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Science
Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen

Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen

Philip Ball

$59.99

If you could be invisible, what would you do? The chances are that it would have something to do with power, wealth or sex. Perhaps all three. But there's no need to feel guilty. Impulses like these have always been at the heart of our fascination with invisibility: it points to realms beyond our senses, serves as a receptacle for fears and dreams, and hints at worlds where other rules apply. Invisibility is a mighty power and a terrible curse, a sexual promise, a spiritual condition. This is a history of humanity's turbulent relationship with the invisible. It takes on the myths and morals of Plato, the occult obsessions of the Middle Ages, the trickeries and illusions of stage magic, the auras and ethers of Victorian physics, military strategies to camouflage armies and ships and the discovery of invisibly small worlds. From the medieval to the cutting-edge, fairy tales to telecommunications, from beliefs about the supernatural to the discovery of dark energy, Philip Ball reveals the universe of the invisible.
Why Aren't We Dead Yet? The Survivor's Guide to the Immune System

Why Aren't We Dead Yet? The Survivor's Guide to the Immune System

Idan Ben-Barak

$27.99

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Disease - specifically infectious disease - is what eventually kills the overwhelming majority of us.

In fact, it’s amazing that it doesn’t get us sooner: we fight off millions of disease-causing germs every day. So how come we’re not dead yet? In this lively and accessible book, Idan Ben-Barak tells us why. He explores the immune system and what keeps it running, how germs are destroyed, and why we develop immunities to certain disease-causing agents. He also examines the role of antibiotics and vaccines, and looks at what the future holds for our collective chances of not being dead.

This is entertaining and thoughtful science writing to inspire the student interested in a career in medicine or immunology, or to inform the reader who just wants to understand more about their body while having a laugh along the way.
A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History

A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History

Nicholas Wade

$19.99

Wade, a longtime journalist covering genetic advances for The New York Times, draws widely on the work of scientists who have made crucial breakthroughs in establishing the reality of recent human evolution. The most provocative claims in this book involve the genetic basis of human social habits. What we might call middle class social traits-thrift, docility, nonviolence, have been slowly but surely inculcated genetically within agrarian societies, Wade argues. While these values have a strong cultural component, Wade argues that evolution has played its part.
How Not To Be Wrong: The Hidden Maths of Everyday Life

How Not To Be Wrong: The Hidden Maths of Everyday Life

Jordan Ellenberg

$39.99

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The maths we learn in school can seem like an abstract set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned.

In fact, Jordan Ellenberg shows us, maths touches on everything we do, and a little mathematical knowledge reveals the hidden structures that lie beneath the world's messy and chaotic surface. In How Not to be Wrong, Ellenberg explores the mathematician's method of analyzing life, from the everyday to the cosmic, showing us which numbers to defend, which ones to ignore, and when to change the equation entirely.

Along the way, he explains calculus in a single page, describes Godel's theorem using only one-syllable words, and reveals how early you actually need to get to the airport.
How Big is Infinity? The 20 Big Maths Questions

How Big is Infinity? The 20 Big Maths Questions

Tony Crilly

$19.99

What are the strangest numbers? Where do numbers come from? Can maths guarantee riches? Why are three dimensions not enough? Can a butterfly's wings really cause a hurricane? Can maths predict the future? In How Big is Infinity?, acclaimed writer Tony Crilly distills the wisdom of some of the greatest minds in history to help provide answers some of the most perplexing, stimulating and surprising questions in mathematics.
Infinitesimal: How a Dangerous Mathematical Theory Shaped the Modern World

Infinitesimal: How a Dangerous Mathematical Theory Shaped the Modern World

Amir Alexander

$39.99

On August 10, 1632, five leading Jesuits convened in a sombre Roman palazzo to pass judgment on a simple idea: that a continuous line is composed of distinct and limitlessly tiny parts. The doctrine would become the foundation of calculus, but on that fateful day the judges ruled that it was forbidden. With the stroke of a pen they set off a war for the soul of the modern world. Amir Alexander takes us from the bloody religious strife of the sixteenth century to the battlefields of the English civil war and the fierce confrontations between leading thinkers like Galileo and Hobbes. The legitimacy of popes and kings, as well as our modern beliefs in human liberty and progressive science, hung in the balance; the answer hinged on the infinitesimal. Pulsing with drama and excitement, Infinitesimal will forever change the way you look at a simple line.
Is There Life on Mars? The 20 Big Universe Questions

