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Science
The Wonders of Light

The Wonders of Light

Marta Garcia-Matos ,  Lluis Torner

$54.95

Discover the spectacular power of light with this visually stunning celebration of the multitude of ways in which light-based technology has shaped our society. Be inspired by state-of-the-art science: sixteen beautiful, straightforward chapters demonstrate the science behind the fascinating and surprising ways in which light can be harnessed and used, from displays, solar cells and the Internet to advanced quantum technologies. Be dazzled by brilliant color: dramatic design and radiant color illustrations bring cutting-edge science and groundbreaking innovations to life, clearly explaining the fundamental principles behind them. Be part of something bigger: published in association with the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) to celebrate the 2015 UNESCO International Year of Light, it is perfect for anyone interested in the frontiers of science, engineering or medicine, and in the phenomenal technological advances that have been made possible by human innovation.
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Stargazing Basics: Getting Started in Recreational Astronomy

Stargazing Basics: Getting Started in Recreational Astronomy

Paul E. Kinzer

$28.95

How do I get started in astronomy? Should I buy binoculars or a telescope? What can I expect to see? This wonderful beginners' guide to astronomy covers all the information you need to get started. This second edition has been fully updated and now includes new illustrations, the latest astronomy equipment and celestial events through to the year 2025. It starts by explaining the basic techniques and equipment you need for exploring the skies before taking you on a tour of the night sky, covering the Moon, Sun, stars, planets and more. Any necessary technical terms are clearly explained. The author gives sound advice on using and purchasing affordable binoculars, telescopes and accessories, and the book is illustrated with photos taken by the author, showing how objects in the sky actually look through modest amateur equipment. It contains a comprehensive glossary and references to further astronomy resources and websites.
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The Water Book

The Water Book

Alok Jha

$35.00

Water is the most every day of substances. It pours from our taps and falls from the sky. We drink it, wash with it, and couldn't live without it. Yet, on closer examination it is also a very strange substance (it is one of only a very small number of molecules which expand when cooled). Look closer again and water reveals itself as a key to a scientific story on the biggest of canvases.

Water is crucial to our survival - life depends on it - but it was also fundamental in the origins of life on Earth. The millions of gallons of water which make up our rivers, lakes and oceans, originated in outer space. How it arrived here and how those molecules of water were formed, is a story which takes us back to the beginning of the universe. Indeed, we know more about the depths of space than we do about the furthest reaches of the oceans. Water has also shaped the world we live in. Whether it is by gently carving the Grand Canyon over millennia, or in shaping how civilisations were built; we have settled our cities along rivers and coasts. Scientific studies show how we feel calmer and more relaxed when next to water. We holiday by the seas and lakes.  Yet one day soon wars may be fought over access to water.

The Water Book will change the way you look at water. After reading it you will be able to hold a glass of water up to the light and see within it a strange molecule that connects you to the origins of life, the birth (and death) of the universe, and to everyone who ever lived.
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Rain: A Natural and Cultural History

Rain: A Natural and Cultural History

Cynthia Barnett

$44.99

Rain is elemental, mysterious, precious, destructive.  It is the subject of countless poems and paintings; the top of the weather report; the source ofthe world's water. Yet this is the first book to tell the story of rain. 

Cynthia Barnett's Rain begins four billion years ago with the torrents that filled the oceans, and builds to the storms of climate change. It weaves together science the true shape of a raindrop, the mysteries of frog and fish rains with the human story of our ambition to control rain, from ancient rain dances to the 2,203 miles of levees that attempt to straitjacket the Mississippi River. 

It offers a glimpse of our  founding forecaster,  Thomas Jefferson, who measured every drizzle long before modern meteorology. Two centuries later, rainy skies would help inspire Morrissey s mopes and Kurt Cobain s grunge. Rain is also a travelogue, taking readers to Scotland to tell the surprising story of the mackintosh raincoat, and to India, where villagers extract the scent of rain from the monsoon-drenched earth and turn it into perfume. 

Now, after thousands of years spent praying for rain or worshiping it; burning witches at the stake to stop rain or sacrificing small children to bring it; mocking rain with irrigated agriculture and cities built in floodplains; even trying to blast rain out of the sky with mortars meant for war, humanity has finally managed to change the rain. Only not in ways we intended.

