Norman kings built on a highly effective Anglo Saxon framework to lay the foundations of modern Britain.
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Image on the Edge: The Margins of Medieval Art

Image on the Edge: The Margins of Medieval Art

Michael Camille

$39.99
What do they all mean - the lascivious ape, autophagic dragons, pot-bellied heads, harp-playing asses, arse-kissing priests and somersaulting jongleurs to be found protruding from the edges of medieval buildings and in the margins of illuminated manuscripts? Now available in a new hardback edition, Michael Camille's Image on the Edge explores that riotous realm of marginal art, so often explained away as mere decoration or zany doodles, where resistance to social constraints flourished.

Medieval image-makers focused attention on the underside of society, the excluded and the ejected. Peasants, servants, prostitutes and beggars all found their place, along with knights and clerics, engaged in impudent antics in the margins of prayer-books or, as gargoyles, on the outsides of churches. Camille brings us to an understanding of how marginality functioned in medieval culture and shows us just how scandalous, subversive and amazing the art of the time could be.

`A handsome, entertaining account of the peculiar fashion for grotesque, obscene and humorous presences on the margins of medieval illuminateed manuscripts.' - Times Higher Education `If the study of medieval art is not to remain an esoteric and elitist descipline then more books like this must be written.' - Burlington Magazine `Camille's polymathic essays undoubtedly will provoke such studies and will expand the field of questions we ask ... and in this he will have made a valuable contribution.' - Oxford Art Journal
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I am Ashurbanipal: King of the World, King of Assyria

I am Ashurbanipal: King of the World, King of Assyria

Gareth Brereton

$49.99
In 669 BC Ashurbanipal inherited the world's largest empire, which stretched from the shores of the eastern Mediterranean to the mountains of western Iran. He ruled from his massive capital at Nineveh, in present-day Iraq, where temples and palaces adorned with brilliantly carved sculptures dominated the citadel mound, and an elaborate system of aqueducts and canals brought water to the king's pleasure gardens. Ashurbanipal, proud of his scholarship, assembled the greatest library in existence during his reign. Guided by this knowledge, he defined the course of the Assyrian empire and asserted his claim to be `king of the world'.

Beautifully illustrated and written by an international team of experts, this book features images of objects excavated from all corners of the empire. The British Museum's unrivalled collection of Assyrian reliefs brings to life the tumultuous events of Ashurbanipal's reign: his conquest of Egypt, the crushing defeat of his rebellious brother in Babylon and his ruthless campaign against the Elamite rulers of south-west Iran.

I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assyria provides an illuminating account of the Assyrian empire told through the story of its last great ruler, and highlights the importance of preserving Iraq's rich cultural heritage for future generations.
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In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World

In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World

Christian Marek ,  Steven Rendall

$78.00
In this critically acclaimed book, Christian Marek masterfully provides the first comprehensive history of Asia Minor from prehistory to the Roman imperial period. Blending rich narrative with in-depth analyses, In the Land of a Thousand Gods shows Asia Minor's shifting orientation between East and West and its role as both a melting pot of nations and a bridge for cultural transmission. Marek employs ancient sources to illuminate civic institutions, urban and rural society, agriculture, trade and money, the influential Greek writers of the Second Sophistic, the notoriously bloody exhibitions of the gladiatorial arena, and more. He draws on the latest research - in fields ranging from demography and economics to architecture and religion - to describe how Asia Minor became a center of culture and wealth in the Roman Empire. A breathtaking work of scholarship, In the Land of a Thousand Gods will become the standard reference book on the subject in English.
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Cage of Ghosts

Cage of Ghosts

Jon Rhodes

$45.00
In this richly illustrated and thought-provoking book, photographer and writer Jon Rhodes investigates Aboriginal ceremonial sites in south-eastern Australia, where the impact of European settlement has been the most intense. Rhodes continues the ethnological and anthropological work of the nineteenth-and twentieth-century documenters of Aboriginal culture to piece together some of the intiguing puzzles and histories he encounters.
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Abson & Company: Slave Traders in Eighteenth-Century West Africa

Abson & Company: Slave Traders in Eighteenth-Century West Africa

Stanley B. Alpern

$89.95
Yorkshireman Lionel Abson was the longest surviving European stationed in West Africa in the eighteenth century. He reached William's Fort at Ouidah on the Slave Coast as a trader in 1767, took over the English fort in 1770, and remained in charge until his death in 1803. He avoided the `white man's grave' for thirty-six years.

Along the way he had three sons with an African woman, the eldest partly schooled in England, and a bright daughter named Sally. When Abson died, royal lackeys kidnapped his children. Sally was placed in the king's harem and pined away; her brothers vanished. That king became so unpopular as a result that the people of Dahomey disowned him. Abson also mastered the local language and became an historian. After only two years as fort chief, he was part of the king's delegation to make peace with an enemy, a unique event in centuries of Dahomean history.