Is There Life on Mars? The 20 Big Universe Questions

Stuart Clark

$19.99

Is There Life On Mars? will help you start to answer 20 of the most perplexing and fascinating questions about the universe, such as: Why do the planets stay in orbit? Was Einstein right? What is Dark Matter? Are we made from Stardust? Is there cosmological evidence for God? Distilling the wisdom and research of scientists operating at the cutting edge of their field, Stuart Clark's book is a stimulating and challenging guide to the wonders of the universe.
Feral: Rewilding the Land, Sea and Human Life

Feral: Rewilding the Land, Sea and Human Life

George Monbiot

$22.99

How many of us sometimes feel that we are scratching at the walls of this life, seeking to find our way into a wider space beyond? That our mild, polite existence sometimes seems to crush the breath out of us? Feral is the lyrical and gripping story of George Monbiot's efforts to re-engage with nature and discover a new way of living. He shows how, by restoring and rewilding our damaged ecosystems on land and at sea, we can bring wonder back into our lives. Making use of some remarkable scientific discoveries, Feral lays out a new, positive environmentalism, in which nature is allowed to find its own way.
Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air

Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air

Richard Holmes

$24.99

This story of aviation moves from the early Anglo-French balloon rivalries and the crazy firework flights of Sophie Blanchard to the astonishing long-distance voyages of American entrepreneur John Wise and French photographer Felix Nadar and to the terrifying high-altitude flights of James Glaisher, FRS, who helped establish the science of meteorology and the notion of a fragile planet. Readers will discover the many writers and dreamersfrom Mary Shelley to Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Dickens to Jules Vernewho felt the imaginative impact of flight and allowed it to soar in their work. This is a subtle portrait of human endeavor, recklessness, and vision.
The Quantum Age: How the Physics of the Very Small has Transformed Our Lives

The Quantum Age: How the Physics of the Very Small has Transformed Our Lives

Brian Clegg

$29.99

The stone age, the iron age, the steam and electrical ages all saw the reach of humankind transformed by new technology. Now we are living in the quantum age, a revolution in everyday life led by our understanding of the very, very small. Today, technologies based on quantum physics account for 30 per cent of US GDP, and yet quantum particles such as atoms, electrons and photons remain enigmatic, acting totally unlike the objects we experience directly. Weird quantum behaviour is also essential to nature. From the mechanism of the Sun to quantum biology in our eyesight, photosynthesis in plants and the ability of birds to navigate, quantum effects are key. Quantum physics lies at the heart of every electronic device, every smartphone and laser, and now quantum superconductors have moved out of the lab to make levitating trains and MRI scanners possible, while soon superfast, ultra-secure quantum computers may be a reality. Acclaimed popular science author Brian Clegg brings his trademark clarity and enthusiasm to a book that will give the world around you a new sense of wonder.
Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe

Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe

Lee Smolin

$19.99

Nothing seems more real than time passing. We experience life itself as a succession of moments. Yet throughout history, the idea that time is an illusion has been a religious and philosophical commonplace. We identify certain truths as 'eternal' constants, from moral principles to the laws of mathematics and nature: these are laws that exist not inside time, but outside it.
 
Many  physicists, therefore, don't believe in time. From Newton and Einstein to today's string theorists and quantum physicists, the widest consensus is that the universe is governed by absolute, timeless laws. In this view, everything that happens, has happened or will happen is set by these laws: in such a determined future, there is no such thing as uncertainty.