As climate change upends rainfall patterns and unleashes increasingly severe storms and drought, Barnett shows rain to be a unifying force in a fractured world. Too much and not nearly enough, rain is a conversation we share, and this is a book for everyone who has ever experienced it.
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Water: Nature and Culture

Water: Nature and Culture

Veronica Strang

$34.99

Since the beginning of time humans have had a vital relationship with water. Water considers humanity's interaction with this essential substance, its physical properties and their material effects, as well as exploring how diverse societies have engaged with these in different times and places.

The earliest societies worshipped water deities, and even today water has important symbolic meanings as the embodiment of spiritual being and regenerative power. Water transformed agriculture through irrigation and drove the industrial revolution. Societies' relationships with water have also changed through history, with the development of new ideas about disease, health and hygiene management. Visions of water as an economic 'asset' have encouraged its enclosure and privatization, sparking major conflicts over ownership and control. Increasing pressure on freshwater resources has also created devastating environmental problems which now threaten the health of humans and other species.

The first book of its kind to give a comprehensive bio-cultural view of the differences and continuities in humankind's relationship with water over time, Water is a unique and fascinating account of water history.  It provides a cultural view of water, as well as taking in material, ecological and political issues, and will appeal to all those interested in the environment and the state of the world today.
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House of Karls

House of Karls

Karl Kruszelnicki

$19.99

In the ruthless pursuit of scientific fact, there is no candidate more formidable than Dr Karl Kruszelnicki. Power hungry for experimentation, data manipulation and outlandish science propaganda, Dr Karl is Australia's incumbent President of Science.

In House of Karls, he addresses a range of issues and questions: how Politics and Greed are dirtying the purity of Science and why the world's most expensive book costs more than $23 million dollars, but only $4 to post. How real is the Five Second Rule with food? Why does a frog in milk stop it from souring? Why did the Nazis steal the only Space Buddha?

Gold may bring power, but how did it get from an exploding star to a gum tree? Why are children smarter than their parents? Why is bank robbery a terrible economic decision, and what are the surprising origins of the 'selfie'? Did you know that the Government knows of a cancer cure and it has 75,000 pieces of Big Data on you...
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A Deadly Wandering: A Mystery, a Landmark Investigation, and the Astonishing Science of Attention in the Digital Age

A Deadly Wandering: A Mystery, a Landmark Investigation, and the Astonishing Science of Attention in the Digital Age

Matt Richtel

$29.99

From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Matt Richtel, a brilliant, narrative-driven exploration of technology's vast influence on the human mind and society, dramatically-told through the lens of a tragic  texting-while-driving  car crash that claimed the lives of two rocket scientists in 2006. 

In this ambitious, compelling, and beautifully written book, Matt Richtel, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times, examines the impact of technology on our lives through the story of Utah college student Reggie Shaw, who killed two scientists while texting and driving. Richtel follows Reggie through the tragedy, the police investigation, his prosecution, and ultimately, his redemption. 

In the wake of his experience, Reggie has become a leading advocate against distracted driving.  Richtel interweaves Reggie's story with cutting-edge scientific findings regarding human attention and the impact of technology on our brains, proposing solid, practical, and actionable solutions to help manage this crisis individually and as a society. 

A propulsive read filled with fascinating, accessible detail, riveting narrative tension, and emotional depth, A Deadly Wandering explores one of the biggest questions of our time-what is all of our technology doing to us?-and provides unsettling and important answers and information we all need.
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Invisible: The History of the Unseen from Plato to Particle Physics

Invisible: The History of the Unseen from Plato to Particle Physics

Philip Ball

$24.99

If you could be invisible, what would you do? The chances are that it would have something to do with power, wealth or sex. Perhaps all three. But there's no need to feel guilty. Impulses like these have always been at the heart of our fascination with invisibility: it points to realms beyond our senses, serves as a receptacle for fears and dreams, and hints at worlds where other rules apply. Invisibility is a mighty power and a terrible curse, a sexual promise, a spiritual condition. This is a history of humanity's turbulent relationship with the invisible. It takes on the myths and morals of Plato, the occult obsessions of the Middle Ages, the trickeries and illusions of stage magic, the auras and ethers of Victorian physics, military strategies to camouflage armies and ships and the discovery of invisibly small worlds. From the medieval to the cutting-edge, fairy tales to telecommunications, from beliefs about the supernatural to the discovery of dark energy, Philip Ball reveals the universe of the invisible.
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Imagination and a Pile of Junk: A Droll History of Inventors and Inventions

