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Science
2015 Australasian Sky Guide

2015 Australasian Sky Guide

Nick Lomb

$16.95

Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide has been providing star-gazers with everything they need to know about the southern night sky for the past 25 years.

This 2015 guide celebrate this landmark with highlights from the past, as well as monthly astronomy maps, viewing tips and highlights, and details of the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to estimate local rise and set times for the Sun, Moon and planets. It also provides information on the solar system, updated with the latest findings from space probes.

Published annually since 1991, the Sky Guide continues to be a favourite with photographers, event planners, sports organisers, teachers, students - anyone who looks up at the stars and wants to know more.

2015 highlights:

- Venus approaches Mars in February and November

- Total eclipse of the Moon in April

- Venus approaches Jupiter in July and October

- Mercury approaches Jupiter in August

Astronomy 2015 Australia: Your Guide to the Night Sky

Astronomy 2015 Australia: Your Guide to the Night Sky

Ken Wallace ,  Glenn Dawes ,  Peter Northfield

$27.95

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This annual gem (produced each year since 1991) continues to  take the Australian stargazer on a wondrous journey of the night sky. This critically acclaimed work, produced by three well known experts in  the field, takes a unique approach to explaining and identifying the  Sun, Moon, planets and constellations; it is simply the best publication  of its type in the world.
Hubble: Window on the Universe

Hubble: Window on the Universe

Giles Sparrow

$55.00

For 20 years the Hubble Space Telescope has been hurtling around our planet at 17,500 mph sending spectacularly sharp images of the universe back to Earth, but after two decades and 570,000 photographs, NASA is preparing to wind down this extraordinarily successful mission. This fully revised and updated edition of Hubble: Window on the Universe (Legacy Edition) showcases the very latest and clearest images of galaxies, nebulae, quasars, exploding stars and stellar nurseries. More than 200 remarkable cosmic images reveal the inner workings of the solar system, the expansion of the Universe, the birth and death of stars, the formation of planetary nebulae, the dynamics of galaxies and the mysterious force known as 'dark energy'. Hubble is a celebration of this large and versatile telescope's astonishing scientific and technical achievements. Featuring the history of the project from its origins and launch in 1990, the discovery and emergency repair of a defective mirror, the impact of subsequent servicing missions and finally, its extraordinary legacy this stunning giant volume will take you on a journey through the universe via 200 glorious full-colour images.
The New Moon: Water, Exploration, and Future Habitation

The New Moon: Water, Exploration, and Future Habitation

Arlin Crotts

$51.95

Explore Earth's closest neighbor, the Moon, in this fascinating and timely book and discover what we should expect from this seemingly familiar but strange, new frontier. What startling discoveries are being uncovered on the Moon? What will these tell us about our place in the Universe? How can exploring the Moon benefit development on Earth? Discover the role of the Moon in Earth's past and present; read about the lunar environment and how it could be made more habitable for humans; consider whether continued exploration of the Moon is justified; and view rare Apollo-era photos and film stills. This is a complete story of the human lunar experience, presenting many interesting but little-known and significant events in lunar science for the first time. It will appeal to anyone wanting to know more about the stunning discoveries being uncovered on the Moon.
Adam Spencer's Big Book of Numbers

Adam Spencer's Big Book of Numbers

Adam Spencer

$29.99

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A hilarious, enlightening romp through the world of numbers with one of Australia's best-loved broadcasters.

Why do people get freaked out by Friday the 13th? Where does a dozen come from? Who was Erno Rubik? And how do you become a master at Sudoku? In 100 bite-sized chapters, mathematician, broadcaster and comedian Adam Spencer unlocks more of the secrets of the world of numbers.

If you've ever wondered about the fourth dimension, why spider monkeys have so many bones in their hands, which numbers are truly narcissistic, or how on earth you play Buckyball, Adam Spencer's Big Book of Numbers will set you straight.