In Time Reborn, Lee Smolin argues that this denial of time is holding back both physics, and our understanding of the universe. We need a major revolution in scientific thought: one that embraces the reality of time and places it at the centre of our thinking. E may equal mc squared now, but that wasn't always the case. Similarly, as our understanding of the universe develops, Newton's fundamental laws might not remain so fundamental. Time, Smolin concludes, is not an illusion: it is the best clue we have to fundamental reality. Time Reborn explains how the true nature of time impacts on us, our world, and our universe.
The Universe in the Rearview Mirror: How Hidden Symmetries Shape Reality

The Universe in the Rearview Mirror: How Hidden Symmetries Shape Reality

Dave Goldberg ,  Herb Thornby

$19.99

Why is the sky dark at night? Is it possible to build a shrink-ray gun? If there is antimatter, can there be antipeople? Why are past, present, and future our only options? Are time and space like a butterfly's wings? No one but Dave Goldberg, the coolest nerd physicist on the planet, could give a hyper drive tour of the universe like this one. Not only does he answer the questions your stoner friends came up with in college, but he also reveals the most profound discoveries of physics with infectious, Carl Sagan-like enthusiasm and accessibility. Goldberg's narrative is populated with giants from the history of physics, and the biggest turns out to be an unsung genius and Nazi holocaust escapee named Emmy Noether - the other Einstein. She was unrecognized, even unpaid, throughout most of her career simply because she was a woman. Nevertheless, her theorem relating conservation laws to symmetries is widely regarded to be as important as Einstein's notion of the speed of light. Einstein himself said she was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began. Symmetry is the unsung great idea behind all the big physics of the last one hundred years - and what lies ahead. In this book, Goldberg makes mindbending science not just comprehensible but gripping. Fasten your seat belt.
Mars Up Close: Inside the Curiosity Mission

Mars Up Close: Inside the Curiosity Mission

Marc Kaufman ,  Elon Musk

$62.00

Following up on Hubble, National Geographic Space Atlas, and Buzz Aldrin's Mission to Mars, National Geographic presents the only book that reveals all the behind-the-scenes stories of the famous Curiosity project. Renowned science journalist Marc Kaufman has spent two years embedded with the engineers and scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, cheering on the rover's spine-tingling landing, learning the back-story of anticipated findings, and witnessing the inescapable frustrations that come from operating a $2.5-billion multi-tasking robot on a planet 35 million miles from Earth. Chapter by chapter, Kaufman explores the science and technology at the heart of our mission to Mars. Why do dry creek beds suggest life may have existed here? How does Curiosity test Mars's soil? When will humans step onto this planet, and what will it be like to live on Mars? To answer these questions, Kaufman introduces one colourful character after another, each a key player in the history-making drama unfolding on the next planet out from the sun. The enthusiasm of these scientists and inventors, not to mention the fascinating knowledge they share, bursts through on every page, confirming foreword writer Elon Musk's declaration that We will be stepping out onto Mars by the 2030s. With images never published before, computer-enhanced with colours that make you want to spend your next vacation on Mars, this is the one and only book that explains everything behind the most ambitious space expedition ever.
A Fire on the Moon

A Fire on the Moon

Norman Mailer

$24.99

Mailer's superb account, written as it was happening, of the first attempt to land men on the moon 'Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.' A Fire on the Moon tells the scarcely credible story of the Apollo 11 mission. It is suffused with Mailer's obsession both with the astronauts themselves and with his own anxieties and terrors about the extremity of what they were trying to achieve. Mailer is both admiring and appalled and the result is a book which is both a gripping narrative and a brilliant depiction of the now-forgotten technical issues and uncertainties around the mission. A Fire on the Moon is also a matchless portrait of an America caught in a morass of introspection and misery, torn apart by the war in Vietnam. But for one, extraordinary week in the summer of 1969 all eyes were on the fates of three men in a rocket, travelling a quarter of a million miles away from Earth. It comes with an introduction by Geoff Dyer.
The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change