This singular book recounts the remarkable life of this key figure in an ignominious period of European and African history, offering a microcosm of the lives of Europeans in eighteenth-century West Africa, and their relationships with and attitudes towards those they met there.
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Inside Pakistan

Inside Pakistan

Hasnain Kazim

$54.99
Pakistan, a land with a long and storied history, is experiencing a tumultuous present. As its population expands to surpass two hundred million, its infrastructure is faltering and rampant unemployment and power outages have become the norm. The military controls much of the nation, and at the same time as the public educational system has found itself lacking needed resources, a brand of conservative and radical Islam has developed that is now a prominent political force. And yet the hope and resilience of the Pakistanis remain as strong as ever, promising the possibility of a calmer tomorrow. Hasnain Kazim, a correspondent for the current-affairs magazine Der Spiegel and the son of Indo-Pakistani immigrants to Germany, explores all of this and more in a riveting account of his four years living in and reporting from the region.

As Kazim and his wife arrived in Islamabad in 2009, they found the country of his parents' birth riven with contradictions: a nuclear power with a tremendous gulf between the rich and poor, Pakistan has experienced a series of natural and manmade disasters in recent years alongside turbulent periods of economic growth and stagnation. What keeps the people of this Islamic society going? What hopes do they hold for the future? As Kazim spoke with Pakistanis at every level of society and of all political persuasions in search of answers to these questions, he discovered a much more complex country than the headlines of violence and extremism would suggest. Told from a sensitive and sympathetic insider's perspective, Inside Pakistan pulls back the curtain on a section of the world that promises to play an ever more important role in years to come.
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The Spanish Anarchists of Northern Australia: Revolution in the Sugar Cane Fields

The Spanish Anarchists of Northern Australia: Revolution in the Sugar Cane Fields

Robert Mason

$108.00
In 1901, the year the six Australian colonies federated to become one country, revolution was being plotted across the world. Publicised in the newspapers and carried by migrants along global trade routes, the anarchist movement appeared prepared for a long period of power as one of the world's dominant historical forces. In few places was this more evident than in Spain, where poverty and population pressure prompted increasing emigration. In anglophone Australia, governments had long been alert to the threat of radicalised migrants, and this book traces the forgotten lives of one particular group of such migrants, the Spanish anarchists of northern Australia, revealing the personal connections between the English-speaking British Empire and the world of Spanish-speaking radicals. The present study demonstrates the vitality of this hidden world, and its importance for the development of Australia.
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Gardens of History and Imagination: Growing New South Wales

Gardens of History and Imagination: Growing New South Wales

Gretchen Poiner ,  Sybil Jack

$60.00
Whether on the ground or in the mind gardens carry meaning. They reflect social and aesthetic values and may express hope, anticipation or grief. Throughout history they have provided a means of physical survival. In creating and maintaining gardens people construe and construct a relationship with their environment. But there is no single meaning carried in the word ‘garden’: as idea and practice it reflects cultural differences in beliefs, values and social organisation. It embodies personal, community even national ways of seeing and being in the world.

There are ten essays in this book, each of which examines the role of gardens and gardening in the settlement of New South Wales and in growing a colony and a state. They explore the significance of gardens for the health of the colony, for its economy, for the construction of social order and moral worth. No less do they reveal the significance of forming and reforming personal identities in this process.

For the immigrants gardening was an act of settlement; it was also a statement of possession for individuals and for Britain. For a long time it was with memories of ‘home’, often selective and idealised, that settlers made gardens but as the colony developed its own character so did gardening possibilities and practices.
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Queen Mary: The Official Biography

Queen Mary: The Official Biography

James Pope-Hennessy

$24.99
The official biography of Queen Mary, grandmother of the current Queen, originally commissioned in 1959 - with a new foreword by Hugo Vickers.

When Queen Mary died in 1953, James Pope-Hennessy was commissioned to write an official biography of her - unusual for a Queen Consort. Queen Mary's life, contrary to popular belief, was essentially dramatic, and she played a far more important and influential role in the affairs of the British monarchy than her public image might have otherwise suggested. Using material from the Royal Archives, private papers and Queen Mary's personal diaries and letters, Pope-Hennessy's biography was a remarkable portrait of a remarkable woman and received rave reviews across the press.

Long out of print, this new edition of Queen Mary will be accompanied by a new foreword from royal biographer and writer Hugo Vickers.
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Obaysch: A Hippopotamus in Victorian London

Obaysch: A Hippopotamus in Victorian London

John Simons

$35.00
Obaysch: A Hippopotamus in Victorian London is the story of Obaysch the hippopotamus, the first `star' animal to be exhibited in the London Zoo.

In 1850, a baby hippopotamus arrived on English shores, allegedly the first in Europe since the Roman Empire, and almost certainly the first in Europe since prehistoric times. Captured near an island from which he took his name, Obaysch was donated by the viceroy of Egypt in exchange for greyhounds and deerhounds. His arrival was greeted with a wave of `Hippomania', doubling the number of visitors to the zoo.

Uncovering the circumstances of Obaysch's capture and exhibition, John Simons investigates the notion of a `star' animal, as well as the cultural value that Obaysch, and the other hippos who joined him over the following few years, accumulated. This book also delves into the historical context of Obaysch and his audience, considering the relationship between Victorian attitudes to hippopotami and the expansion of the British Empire into sub-Saharan Africa.
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The Royal Navy 1793-1800: Birth of a Superpower

The Royal Navy 1793-1800: Birth of a Superpower

Mark Jessop

$52.99
France declared war upon the British in 1793\. The burden to conduct a long conflict proved heavy for that island nation. Poverty increased. Liberties and freedoms were sometimes taken away. Thousands of men had to leave their families, and disease, desertion and death meant that many never returned.