Imagination and a Pile of Junk: A Droll History of Inventors and Inventions

Trevor Norton

$19.99

Trevor Norton, who has been compared to Gerard Durrell and Bill Bryson, weaves an entertaining history with a seductive mix of eureka moments, disasters and dirty tricks. Although inventors were often scientists or engineers, many were not: Samuel Morse (Morse code) was a painter, Lazlow Biro (ballpoint) was a sculptor and hypnotist, and Logie Baird (TV) sold boot polish. The inventor of the automatic telephone switchboard was an undertaker who believed the operator was diverting his calls to rival morticians so he decided to make all telephone operators redundant. Inventors are mavericks indifferent to conventional wisdom so critics were dismissive of even their best ideas: radio had 'no future,' electric light was 'an idiotic idea' and X-rays were 'a hoax.' Even so, the state of New Jersey moved to ban X-ray opera glasses. The head of the General Post Office rejected telephones as unneccesary as there were 'plenty of small boys to run messages.' Inventomania is a magical place where eccentrics are always in season and their stories are usually unbelievable - but rest assured, nothing has been invented.
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Animal, Vegetable, Mineral?: How Eighteenth-Century Science Disrupted the Natural Order

Animal, Vegetable, Mineral?: How Eighteenth-Century Science Disrupted the Natural Order

Susannah Gibson

$34.95

Since the time of Aristotle, there had been a clear divide between the three kingdoms of animal, vegetable, and mineral. But by the eighteenth century, biological experiments, and the wide range of new creatures coming to Europe from across the world, challenged these neat divisions. 

Abraham Trembley found that freshwater polyps grew into complete individuals when cut. This shocking discovery raised deep questions: was it a plant or an animal? And this was not the only conundrum. What of coral? Was it a rock or a living form?  Did plants have sexes, like animals? The boundaries appeared to blur. And what did all this say about the nature of life itself? Were animals and plants soul-less, mechanical forms, as Descartes suggested? The debates raging across science played into some of the biggest and most controversial issues of Enlightenment Europe. 

In this book, Susannah Gibson explains how a study of pond slime could cause people to question the existence of the soul; observation of eggs could make a man doubt that God had created the world; how the discovery of the Venus fly-trap was linked to the French Revolution; and how interpretations of fossils could change our understanding of the Earth's history. Using rigorous historical research, and a lively and readable style, this book vividly captures the big concerns of eighteenth-century science. And the debates concerning the divisions of life did not end there; they continue to have resonances in modern biology.
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The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction is Not a Disease

The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction is Not a Disease

Marc Lewis

$29.99

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The psychiatric establishment in the Western world has unanimously branded addiction a brain disease. And the idea that an addict has an incurable illness, as opposed to a contemptible moral weakness, has served an historically important role in changing how addiction is understood, researched, and treated throughout the world. But as renowned developmental neuroscientist and recovered addict Marc Lewis argues in this illuminating, compelling, likely controversial book, addiction is not in fact a disease.

Addiction, whether to drugs, alcohol, gambling, food, sex, or cigarettes, is rather a developmental learning process resulting from the normal functioning of the human brain. Through vividly rendered, compassionate stories of five addicts, interpreted in the light of state-of-the-art neuroscientific knowledge, Lewis shows how the compulsion to use arises in a brain that is highly efficient in pursuing singular goals. He reveals addiction as an unfortunate twist of fate for a brain doing what it's designed to do - seek pleasure and relief  - in a world that's not cooperating. He shows that recovery from addiction is indeed possible,and that it is nothing like remission from a disease, because brain physiology doesn't need to change for addicts to get better.

The Biology of Desire is vital and enlightening reading for anyone who has wrestled with addiction themselves, in their families, or as a medical or treatment professional. It illuminates a path to more effective treatment for addicts, and limns the essential requirements for individual recovery. Combining clearly rendered scientific explanation with insight, compassion, and even humor, Lewis boldly challenges us all to re-examine our approach to addiction, and whether the metaphors we've used to explain it have now become obstacles to healing.
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Bird Minds: Cognition and Behaviour of Australian Native Birds

Bird Minds: Cognition and Behaviour of Australian Native Birds

Gisela Kaplan

$45.00

In her comprehensive and carefully crafted book, Gisela Kaplan demonstrates how intelligent and emotional Australian birds can be. She describes complex behaviours such as grieving, deception, problem solving and the use of tools.

