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Science
The Story of Science: From the Writings of Aristotle to the Big Bang Theory

The Story of Science: From the Writings of Aristotle to the Big Bang Theory

Susan Wise Bauer

$33.95

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JULY 2015 ----- Far too often, public discussion of science is carried out by journalists, voters, and politicians who have received their science secondhand. The Story of Science shows us the joy and importance of reading groundbreaking science writing for ourselves and guides us back to the masterpieces that have changed the way we think about our world, our cosmos, and ourselves.

Able to be referenced individually, or read together as the narrative of Western scientific development, the book's twenty-eight succinct chapters lead readers from the first science texts by Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle through twentieth-century classics in biology, physics, and cosmology. The Story of Science illuminates everything from mankind's earliest inquiries to the butterfly effect, from the birth of the scientific method to the rise of earth science and the flowering of modern biology. Each chapter recommends one or more classic books and provides entertaining accounts of crucial contributions to science, vivid sketches of the scientist-writers, and clear explanations of the mechanics underlying each concept. 

The Story of Science reveals science to be a dramatic undertaking practiced by some of history's most memorable characters. It reminds us that scientific inquiry is a human pursuit-an essential, often deeply personal, sometimes flawed, frequently brilliant way of understanding the world.

In the tradition of her perennial bestseller The-Well Educated Mind, Susan Wise Bauer delivers an accessible, entertaining, and illuminating springboard into the scientific education you never had.
TED: How We'll Live on Mars

TED: How We'll Live on Mars

Stephen Petranek

$16.99

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It sounds like science fiction, but award-winning journalist Stephen Petranek considers it fact: within 20 years, humans will live on Mars. We'll need to.

In this sweeping, provocative book that mixes business, science and human reporting, Petranek makes the case that living on Mars is an essential back-up plan for humanity, and explains in fascinating detail just how it will happen. It's clear that the race is on. Private companies (driven by iconoclastic entrepreneurs like Elon Musk and Sir Richard Branson); Dutch reality show/space mission Mars One; NASA and the Chinese government are among the many groups competing to plant the first stake on Mars and open the door for human habitation. For Elon Musk, it's the ultimate awesome thing. For other entrepreneurs, it's about competition and opportunity. For NASA, the Chinese government, and the leagues of other private companies and foreign nationals racing to get to Mars, there are more urgent reasons as well: life on Mars has potential life-saving possibilities for those of us on earth. 

Depleting water supplies, overwhelming climate change and a host of other disasters - from terrorist attacks to meteor strikes - all loom large. We must become a space-faring species to survive. In this close-up narrative chronicle, Petranek introduces the circus of lively characters all engaged in a big-money, big-drama effort to expand the limits of human knowledge - and life - by being the first to settle the Red Planet. 

How We'll Live on Mars brings first-hand reporting, interviews with key players and extensive research to bear on the question of how we can best, and most plausibly, expect to see life on Mars - within the next 20 years.
End Game: Tipping Point for Planet Earth

End Game: Tipping Point for Planet Earth

Anthony Barnosky ,  Elizabeth Hadly

$29.99

Will the struggle to simply stay alive become humanity's future rather than its past? The grand challenge of the 21st century is to ensure this is not the case.

What happens if population pressures finally hit a threshold that tumbles the dominoes of food, water, energy, climate, pollution, and biodiversity, which in turn break up the intricate workings of the global society? Just how close we may be to a global tipping point becomes apparent when you take a helicopter view and see what's happening at the scale of the entire planet.

In End Game Professors Anthony Barnosky and Elizabeth Hadly have compiled a giddying single overview of the calamities which we face from huge human population growth. We know that resources, climate change and environmental contamination are all at dangerous levels, but what if they all become critical at once? Unless things change this tipping point will be reached. Our carbon footprint is now a carbon acre, global warming is now simmering - we each probably use up about about 194 pounds of stuff a day and an Olympic swimming pool's worth of water each year. And soon there will be 9 billion of us. 