At first the Royal Navy barely had enough warships to cope, but eight years later she had more than enough. By that time a threat of invasion towards Ireland prompted Parliament to enact a new nation, christened The United Kingdom of Great Britain. As such, 1800 became the final year of the old Kingdom of Great Britain.

As she passed away, many of her men and women might have wondered as to what had made her navy a true Neptune. What had assisted the slow birth of a naval 'superpower'? This book seeks to answer that very question.
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China Imagined: From European Fantasy to Spectacular Power

China Imagined: From European Fantasy to Spectacular Power

Gregory B. Lee

$39.95
How did China become China? And where is it leading us? We talk as if it had always existed: eternal China with its 5,000 years of uninterrupted history. But the name 'China' was first used by sixteenth-century Europeans, and its Chinese equivalent, Zhongguo, only gained currency in the mid-1800s.

China Imagined is a thoughtful exploration of the idea of China, from the naming and mapping of its territory and peoples to the creation and rise of the modern nation-state. China's early history describes a multilingual space, ruled by a homogeneous elite with its own minority culture--a far cry from Maoism's national mass culture, or Xi Jinping's state-controlled digital society today.

Gregory Lee traces this complex, diverse entity's evolution since the Opium Wars into a China made in 'our' image. Today, it is a great power integral to the global system, whether it comes to climate change, security or inequality. Given this rapid convergence with the West, Xi's China holds up a mirror to our own nations. Trump's America, Putin's Russia and post- Brexit Europe all betray echoes of the 'Chinese Dream'. If China is a product of Westernisation, is it now the West's turn to become China?
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Hermann Goering: Blumenkrieg, From Vienna to Prague 1938-39

Hermann Goering: Blumenkrieg, From Vienna to Prague 1938-39

Blaine Taylor

$59.99
The year 1938-39 was when Hitler set out on the road of pre-war bloodless conquests, which led to the actual shooting combat over Poland in September 1939. Both willing and unwilling, Hermann Goering was his main acolyte in achieving the peaceful military occupations of Austria and the Czech-German Sudetenland in 1938, followed by that of Bohemia and Moravia, plus Memel in 1939.

Prior to this, Goering played perhaps the key role in the Nazi overthrow of the Third Reich's conservative military and foreign services, being named field marshal as his reward. Having helped Franco win the Spanish Civil War, Goering's Air Force Legion Kondor also returned home victorious, having acquired valuable air war experience in aces, aircraft, and tactics, which served Goering well in the first phase of World War II. A major factor in making the Allies back down to Germany at the infamous Munich Pact Conference, Goering's Luftwaffe was the key bargaining chip that gained these unprecedented territorial acquisitions for Hitler - all without a shot being fired. He also helped achieve alliances with Fascist Slovakia and Italy.
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Sikkim: Requiem for a Himalayan Kingdom

Sikkim: Requiem for a Himalayan Kingdom

Andrew Duff

$34.99
This is the true story of Sikkim, a tiny Buddhist kingdom in the Himalayas that survived the end of the British Empire in India only to be annexed by India in 1975. It tells the remarkable story of Thondup, the last King of Sikkim, and his American wife Hope Cooke, thrust unwittingly into the spotlight as they sought support for Sikkim's independence after their `fairytale' wedding in 1963. But as tensions between India and China spilled over into war in the Himalayas, Sikkim became a pawn in the Cold War ideological battle that played out in Asia during the 1960s and 1970s.

Rumours circulated that Hope was a CIA spy. Meanwhile a shadowy Scottish adventuress, the Kazini of Chakung, married to Sikkim's leading political figure, coordinated opposition to the Palace. As the geopolitical tectonic plates of the Himalayas ground together, forming the political landscape that exists today, Sikkim never stood a chance. On the eve of declaring Emergency in India, Indira Gandhi brazenly annexed the country.

Thondup died a broken man in 1982; Hope returned to New York; Sikkim began a new phase as India's 2nd state. Based on interviews and archive research, as well as a retracing of a journey the author's grandfather made in 1922, this is a thrilling, romantic and informative glimpse of life in Shangri La.
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Mary Queen of Scots

Mary Queen of Scots

Stefan Zweig ,  Eden Paul  ,  Cedar Paul

$29.99
From the moment of her birth to her death on the scaffold, Mary Stuart spent her life embroiled in power struggles that shook the foundations of Renaissance Europe. Revered by some as the rightful Queen of England, reviled by others as a murderous adultress, her long and fascinating rivalry with her cousin Elizabeth I led ultimately to her downfall.

Zweig, one of the most popular writers of the twentieth century, brings Mary to life and turns her tale into a story of passion and plotting as gripping as any novel.
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Scotland: Defending the Nation: Mapping the Military Landscape

Scotland: Defending the Nation: Mapping the Military Landscape

Carolyn Anderson ,  Chris Fleet

$69.99
Scotland has had a uniquely important military history over the last five centuries. Conflict with England in the 16th century, Jacobite rebellions in the 18th century, 20th-century defences and the two world wars, as well as the Cold War, all resulted in significant cartographic activity.