Adam Spencer with his BIG BOOK of Numbers at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
I Think You'll Find it's a Bit More Complicated Than That

I Think You'll Find it's a Bit More Complicated Than That

Ben Goldacre

$29.99

Goldacre is a doctor, writer, broadcaster and academic who specialises in unpicking dodgy scientific claims made by drug companies, newspapers, governments, PR people... in short anyone who tries to mislead the general public in medical and scientific areas. This is a selection of his writings - witty, indignant, reasoned, rational and enormously enjoyable. From the author of the bestselling Bad Science and Bad Pharma. In Bad Science, Goldacre hilariously exposed the tricks that quacks and journalists use to distort science. In Bad Pharma, he put the $600 billion global pharmaceutical industry under the microscope. Now the pick of the journalism by one of our wittiiest, most indignant and fearless commentators on the worlds of medicine and science is collected in one volume.
The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures

The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures

Christine Kenneally

$29.99

We are doomed to repeat history if we fail to learn from it, but how are we affected by the forces that are invisible to us?

What role does Neanderthal DNA play in our genetic makeup? How did the theory of eugenics embraced by Nazi Germany first develop? How is trust passed down in Africa, and silence inherited in Tasmania? How are private companies like Ancestry.com uncovering, preserving and potentially editing the past? 

In The Invisible History of the Human Race, Christine Kenneally reveals that, remarkably, it is not only our biological history that is coded in our DNA, but also our social history. She breaks down myths of determinism and draws on cutting-edge research to explore how both historical artefacts and our DNA tell us where we have come from and where we may be going.

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“The word “brilliant” gets thrown around a lot, but it should be saved for Christine Kenneally and her book The Invisible History of the Human Race. Transcending the nature-nurture dichotomy, Kenneally shows us how our societies and our selves got to be the way they are. Don’t read this book looking for neat answers—gaze instead through a glorious kaleidoscope of science, psychology, history and first-class storytelling.” —Susan Cain, New York Times bestselling author of QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.

“Christine Kenneally vividly traces the astonishing 21st century progress in the science of who we are.  And she never loses sight of the human stories we tell about our heredity and history, which constitute us just as much as bits and genes do.” —Jordan Ellenberg, professor of mathematics at the University of Wisconsin, author of How Not To Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking
Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation

Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation

Bill Nye

$34.99

Evolution is one of the most powerful and important ideas ever developed in the history of science. Every question it raises leads to new answers, new discoveries, and new smarter questions. The science of evolution is as expansive as nature itself. It is also the most meaningful creation story that humans have ever found. Bill Nye Sparked by a controversial debate in February 2014, Bill Nye has set off on an energetic campaign to spread awareness of evolution and the powerful way it shapes our lives. In Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation, he explains why race does not really exist; evaluates the true promise and peril of genetically modified food; reveals how new species are born, in a dog kennel and in a London subway; takes a stroll through 4.5 billion years of time; and explores the new search for alien life, including aliens right here on Earth. With infectious enthusiasm, Bill Nye shows that evolution is much more than a rebuttal to creationism; it is an essential way to understand how nature works - and to change the world. It might also help you get a date on a Saturday night.
The Copernicus Complex: The Quest for Our Cosmic (In)Significance

The Copernicus Complex: The Quest for Our Cosmic (In)Significance

Caleb Scharf

$39.99

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Though the concept of  the universe  suggests the containment of everything, the latest ideas in cosmology hint that our universe may be just one of a multitude of others - a single slice of an infinity of parallel realities.

In The Copernicus Complex, the renowned astrophysicist and author Caleb Scharf takes us on a cosmic adventure like no other, from tiny microbes within the Earth to distant exoplanets and beyond, asserting that the age-old Copernican principle is in need of updating. As Scharf argues, when Copernicus proposed that the Earth was not the fixed point at the center of the known universe (and therefore we are not unique), he set in motion a colossal scientific juggernaut, forever changing our vision of nature. But the principle has never been entirely true-we do live at a particular time, in a particular location, under particular circumstances. To solve this conundrum we must put aside our Copernican worldview and embrace the possibility that we are in a delicate balance between mediocrity and significance, order and chaos.