The combination of this spend will plunge us quite suddenly into a global knife fight for remaining space, food, oil and water. The danger is palpable, but the solutions, as Barnosky and Hadly show, are still available. The most important wake-up call since Paul and Anne Ehrlich's 'The Population Bomb', 'End Game' is globally relevant and increasingly crucial.
Letters to My Grandchildren

Letters to My Grandchildren

David Suzuki

$29.99

In this inspiring series of letters to his grandchildren, David Suzuki offers grandfatherly advice mixed with stories from his own remarkable life and explores what makes life meaningful. He challenges his grandchildren - and us - to do everything at full tilt. He explains why sports, fishing, feminism, and failure are important; why it is dangerous to deny our biological nature; and why First Nations must lead a revolution. Drawing on his own experiences and the wisdom he has gained over his long life, he decries the lack of elders and grandparents in the lives of many people, especially immigrants, and champions the importance of heroes. And he even has something to say about fashion. The book also provides an intimate look at Suzuki's life as a father and grandfather with letters that are chock-full of anecdotes about his children and grandchildren when they were small. As he ponders life's deepest questions and offers up a lifetime of wisdom, Suzuki inspires us all to live with courage, conviction, and passion.
Against the Grain: Fourteen Farmers Adapt to Climate Change

Against the Grain: Fourteen Farmers Adapt to Climate Change

Bill Hampel

$29.95

Can we humans simply ignore the fires, floods and increased deaths climate change is bringing? Fourteen farmers - those bearing the brunt of climate change - who accept the science, tell how they have observed or recorded the unpredictable weather events, the reduction in rainfall and its shift to the hotter months when is less useful to plants. 

Far from contributing to the problem with their farming practices, these farmers demonstrate how to reduce their greenhouse gases - to zero or below in some cases - and remain profitable. They are all committed to pass on their farm in a better condition than when they bought or inherited it.  Crops or livestock, big or small, they have worked co-operatively, mostly through Landcare, to plant thousands of trees and daily enjoy, and in one case meticulously record, over 100 bird species. Several have blocks of mature trees just for posterity. 

These inspiring and informative farmer stories open up a world new to most city dwellers.  A summary of climate change impacts and an account of the numerous economic, political and media barriers to change, combine to provide a context for their work.
At the Edge of Uncertainty: 11 Discoveries Taking Science by Surprise

At the Edge of Uncertainty: 11 Discoveries Taking Science by Surprise

Michael Brooks

$21.99

The atom. The Big Bang. DNA. Natural selection. All ideas that have revolutionised science - and that were dismissed out of hand when they first appeared. The surprises haven't stopped: here, Michael Brooks, bestselling author of 13 Things that Don't Make Sense, investigates the new wave of unexpected insights that are shaping the future of scientific discovery. 

Through eleven radical new insights, Brooks takes us to the extreme frontiers of what we understand about the world. He journeys from the observations that might rewrite our history of the universe, through the novel biology behind our will to live, and on to the physiological root of consciousness. Along the way, he examines how the underrepresentation of women in clinical trials means that many of the drugs we use are less effective on women than men and more likely to have adverse effects, explores how merging humans with other species might provide a solution to the shortage of organ donors, and finds out if there is such a thing as the will to live.  When we think about science, we often think of iron-clad facts. But today more than ever, our unshakeable truths have been shaken apart. 

As Michael Brooks reveals, the best science is about open-mindedness, imagination and a love of mind-boggling adventures at the edge of uncertainty.
The End of Science: Facing the Limits of Knowledge in the Twilight of the Scientific Age

The End of Science: Facing the Limits of Knowledge in the Twilight of the Scientific Age

John Horgan

$22.99

In The End of Science, John Horgan makes the case that the era of truly profound scientific revelations about the universe and our place in it is over. Interviewing scientific luminaries such as Stephen Hawking, Francis Crick, and Richard Dawkins, he demonstrates that all the big questions that can be answered have been answered, as science bumps up against fundamental limits. The world cannot give us a theory of everything, and modern endeavors such as string theory are ironic and theological in nature, not scientific, because they are impossible to confirm. Horgan's argument was controversial in 1996, and it remains so today, still firing up debates in labs and on the internet, not least because - as Horgan details in a lengthy new introduction - ironic science is more prevalent than ever. Still, while Horgan offers his critique, grounded in the thinking of the world's leading researchers, he offers homage, too. If science is ending, he maintains, it is only because it has done its work so well.
The Well-Tuned Brain: Neuroscience and the Life Well Lived

