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History
Australians: Flappers to Vietnam

Australians: Flappers to Vietnam

Thomas Keneally

$49.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE NOVEMBER 2014 ----- As in the two previous volumes of Australians Keneally brings history to vivid and pulsating life as he traces the lives and the deeds of Australians known and unknown.
 
Australia emerged from WW1 into a decade of profound change, characterised by a revolution in behaviour amongst the young; by the first great age of consumerism; by the new and increasingly sophisticated impact of the movies; by secret right wing armies and the emergence of the Communist Party; and by two less remembered and very interesting PMs, the handsome, sombre Stanley Melbourne Bruce of the Melbourne Establishment, and Jim Scullin, unpretentious Labor man of humbler Irish parentage.

As another war grew closer he follows the famous and the infamous through the Great Crash and the rise of Fascism, and explains how Australia was inexorably drawn into a war which led her forces into combat throughout Asia, Africa, Europe and the Pacific. At home an atmosphere of fear grew with the fall of Singapore and the bombing of Darwin, the Japanese advance and then the American Alliance and the arrival of General MacArthur. Peace brought its own problems with the Depression that left one-third of Australians unemployed.

Keneally believes too that the 1950s are misunderstood - depicted by some as an age of full employment, by others as the age of suburban spread and boredom under the serene prime ministership of Robert Menzies. But Menzies was complicated and so were the 1950s. A majority of Australians believed there would be nuclear war before the end of the decade.

The result of masterly writing and exhaustive research is a volume which brings Australia's more recent history to vibrant life.
How We Got to Now: Six Innovations that made the Modern World

How We Got to Now: Six Innovations that made the Modern World

Steven Johnson

$29.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE NOVEMBER 2014 ----- How did our mastery of artificial cold help give birth to at least four million babies, create the golden age of Hollywood and unlock the secrets of the universe? And what about our battle against dirt? How did that create the flat screen and the iPhone?

This book is a celebration of ideas: how they happen and their sometimes unintended results. Johnson shows how simple scientific breakthroughs have driven other discoveries through the network of ideas and innovations that made each finding possible. He traces important inventions through ancient and contemporary history, unlocking tales of unsung heroes and radical revolutions that changed the world and the way we live in it.
The Classics Magpie: From Chariot-Racing Hooligans to Debauched Dinner Parties - A Miscellany That Shakes the Dust off the Ancient World

The Classics Magpie: From Chariot-Racing Hooligans to Debauched Dinner Parties - A Miscellany That Shakes the Dust off the Ancient World

Jane C. Hood

$29.99

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Who first thought of atoms? How much can you learn about archaeology from an oil lamp? Who came up with the theory of the 'wandering womb'?

Oxford Classicist Jane Hood delves into the history, culture, literature, mythology and philosophy of ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt, using her expert eye to unearth unexpected gems, glittering fragments and quotable nuggets from a lost world. From ancient cosmetics to the earliest known computer, from the deciphering of ancient languages to the amazing things the Romans did with concrete, this is the essential miscellany for all curious minds, whether you learned the Classics at school or not.
SPQR: A Roman Miscellany

SPQR: A Roman Miscellany

Anthony Everitt

$24.99

SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus. A moreishly entertaining and richly informative miscellany of facts about Rome and the Roman world. Do you know to what use the Romans put the excrement of the kingfisher? Or why a dinner party invitation from the emperor Domitian was such a terrifying prospect? Or why Roman women smelt so odd? The answers to these questions can be found in SPQR, a compendium of extraordinary facts and anecdotes about ancient Rome and its Empire. Its 500-odd entries range across every area of Roman life and society, from the Empress Livia's cure for tonsillitis to the most reliable Roman methods of contraception.
The Best Australian Essays 2014

The Best Australian Essays 2014

Robert Manne

$29.99

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In The Best Australian Essays 2014, Robert Manne assembles his picks of contemporary non-fiction writing. This sharp collection of essays about the human condition evinces lucid insight, shrewd understanding and heartbreaking empathy.

Previous contributors include Helen Garner, J M Coetzee, Gillian Mears, Tim Flannery, Robyn Davidson, Clive James, Chloe Hooper, David Marr, David Malouf, Robert Manne, Noel Pearson and Anna Krien.
Triumph and Demise: The Broken Promise of a Labor Generation

Triumph and Demise: The Broken Promise of a Labor Generation

Paul Kelly

$34.99

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Drawing on more than sixty on-the-record interviews with all the major players, Triumph and Demise is full of remarkable disclosures.

It is the inside account of the hopes, achievements and bitter failures of the Labor Government from 2007 to 2013. Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard came together to defeat John Howard, formed a brilliant partnership and raised the hopes of the nation. Yet they fell into tension and then hostility under the pressures of politics and policy.