Weaving together cutting-edge science and classic storytelling, historical accounts and speculations on what the future holds, The Copernicus Complex presents a compelling argument for what our true cosmic status is, and proposes a way forward for the ultimate quest: to determine life's abundance not just across this universe but across all realities.
It Started with Copernicus: Vital Questions About Science

It Started with Copernicus: Vital Questions About Science

Keith Parsons

$34.99

A unique approach to the philosophy of science that focuses on the liveliest and most important controversies surrounding science. Is science more rational or objective than any other intellectual endeavor? Are scientific theories accurate depictions of reality or just useful devices for manipulating the environment?

These core questions are the focus of this unique approach to the philosophy of science. Unlike standard textbooks, this book does not attempt a comprehensive review of the entire field, but makes a selection of the most vibrant debates and issues. The author tackles such stimulating questions as: Can science meet the challenges of skeptics? Should science address questions traditionally reserved for philosophy and religion? Further, does science leave room for human values, free will, and moral responsibility? Written in an accessible, jargon-free style, the text succinctly presents complex ideas in an easily understandable fashion. By using numerous examples taken from diverse areas such as evolutionary theory, paleontology and astronomy, the author piques our curiosity in current scientific controversies.

Concise bibliographic essays at the end of each chapter invite readers to sample ideas different from the ones offered in the text and to explore the range of opinions on each topic. Rigorous yet highly readable, this excellent invitation to the philosophy of science makes a convincing case that understanding the nature of science is essential for understanding life itself.
The Best Australian Science Writing 2014

The Best Australian Science Writing 2014

Ashley Hay ,  Ian Lowe

$29.99

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Now in its 4th year, this annual collection celebrates the finest Australian science writing of the year.

Why are Sydney's golden orb weaver spiders getting fatter and fitter? Could sociology explain the recent upsurge in diagnoses of prostate cancer? Why were Darwinites craving a good storm during The Angry Summer? Is it true that tuberculosis has become deadlier over time? And are jellyfish really taking over the world?

This popular and acclaimed anthology steps inside the nation's laboratories and its finest scientific and literary minds. Featuring prominent authors such as Tim Flannery, Jo Chandler, Frank Bowden and Iain McCalman, as well as many new voices, it covers topics as diverse and wondrous as our 'lumpy' universe, the creation of dragons and the frontiers of climate science.
The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-is

The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All-There-is

Roberto Trotta

$24.99

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From the big bang to black holes, from dark matter to dark energy, from the origins of the universe to its ultimate destiny, The Edge of the Sky tells the story of the most important discoveries and mysteries in modern cosmology--with a twist.

The book's lexicon is limited to the thousand most common words in the English language, excluding physics, energy, galaxy, or even universe. Through the eyes of a fictional scientist (Student-People) hunting for dark matter with one of the biggest telescopes (Big-Seers) on Earth (Home-World), cosmologist Roberto Trotta explores the most important ideas about our universe (All-there-is) in language simple enough for anyone to understand.

A unique blend of literary experimentation and science popularisation, this delightful book is a perfect gift for any aspiring astronomer. The Edge of the Sky tells the story of the universe on a human scale, and the result is out of this world.
Standard Deviations: Flawed Assumptions, Tortured Data and Other Ways to Lie with Statistics

Standard Deviations: Flawed Assumptions, Tortured Data and Other Ways to Lie with Statistics

Gary Smith

$29.99

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Did you know that having a messy room will make you racist? Or that human beings possess the ability to postpone death until after important ceremonial occasions? Or that people live three to five years longer if they have positive initials, like ACE? All of these 'facts' have been argued with a straight face by researchers and backed up with reams of data and convincing statistics.

As Nobel Prize-winning economist Ronald Coase once cynically observed, 'If you torture data long enough, it will confess.' Lying with statistics is a time-honoured con. In Standard Deviations, economics professor Gary Smith walks us through the various tricks and traps that people use to back up their own crackpot theories. Sometimes, the unscrupulous deliberately try to mislead us. Other times, the well-intentioned are blissfully unaware of the mischief they are committing. Today, data are so plentiful that researchers spend precious little time distinguishing between good, meaningful deductions and total rubbish. Not only do others use data to fool us, we fool ourselves.

