Abbey's Bookshop Logo
Go to my checkout basket
Login to Abbey's Bookshop
Register with Abbey's Bookshop
True Crime
Code of Silence: How One Honest Police Officer Took on Australia's Most Corrupt Police Force

Code of Silence: How One Honest Police Officer Took on Australia's Most Corrupt Police Force

Colin Dillon

$29.99

Double Reward Points
More info
The powerful true story of the first police officer to lift the lid on police corruption in Queensland and what then happened to him.

'Wherever there is power and money, there is always the risk of corruption. But everyone has a choice: to become involved or to take a stand against it.'

Colin Dillon is an extraordinary man. He was the first Indigenous policeman in Australia. But that is actually a very small part of his story.

He was also the first serving police officer to voluntarily appear before the Fitzgerald Commission of Inquiry in 1987 and give first-hand evidence of police corruption. He did this at a time when the Fitzgerald Inquiry was beginning and struggling for traction. His evidence at the Inquiry was instrumental in eventually sending some police, including Police Commissioner Terry Lewis, and politicians to prison.

Revealing, powerful and uncompromising, this is the story of Colin Dillon's nearly 40 years in a police force rotten to the core. It describes the extraordinary range of criminal activities - drugs, gaming, SP bookmaking, brothels, vehicle theft - that were allowed to operate with impunity in return for bribes. It also tells of the high price an honest man and his family paid for his decision to break the code of silence.
Add this item to my basket
The Golden Age of Murder

The Golden Age of Murder

Martin Edwards

$19.99

This is the first book about the Detection Club, the world’s most famous and most mysterious social network of crime writers. Drawing on years of in-depth research, it reveals the astonishing story of how members such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers reinvented detective fiction. Detective stories from the so-called “Golden Age” between the wars are often dismissed as cosily conventional. Nothing could be further from the truth: some explore forensic pathology and shocking serial murders, others delve into police brutality and miscarriages of justice; occasionally the innocent are hanged, or murderers get away scot-free.

Their authors faced up to the Slump and the rise of Hitler during years of economic misery and political upheaval, and wrote books agonising over guilt and innocence, good and evil, and explored whether killing a fellow human being was ever justified. Though the stories included no graphic sex scenes, sexual passions of all kinds seethed just beneath the surface.Attracting feminists, gay and lesbian writers, Socialists and Marxist sympathisers, the Detection Club authors were young, ambitious and at the cutting edge of popular culture – some had sex lives as bizarre as their mystery plots.

Fascinated by real life crimes, they cracked unsolved cases and threw down challenges to Scotland Yard, using their fiction to take revenge on people who hurt them, to conduct covert relationships, and even as an outlet for homicidal fantasy. Their books anticipated not only CSI, Jack Reacher and Gone Girl, but also Lord of the Flies. The Club occupies a unique place in Britain’s cultural history, and its influence on storytelling in fiction, film and television throughout the world continues to this day. The Golden Age of Murder rewrites the story of crime fiction with unique authority, transforming our understanding of detective stories and the brilliant but tormented men and women who wrote them.
Add this item to my basket
The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay

The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay

David Murray

$24.99

How did a father with no criminal history come to be on trial for the brutal murder of his wife?

It began with a phone call to Brisbane police on 20 April 2012. Allison, wife of real-estate agent Gerard Baden-Clay, was missing.

When investigating officers arrived at the family home, in one of the city's wealthiest suburbs, a neatly dressed Gerard had been getting the couple's three daughters ready for school. Scratches on his face were shaving cuts, he told them. Police weren't so sure and opened one of Australia's biggest ever missing persons investigations.

Ten days after Gerard reported Allison's disappearance, the body of the former beauty queen was discovered on a creek bank 14 kilometres from home.

The Murder of Allison Baden-Clay is written by the investigative journalist who covered the case from the start. It weaves together exclusive interviews and police and court records to explain how a father with no criminal history came to be on trial for a brutal murder. It's also a story about everyday choices and their consequences.
Add this item to my basket
The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

Kate Summerscale

$27.99

Double Reward Points
More info
Early in the morning of Monday 8 July 1895, thirteen-year-old Robert Coombes and his twelve-year-old brother Nattie set out from their small, yellow-brick terraced house in East London to watch a cricket match at Lord's. Their father had gone to sea the previous Friday, the boys told their neighbours, and their mother was visiting her family in Liverpool. Over the next ten days Robert and Nattie spent extravagantly, pawning their parents' valuables to fund trips to the theatre and the seaside. But as the sun beat down on the Coombes house, a strange smell began to emanate from the building. When the police were finally called to investigate, the discovery they made sent the press into a frenzy of horror and alarm, and Robert and Nattie were swept up in a criminal trial that echoed the outrageous plots of the 'penny dreadful' novels that Robert loved to read. In The Wicked Boy, Kate Summerscale has uncovered a fascinating true story of murder and morality - it is not just a meticulous examination of a shocking Victorian case, but also a compelling account of its aftermath, and of man's capacity to overcome the past.
Add this item to my basket
Hope: A Memoir of Survival

Hope: A Memoir of Survival

Amanda Berry ,  Gina DeJesus

$24.99

'We have written here about terrible things that we never wanted to think about again... Now we want the world to know: we survived, we are free, we love life.'

On May 6, 2013, Amanda Berry made headlines around the world when she fled a Cleveland home and called 911, saying: "Help me, I'm Amanda Berry... I've been kidnapped, and I've been missing for ten years."

A horrifying story rapidly unfolded. Ariel Castro, a local school bus driver, had separately lured Berry and two other young women, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight, to his home, where he trapped them and kept them chained. In the decade that followed, the three girls were frequently raped, psychologically abused and threatened with death if they attempted to escape. Years after she was taken, Berry had a daughter by their captor, a child she bravely raised as normally as possible under impossible conditions.