Veteran journalist Paul Kelly probes the dynamics of the Rudd-Gillard partnership and dissects what tore them apart. He tells the full story of Julia Gillard's tragedy as our first female prime minister - her character, Rudd's destabilisation, the carbon tax saga and how Gillard was finally pulled down on the eve of the 2013 election.

Kelly documents the most misunderstood event in these years - the rise of Tony Abbott and the reason for his success. It was Abbott's performance that denied Rudd and Gillard the chance to recover. Labor misjudged Abbott and paid the price. Kelly writes with a keen eye and fearless determination.

His central theme is that Australian politics has entered a crisis of the system that, unless corrected, will diminish the lives of all Australians.
Stand and Deliver: Celebrating 50 Years of the National Press Club of Australia

Stand and Deliver: Celebrating 50 Years of the National Press Club of Australia

Steve Lewis

$39.99

For the past half century, the National Press Club has stood at the centre of political and social debate in Australia. Leaders and opinion makers have sought to speak at the National Press Club, using its pulpit to discuss and debate the issues of the day. To celebrate the club's fiftieth anniversary, this book collects the best speeches of the past 50 years and brings to life the Club's rich and colourful history and role. Stand and Deliver brings together some of the most influential, controversial and iconic figures in recent history, including Bill Gates, Margaret Thatcher, Paul Keating, Julia Gillard, Germaine Greer, Bob Hawke, Barry Humphries, Kevin Rudd, John Howard and the Dalai Lama. Australia's leading institution for informed discussion and debate, the National Press Club of Australia was established by journalists to provide a genuine national forum for discussion of the issues of the day by the personalities who help shape them. Through the National Australia Bank Address, the Press Club has developed a reputation nationally and internationally as Australia's leading forum for the discussion of issues and debate on public policy in a lively, informative and entertaining format.
Last Woman Hanged: The Terrible, True Story of Louisa Collins

Last Woman Hanged: The Terrible, True Story of Louisa Collins

Caroline Overington

$39.99

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One woman. Two husbands. Four trials. One bloody execution. The last woman hanged in NSW. In January 1889, Louisa Collins, a 41-year-old mother of ten children, became the first woman hanged at Darlinghurst Gaol and the last woman hanged in New South Wales. Both of Louisa's husbands died suddenly. The Crown was convinced that Louisa poisoned them with arsenic and, to the horror of many in the legal community, put her on trial an extraordinary four times in order to get a conviction. Louisa protested her innocence until the end.

Now, in Last Woman Hanged, writer and journalist Caroline Overington delves into the archives to re-examine the original forensic reports, court documents, judges' notebooks, witness statements and police and gaol records, in an effort to discover the truth. Much of the evidence against Louisa was circumstantial. Some of the most important testimony was given by her only daughter, May, who was just 10 years old when asked to take the stand.

The historical context is also important: Louisa Collins was hanged at a time when women were in no sense equal under the law - except when it came to the gallows.  Women could not vote or stand for parliament - or sit on juries. There were no female politicians and no women judges. Against this background, a small group of women rose up to try to save Louisa's life, arguing that a legal system comprising only men - male judges, all-male jury, male prosecutor, governor and Premier - could not with any integrity hang a woman.

The tenacity of these women would not save Louisa but it would ultimately carry women from their homes all the way to Parliament House. Less than 15 years after Louisa was hanged, Australian women would become some of the first in the world to get the vote. They would take seats in State parliament, and in Canberra. They would become doctors, lawyers, judges, premiers - even the Prime Minister.

Caroline says: 'My hope is that Last Woman Hanged will be read not only as a true crime story but as a letter of profound thanks to that generation of women who fought so hard for the rights we still enjoy today.'

Last Woman Hanged: The Terrible, True Story of Louisa Collins Caroline Overington at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
Mistress: The True Story of Mistresses and Their Men

Mistress: The True Story of Mistresses and Their Men

Matthew Benns ,  Terry Smyth

$34.99

Since the First Fleet landed, Australian history has been littered with mistresses. Slide between the covers of this book to find a cheaters' list of those women and a star-studded hall of infamy of Australia's rich and powerful men, catching them sneaking into their lover's bed in the dead of night. They are all here: Michael Hutchence, Clive James, Tony Mokbel - the list goes on... Wealthy and powerful men have always attracted beautiful mistresses. Kerry Packer, Australia's richest man, was one such notorious philanderer. He only moved home to his wife, Ros, from the flat of his mistress the day before he died. Politicians are no better: Bob Hawke had a prolonged love affair with his biographer Blanche d'Alpuget before finally casting aside loyal wife Hazel. Former Liberal leader Sir Billy Snedden died on the job in a Sydney motel room with his lover and was found wearing only a condom. Today's politicians certainly aren't squeaky clean either... Mistress takes you between the sheets with Australia's billionaires, footballers, celebrities, gangsters and politicians; the women they cheat with, the wives they betray. And it explains the one lie that binds them all - sex.
The Adolescent Country: A Lowy Institute Paper