Drawing on breakthrough research in behavioural economics by luminaries like Daniel Kahneman and Dan Ariely, and taking to task some of the conclusions of Freakonomics author Steven D. Levitt, Standard Deviations demystifies the science behind statistics and brings into stark relief the fraud that surrounds us all.
A Duck is Watching Me: Strange and Unusual Phobias

A Duck is Watching Me: Strange and Unusual Phobias

Bernie Hobbs

$19.99

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We are all fascinated by phobias and the weird and wonderful things that people are afraid of. Some phobias are those many of us can identify with - fear of needles, spiders or snakes, for example - but others are harder to explain, such as the fear of string, or the fear of paper, fear of the colour red. And some are truly strange and unusual: fear of being tickled with feathers, fear or things to the left side of the body, fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth and, of course, fear that a duck is watching you ...

With an introduction on the biological origins of fear and anxiety by science broadcaster Bernie Hobbs, this book takes a light-hearted look at phobias. So what are you afraid of? Take a look inside and discover the things that make our hearts race and our stomachs clench: the big, the small and the sticky.
House of Karls

House of Karls

Karl Kruszelnicki

$32.99

In the ruthless pursuit of scientific fact, there is no candidate more formidable than Dr Karl Kruszelnicki. Power hungry for experimentation, data manipulation and outlandish science propaganda, Dr Karl is Australia's incumbent President of Science. In House of Karls, he addresses a range of issues and questions: how Politics and Greed are dirtying the purity of Science and why the world's most expensive book costs more than $23 million dollars, but only $4 to post. How real is the Five Second Rule with food? Why does a frog in milk stop it from souring? Why did the Nazis steal the only Space Buddha? Gold may bring power, but how did it get from an exploding star to a gum tree? Why are children smarter than their parents? Why is bank robbery a terrible economic decision, and what are the surprising origins of the 'selfie'? Did you know that the Government knows of a cancer cure and it has 75,000 pieces of Big Data on you ...Vote #1 @doctorkarl. Knowledge is Power.
The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty

The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty

Robert P. Crease ,  Alfred Scharff Goldhaber

$37.95

Time travel, parallel worlds, random behaviour: the language and the imagery of quantum mechanics are ubiquitous, yet the science - and its journey into everyday language - still confounds us. Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber tell how a controversial idea from an obscure branch of optics grew in complexity and authority, eventually dominating the scientific community and commanding the attention of the culture at large. Recounting fiery disputes between figures including Einstein, Schrodinger and Pauli, the authors trace popular images back to their scientific roots and uncover modern manifestations in everything from architecture and sculpture to the prose of John Updike. The Quantum Moment combines an exhilarating history of the quantum with shrewd insight into our experience of the everyday.
Small Wonders: A Close Look at Nature's Miniatures

Small Wonders: A Close Look at Nature's Miniatures

Stanley Breeden ,  Kaisa Breeden

$39.99

Award-winning nature photographers Stanley and Kaisa Breeden explore Australia's small animal life to reveal the wonder and beauty of looking closely into nature.

Their specially developed digital photography techniques make it possible to see intriguing details you may never have suspected were there. Stanley is recognised as one of Australia's pioneering nature photographers and writers. He is the author of some 20 natural history books and has been published in the world's leading natural history magazines. He is a double Emmy-Award winning documentary film-maker and writer, having worked in both Australia and India for National Geographic. After retiring from film photography, he embraced the digital realm with gusto, winning additional awards for photography and writing with his wife Kaisa. 

Together Stan and Kaisa produce fantastically clear and detailed views of nature's realms, using their pioneering new techniques involving focus stacking, combined with HDR and macro panorama photography. As a result, many of the subjects they depict are composed of 5 or more - and up to 25 - photographs.
Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time

Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time

Michael Benson

$60.00

In Cosmigraphics, Michael Benson, author of ground-breaking books of space photography, turns his attention to the history of the visual description and mapping of the universe. This is a story that begins in myth and ends with science. Selecting the most artful and profound examples of cosmic imagery, Benson chronicles successive cosmological models that capture our growing awareness of humanity's place in nature, from terracentric to heliocentric to galactocentric to our current disaggregated decenteredness; shows how the invention and perfection of the telescope forced wondrous visions of unimaginable places; and explains why today photography alone cannot reveal the deeper truths about time and space in images. As much a work of art as it is of science, it includes hundreds of brilliant illustrations. Cosmigraphics is the first book to explore the visual side of our greatest imaginative achievement as a species: the unveiling of a vast universe that is largely invisible to our senses. It will be appeal to the many space-struck Earthlings who are Benson's loyal readers, art lovers and readers interested in the history of science, the visualisation of information, graphic design and mapping.
Microbiology: A Very Short Introduction