The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change

Yoram Bauman ,  Grady Klein

$27.99

Climate change is no laughing matter, but maybe it should be. The topic is so critical that everyone, from students to policy-makers to voters, needs a quick and easy guide to the basics. The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change entertains as it educates, delivering a unique and enjoyable presentation of mind-blowing facts and critical concepts. Stand-up economist Yoram Bauman and award-winning illustrator Grady Klein have created the funniest overview of climate science, predictions, and policy that you'll ever read. You'll giggle, but you'll also learn, about everything from Milankovitch cycles to carbon taxes. If those subjects sound daunting, consider that Bauman and Klein have already written two enormously successful cartoon guides to economics, making the notoriously dismal science accessible to countless readers. If economics can be funny, then climate science can be a riot. The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change takes the intimidation and gloom out of one of the most complex and hotly debated challenges of our time.
Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper

Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper

Robert Bryce

$21.99

In the face of today's environmental and economic challenges, doomsayers preach that the only way to stave off disaster is for humans to reverse course: to de-industrialise, re-localise, reduce consumption and forswear development. But in this timely and much-needed rebuke, Robert Bryce shows that the real solutions to our problems are to be found in the innovations and technologies of the future, and in the force that inspires their invention: the inexorable human drive to make things smaller, faster, lighter, denser, cheaper. 

Utilising on-the-ground reporting from Ottawa and Panama to Bakersfield, California and Canadian County, Oklahoma, along with an easy-to-read narrative, numerous company profiles, graphics, and photographs, Bryce shows how things are getting better, a lot better. They are getting better thanks to technologies that improve the quality of our lives and help preserve the natural world -- technologies like the vacuum tube and mass-produced fertiliser, the printing press and mobile phones, nanotech medicine and advanced drill rigs -- all provide vivid proof of our desire to find smaller faster solutions.

He profiles well-known companies like Ford and Intel, along with newer ones like Khan Academy and M-PESA, to show how businesses are helping to create a world in which people are living longer, freer, healthier, lives than at any time in human history. "Smaller, Faster, Lighter, Denser, Cheaper" reveals that the tools we need to save the planet aren't to be found in the technologies or lifestyles of the past. Nor must we sacrifice prosperity and human progress to ensure our survival. The path to a sustainable future will be forged by innovators and businesses all over the world who will continue making things Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper because, well, that's what we humans do.
Governing for Sustainability

Governing for Sustainability

Tom Prugh ,  Michael Renner ,  Gar Alperovitz ,  Katie Auth

$29.99

Citizens expect their governments to lead on sustainability. But from largely disappointing international conferences like Rio II to the U.S.'s failure to pass meaningful climate legislation, governments' progress has been lackluster. That's not to say leadership is absent; it just often comes from the bottom up rather than the top down. Action--on climate, species loss, inequity, and other sustainability crises--is being driven by local, people's, women's, and grassroots movements around the world, often in opposition to the agendas pursued by governments and big corporations. These diverse efforts are the subject of the latest volume in the Worldwatch Institute's highly regarded State of the World series. The 2014 edition, marking the Institute's 40th anniversary, examines both barriers to responsible political and economic governance as well as gridlock-shattering new ideas. The authors analyze a variety of trends and proposals, including regional and local climate initiatives, the rise of benefit corporations and worker-owned firms, the need for energy democracy, the Internet's impact on sustainability, and the importance of eco-literacy. A consistent thread throughout the book is that informed and engaged citizens are key to better governance. The book is a clear-eyed yet ultimately optimistic assessment of citizens' ability to govern for sustainability. By highlighting both obstacles and opportunities, State of the World 2014 shows how to effect change within and beyond the halls of government. This volume will be especially useful for policymakers, environmental nonprofits, students of environmental studies, sustainability, or economics--and citizens looking to jumpstart significant change around the world.
Blue urbanism: Exploring Connections Between Cities and Oceans

Blue urbanism: Exploring Connections Between Cities and Oceans

Timothy Beatley

$34.99

What would it mean to live in cities designed to foster feelings of connectedness to the ocean? As coastal cities begin planning for climate change and rising sea levels, author Timothy Beatley sees opportunities for rethinking the relationship between urban development and the ocean. Modern society is more dependent upon ocean resources than people are commonly aware of, from oil and gas extraction to wind energy, to the vast amounts of fish harvested globally, to medicinal compounds derived from sea creatures, and more.