Many Australian birds cooperate and defend each other, and exceptional ones go fishing by throwing breadcrumbs in the water, extract poisonous parts from prey and use tools to crack open eggshells and mussels. Kaplan brings together evidence of many such cognitive abilities, suggesting plausible reasons for their appearance in Australian birds. Bird Minds is the first attempt to shine a critical and scientific light on the cognitive behaviour of Australian land birds. In this fascinating volume, the author also presents recent changes in our understanding of the avian brain and links these to life histories and longevity.

Following on from Kaplan's well-received books on the Australian Magpie and the Tawny Frogmouth, as well as two earlier titles on birds, Bird Minds contends that the unique and often difficult conditions of Australia's environment have been crucial for the evolution of unusual complexities in avian cognition and behaviour.
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Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?

Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?

Andrew Lawler

$32.99

Queen Victoria was obsessed with it. Socrates' last words were about it. Charles Darwin and Louis Pasteur made their scientific breakthroughs using it. Catholic popes, African shamans, Chinese philosophers, and Muslim mystics praised it.

Hailed as a messenger of the gods, powerful sex symbol, gambling aid, all-purpose medicine, handy research tool, the humble chicken has been also cast the epitome of evil, and the star of the world's most famous joke...

Beginning with the recent discovery, that the chicken's unlikely ancestor is T. Rex, this book tracks the chicken from its original domestication in the jungles of Southeast Asia some 10,000 years ago to today's Western societies, where it became the most engineered of animals, to the uncertain future of what is now humanity's single most important source of protein.

In a masterful combination of historical sleuthing and journalistic exploration on four continents, Lawler reframes the way we feel and think about all domesticated animals, even nature itself.
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A Buzz in the Meadow

A Buzz in the Meadow

Dave Goulson

$22.99

This book is from the author of the Samuel Johnson Prize - shortlisted Sunday Times bestseller, A Sting in the Tale. In 2003, Dave Goulson bought a derelict farm in the heart of rural France, together with 33 acres of surrounding meadow. Over the course of a decade, he created a place for his beloved bumblebees to thrive along with myriad insects of every kind. In this book you will learn how a deathwatch beetle finds its mate, about the importance of houseflies, why butterflies have spots on their wings, about dragonfly sex, bed-bugs and wasps. But it is also a wake-up call, urging us to cherish and protect life on earth in all its forms. A Buzz in the Meadow is a captivating look at our natural world and a call to arms for nature-lovers everywhere.
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The Cell: The Origin of Life

The Cell: The Origin of Life

Jack Challoner ,  Philip Dash

$49.99

The microscopic cell is Earths greatest success story, and the common ancestor we share with all other organisms. Formed over three and a half billion years ago, life exploded from this minuscule powerhouse, first throughout the seas and then, over millions of years, across the lands to create the complex living forms populating the planet today. Yet, how has such a minute organism been so powerful? What has enabled it both to create and break down life on earth over billions of years? And, how have cells interacted to create an extraordinary diversity of plant, aquatic, terrestrial, and avian life? Here, Jack Challoner shines a spotlight on the passage of the cell through time to explore how a continual myriad of interactions and symbiotic relationships have been, and continue to be, the extraordinary catalyst for life.
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Looking for the Goshawk

Looking for the Goshawk

Conor Mark Jameson

$19.99

The book traces Conor Jameson's travels in search of the Goshawk, a magnificent yet rarely seen (in Britain at least) raptor. Each episode of the narrative arises from personal experience, investigation, and the unearthing of information from research, exploration and conversations. The journey takes him from an encounter with a stuffed Goshawk in a glass case, through travels into supposed Goshawk territories in Britain, to Berlin - where he finds the bird at ease in the city. Why, he wants to know, is the bird so rarely seen in Britain? He explores the politics of birdwatching, the sport of falconry and the impact of persecution on the recent history of the bird in Britain and travels the length of Britain, through central Europe and the USA in search of answers to the goshawk mystery. Throughout his journey he is inspired by the writings of T H White who told of his attempts to tame a Goshawk in his much-loved book. It's a gripping tale on the trail of a most mysterious and charismatic bird.
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Bison

Bison

Desmond Morris

$24.99

Bison once ranged across the Great Plains of North America in vast herds - early eighteenth century explorers described them as 'innumerable' - and at the beginning of the nineteenth century they numbered in the tens of millions.