Microbiology: A Very Short Introduction

Nicholas P. Money

$15.95

In recent decades we have come to realize that the microbial world is hugely diverse, and can be found in the most extreme environments. Fungi, single-celled protists, bacteria, archaea, and the vast array of viruses and sub-viral particles far outnumber plants and animals. Microbes, we now know, play a critical role in ecosystems, in the chemistry of atmosphere and oceans, and within our bodies. The field of microbiology, armed with new techniques from molecular biology, is now one of the most vibrant in the life sciences. In this Very Short Introduction Nicholas P. Money explores not only the traditional methods of microscopy and laboratory culture but also the modern techniques of genetic detection and DNA sequencing, genomic analysis, and genetic manipulation. In turn he demonstrates how advances in microbiology have had a tremendous impact on the areas of medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Rocks and Minerals: A Photographic Field Guide

Rocks and Minerals: A Photographic Field Guide

Chris Pellant ,  Helen Pellant

$19.99

For experts and armchair enthusiasts like, Rocks and Minerals will appeal to anyone interested in uncovering the mysteries of this subject.A general introduction is followed by a detailed exploration of the three groups of rocks: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary, including their formation and occurrence, main characteristics and economic uses. A number of examples from each category will be explored and illustrated. The second part of the book begins with an introduction to minerals, including gemstones, explaining their classification, occurrence, formation and characteristics, identification and economic uses. This is followed by accounts and images of a wide selection of examples.This is a great book for fans of nature walks and nature photography, and for collectors of rocks and gemstones.
Sustainable Futures: Linking Population, Resources and the Environment

Sustainable Futures: Linking Population, Resources and the Environment

Jenny Goldie ,  Katharine Betts

$39.95

Sustainable Futures explores the links between population growth, diminishing resources and environmental challenges, and the implications for Australia's future. Written by leaders in their field, and based on presentations from the 2013 Fenner Conference on 'Population, Resources and Climate Change', this book is a timely insight into the intertwined challenges that we currently face, and what can be done to ensure a sustainable and viable future.
Question Everything: 132 Science Questions - and Their Unexpected Answers

Question Everything: 132 Science Questions - and Their Unexpected Answers

New Scientist

$19.99

The latest in the bestselling New Scientist Last Word series All science begins with questions...- Why is the night sky black, even though it's full of stars? - How do pebbles skim on water? - Why doesn't your own snoring wake you up? - And why is the Large Hadron Collider so ...er ...large? And as these intriguing, imaginative and occasionally bonkers questions and answers drawn from New Scientist magazine's archives show: question everything and you might find your way to amazing, unexpected insights into our minds, bodies and the universe, and the science behind the scenes that keeps them ticking. As you would expect from New Scientist, this is top-flight science at its most accessible, unpredictable and entertaining. This latest mind-bending addition to the No. 1 bestselling series will fascinate 'Last Word' fans and new readers alike. The New Scientist books from Profile have become sure-fire Christmas bestsellers, now selling over two million copies through bookshops. Last year's Nothing was in the bestseller lists for six weeks. This new book is sure to be at least as successful.
Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics Under Hitler

Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics Under Hitler

Philip Ball

$19.99

Serving the Reich tells the story of physics under Hitler. While some scientists tried to create an Aryan physics that excluded any 'Jewish ideas', many others made compromises and concessions as they continued to work under the Nazi regime. Among them were three world-renowned physicists: Max Planck, pioneer of quantum theory, regarded it as his moral duty to carry on under the regime. Peter Debye, a Dutch physicist, rose to run the Reich's most important research institute before leaving for the United States in 1940. Werner Heisenberg, discovered the Uncertainty Principle, and became the leading figure in Germany's race for the atomic bomb. After the war most scientists in Germany maintained they had been apolitical or even resisted the regime: Debye claimed that he had gone to America to escape Nazi interference in his research; Heisenberg and others argued that they had deliberately delayed production of the atomic bomb. Mixing history, science and biography, Serving the Reich is a gripping exploration of moral choices under a totalitarian regime. Here are human dilemmas, failures to take responsibility, three lives caught between the idealistic goals of science and a tyrannical ideology.
Alan Turing: The Enigma