In Blue Urbanism, Beatley argues that, given all we've gained from the sea, city policies, plans, and daily urban life should acknowledge and support a healthy ocean environment. The book explores issues ranging from urban design and land use, to resource extraction and renewable energy, to educating urbanites about the wonders of marine life. Beatley looks at how emerging practices like  community supported fisheries  and aquaponics can provide a sustainable alternative to industrial fishing practices.  Other chapters delve into incentives for increasing use of wind and tidal energy as renewable options to oil and gas extraction that damages ocean life, and how the shipping industry is becoming more  green.

Additionally, urban citizens, he explains, have many opportunities to interact meaningfully with the ocean, from beach cleanups to helping scientists gather data. Ultimately, he explains that we must create a culture of  ocean literacy  using a variety of approaches, from building design and art installations that draw inspiration from marine forms, to encouraging citizen volunteerism related to oceans, to city-sponsored research, and support for new laws that protect marine health. Equal parts inspiration and practical advice for urban planners, ocean activists, and policymakers, Blue Urbanism offers a comprehensive look at the challenges and great potential for urban areas to integrate ocean health into their policy and planning goals.
Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet

Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet

Ugo Bardi

$29.95

As we dig, drill, and excavate to unearth the planet s mineral bounty, the resources we exploit from ores, veins, seams, and wells are gradually becoming exhausted. Mineral treasures that took millions, or even billions, of years to form are now being squandered in just centuries or sometimes just decades. Will there come a time when we actually run out of minerals? Debates already soar over how we are going to obtain energy without oil, coal, and gas. But what about the other mineral losses we face? Without metals, and semiconductors, how are we going to keep our industrial system running? Without mineral fertilisers and fuels, how are we going to produce the food we need?

Ugo Bardi delivers a sweeping history of the mining industry, starting with its humble beginning when our early ancestors started digging underground to find the stones they needed for their tools. He traces the links between mineral riches and empires, wars, and civilisations, and shows how mining in its various forms came to be one of the largest global industries. He also illustrates how the gigantic mining machine is now starting to show signs of difficulties. The easy mineral resources, the least expensive to extract and process, have been mostly exploited and depleted. There are plenty of minerals left to extract, but at higher costs and with increasing difficulties.

The effects of depletion take different forms and one may be the economic crisis that is gripping the world system. And depletion is not the only problem. Mining has a dark side pollution that takes many forms and delivers many consequences, including climate change. The world we have been accustomed to, so far, was based on cheap mineral resources and on the ability of the ecosystem to absorb pollution without generating damage to human beings. Both conditions are rapidly disappearing. Having thoroughly plundered planet Earth, we are entering a new world. Bardi draws upon the world s leading minerals experts to offer a compelling glimpse into that new world ahead.
Forests in our changing world: New Principles for Conservation and Management

Forests in our changing world: New Principles for Conservation and Management

Joe Landsberg ,  Richard H. Waring

$39.95

Scientists tell us that climate change is upon us and the physical world is changing quickly with serious implications for biodiversity and human well-being. Forests cover vast regions of the globe and serve as a first line of defence against the worst effects of climate change, but only if we keep them healthy and resilient. Forests in Our Changing World tells us how to do that. Authors Joe Landsberg and Richard Waring present an overview of forests around the globe, describing basic precepts of forest ecology and physiology and how forests will change as earth's climate warms. Drawing on years of research and teaching, they discuss the values and uses of both natural and plantation-based forests. In easy-to-understand terms, they describe the ecosystem services forests provide, such as clean water and wildlife habitat, present economic concepts important to the management and policy decisions that affect forests, and introduce the use of growth-and-yield models and remote-sensing technology that provide the data behind those decisions. This book is a useful guide for undergraduates as well as managers, administrators, and policy makers in environmental organisations and government bodies looking for a clear overview of basic forest processes and pragmatic suggestions for protecting the health of forests.
The GMO Deception: What You Need to Know About the Food, Corporations, and Government Agencies Putting Our Families and Our Environment at Risk