In this book two map experts explore the extraordinary rich legacy of Scottish military mapping, showing and explaining the variety of military maps produced for different purposes, including fortification plans, reconnaissance mapping, battle plans, military roads and route-way plans, tactical maps, plans of mines, enemy maps showing targets, as well as plans showing the construction of defences. In addition to plans, elevations, and views, they also discuss unrealised proposals and projected schemes. Many of these maps are both striking and attractive, and have been selected for the particular stories they tell about attacking and defending the country.
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Jerusalem on the Amstel: The Quest for Zion in the Dutch Republic

Jerusalem on the Amstel: The Quest for Zion in the Dutch Republic

Lipika Pelham

$49.95
Seventeenth-century Amsterdam was a cosmopolitan `carnival of nations': French Huguenots, North African merchants, Spanish Moriscos-and Iberian New Christians, formerly Jewish families forcibly converted to Catholicism, now fleeing the Inquisition and rediscovering their ancestral faith.

This is the extraordinary tale of Amsterdam's prosperous Sephardi community during the Dutch Golden Age. Trading, writing, publishing, staging plays and being painted by Rembrandt, this Nacao (Nation) of formerly wandering Jews not only settled but thrived, enjoying high status and unparalleled freedom. At a time when Dutch Catholics were repressed and Jews elsewhere were confined to the ghetto, this community dared to nurture the `Hope of Israel', sowing the seeds of Zionism.

Lipika Pelham charts the captivating history of Amsterdam's Jews, from their integral role in the Dutch economic miracle and the Enlightenment to a sombre coda in 1942, when the Nazis herded them into the `Jewish Theatre' for deportation to the camps. But this was not the death of the resilient Nacao-Pelham also seeks out its descendants in present-day Amsterdam, offering poignant reflection on the meaning of nationhood, the Holocaust and what remains of Jerusalem on the Amstel.
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The Survival of the Jews in France: 1940-44

The Survival of the Jews in France: 1940-44

Jacques Semelin

$75.00
Between the French defeat in 1940 and liberation in 1944, the Nazis killed almost 80,000 of France's Jews, both French and foreign. Since that time, this tragedy has been well-documented. But there are other stories hidden within it - ones neglected by historians.

In fact, 75% of France's Jews escaped the extermination, while 45% of the Jews of Belgium perished, and in the Netherlands only 20% survived.

The Nazis were determined to destroy the Jews across Europe, and the Vichy regime collaborated in their deportation from France. So what is the meaning of this French exception?

Jacques Semelin sheds light on this 'French enigma', painting a radically unfamiliar view of occupied France. His is a rich, even-handed portrait of a complex and changing society, one where helping and informing on one's neighbours went hand in hand; and where small gestures of solidarity sat comfortably with anti-Semitism.

Without shying away from the horror of the Holocaust's crimes, this seminal work adds a fresh perspective to our history of the Second World War.
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Blue Streak: Britain's Medium Range Ballistic Missile

Blue Streak: Britain's Medium Range Ballistic Missile

John Boyes

$55.00
In the early 1950s the United States wished to concentrate its defence resources on the development of a 4,000 mile range intercontinental ballistic missile. As a stop-gap measure, US defence chiefs hoped to assist Britain with the development of its own intermediate range missile. Despite US concerns that British resources were limited the Air Ministry nonetheless proceeded with the missile, called Blue Streak, to fulfil the operational requirement which would give Britain an independent deterrent which should remain invulnerable until the early 1970s.

Blue Streak: Britain's Medium Range Ballistic Missile traces the path from the political decision to issue the contracts through the early development and testing both in the UK and in Australia. The reasons for the project's cancellation are considered and Blue Streak's subsequent role as the first stage of the ELDO civilian satellite launcher is noted. A requirement of the project was the need to base the missiles in underground launchers to protect them from attack. This aspect of the project is fully covered using recently available information and specially drawn plans.
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Bomber Squadron: Men Who Flew with XV Squadron

Bomber Squadron: Men Who Flew with XV Squadron

Martyn R. Ford-Jones

$55.00
During the Second World War, thousands of young men volunteered for service with the Royal Air Force. Some of these became fighter pilots, but a great many more were destined to be trained as members of bomber aircrew; pilots, navigators, wireless operators, bomb aimers, air gunners and flight engineers. On completion of their training a number of these men were posted to XV Squadron, a highly regarded frontline bomb squadron which had been formed during the First World War.

Bomber Squadron: Men Who Flew with XV relates the personal stories of a small number of these men, giving an insight to their anxious moments when flying on operational sorties, staring death in the face in the form of enemy night-fighters and ground fire, and relaxing with them during their off-duty hours. The book also reveals the motivations, emotions and personal attitudes of these men, who flew into combat on an almost nightly basis. Their stories encompass the whole six years of the war, over which period XV Squadron flew a range of different bomber aircraft including Fairey Battles, Bristol Blenheims, Vickers Wellingtons, Short Stirlings and Avro Lancasters.
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Superguns 1854-1991: Extreme artillery from the Paris Gun and the V-3 to Iraq's Project Babylon

Superguns 1854-1991: Extreme artillery from the Paris Gun and the V-3 to Iraq's Project Babylon

Steven J. Zaloga ,  Jim Laurier

$24.99
Over the last 150 years, gun designers have sought to transform warfare with artillery of superlative range and power, from William Armstrong's 19th-century monster guns to the latest research into hypersonic electro-magnetic railguns.