Drawing upon their recollections and the secret diary kept by Amanda Berry, Berry and Gina DeJesus describe the unimaginable torment they suffered and the strength and resourcefulness that enabled them to survive. Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post reporters Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan interweave the events within Castro's house with original reporting on the efforts to find the missing girls.

The full story behind the headlines - including details never previously released on Castro's life and motivations - Hope is a harrowing yet inspiring chronicle of two women whose courage and ingenuity ultimately delivered them back to their lives and families.
Add this item to my basket
You Could Do Something Amazing with Your Life (You are Raoul Moat)

You Could Do Something Amazing with Your Life (You are Raoul Moat)

Andrew Hankinson

$29.99

Winner of a UK Northern Writers Award Raoul Moat was the fugitive Geordie bodybuilder-mechanic who became notorious one hot July week when, after killing his ex-girlfriend's new boyfriend, shooting her in the stomach, and blinding a policeman, he disappeared into the woods of Northumberland, evading discovery for seven days - even after TV tracker Ray Mears was employed by the police to find him. Eventually, cornered by the police, Moat shot himself. Andrew Hankinson, a journalist from Newcastle, re-tells Moat's story using Moat's words, and those of the state services which engaged with him, bringing the reader disarmingly close at all times to the mind of Moat. It is a reading experience unrelieved by authorial distance or expert interpretation. The narrative Hankinson has woven is entirely compelling, even if Moat's weaknesses are never far from sight, requiring the reader to work out where he or she should stand.
Add this item to my basket
Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction

Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction

Erika Janik

$43.95

A lively exploration of the struggles faced by women in law enforcement and mystery fiction for the past 175 years.

In 1910, Alice Wells took the oath to join the all-male Los Angeles Police Department. She wore no uniform, carried no weapon, and kept her badge stuffed in her pocketbook. She wasn't the first or only policewoman, but she became the movement's most visible voice.

Police work from its very beginning was considered a male domain, far too dangerous and rough for a respectable woman to even contemplate doing, much less take on as a profession. A policewoman worked outside the home, walking dangerous city streets late at night to confront burglars, drunks, scam artists, and prostitutes. To solve crimes, she observed, collected evidence, and used reason and logic traits typically associated with men. And most controversially of all, she had a purpose separate from her husband, children, and home.

Women who donned the badge faced harassment and discrimination. It would take more than seventy years for women to enter the force as full-fledged officers. Yet within the covers of popular fiction, women not only wrote mysteries but also created female characters that handily solved crimes. Smart, independent, and courageous, these nineteenth - and early twentieth - century female sleuths (including a healthy number created by male writers) set the stage for Agatha Christie's Miss Marple, Sara Paretsky's V. I. Warshawski, Patricia Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta, and Sue Grafton's Kinsey Millhone, as well as TV detectives such as Jane Tennison of "Prime Suspect"  and Olivia Benson of "Law and Order".

The authors were not amateurs dabbling in detection but professional writers who helped define the genre and competed with men, often to greater success. "Pistols and Petticoats" tells the story of women's very early place in crime fiction and their public crusade to transform policing. Whether real or fictional, investigating women were nearly always at odds with society. Most women refused to let that stop them, paving the way to a modern professional life for women on the force and in popular culture.
Add this item to my basket
Deadly Games: Kids who Kill Kids

Deadly Games: Kids who Kill Kids

Gabrielle O'Reilly  ,  Liz Frame

$29.95

A little over twenty years ago the world was shocked and numbed when it learned that two ten-year-old boys had deliberately lured, tortured and murdered two-year-old James Bulger. How could this happen, the world wondered.

The reality is that this was nothing new. Throughout history there have been no shortage of cases where kids have deliberately and calculatingly killed kids.

Deadly Games provides a detailed look at some of the most murderous children who have ever lived, spanning throughout time and across nations. Some have killed for retribution, others simply for the thrill. The shocking and unfathomable crimes committed by young children will leave you questioning what children are actually capable of, and whether society is appropriately dealing with this ongoing horror.

More than 40 strong true crime stories, mainly modern day but some reaching back as far as the 18th century. Children killing children is a controversial topic, but there is a plethora of cases where kids have deliberately killed other children for mere pleasure and experience.

Inspired by the killing of young English boy Jamie Bulger, Deadly Games features stories from across the globe and including a section on American school massacres and five horrifying Australian cases.
Add this item to my basket
Killing Time: Surviving Dubai's Most Notorious Prisons

Killing Time: Surviving Dubai's Most Notorious Prisons

Karl Williams

$32.99

Karl Williams was on holiday in Dubai, living it large with two English friends, when they were accused of drug dealing, arrested, and tortured by police. They were innocent, but the authorities didn't care.

And so began their year-long nightmare as they were locked up in Port Rashid where prisoners of all nationalities were crammed into stinking cells, violence could erupt in seconds, and control of the jail was in the hands of a few powerful inmates. Unless you knew the right people and could work the system, you were screwed. 

Karl was a survivor and managed to rise up the prison pecking order, making friends with local gangsters, Russian mafia and other assorted murderers, drug dealers, fraudsters and hapless innocents he encountered behind bars. But it was hard to stay positive when facing life or the death penalty... And then he was moved to the notorious Central prison, a terrifying place where HIV positive prisoners were used by gangsters to infect their enemies; and murders and rape were common. When Karl had lost all hope of finding justice, Reprieve, an organization of committed human rights defenders, took up his case.

Raw, totally gripping, and at times brutally funny, Killing Time takes you behind the shiny desert paradise to the heart of the real Dubai.
Add this item to my basket
           
Your cart does not contain any items.