The GMO Deception: What You Need to Know About the Food, Corporations, and Government Agencies Putting Our Families and Our Environment at Risk

Sheldon Krimsky ,  Jeremy Gruber ,  Ralph Nader

$32.99

Seventy-five percent of processed foods on supermarket shelves--from soda to soup, crackers to condiments--contain genetically engineered ingredients. The long-term effects of these foods on human health and ecology are still unknown, and public concern has been steadily intensifying. This new book from the Council for Responsible Genetics gathers the best, most thought-provoking essays by the leading scientists, science writers, and public health advocates. Collectively, they address such questions as: Are GM foods safe and healthy for us? Will GM food really solve world hunger? Who really controls the power structure of food production? Are GM foods ecologically safe and sustainable? Why is it so difficult to get GM foods labeled in the US? What kinds of regulations and policies should be instituted? How is seed biodiversity, of lack thereof, affecting developing countries? Should animals be genetically modified for food? How are other countries handling GM crops? Ultimately, this definitive book encourages us to think about the social, environmental, and moral ramifications of where this particular branch of biotechnology is taking us, and what we should do about it.
The Island of Knowledge: The Limits of Science and the Search for Meaning

The Island of Knowledge: The Limits of Science and the Search for Meaning

Marcelo Gleiser

$36.99

Do all questions have answers? How much can we know about the world? Is there such a thing as an ultimate truth? To be human is to want to know, but what we are able to observe is only a tiny portion of what's out there. In The Island of Knowledge, physicist Marcelo Gleiser traces our search for answers to the most fundamental questions of existence. In so doing, he reaches a provocative conclusion: science, the main tool we use to find answers, is fundamentally limited. These limits to our knowledge arise both from our tools of exploration and from the nature of physical reality: the speed of light, the uncertainty principle, the impossibility of seeing beyond the cosmic horizon, the incompleteness theorem, and our own limitations as an intelligent species. Recognizing limits in this way, Gleiser argues, is not a deterrent to progress or a surrendering to religion. Rather, it frees us to question the meaning and nature of the universe while affirming the central role of life and ourselves in it. Science can and must go on, but recognizing its limits reveals its true mission: to know the universe is to know ourselves. Telling the dramatic story of our quest for understanding, The Island of Knowledge offers a highly original exploration of the ideas of some of the greatest thinkers in history, from Plato to Einstein, and how they affect us today. An authoritative, broad-ranging intellectual history of our search for knowledge and meaning, The Island of Knowledge is a unique view of what it means to be human in a universe filled with mystery.
Papyrus - the Plant That Changed the World: from Ancient Egypt to Today's Water Wars

Papyrus - the Plant That Changed the World: from Ancient Egypt to Today's Water Wars

John Gaudet

$36.95

From ancient Pharos to 21st Century water wars, papyrus is a unique plant that is still one of the fastest growing plant species on earth. It produces its own soil--a peaty, matrix that floats on water--and its stems inspired the fluted columns of the ancient Greeks. In ancient Egypt, the papyrus bounty from the Nile delta provided not just paper for record keeping--instrumental to the development of civilization--but food, fuel and boats. Disastrous weather in the 6th Century caused famines and plagues that almost wiped out civilization in the west, but it was papyrus paper in scrolls and codices that kept the record of our early days and allowed the thread of history to remain unbroken. The sworn enemy of oblivion and the guardian of our immortality it came to our rescue then and will again. Today, it is not just a curious relic of our ancient past, but a rescuing force for modern ecological and societal blight. In an ironic twist, Egypt is faced with enormous pollution loads that forces them to import food supplies, and yet papyrus is one of the most effective and efficient natural pollution filters known to man. Papyrus was the key in stemming the devastation to the Sea of Galilee and Jordan River from raging peat fires (that last for years), heavy metal pollution in the Zambezi River Copperbelt and the papyrus laden shores of Lake Victoria--which provides water to more than 30 million people--will be crucial as the global drying of the climate continues. 8 page insert, illustrations throughout.
Coral Reefs: A Very Short Introduction