Taking a case study approach, Superguns explains the technology and role of the finest monster weapons of each era. It looks at the 1918 Wilhelm Gun, designed to shell Paris from behind the German trenches; the World War II V-3 gun built to bombard London across the Channel; the Cold War atomic cannons of the US and Soviet Union; and the story of Dr Gerald Bull's HARP program and the Iraqi Supergun he designed for Saddam Hussein. Illustrated throughout, this is an authoritative history of the greatest and most ambitious artillery pieces of all time.
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Meeting China Halfway: How to Defuse the Emerging US-China Rivalry

Meeting China Halfway: How to Defuse the Emerging US-China Rivalry

Lyle J. Goldstein

$66.00
Though a US China conflict is far from inevitable, major tensions are building in the Asia-Pacific region. These strains are the result of historical enmity, cultural divergence, and deep ideological estrangement, not to mention apprehensions fueled by geopolitical competition and the closely related security dilemma.

Despite worrying signs of intensifying rivalry, few observers have provided concrete paradigms to lead this troubled relationship away from disaster. This book is dramatically different in that Lyle J. Goldstein's focus is on laying bare both US and Chinese perceptions of where their interests clash and proposing new paths to ease bilateral tensions through compromise. Each chapter contains a cooperation spiral - the opposite of an escalation spiral - to illustrate these policy proposals. Goldstein makes one hundred policy proposals over the course of this book to inaugurate a genuine debate regarding cooperative policy solutions to the most vexing problems in US-China relations.

Goldstein not only parses findings from American scholarship but also breaks new ground by analyzing hundreds of Chinese-language sources, including military publications, never before evaluated by Western experts. Meeting China Halfway, new in paperback, remains a refreshing and unique contribution to the study of the world's most important bilateral relationship.
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Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Omer Bartov

$26.99
A substantive contribution to the history of ethnic strife and extreme violence (The Wall Street Journal) and a cautionary examination of how genocide can take root at the local level-turning neighbors, friends, and family against one another-as seen through the eastern European border town of Buczacz during World War II.

For more than four hundred years, the Eastern European border town of Buczacz-today part of Ukraine-was home to a highly diverse citizenry. It was here that Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews all lived side by side in relative harmony. Then came World War II, and three years later the entire Jewish population had been murdered by German and Ukrainian police, while Ukrainian nationalists eradicated Polish residents. In truth, though, this genocide didn't happen so quickly.

In Anatomy of a Genocide, Omer Bartov explains that ethnic cleansing doesn't occur as is so often portrayed in popular history, with the quick ascent of a vitriolic political leader and the unleashing of military might. It begins in seeming peace, slowly and often unnoticed, the culmination of pent-up slights and grudges and indignities. The perpetrators aren't just sociopathic soldiers. They are neighbors and friends and family. They are also middle-aged men who come from elsewhere, often with their wives and children and parents, and settle into a life of bourgeois comfort peppered with bouts of mass murder.

For more than two decades Bartov, whose mother was raised in Buczacz, traveled extensively throughout the region, scouring archives and amassing thousands of documents rarely seen until now. He has also made use of hundreds of first-person testimonies by victims, perpetrators, collaborators, and rescuers. Anatomy of a Genocide profoundly changes our understanding of the social dynamics of mass killing and the nature of the Holocaust as a whole. Bartov's book isn't just an attempt to understand what happened in the past. It's a warning of how it could happen again, in our own towns and cities-much more easily than we might think.
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The First World War in Focus: Rare and Unseen Photographs

The First World War in Focus: Rare and Unseen Photographs

Alan Wakefield

$29.99
As we near the end of extensive centennial commemorations of World War I, it nonetheless retains the power to surprise, even shock us. That's perhaps nowhere more true than in the photographs of the war that have come down to us - countless of them preserved over the decades by Imperial War Museums. The First World War in Focus presents one hundred photographs from that unparalleled collection, many of them published here for the first time, revealing World War I with astonishing breadth and clarity.

Mostly taken by military personnel using private cameras, the photographs presented here tell the story of the conflict on all fronts through aspects that often evaded the lenses of official photographers. We see well-known events such as the unofficial 1914 Christmas truce and the Battle of the Somme from new angles. Other photos show us the war being fought as far afield as Samoa and China, balancing very different images from the Home Front - which themselves were censored in their day as a risk to morale.

