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The New Literary Middlebrow: Tastemakers and Reading in the Twenty-First Century by Beth Driscoll at Abbey's Bookshop,

The New Literary Middlebrow: Tastemakers and Reading in the Twenty-First Century

Beth Driscoll


9781137402912

Palgrave Macmillan


Literary theory;
Literary studies: from c 1900 -


Hardback

234 pages

$124.95  $30.00
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The middlebrow is a dominant cultural force in the twenty-first century. This book defines the new literary middlebrow through eight key features: middle class, feminized, reverential, commercial, emotional, recreational, earnest and mediated. Case studies include Oprah's Book Club, the Man Booker Prize and the Harry Potter phenomenon.

By:   Beth Driscoll
Imprint:   Palgrave Macmillan
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 216mm,  Width: 140mm,  Spine: 12mm
Weight:   425g
ISBN:   9781137402912
ISBN 10:   1137402911
Pages:   234
Publication Date:   September 2014
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active

Beth Driscoll is Lecturer in Publishing and Communications at the University of Melbourne, Australia.


The New Literary Middlebrow: Tastemakers and Reading in the Twenty-First Century, is an excellent introduction to the mechanisms of literary appreciation and distribution in contemporary culture. ... Driscoll's account of the 'new literary middlebrow' makes this an essential book for literary critics and cultural scholars who want to understand contemporary reading culture. (Jaime Harker, Cultural Studies Review, Vol. 22 (1), 2016) ...Driscoll does a thorough and thoughtful job of working out the cultural and institutional dimensions of her analysis. In particular, she makes a strong case for there being a distinctively feminised mode of reading, which values affective identification with characters, which looks for a reflection of its own experiences in their lives, and which is 'ethical' in the sense of exercising moral judgement on a world that is taken to be close to the real world: this regime looks for 'stories of personal growth and moral redemption,' and sees reading 'as part of a larger project of moral improvement' (40). John Frow, Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature Driscoll is a lecturer in Publishing and Communications at the University of Melbourne, and while her book draws on theory and is written mainly for academic readers, it's highly accessible, especially for the people she's writing about, we literary middlebrows. Jane Sullivan, The Sydney Morning Herald

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