However, during the next century or so humans were responsible for the bison's near extinction in North America, slaughtering an estimated 50 million for their meat, pelts and fur, reducing the bison population to less than a thousand by 1890. Hunting of bison became so prevalent that travellers on longhaul trips in the Midwest would shoot them from their trains. Notable developments have been made in recent years to revive the decimated bison population of North America: farming of bison has increased their population to nearly 150,000, and the American bison is no longer considered an endangered species.

In Bison renowned zoologist Desmond Morris explores the animal's evolution and habitat, from their first evidence in fossil records 2 million years ago to today.  He reveals the different sides to its personality - bison are extremely unpredictable and, while they normally appear lazy and calm, can attack at any moment - and describes the important differences between the European wisent and American bison, the only two species now surviving. The book also discusses depictions of the bison in art, from early painting to contemporary metal sculpture. This vibrantly illustrated book will appeal to anyone curious about the natural and cultural history of this iconic creature.
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The Dingo Debate: Origins, Behaviour and Conservation

The Dingo Debate: Origins, Behaviour and Conservation

Bradley Smith

$39.95

The Dingo Debate explores the intriguing and relatively unknown story of Australia's most controversial animal - the dingo. Throughout its existence, the dingo has been shaped by its interactions with human societies. With this as a central theme, the book traces the story of the dingo from its beginnings as a semi-domesticated wild dog in South-east Asia, to its current status as a wild Australian native animal under threat of extinction.

It describes how dingoes made their way to Australia, their subsequent relationship with Indigenous Australians, their successful adaption to the Australian landscape and their constant battle against the agricultural industry. During these events, the dingo has demonstrated an unparalleled intelligence and adaptable nature seen in few species. The book concludes with a discussion of what the future of the dingo in Australia might look like, what we can learn from our past relationship with dingoes and how this can help to allow a peaceful co-existence. 

The Dingo Debate reveals the real dingo beneath the popular stereotypes, providing an account of the dingo's behaviour, ecology, impacts and management according to scientific and scholarly evidence rather than hearsay. This book will appeal to anyone with an interest in Australian natural history, wild canids, and the relationship between humans and carnivores.
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Eagle

Eagle

Janine Rogers

$24.99

A symbol of power, divinity, war, justice, cruelty - for millenia the eagle has been one of the most important symbols in the human imagination. Exploring the rich history of this bird of prey and its portrayal in art, film, literature, and poetry, Eagle explains how this emblematic creature fulfils a diversity of roles in cultures around the world.

We associate the eagle with light and learning, but we also connect it to death and corruption. Eagles adorn flags, crests and other emblems, but they have also been relentlessly persecuted as a predatory threat to livestock. Eagles have suffered from the effects of expansive human activities for many years, from habitat destruction to pesticide use and global warming. Saving eagles from destruction is critical for our ecological environments, for they control pest populations and dispose of carcasses. Saving them is also critical for our intellectual environments, as eagles are important parts of our psychological and cultural landscapes. 

Featuring many illustrations of eagles in the wild, in art and in popular culture, Eagle shines new light on our complex relationships with these birds, their international significance, and the dire implications of losing them to modern ecological threats.
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Flamingo

Flamingo

Caitlin R. Kight

$24.99

The flamingo is possibly the most easily recognized bird in the world. But it is not a single species - there are six different species of flamingos, each differing in size and colour. Caitlin R. Kight presents this fascinating creature in an accessible way, introducing the history of the bird, its behaviour, habitats and symbolism. She describes how the bird gets its rosy pink colour and discusses how and why it has become such an iconic animal throughout the world. A wonderful cultural history for birdlovers and animal enthusiasts alike, Flamingo provides valuable insights into just what makes our pink-feathered friend so special.
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Guinea Pig

Guinea Pig

Dorothy Yamamoto

$24.99

Guinea pigs are a popular pet, 'cute but dim' friends for those looking for an alternative to dogs and cats. They are increasingly bred for looks, shaped by humans in search of an ideal appearance. But it was guinea pigs that influenced humans from as early as 5000 BC, when their domestication began a long and fruitful relationship, influencing scientists such as William Harvey, and painters from Jan Brueghel to Beatrix Potter.