Together, these images bring the experience of World War I closer to us than ever, reminding us that what unfolds in history as a sweeping narrative was experienced as a series of striking moments in individual lives.
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Hawker Typhoon And Tempest: A Formidable Pair

Hawker Typhoon And Tempest: A Formidable Pair

Philip Birtles

$75.00
With the technology of the Hurricane being at the end of the biplane combat aircraft era, there was an urgent requirement for a modern fighter with a capability ahead of the anticipated German fighter development for the Luftwaffe. The Hawker design team lead by Sydney Camm created the all-metal stressed skin structure Typhoon powered by the revolutionary Napier Sabre engine. Whereas the Hurricane had been developed in peacetime, the Typhoon was designed in wartime, when the urgency of the programme caused the development of both the airframe and engine to be accelerated, resulting in teething troubles not being fully solved when the aircraft entered service with the RAF. The much improved Tempest used the same engine and basic fuselage with thinner lamina flow wings, giving improved performance at altitude, and allowing the destruction of the V1s at low altitude. Both aircraft made a significant impact on the victory by the Allies in WW2, although their low level ground attack missions were extremely hazardous, and resulted in high pilot losses.
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John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court

John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court

Richard Brookhiser

$42.99
In 1801, a 45-year-old Revolutionary War veteran and politician, slovenly, genial, brilliant, and persuasive, became the fourth chief justice of the United States, a post he would hold for a record thirty-four years. Before John Marshall joined the Court, the judicial branch was viewed as the poor sister of the federal government, lacking in dignity and clout. After his passing, the Supreme Court of the United States would never be ignored again. John Marshall is award-winning and bestselling author Richard Brookhiser's definitive biography of America's longest-serving Chief Justice.

Marshall (1755-1835) was born in Northern Virginia and served as a captain during the Revolutionary War and then as a delegate to the Virginia state convention. He was a friend and admirer of George Washington, and a cousin and enemy of Thomas Jefferson. His appointment to the Supreme Court came almost by chance-Adams saw him as the last viable option, after previous appointees declined the nomination. Yet he took to the court immediately, turning his sharp mind toward strengthening America's fragile legal order.

Americans had inherited from their colonial past a deep distrust of judges as creatures of arbitrary royal power; in reaction, newly independent states made them pawns of legislative whim. The result was legal caprice, sometimes amounting to chaos. Marshall wanted a strong federal judiciary, led by the Supreme Court, to define laws, protect rights, and balance the power of the legislative and executive branches. However, America's legal system, he believed, was threatened by specific individuals-namely Thomas Jefferson and the early Republican Party-who were intent on undermining the Constitution and respect for law in order to empower themselves.

As a Federalist and a follower of Washington and Hamilton, he also wanted a strong national government, favorable to business. In his three decades on the court, Marshall accomplished just that. As Brookhiser vividly relates, in a string of often-colorful cases involving businessmen, educators, inventors, scoundrels, Native Americans, and slaves, Marshall clipped the power of the states vis-a-vis the federal government, established the Supreme Court's power to correct or rebuke Congress or the president, and bolstered commerce and contracts. John Marshall's modus operandi was charm and wit, frequently uniting his fellow justices around unanimous decisions in even the most controversial cases. For better and for worse, he made the Supreme Court a central part of American life.

John Marshall is the definitive biography of America's greatest judge and most important early Chief Justice.
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The Lost Founding Father: John Quincy Adams and the Transformation of American Politics

The Lost Founding Father: John Quincy Adams and the Transformation of American Politics

William J. Cooper

$26.95
Overshadowed by both his brilliant father and the brash and bold Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams has long been dismissed as an aloof intellectual. Viciously assailed by Jackson and his populist mobs for being both slippery and effete, Adams nevertheless recovered from defeat in 1828's presidential election to lead the nation as a lonely Massachusetts congressman in the fight against slavery. Award-winning historian William J. Cooper's balanced, wellsourced, and accessible work (Publishers Weekly) demonstrates that Adams should be considered our lost Founding Father, his moral and political vision the final link to the visionaries who created our nation. With his heroic arguments in the Amistad trial forever memorialized, Adams stood strong against the expansion of slavery that would send the nation hurtling into war. This well-crafted (William McFeely) biography reveals Adams to be one of the most battered, but courageous and inspirational, politicians in American history.
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American Secret Projects Vol 2: Airlifters

American Secret Projects Vol 2: Airlifters

George Cox ,  Craig Kaston

$69.95
This book charts the history of the US airlifter from its origins in World War II to today's transport giants. In doing so, it reveals and describes numerous designs which never saw the light of day, examining the thinking behind them and giving insights into why they did, or did not, succeed.

In many ways, this untold story of aviation history reflects both the changing face of conflict and the exercise of geo-political power; it has also had a major bearing on the development of civil aviation. The book has been made possible by the authors being given unprecedented access to major aerospace company archives, uncovering scores of design proposals which have never previously been revealed. It is profusely illustrated, much in full color, with artwork and three-view drawings extracted from manufacturers' archives and with photographs of original project models. As well as describing how airlifters were progressively developed to meet ever-more demanding military transport requirements, the book looks at other roles for which they were adapted, from nuclear test-beds to Space-Shuttle carriers.

This previously untold story describes more than 200 unknown, or little known, designs, and contains more than 400 illustrations detailing some of the largest and most incredible aircraft ever conceived.
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By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783

By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783

Michael J. Green

$63.00
Soon after the American Revolution, certain of the founders began to recognize the strategic significance of Asia and the Pacific and the vast material and cultural resources at stake there. Over the coming generations, the United States continued to ask how best to expand trade with the region and whether to partner with China, at the center of the continent, or Japan, looking toward the Pacific. Where should the United States draw its defensive line, and how should it export democratic principles? In a history that spans the eighteenth century to the present, Michael J. Green follows the development of U.S. strategic thinking toward East Asia, identifying recurring themes in American statecraft that reflect the nation's political philosophy and material realities.