The Well-Tuned Brain: Neuroscience and the Life Well Lived

Peter C. Whybrow

$35.95

Why do we overeat, even if we re not hungry? Or compulsively shop when our closets overflow with stuff? What explains our seemingly unstoppable descent into debt? The Well-Tuned Brain offers a fascinating analysis of the disruptive mismatch that has emerged and what we can do about changing it between the compelling material opportunity of the consumer society, together with its associated stress and workaholic demands, and who we are as evolved creatures of this planet. In eloquent prose, eminent neuropsychiatrist Peter C. Whybrow combines philosophical and historical perspectives with personal stories and the work of economists and social theorists, plus the latest discoveries in behavioral neuroscience. He demonstrates that we now have the essential self-knowledge to build a balanced and sustainable market society of responsible and well-tuned individuals one where material advance and technology serve as instruments in achieving the good life, rather than being confused with the good life itself.
Domesticated: Evolution in a Man-Made World

Domesticated: Evolution in a Man-Made World

Richard C. Francis

$35.95

How did the deadly wolf evolve into the lap-loving Pekingese, the wildcat into the tabby cat, and the awe-inspiring auroch into the meek milk-producing cow? It happened through the process that biologists call domestication. Domesticated creatures have served us well. In fact, without them, civilization as we know it would not exist. A natural storyteller, Richard C. Francis weaves history, archaeology, and anthropology to create a fascinating narrative while seamlessly integrating the most cutting-edge ideas in twenty-first-century biology, from genomics to evo-devo. Each domesticated species is a case study in evolution. Two key themes emerge: that domestication often results in the retention of juvenile traits, and that, for all the spectacular alterations wrought by natural and artificial selection, evolution remains fundamentally a conservative process: the Pekingese, for example, retains ample evidence of its wolf ancestry. In the final chapters, Francis explores the ways in which these themes apply to human evolution.
Plants: From Roots to Riches

Plants: From Roots to Riches

Kathy Willis ,  Carolyn Fry

$22.99

Our peculiarly British obsession with gardens goes back a long way and Plants: From Roots to Riches takes us back to where it all began. Across 25 vivid episodes, Kathy Willis, Kew's charismatic Head of Science, shows us how the last 250 years transformed our relationship with plants.

Behind the scenes at the Botanical Gardens all kinds of surprising things have been going on. As the British Empire painted the atlas red, explorers, adventurers and scientists brought the most interesting specimens and information back to London. From the discovery of Botany Bay to the horrors of the potato famine, from orchid hunters to quinine smugglers, from Darwin's experiments to the unexpected knowledge unlocked by the 1987 hurricane, understanding how plants work has changed our history and could safeguard our future.

In the style of A History of the World in 100 Objects, each chapter tells a separate story, but, gathered together, a great picture unfolds, of our most remarkable science, botany. Plants: From Roots to Riches is a beautifully designed book, packed with 200 images in both colour and black and white from Kew's amazing archives, some never reproduced before. 

Kathy Willis and Carolyn Fry, the acclaimed popular-science writer, have also added all kinds of fascinating extra history, heroes and villains, memorable stories and interviews. Their book takes us on an exciting rollercoaster ride through our past and future and shows us how much plants really do matter.
The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity

The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity

Professor Pedro G. Ferreira

$22.99

Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is possibly the most perfect intellectual achievement in modern physics. Anything that involves gravity, the force that powers everything on the largest, hottest or densest of scales, can be explained by it. From the moment Einstein first proposed the theory in 1915, it was received with enthusiasm yet also with tremendous resistance, and for the following ninety years was the source of a series of feuds, vendettas, ideological battles and persecutions featuring a colourful cast of characters. A gripping, vividly told story, A Perfect Theory entangles itself with the flashpoints of modern history and is the first complete popular history of the theory, showing how it has informed our understanding of exactly what the universe is made of and how much is still undiscovered: from the work of the giant telescopes in the deserts of Chile to our newest ideas about black holes and the Large Hadron Collider deep under French and Swiss soil.
The Quantum Age: How the Physics of the Very Small Has Transformed Our Lives