Coral Reefs: A Very Short Introduction

Charles R. Sheppard

$14.95

Coral reefs have been long regarded with awe by the millions of people who have encountered them over the centuries. Early seafarers were wary of them, naturalists were confused by them, yet many coastal people benefited greatly from these mysterious rocky structures that grew up to the surface of the sea. They have been rich in their supply of food, and they provided a breakwater from storms and high waves to countless coastal communities that developed from their protection. Their scale is enormous and their value high. Found in countless locations around the world, from the Indo-Pacific coral reef province to the Caribbean and Australia, they support both marine and human life. In this Very Short Introduction, Charles Sheppard provides an account of what coral reefs are, how they are formed, how they have evolved, and the biological lessons we can learn from them. Today, the vibrancy and diversity of these fascinating ecosystems are under threat from over exploitation and could face future extinction, unless our conservation efforts are stepped up in order to save them. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Stung!: On Jellyfish Blooms and the Future of the Ocean

Stung!: On Jellyfish Blooms and the Future of the Ocean

Lisa-Ann Gershwin ,  Sylvia A. Earle

$36.95

Our oceans are becoming increasingly inhospitable to life-growing toxicity and rising temperatures coupled with overfishing have led many marine species to the brink of collapse. And yet there is one creature that is thriving in this seasick environment: the beautiful, dangerous, and now incredibly numerous jellyfish. As foremost jellyfish expert Lisa-ann Gershwin describes in Stung!, the jellyfish population bloom is highly indicative of the tragic state of the world's ocean waters, while also revealing the incredible tenacity of these remarkable creatures. In Stung!, Gershwin tells stories of jellyfish both attractive and deadly while illuminating many interesting and unusual facts about their behaviors and environmental adaptations. The story of the jellyfish, as Gershwin makes clear, is also the story of the world's oceans, and Stung! provides a unique and urgent look at their inseparable histories - and future.
50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know

50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know

Tony Crilly

$19.99

Who invented zero? Why 60 seconds in a minute? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? And can a butterfly's wings really cause a storm on the far side of the world? In 50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know, Professor Tony Crilly explains in 50 clear and concise essays the mathematical concepts - ancient and modern, theoretical and practical, everyday and esoteric - that allow us to understand and shape the world around us. Packed with diagrams, examples and anecdotes, this book is the perfect overview of this often daunting but always essential subject. For once, mathematics couldn't be simpler. Contents include: Origins of mathematics, from Egyptian fractions to Roman numerals; Pi and primes, Fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio; What calculus, statistics and algebra can actually do; The very real uses of imaginary numbers; The Big Ideas of relativity, Chaos theory, Fractals, Genetics and hyperspace; The reasoning behind Sudoku and code cracking, Lotteries and gambling, Money management and compound interest; Solving of Fermat's last theorem and the million-dollar question of the Riemann hypothesis.
Complexity: A Very Short Introduction

Complexity: A Very Short Introduction

John H. Holland

$15.95

The importance of complexity is well-captured by Hawking's comment: Complexity is the science of the 21st century . From the movement of flocks of birds to the Internet, environmental sustainability, and market regulation, the study and understanding of complex non-linear systems has become highly influential over the last 30 years. In this Very Short Introduction, one of the leading figures in the field, John Holland, introduces the key elements and conceptual framework of complexity. From complex physical systems such as fluid flow and the difficulties of predicting weather, to complex adaptive systems such as the highly diverse and interdependent ecosystems of rainforests, he combines simple, well-known examples - Adam Smith's pin factory, Darwin's comet orchid, and Simon's 'watchmaker' - with an account of the approaches, involving agents and urn models, taken by complexity theory. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
How to Gamble If You Must: Inequalities for Stochastic Processes