Drawing on archives, interviews, and his own experience in the Pentagon and White House, Green finds one overarching concern driving U.S. policy toward East Asia: a fear that a rival power might use the Pacific to isolate and threaten the United States and prevent the ocean from becoming a conduit for the westward free flow of trade, values, and forward defense. By More Than Providence works through these problems from the perspective of history's major strategists and statesmen, from Thomas Jefferson to Alfred Thayer Mahan and Henry Kissinger. It records the fate of their ideas as they collided with the realities of the Far East and adds clarity to America's stakes in the region, especially when compared with those of Europe and the Middle East.
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Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff

Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff

Edward J. Balleisen

$54.99
In America, fraud has always been a key feature of business, and the national worship of entrepreneurial freedom complicates the task of distinguishing salesmanship from deceit. In this sweeping narrative, Edward Balleisen traces the history of fraud in America - and the evolving efforts to combat it - from the age of P. T. Barnum through the eras of Charles Ponzi and Bernie Madoff. This unprecedented account describes the slow, piecemeal construction of modern institutions to protect consumers and investors - from the Gilded Age through the New Deal and the Great Society. It concludes with the more recent era of deregulation, which has brought with it a spate of costly frauds, including corporate accounting scandals and the mortgage-marketing debacle. By tracing how Americans have struggled to foster a vibrant economy without encouraging a corrosive level of cheating, Fraud reminds us that American capitalism rests on an uneasy foundation of social trust.
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John Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy

John Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy

Luke Mayville

$44.99
Long before the one percent became a protest slogan, American founding father John Adams feared the power of a class he called simply the few - the wellborn, the beautiful, and especially the rich. In John Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy, Luke Mayville explores Adams's deep concern with the way in which inequality threatens to corrode democracy and empower a small elite. Adams believed that wealth is politically powerful not merely because money buys influence, but also because citizens admire and even identify with the rich. Mayville explores Adams's theory of wealth and power in the context of his broader concern about social and economic disparities - reflections that promise to illuminate contemporary debates about inequality and its political consequences. He also examines Adams's ideas about how oligarchy might be countered. A compelling work of intellectual history, John Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy has important lessons for today's world.
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The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant ,  Elizabeth D. Samet

$70.95
Originally published in 1885 by Mark Twain, Ulysses S. Grant's landmark memoir has been annotated by Elizabeth Samet in this lavish edition. No previous edition combines such a sweep of historical and cultural contexts with the literary authority that Samet, obsessed with Grant for decades, brings to the table.

Whether exploring novels Grant read at West Point or presenting majestic images culled from archives, Samet curates a richly annotated edition. Never has Grant's transformation from tanner's son to military leader been more insightfully and passionately explained than in this timely edition, appearing on the 150th anniversary of Grant's 1868 presidential election.
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Covert Regime Change: America's Secret Cold War

Covert Regime Change: America's Secret Cold War

Lindsey A. O'Rourke

$79.00
States seldom resort to war to overthrow their adversaries. They are more likely to attempt to covertly change the opposing regime, by assassinating a foreign leader, sponsoring a coup d'etat, meddling in a democratic election, or secretly aiding foreign dissident groups.

In Covert Regime Change, Lindsey A. O'Rourke shows us how states really act when trying to overthrow another state. She argues that conventional focus on overt cases misses the basic causes of regime change. O'Rourke provides substantive evidence of types of security interests that drive states to intervene. Offensive operations aim to overthrow a current military rival or break up a rival alliance. Preventive operations seek to stop a state from taking certain actions, such as joining a rival alliance, that may make them a future security threat. Hegemonic operations try to maintain a hierarchical relationship between the intervening state and the target government. Despite the prevalence of covert attempts at regime change, most operations fail to remain covert and spark blowback in unanticipated ways.

Covert Regime Change assembles an original dataset of all American regime change operations during the Cold War. This fund of information shows the United States was ten times more likely to try covert rather than overt regime change during the Cold War. Her dataset allows O'Rourke to address three foundational questions: What motivates states to attempt foreign regime change? Why do states prefer to conduct these operations covertly rather than overtly? How successful are such missions in achieving their foreign policy goals?
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The American President: Detailed Biographies, Historical Timelines From George Washington to Donald Trump

The American President: Detailed Biographies, Historical Timelines From George Washington to Donald Trump

Kathryn Moore

$39.99
Fully updated to include the 2016 election, this book is the most thorough, authoritative, and up-to-date single-volume reference to the presidency in print.