Alan Turing: The Enigma

Andrew Hodges

$19.99

This is the official story that has inspired the British film, The Imitation Game, a nail-biting race against time following Alan Turing the pioneer of modern-day computing and credited with cracking the German Enigma code and his brilliant team at Britain's top-secret code-breaking centre, Bletchley Park, during the darkest days of World War II. Turing, whose contributions and genius significantly shortened the war, saving thousands of lives, was the eventual victim of an unenlightened British establishment, but his work and legacy live on. Prime minister Gordon Brown released a statement of apology in 2009 on behalf of the British government for the appalling treatment of Turing.
The Malay Archipelago

The Malay Archipelago

Wallace Alfred Russel

$24.99

Of all the extraordinary Victorian travelogues, The Malay Archipelago has a fair claim to be the greatest - both as a beautiful, alarming, vivid and gripping account of some eight years' travel across the entire Malay world - from Singapore to the western edges of New Guinea - and as the record of a great mind. As Wallace, often under conditions of terrible hardship and sickness, battles through jungles, lives with headhunters, and collects beetles, butterflies and birds-of-paradise, he makes discoveries about the workings of biology that have shaped our view of the world ever since.
The Arrival of the Fittest: Solving Evolution's Greatest Puzzle

The Arrival of the Fittest: Solving Evolution's Greatest Puzzle

Andreas Wagner

$29.99

The power of Darwin's natural selection is beyond doubt, explaining how useful adaptations are preserved over generations. But the biggest mystery about evolution eluded him: how those adaptations arise in the first place. Can random mutations over a mere 3.8 billion years solely be responsible for wings, eyeballs, knees, photosynthesis, and the rest of nature's creative marvels? And by calling these mutations 'random', are we not just admitting our own ignorance? What if we could now uncover the wellspring of all biological innovation? Renowned evolutionary biologist Andreas Wagner presents the missing piece in Darwin's theory. Using cutting-edge experimental and computational technologies, he has found that adaptations are not just driven by chance, but by a set of laws that allow nature to discover new molecules and mechanisms in a fraction of the time that random variation would take. Consider the Arctic cod, a fish that lives in waters cold enough to turn the internal fluids of most organisms into ice crystals. And yet, the Arctic cod survives by producing 'natural anti-freeze', proteins that lower the freezing temperature of its body fluids. The invention of those proteins is an archetypal example of nature's enormous powers of creativity. Meticulously researched, carefully argued, and full of fascinating examples from the animal kingdom, Arrival of the Fittest offers up the final puzzle piece in the mystery of life's rich diversity.
The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World's Leading Neuroscientists

The Future of the Brain: Essays by the World's Leading Neuroscientists

Gary Marcus ,  Jeremy Freeman

$43.95

Including a chapter by 2014 Nobel laureates May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser An unprecedented look at the quest to unravel the mysteries of the human brain, The Future of the Brain takes readers to the absolute frontiers of science. Original essays by leading researchers such as Christof Koch, George Church, Olaf Sporns, and May-Britt and Edvard Moser describe the spectacular technological advances that will enable us to map the more than eighty-five billion neurons in the brain, as well as the challenges that lie ahead in understanding the anticipated deluge of data and the prospects for building working simulations of the human brain. A must-read for anyone trying to understand ambitious new research programs such as the Obama administration's BRAIN Initiative and the European Union's Human Brain Project, The Future of the Brain sheds light on the breathtaking implications of brain science for medicine, psychiatry, and even human consciousness itself. Contributors include: Misha Ahrens, Ned Block, Matteo Carandini, George Church, John Donoghue, Chris Eliasmith, Simon Fisher, Mike Hawrylycz, Sean Hill, Christof Koch, Leah Krubitzer, Michel Maharbiz, Kevin Mitchell, Edvard Moser, May-Britt Moser, David Poeppel, Krishna Shenoy, Olaf Sporns, Anthony Zador.
The Incredible Unlikeliness of Being: Evolution and the Making of Us