Guinea pigs are more than simply pets: they have been at the centre of countless works of art and literature, inspiring children and adults alike. Guinea Pig is the first book of its kind to take an in-depth look at the fascinating history of guinea pig and human interaction. It examines guinea pigs' roles as pets alongside their roles as sacrificial offerings to Inca gods, a dish at the Last Supper, and the mascot of the airmen's Guinea Pig Club. The guinea pig is also famous as an experimental subject - the origin of the term now given to anyone who participates in a scientific study or experiment.

Guinea Pig is the perfect companion for animal lovers, guinea pig owners and anyone who is interested in the history of domesticated animals.
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Lesser Beasts: A Snout-to-Tail History of the Humble Pig

Lesser Beasts: A Snout-to-Tail History of the Humble Pig

Mark Essig

$34.99

Unlike other barnyard animals, which pull plows, give eggs or milk, or grow wool, a pig produces only one thing: meat. Incredibly efficient at converting almost any organic matter into nourishing, delectable protein, swine are nothing short of a gastronomic godsend - yet their flesh is banned in many cultures, and the animals themselves are maligned as filthy, lazy brutes. 

As historian Mark Essig reveals in Lesser Beasts, swine have such a bad reputation for precisely the same reasons they are so valuable as a source of food: they are intelligent, self-sufficient, and omnivorous. What's more, he argues, we ignore our historic partnership with these astonishing animals at our peril.

Tracing the interplay of pig biology and human culture from Neolithic villages 10,000 years ago to modern industrial farms, Essig blends culinary and natural history to demonstrate the vast importance of the pig and the tragedy of its modern treatment at the hands of humans. Pork, Essig explains, has long been a staple of the human diet, prized in societies from Ancient Rome to dynastic China to the contemporary American South. 

Yet pigs' ability to track down and eat a wide range of substances (some of them distinctly unpalatable to humans) and convert them into edible meat has also led people throughout history to demonize the entire species as craven and unclean. Today's unconscionable system of factory farming, Essig explains, is only the latest instance of humans taking pigs for granted, and the most recent evidence of how both pigs and people suffer when our symbiotic relationship falls out of balance. 

An expansive, illuminating history of one of our most vital yet unsung food animals, Lesser Beasts turns a spotlight on the humble creature that, perhaps more than any other, has been a mainstay of civilization since its very beginnings - whether we like it or not.
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How Not to be Wrong: The Hidden Maths of Everyday Life

How Not to be Wrong: The Hidden Maths of Everyday Life

Jordan Ellenberg

$24.99

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The Sunday Times Bestseller. The maths we learn in school can seem like an abstract set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In fact, Jordan Ellenberg shows us, maths touches on everything we do, and a little mathematical knowledge reveals the hidden structures that lie beneath the world's messy and chaotic surface. In How Not to be Wrong, Ellenberg explores the mathematician's method of analyzing life, from the everyday to the cosmic, showing us which numbers to defend, which ones to ignore, and when to change the equation entirely. Along the way, he explains calculus in a single page, describes Godel's theorem using only one-syllable words, and reveals how early you actually need to get to the airport.
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Math Geek: From Klein Bottles to Chaos Theory, a Guide to the Nerdiest Math Facts, Theorems, and Equations

Math Geek: From Klein Bottles to Chaos Theory, a Guide to the Nerdiest Math Facts, Theorems, and Equations

Raphael Rosen

$22.99

Do you dream about long division in your sleep? Does the thought of solving abstruse equations bring a smile to your face? Do you love celebrating pi every March? Then, Math Geek was made for you!

With this guide, you'll learn even more about the power of numbers as you explore their brilliant nature in ways you've never imagined. From manhole covers to bubbles to subway maps, each page gives you a glimpse of the world through renowned mathematicians' eyes and reveals how their theorems and equations can be applied to nearly everything you encounter. Covering dozens of your favorite math topics, you'll find fascinating answers to questions like: How are the waiting times for buses determined? Why is Romanesco Broccoli so mesmerizing? How do you divide a cake evenly? Should you run or walk to avoid rain showers?