In The American President: A Complete History, historian Kathryn Moore presents a riveting narrative of each president's experiences in and out of office, along with illuminating facts and statistics about each administration, timelines of national and world events, astonishing trivia, and more. Together, these details create a complex and nuanced portrait of the American presidency, from the nation's infancy to today - including Donald Trump's first year in office.
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Plumes from Paradise: Trade Cycles in Outer Southeast Asia and their Impact on New Guinea and Nearby Islands Until 1920

Plumes from Paradise: Trade Cycles in Outer Southeast Asia and their Impact on New Guinea and Nearby Islands Until 1920

Pamela Swadling

$40.00
The natural resources of New Guinea and nearby islands have attracted outsiders for at least 5000 years: spices, aromatic woods and barks, resins, plumes, sea slugs, shells and pearls all brought traders from distant markets. Among the most sought-after was the bird of paradise. Their magnificent plumes bedecked the hats of fashion-conscious women in Europe and America, provided regalia for the Kings of Nepal, and decorated the headdresses of Janissaries of the Ottoman Empire.
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The Gulag Archipelago

The Gulag Archipelago

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

$27.99
The Gulag Archipelago helped create the world we live in today' Anne Applebaum

A vast canvas of camps, prisons, transit centres and secret police, of informers and spies and interrogators but also of everyday heroism, The Gulag Archipelago is Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's grand masterwork. Based on the testimony of some 200 survivors, and on the recollection of Solzhenitsyn's own eleven years in labour camps and exile, it chronicles the story of those at the heart of the Soviet Union who opposed Stalin, and for whom the key to survival lay not in hope but in despair.

A thoroughly researched document and a feat of literary and imaginative power, this edition of The Gulag Archipelago was abridged into one volume at the author's wish and with his full co-operation.
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The Soviet Union: A Short History

The Soviet Union: A Short History

Mark Edele

$46.95
An acclaimed historian explores the dynamic history of the twentieth century Soviet Union.

In ten concise and compelling chapters, The Soviet Union covers the entire Soviet Union experience from the years 1904 to 1991 by putting the focus on three major themes: warfare, welfare, and empire. Throughout the book, Mark Edele - a noted expert on the topic - clearly demonstrates that the Soviet Union was more than simply Russia. Instead, it was a multi-ethnic empire.

The author explains that there were many incarnations of Soviet society throughout its turbulent history, each one a representative of Soviet socialism. The text covers a wide range of topics: The end Romanov empire; The outbreak of World War I; The Bolshevik Revolution of 1917; The breakdown of the old empire and its re-constitution in the Civil War; The New Economic Policy; The rise of Stalin; The Soviet's role in World War II; Post war normalization; and Gorbachev's attempt to end the Cold War. The author also explores the challenges encountered by the successor states, their struggles with and against democracy, capitalism, authoritarianism, and war. This vital resource:

Provides a concise overview of the history of the Soviet Union Includes information on the latest research that takes the broad view of the history of the Soviet Union and its place in world history Treats scholarly disagreements as part of the history of the influence of the Soviet Union on the course of the twentieth century Offers suggestion for further readings and a link to online primary sources.

Written for students of twentieth century Russia, the Russian Revolution, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War, and twentieth century World History, The Soviet Union: A Short History is a volume in the popular Wiley Short Histories series.
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Barcelona

Barcelona

Gary McDonogh ,  Sergi Martinez-Rigol

$28.95
Barcelona has existed as a settlement for two millennia. Early civilizations shaped the city before it achieved, in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, global power as a trading metropolis and empire capital. After a long struggle with the unifying Spanish state, the city revived, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as an industrial and commercial powerhouse. It became a center of culture, ornamented by modern planning and wondrous works by Gaud and others. Barcelona became known as The Rose of Fire home to revolutionaries and anarchists. Creativity and conflict continued to shape Barcelona in the twentieth century, as its citizens faced the Spanish Republic, Civil War and Franco's dictatorship. Linking social and cultural currents to the rich architectural and experiential heritage of this multi-layered city, McDonogh and Mart nez-Rigol reveal Barcelona's hidden history to modern-day visitors and residents alike.
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Empire of the Seas: How the Navy Forged the Modern World

Empire of the Seas: How the Navy Forged the Modern World

Brian Lavery

$22.99
The year 1588 marked a turning point in our national story. Victory over the Spanish Armada transformed us into a seafaring nation and it sparked a myth that one day would become a reality - that the nation's new destiny, the source of her future wealth and power lay out on the oceans. This book tells the story of how the navy expanded from a tiny force to become the most complex industrial enterprise on earth; how the need to organise it laid the foundations of our civil service and our economy; and how it transformed our culture, our sense of national identity and our democracy.

Brian Lavery's narrative explores the navy's rise over four centuries; a key factor in propelling Britain to its status as the most powerful nation on earth, and assesses the turning point of Jutland and the First World War. He creates a compelling read that is every bit as engaging as the TV series itself.
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Exterminate All The Brutes

Exterminate All The Brutes

Sven Lindqvist

$22.99
Over twenty years ago, Sven Lindqvist, one of the great pioneers of a new kind of experiential history writing, set out across Central Africa. Obsessed with a single line from Conrad's The Heart of Darkness - Kurtz's injunction to 'Exterminate All the Brutes' - he braided an account of his experiences with a profound historical investigation, revealing to the reader with immediacy and cauterizing force precisely what Europe's imperial powers had exacted on Africa's people over the course of the preceding two centuries.

Shocking, humane, crackling with imaginative energies and moral purpose, Exterminate All the Brutes stands as an impassioned, timeless classic. It is essential reading for anybody ready to come to terms with the brutal, racist history on which Europe built its wealth.
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