The Incredible Unlikeliness of Being: Evolution and the Making of Us

Dr. Alice Roberts

$39.99

The presenter of the BBC's The Incredible Human Journey gives us a new and highly accessible look at our own bodies, allowing us to understand how we develop as an embryo, from a single egg into a complex body, and how our embryos contain echoes of our evolutionary past. Bringing together the latest scientific discoveries, Professor Alice Roberts illustrates that evolution has made something which is far from perfect. Our bodies are a quirky mix of new and old, with strokes of genius alongside glitches and imperfections which are all inherited from distant ancestors. Our development and evolutionary past explains why, as embryos, we have what look like gills, and as adults we suffer from back pain. This is a tale of discovery, not only exploring why and how we have developed as we have, but also looking at the history of our anatomical understanding. It combines the remarkable skills and qualifications Alice Roberts has as a doctor, anatomist, osteoarchaeologist and writer. Above all, she has a rare ability to make science accessible, relevant and interesting to mainstream audiences and readers.
Tales from Gombe

Tales from Gombe

Anup Shah ,  Fiona Rogers

$70.00

Anup Shah and Fiona Rogers have spent much of the last decade in the company of the world-famous chimpanzees of Tanzania's Gombe National Park, getting to know their characters and learning about the intricacies of their lives. Tales from Gombe provides an unparalled insight into their world. Through endearing stories and stunningly intimate photography, it tells the story of their lives, an epic saga full of convoluted plots, family alliances, intrigue, love, passion, suffering, ambition, politics, puzzles, surprises and controversies. The chimpanzees of Tanzania's Gombe National Park are probably the most famous group of wild animals in history, having been observed and chronicled for more than 50 years. Through studies initiated by the palaeontologist and anthropologist Louis Leakey and carried out by the primatologist Dr Jane Goodall, people worldwide know some of their names and stories. In Tales from Gombe Anup Shah and Fiona Rogers introduce us to all the different characters in this unique family, from the bold and mischievous Google and the powerful Titan to the enigmatic Freud. They tell the dramatic story of this unusual society, describing all that has happened since they started studying them, while beautifully capturing the daily interactions of the various characters. The combination of breathtaking photography and rich social history provides the reader with a thought-provoking experience and evokes a strong sense of empathy and respect for chimpanzees. Highly captivating and often deeply moving, Tales from Gombe will inspire all those who read it to learn more about our closest cousins.
How Many Socks Make a Pair?: Surprisingly Interesting Everyday Maths

How Many Socks Make a Pair?: Surprisingly Interesting Everyday Maths

Rob Eastaway

$19.99

'A WITTY BOOK THAT PROVOKES THE IMAGINATION' The Times How many socks make a pair? The answer is not always two. And behind this question lies a world of maths that can be surprising, amusing and even beautiful. Using playing cards, a newspaper, the back of an envelope, a Sudoku, some pennies and of course a pair of socks, Rob Eastaway shows how maths can demonstrate its secret beauties in even the most mundane of everyday objects. If you already like maths you'll discover plenty of new surprises. And if you've never picked up a maths book in your life, this one will change your view of the subject forever.
I Used to Know That: Maths

I Used to Know That: Maths

Chris Waring

$11.95

If memories of learning algebra bring you out in a cold sweat and thoughts of quadratic equations cause you feelings of fear and dread, I Used to Know That: Maths can help. A light-hearted and informative reminder of the things that we learnt in school but have since become relegated to the backs of our minds, this book will help you to brush up on your mental arithmetic, including percentages, averages and recurring decimals or work on your trigonometry skills, from Pythagoras' theorem to triangle areas and angles. A practical guide to turn to when an answer is eluding you, from helping a child with homework to calculating change or understanding statistics. I Used to Know That: Maths is a fun and accessible way to re-visit all those useful tips and maths tricks that you have forgotten from your school days.
Love and Math: The Heart of Hidden Reality