How to Gamble If You Must: Inequalities for Stochastic Processes

Lester Dubins

$25.95

This classic of advanced statistics is geared toward graduate-level readers and uses the concepts of gambling to develop important ideas in probability theory. Revised and updated, it features contributions from two well-known statisticians, including a new Introduction, updated references, and findings from recent research. Strongly recommended. - Journal of the American Statistical Association. 2014 edition.
Nonlinear Dynamics: Exploration Through Normal Forms

Nonlinear Dynamics: Exploration Through Normal Forms

Peter B. Kahn

$39.95

Geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students, this exposition covers the method of normal forms and its application to ordinary differential equations through perturbation analysis. In addition to its emphasis on the nonuniqueness property of normal form expansion, the text features numerous examples from electrical and mechanical engineering, particle physics, astrophysics, and other fields. 1998 edition.
50 Physics Ideas You Really Need to Know

50 Physics Ideas You Really Need to Know

Joanne Baker

$19.99

We encounter physics before we've even left the house in the morning; an alarm clock tracks time, a mirror reflects light waves and our mobile phones rely on satellites held in their orbit by gravity. Where would we be without the Bernoulli equation to explain how planes fly, electromagnetic waves enabling us to communicate around the world or the discovery of X-rays? In 50 Physics Ideas You Really Need to Know Joanne Baker will uncover the physics all around us, from basic concepts like gravity, light and energy through to the complexities of quantum theory, chaos and dark energy. Featuring short biographies of iconic physicists, explanatory diagrams and timelines showing discoveries within their historical context, this book is the perfect guide to the fundamental concepts of physics, making even the most challenging theories easy to understand. Contents include: Newton's law of gravitation, Brownian motion, Chaos theory, Fleming's right hand rule, Planck's law, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's cat, Superconductivity, Rutherford's atom, Nuclear fission and fusion, The God particle, String theory, Special and general relativity, The big bang and the Anthropic principle.
Problems in Quantum Mechanics

Problems in Quantum Mechanics

D. ter Haar

$46.95

A wide-ranging collection of problems and solutions related to quantum mechanics, this text will be useful to students pursuing an advanced degree in physics. Topics include one-dimensional motion, tunnel effect, angular momentum, central field of force, motion of particles in a magnetic field, scattering, relativistic wave equations, and many other subjects. 1975 edition.
Quantum Mechanics

Quantum Mechanics

David Beard

$32.95

This text appeals to readers' intuitive grasp of the wave theory of light, explaining how quantum mechanics arises from the diffraction and interference experiments in the same manner of physical optics. Coherent examples explore the quantum mechanical analog of classical quantities and examine the physical meanings of the theory and its applications. 1963 edition.
Quantum Mechanics with Applications

Quantum Mechanics with Applications

David Beard

$32.95

This introductory text emphasizes Feynman's development of path integrals and its application to wave theory for particles. Early chapters provide a foundation in the mathematical study and properties of wave motion. Subsequent sections stress the physical consequences of a wave theory of material properties and offer extensive applications to atomic structure and diatomic molecules. 1970 edition.
Glimpses of Australian Birdlife

Glimpses of Australian Birdlife

Sally Elmer, Peter Slater, Raoul Slater

$35.00

This beautifully photographed book captures the variety and brilliance of Australian birds in their natural habitat. Glimpses of Australian Birdlife by Sally Elmer and Peter Slater features stunning photos of small and large bush-birds and waterbirds, as well as a brief passage about how the photo was taken. The authors have spent many days travelling Australia to catch a glimpse of these birds, photographing them in flight, resting, hunting for prey and nesting Short poems and haikus, by Peter Slater, accompany some of the images. A visual delight, Glimpses of Australian Birdlife, would make a wonderful gift for nature lovers or those interested in nature.
Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide

Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide

Iain Campbell ,  Sam Woods ,  Nick Leseberg ,  Geoff Jones

$49.95

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date guide to Australian birds. Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution maps The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike
           
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