The Quantum Age: How the Physics of the Very Small Has Transformed Our Lives

Brian Clegg

$21.99

The stone age, the iron age, the steam and electrical ages all saw the reach of humankind transformed by new technology. Now we are living in the quantum age, a revolution in everyday life led by our understanding of the very, very small. Today, technologies based on quantum physics account for 30 per cent of US GDP, and yet quantum particles such as atoms, electrons and photons remain enigmatic, acting totally unlike the objects we experience directly. Weird quantum behaviour is also essential to nature. From the mechanism of the Sun to quantum biology in our eyesight, photosynthesis in plants and the ability of birds to navigate, quantum effects are key. Quantum physics lies at the heart of every electronic device, every smartphone and laser, and now quantum superconductors have moved out of the lab to make levitating trains and MRI scanners possible, while soon superfast, ultra-secure quantum computers may be a reality. Acclaimed popular science author Brian Clegg brings his trademark clarity and enthusiasm to a book that will give the world around you a new sense of wonder.
Einstein's Dice and Schrodinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics

Einstein's Dice and Schrodinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics

Paul Halpern

$36.99

Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrodinger were friends and comrades-in-arms against what they considered the most preposterous aspect of quantum mechanics: its randomness. Although Einstein's own work provided early insights into quantum mechanics, he nevertheless refused to believe that God played dice with the universe. Schrodinger, too, rebelled at the indeterminate nature of the universe that his own work had revealed, and constructed a fable of a cat that was neither alive nor dead to highlight the apparent absurdity of a theory gone wrong. In Einstein's Dice and Schrodinger's Cat, physicist Paul Halpern tells the story of how Einstein and Schrodinger searched, first as collaborators and then as competitors, for a Grand Unified Theory that would eliminate quantum weirdness and make the universe seem sensible again. This story of their quest--which ultimately failed--provides readers with new insights into the history of physics and the lives and work of two scientists whose obsessions drove its progress.
Smashing Physics: Inside the World's Biggest Experiment

Smashing Physics: Inside the World's Biggest Experiment

Jon Butterworth

$19.99

The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland.

This book will also leave you with a working knowledge of the new physics and what the discovery of the Higgs particle means for how we define the laws of nature.  It will take you to the cutting edge of modern scientific thinking.
Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Under-Rated Organ

Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Under-Rated Organ

Giulia Enders

$29.99

The key to living a happier, healthier life is inside us. Our gut is almost as important to us as our brain or our heart, yet we know very little about how it works.

In Gut, Giulia Enders shows that rather than the utilitarian and - let's be honest - somewhat embarrassing body part we imagine it to be, it is one of the most complex, important, and even miraculous parts of our anatomy. And scientists are only just discovering quite how much it has to offer - new research shows that gut bacteria can play a role in everything from obesity and allergies to Alzheimer's.

Beginning with the personal experience of illness that inspired her research, and going on to explain everything from the basics of nutrient absorption to the latest science linking bowel bacteria with depression, Enders has written an entertaining, informative health handbook.

Gut definitely shows that we can all benefit from getting to know the wondrous world of our inner workings.

Enders' message is simple - if we treat our gut well, it will treat us well in return. But how do we do that? And why do we need to? Find out in this surprising, and surprisingly funny, exploration of the least understood of our organs.
Asteroids: Relics of Ancient Time

Asteroids: Relics of Ancient Time

Michael K. Shepard

$59.95

Where do asteroids come from and what are they made of? What clues do they hold about the evolution of the Solar System? Scientists have catalogued hundreds of thousands of asteroids, and many are thought to contain water and amino acids, the building blocks of life. Michael Shepard tells the fascinating story of their discovery, and what they can tell us about the history of our own planet. He describes how we find and study asteroids, what they look like through the eyes of powerful telescopes and spacecraft, and plans for future sample return missions. This timely book interweaves accessible scientific explanations with historical background and personal narrative, providing an engaging read for anyone curious about asteroids and what they may mean for our future - both as threats and opportunities.
An Introduction to Star Formation