Love and Math: The Heart of Hidden Reality

Edward Frenkel

$21.99

A New York Times Science Bestseller What if you had to take an art class in which you were only taught how to paint a fence? What if you were never shown the paintings of van Gogh and Picasso, weren't even told they existed? Alas, this is how math is taught, and so for most of us it becomes the intellectual equivalent of watching paint dry. In Love and Math, renowned mathematician Edward Frenkel reveals a side of math we've never seen, suffused with all the beauty and elegance of a work of art. In this heartfelt and passionate book, Frenkel shows that mathematics, far from occupying a specialist niche, goes to the heart of all matter, uniting us across cultures, time, and space. Love and Math tells two intertwined stories: of the wonders of mathematics and of one young man's journey learning and living it. Having braved a discriminatory educational system to become one of the twenty-first century's leading mathematicians, Frenkel now works on one of the biggest ideas to come out of math in the last 50 years: the Langlands Program. Considered by many to be a Grand Unified Theory of mathematics, the Langlands Program enables researchers to translate findings from one field to another so that they can solve problems, such as Fermat's last theorem, that had seemed intractable before. At its core, Love and Math is a story about accessing a new way of thinking, which can enrich our lives and empower us to better understand the world and our place in it. It is an invitation to discover the magic hidden universe of mathematics.
Masters of the Universe: Conversations With Cosmologists of the Past

Masters of the Universe: Conversations With Cosmologists of the Past

Helge Kragh

$50.95

How did our modern picture of the universe come into being? Masters of the Universe tells this fascinating story in an unusual format that blends factual and fictional elements. It is based on a series of interviews that a fictional person conducted with leading astronomers and physicists between 1913 and 1965. Among the interviewed scientists are giants such as Albert Einstein, Edwin Hubble, and George Gamow, but also scientists who are less well known today or not primarily known as cosmologists such as Karl Schwarzschild, Paul Dirac, and Svante Arrhenius. By following the interviews the reader gets a lively and almost authentic impression of the problems that faced this early generation of cosmologists. Although the interviews are purely fictional, a product of the author's imagination, they could have taken place in just the way that is described. They are solidly based on historical facts and, moreover, supplemented with careful annotations and references to the literature. In this way the book bridges the gap between scholarly and popular history of science.
Six Not-so-Easy Pieces: Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry, and Space-Time

Six Not-so-Easy Pieces: Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry, and Space-Time

Richard P. Feynman ,  Robert B. Leighton ,  Matthew Sands

$18.99

Six lectures, all regarding the most revolutionary discovery in twentieth-century physics: Einsteins Theory of Relativity. No onenot even Einstein himselfexplained these difficult, anti-intuitive concepts more clearly, or with more verve and gusto, than Feynman.
Great White

Great White

James Woodford

$34.99

'I remember thinking two things at the time. Firstly, if it had wanted to eat us we wouldn't have stood a chance and second, it didn't want to eat us.' When James Woodford was confronted by half a dozen sharks swimming at full speed, he froze in shock. But he was even more surprised when they swam right past, completely ignoring him. He couldn't reconcile this experience with the mindless eating-machines that dominate the discussion of sharks in Australia. Interviewing world-renowned experts and joining research teams at Neptune Islands, one of the most famous shark aggregation locations in the world - and consequently one of the most dangerous dive sites - James investigates these intriguing creatures at close range and discovers their fascinating world.
Australian Wildlife Folding Pocket Guide

Australian Wildlife Folding Pocket Guide

James Kavanagh

$8.99

The world's third-largest island nation has a wide range of wildlife - there are over 450 species of mammals, 300 species of lizards, 110,000 species of insects, not to mention 800 species of bird. Eco-tourists, adventurers, and nature lovers will find Australian Wildlife to be the essential pocket-sized, folding guide to use as they travel. This beautifully illustrated guide highlights over 140 familiar species of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. A map of prominent vegetation zones found in Australia has been included. Laminated for durability, this guide will conveniently fit into a pocket when you want to reach for your camera or binoculars.
           
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