Filled with compelling mathematical explanations, Math Geek sheds light on the incredible world of numbers hidden deep within your day-to-day life.
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Professor Povey's Perplexing Problems: Pre-University Physics and Maths Puzzles with Solutions

Professor Povey's Perplexing Problems: Pre-University Physics and Maths Puzzles with Solutions

Thomas Povey

$19.99

In Professor Povey's Perplexing Problems, Thomas Povey shares over 100 of his favourite problems in the mathematical sciences. Whether you are an aspiring scientist or an old-hand, you can now pit yourself against these uncompromisingly challenging problems, developed - in time-honoured tradition - to test an interviewee's ability to think. Detailed answers are provided, with a refreshing blend of scientific history, application and personal anecdote. In this delightful and idiosyncratic romp through pre-university maths and physics, the author shows us that behind every single one of these questions lies a new way of thinking about subjects we thought we had understood. He argues that engaging with the unfamiliar is key to forming deeper insights and developing intellectual independence. Professor Povey's Perplexing Problems is a manifesto that science should be playful, and that we should celebrate the curious.
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From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time

From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time

Sean Carroll

$19.99

Twenty years after Stephen Hawking's 9-million-copy selling A Brief History of Time, pioneering theoretical physicist Sean Carroll takes our investigation into the nature of time to the next level. You can't unscramble an egg and you can't remember the future. But what if time doesn't (or didn't!) always go in the same direction? Carroll's paradigm-shifting research suggests that other universes experience time running in the opposite direction to our own. Exploring subjects from entropy and quantum mechanics to time travel and the meaning of life, Carroll presents a dazzling new view of how we came to exist.
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Human Universe

Human Universe

Brian Cox ,  Andrew Cohen

$19.99

Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from.

What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile.

This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place in the universe. We have no right to expect answers; we have no right to even ask. But ask and wonder we do. Human Universe is first and foremost a love letter to humanity; a celebration of our outrageous fortune in existing at all.

I have chosen to write my letter in the language of science, because there is no better demonstration of our magnificent ascent from dust to paragon of animals than the exponentiation of knowledge generated by science. Two million years ago we were apemen. Now we are spacemen. That has happened, as far as we know, nowhere else. That is worth celebrating.
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Nuclear Physics: A Very Short Introduction

Nuclear Physics: A Very Short Introduction

Frank Close

$15.95

Nuclear physics began long before the identification of fundamental particles, with J. J. Thomson's discovery of the electron at the end of the 19th century, which implied the existence of a positive charge in the atom to make it neutral. In this Very Short Introduction Frank Close gives an account of how this area of physics has progressed, including the recognition of how heavy nuclei are built up in the cores of stars and in supernovae, the identification of quarks and gluons, and the development of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Exploring key concepts such as the stability of different configurations of protons and neutrons in nuclei, Frank Close shows how nuclear physics brings the physics of the stars to Earth and provides us with important applications, particularly in medicine.
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Introduced Dung Beetles in Australia: A Pocket Field Guide

Introduced Dung Beetles in Australia: A Pocket Field Guide

Penny Edwards ,  Pam Wilson ,  Pam Wilson

$22.00

This field guide to introduced dung beetles covers all species found in Australia, including two newly introduced species. It will enable farmers, Landcare workers and the interested public to identify and learn about the basic biology of these beetles found in cattle dung.
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Prehistoric Marine Life in Australia's Inland Sea

Prehistoric Marine Life in Australia's Inland Sea

Danielle Clode

$24.95

Step back to a time when Australia's red centre was flooded by a vast shallow ocean, the Eromanga Sea. While dinosaurs stalked the scattered islands that made up the Australian continent, giant marine reptiles ruled the waves. Plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs swam in an inland sea filled with schools of ammonites, pterosaurs flew overhead and giant carnivorous amphibians lurked in the rivers. Prehistoric Marine, the third in the Museum Victoria Nature series, is a guide to the fauna of the Eromanga Sea and its coasts during the Cretaceous period. This richly illustrated book brings to life yet another aspect of the fascinating world of Australia's prehistoric past and provides an accessible introduction to some of the amazing fauna, geology and fossils found in this part of the world.
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