An Introduction to Star Formation

Derek Ward-Thompson ,  Anthony P. Whitworth

$84.95

Guiding the reader through all the stages that lead to the formation of a star such as our Sun, this advanced textbook provides students with a complete overview of star formation. It examines the underlying physical processes that govern the evolution from a molecular cloud core to a main-sequence star, and focuses on the formation of solar-mass stars. Each chapter combines theory and observation, helping readers to connect with and understand the theory behind star formation. Beginning with an explanation of the interstellar medium and molecular clouds as sites of star formation, subsequent chapters address the building of typical stars and the formation of high-mass stars, concluding with a discussion of the by-products and consequences of star formation. This is a unique, self-contained text with sufficient background information for self-study, and is ideal for students and professional researchers alike.
Cave: Nature and Culture

Cave: Nature and Culture

Ralph Crane ,  Lisa Fletcher

$29.99

To enter caves is to venture beyond the realm of the everyday. From huge vaulted caverns to impassable water-filled passages, the karst topography of Guilin in China and the lava tubes of Hawaii, from tiny remote pilgrimage sites to massive tourism enterprises, caves are places of mystery.

Dark spaces that remain largely unexplored, caves are astonishing wonders of nature and habitats for exotic flora and fauna. This book investigates the natural and cultural history of caves and considers the roles they have played in the human imagination and experience of the natural world. It explores the long history of the human fascination with caves, across countries and continents, examining their dual role as spaces of both wonder and fear. In Cave we encounter the adventurers and 'cave hunters' who pioneered the science of caves, and the explorers and cave divers still searching for new, unnavigated routes deep into the earth. This book explores the lure of the subterranean world by examining caving and cave tourism and by looking to the mythology, literature and art of caves.

This lavishly illustrated book will appeal to general readers and experts alike interested in the ecology and use of caves, or the extraordinary artistic responses earth's dark recesses have evoked over the centuries.
State of the World: Confronting Hidden Threats to Sustainability

State of the World: Confronting Hidden Threats to Sustainability

The Worldwatch Institute

$29.99

This is the newest edition of The Worldwatch Institute's respected State of the World series that highlights the ignored threats to sustainability. We think we understand environmental damage: pollution, water scarcity, a warming world. But these problems are just the tip of the iceberg. Food insecurity, financial assets drained of value by environmental damage, and a rapid rise in diseases of animal origin are among the underreported consequences of an unsustainable global system. In State of the World 2015, the flagship publication of The Worldwatch Institute, experts explore hidden threats to sustainability and how to address them. Eight key issues are addressed in depth, along with the central question of how we can develop resilience to these and other shocks. With the latest edition of State of The World, the authorities at Worldwatch bring to light challenges we can no longer afford to ignore.
What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming: Toward a New Psychology of Climate Action

What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming: Toward a New Psychology of Climate Action

Per Espen Stoknes

$34.99

Why does knowing more mean believing and doing less? A prescription for change The more facts that pile up about global warming, the greater the resistance to them grows, making it harder to enact measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prepare communities for the inevitable change ahead. It is a catch-22 that starts, says psychologist and economist Per Espen Stoknes, from an inadequate understanding of the way most humans think, act, and live in the world around them.

With dozens of examples from the private sector to government agencies Stoknes shows how to retell the story of climate change and, at the same time, create positive, meaningful actions that can be supported even by deniers. In What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming, Stoknes not only masterfully identifies the five main psychological barriers to climate action, but addresses them with five strategies for how to talk about global warming in a way that creates action and solutions, not further inaction and despair. These strategies work with, rather than against, human nature. They are social, positive, and simple making climate-friendly behaviors easy and convenient. They are also story-based, to help add meaning and create community, and include the use of signals, or indicators, to gauge feedback and be constantly responsive.

Whether you are working on the front lines of the climate issue, immersed in the science, trying to make policy or educate the public, or just an average person trying to make sense of the cognitive dissonance or grapple with frustration over this looming issue, What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming moves beyond the psychological barriers that block progress and opens new doorways to social and personal transformation.
Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War

Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War

Brandon R. Brown

$35.95

Planck's Law, an equation used by physicists to determine the radiation leaking from any object in the universe, was described by Albert Einstein as  the basis of all twentieth-century physics.  

Max Planck is credited with being the father of quantum theory, and his work laid the foundation for our modern understanding of matter and energetic processes. But Planck's story is not well known, especially in the United States. A German physicist working during the first half of the twentieth century, his library, personal journals, notebooks, and letters were all destroyed with his home in World War II. What remains, other than his contributions to science, are handwritten letters in German shorthand, and tributes from other scientists of the time, including his close friend Albert Einstein. 

In Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War, Brandon R. Brown interweaves the voices and writings of Planck, his family, and his contemporaries-with many passages appearing in English for the first time-to create a portrait of a groundbreaking physicist working in the midst of war.  Planck spent much of his adult life grappling with the identity crisis of being an influential German with ideas that ran counter to his government. During the later part of his life, he survived bombings and battlefields, surgeries and blood transfusions, all the while performing his influential work amidst a violent and crumbling Nazi bureaucracy. When his son was accused of treason related to a bombing, Planck tried to use his standing as a German  national treasure,  and wrote direct letters to Hitler to spare his son's life.

Brown tells the story of Planck's friendship with the far more outspoken Albert Einstein, and shows how his work fits within the explosion of technology and science that occurred during his life. The story of a brilliant man living in a dangerous time, Brandon Brown gives Max Planck his rightful place in the history of science, and shows how war-torn Germany deeply impacted his life and work.
Beneath the Surface: Killer Whales, SeaWorld, and the Truth Beyond Blackfish

Beneath the Surface: Killer Whales, SeaWorld, and the Truth Beyond Blackfish

John Hargrove ,  Howard Chua-Eoan

$34.99

Over the course of two decades, John Hargrove worked with 20 different whales on two continents and at two of SeaWorld's U.S. facilities. For Hargrove, becoming an orca trainer fulfilled a childhood dream. However, as his experience with the whales deepened, Hargrove came to doubt that their needs could ever be met in captivity.

When two fellow trainers were killed by orcas in marine parks, Hargrove decided that SeaWorld's wildly popular programs were both detrimental to the whales and ultimately unsafe for trainers. After leaving SeaWorld, Hargrove became one of the stars of the controversial documentary Blackfish. The outcry over the treatment of SeaWorld's orca has now expanded beyond the outlines sketched by the award-winning documentary, with Hargrove contributing his expertise to an advocacy movement that is convincing both federal and state governments to act.

In Beneath the Surface, Hargrove paints a compelling portrait of these highly intelligent and social creatures, including his favourite whales Takara and her mother Kasatka, two of the most dominant orcas in SeaWorld.  And he includes vibrant descriptions of the lives of orcas in the wild, contrasting their freedom in the ocean with their lives in SeaWorld. Hargrove's journey is one that humanity has just begun to take-toward the realization that the relationship between the human and animal worlds must be radically rethought.
Life's Greatest Secret: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code

Life's Greatest Secret: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code

Matthew Cobb

$49.99

Life's Greatest Secret is the story of the discovery and cracking of the genetic code. This great scientific breakthrough has had far-reaching consequences for how we understand ourselves and our place in the natural world. The code forms the most striking proof of Darwin's hypothesis that all organisms are related, holds tremendous promise for improving human well-being, and has transformed the way we think about life. Matthew Cobb interweaves science, biography and anecdote in a book that mixes remarkable insights, theoretical dead-ends and ingenious experiments with the pace of a thriller. He describes cooperation and competition among some of the twentieth-century's most outstanding and eccentric minds, moves between biology, physics and chemistry, and shows the part played by computing and cybernetics. The story spans the globe, from Cambridge MA to Cambridge UK, New York to Paris, London to Moscow. It is both thrilling science and a fascinating story about how science is done.
Beaver

Beaver

Rachel Poliquin

$24.99

Despite their humble appearance, beavers have a remarkable history. Ancient Greeks regarded beavers as models of chastity and prudence. Beaver fur drove the exploration of North America, and beavers are heralded as heroes, able to survive climate change by creating wetland habitats. This book explores our long infatuation with the beaver from North American mythology and Aesop's Fables to contemporary environmental politics. It also examines the facts and fictions of beaver democracies, beaver architecture and even, surprisingly, beaver-flavoured ice-cream. Beaver is a beautifully illustrated book, which will appeal to anyone interested in animal lore and in discovering extraordinary insights into animal biology.
Bees: An Up-Close Look at Pollinators Around the World

Bees: An Up-Close Look at Pollinators Around the World

Sam Droege ,  Laurence Packer

$35.00

While we eat, work, and sleep, bees are busy around the world. More than 20,000 species are in constant motion! They pollinate plants of all types and keep our natural world intact. In Bees, you'll find a new way to appreciate these tiny wonders. Sam Droege and Laurence Packer present more than 100 of the most eye-catching bees from around the world as you've never seen them: up-close and with stunning detail. You'll stare into alien-like faces. You'll get lost in mesmerizing colors and patterns, patches and stripes of arresting yellow or blue. Whether you linger on your first close look at the Western Domesticated Honey Bee or excitedly flip straight to the rare Dinagapostemon sicheli, there's no doubt you'll be blown away by the beauty of bees.
Green Guide to Garden Birds of Australia

Green Guide to Garden Birds of Australia

Peter Slater  ,  Sally Elmer

$18.99

Investigating the ever popular subject of the birds nin our backyards, this Green Guide features identification spreads coveirng all the major species and families that occur in gardens across Australia, including iconic, rare and introduced species.
Metamorphosis: Astonishing Insect Transformations

Metamorphosis: Astonishing Insect Transformations

Rupert Soskin

$49.99

Insects truly are the ugly ducklings of the natural world. How does something as beautiful as a butterfly begin life as little more than a fancy maggot? Or something as elegant and delicate as a lacewing hatch out looking like a minuscule escapee from a horror movie? What are the circumstances that require a creature to transform from one body shape into another, a shape that is often so utterly different from the first that you would be forgiven for thinking they were completely unrelated organisms?

This book illustrate some of the dramatic transformations insects undergo in their life cycles and explore why evolution has arrived at these remarkable solutions to survival. The aim of the book is to show remarkable transformations, some of which most people could never see in a lifetime. The book is divided into two main sections:. Insects that undergo partial metamorphosis such as dragonflies, grasshoppers and bugs. Here the young resemble the adult, changing gradually with each moult. Insects that experience a complete metamorphosis such as butterflies, moths, beetles, bees, wasps, ants and flies. In these species the young bear no resemblance to the adult in appearance, habitat or diet, until they pupate.

The author is undertaking a unique project to photograph a range of selected species at each stage of development - from egg, to larva, to pupa and finally fully formed adult.
Weeds

Weeds

Nina Edwards

$39.99

Weeds can seem nothing more than intruders in a well-manicured garden. They spring up unwanted and are hastily removed without a second thought. Superweeds are characterized as malevolent trespassers, intent on destroying humanity's carefully cultivated allotments and trails. But the idea of a weed is constantly changing.

In a field of corn the scarlet poppy may be unwelcome, but in other contexts it may be prized. What we now consider as weeds may once have had practical uses, as food, for example. Some weeds can be helpful to our ecology, yet the presence of weeds is often considered to be a sign of neglect. They are blitzed from farmland, wayside verges, gardens and even pavements. The concept of what is and is not considered naturally occurring even in our remaining wilderness involves a sense of what is native or alien. This book discusses the history of weeds, looking at the ways literature has interrogated this slippery concept.

Weeds is an informative resource for understanding exactly what turns a plant into a weed in varying contexts and reveals just how interesting and useful these seemingly pointless plants can be.  Weeds is the perfect companion for gardeners or readers with an interest in botany, as well anyone seeking knowledge about what is, and what is not, a weed.
Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises: A Natural History and Species Guide

Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises: A Natural History and Species Guide

Annalisa Berta

$60.00

The 89 species of the order Cetacea are some of the most diverse, intelligent, and elusive animals on the planet. Highly migratory, they live beneath remote skies thousands of miles away from land. The huge distances they cover and the depths they dive mean we catch only the merest glimpse of their lives. Technological advances have, however, increased our understanding, and for the first time, Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises gathers together all the most interesting new research to offer detailed profiles of each species, alongside the information needed to identify them. This title combines highlights from the latest scholarly studies of the nature and behavior of the worlds whales, dolphins, and porpoises, with a hard working field guide for use in observing these animals in the wild.
           
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