The Adolescent Country: A Lowy Institute Paper

Peter Hartcher

$9.99

The great crises that threaten Australia's national prosperity come from abroad. So do the grandest opportunities. But in Australian politics the big matters are commonly crowded out by the small. International policy is used for domestic point-scoring. Leaders are criticised for travelling beyond the water's edge. Measured against its potential today and its needs tomorrow, Australia is seriously underperforming. It is wasting valuable opportunities to strengthen its position and help shape the world. Drawing on exclusive interviews with prime ministers, foreign ministers and other policy-makers, Gold Walkley award-winning journalist Peter Hartcher argues Australia needs to shake off its 'provincial reflex' and become a mature player in global affairs.
Gallipoli

Gallipoli

Peter FitzSimons

$49.99  $39.99

On 25 April 1915, Allied forces landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula in present-day Turkey to secure the sea route between Britain and France in the west and Russia in the east. After eight months of terrible fighting, they would fail. Peter tells this iconic tale in Gallipoli.

History comes to life with Peter Fitzsimons. Turkey regards the victory to this day as a defining moment in its history, a heroic last stand in the defence of the nation's Ottoman Empire. But, counter-intuitively, it would signify something perhaps even greater for the defeated Australians and New Zealanders involved: the birth of their countries' sense of nationhood.

Now approaching its centenary, the Gallipoli campaign, commemorated each year on Anzac Day, reverberates with importance as the origin and symbol of Australian and New Zealand identity. As such, the facts of the battle - which was minor against the scale of the First World War and cost less than a sixth of the Australian deaths on the Western Front - are often forgotten or obscured. 

Peter FitzSimons, with his trademark vibrancy and expert melding of writing and research, recreates the disaster as experienced by those who endured it or perished in the attempt.
Furphies and Whizz-Bangs: ANZAC Slang from the Great War

Furphies and Whizz-Bangs: ANZAC Slang from the Great War

Amanda Laugesen

$32.95

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Furphies and Whizz-bangs: ANZAC Slang from the Great War tells the story of the First World War through an examination of the slang used by soldiers from Australia and New Zealand.

Drawing on a range of primary source material taken from soldiers’ letters, diaries and trench publications, along with contemporary newspapers and books, the language of the ANZAC soldiers is brought to life. 

From the language soldiers used to make sense of military life, to the slang of the trenches, to the words of the home front, this book illuminates the cultural and social worlds of ANZAC soldiers. It tells us of the everyday grumblings of the soldiers, the horrors of the battlefield, and the humour they used as they tried to endure the war. Also included are chapters on the slang of the Australian Flying Corps and the Royal Australian Navy, and place names used by soldiers.
In All Respects Ready: Australia's Navy in World War One

In All Respects Ready: Australia's Navy in World War One

David Stevens

$59.95

Written by Australia’s foremost naval historian, In All Respects Ready presents the most comprehensive and authoritative account of the Australian Navy’s involvement in World War I yet published.

When the newly built Australian fleet sailed into Sydney for the first time in October 1913, it was portrayed as a sign of peace that came from being prepared for war. Within a year that war had broken out, and the Royal Australian Navy, fully trained and ready, was the most professional and effective force Australia had to offer the British Empire. Throughout the next four years of conflict Australian ships and sailors would operate across the seas and oceans of the world, establishing a tradition of intrepid courage and dogged endurance while forging their own unique naval and national identity.

Impeccably researched, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped official reports, intelligence summaries and private diaries, this book offers far more than a chronicle of historical fact. Crafting the definitive work on this largely ignored chapter of Australian history, the author presents an engaging narrative of the war at sea that brings to life both the human element and a richly depicted sense of place.
True Light and Shade: An Aboriginal Perspective of Joseph Lycett's Art

True Light and Shade: An Aboriginal Perspective of Joseph Lycett's Art

John Maynard

$49.99

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True Light and Shade is filled with beautiful images by convict artist Joseph Lycett that powerfully capture in intimate detail Aboriginal life, a rare record of Aboriginal people within the vicinity of Newcastle and how they adapted to European settlement before cultural destruction impacted on these groups.

John Maynard writes an engaging short biography of Lycett and his life in Australia and follows this with a detailed commentary on each of the 20 images in the album. Each image is reproduced in full on a double page spread and then, on the spreads following, details have been enlarged to accompany John's text as he takes us through exactly what is happening in every picture: ceremony, hunting and fishing, carrying food (carving up whalemeat), land management and burning, interactions with Europeans, family life, dances, funeral rituals, and punishment. When you return again to examine the full image, you see it in a completely different light. John also includes written records from the time that corroborate Lycett's views.
Australia on Horseback: The Story of the Horse and the Making of a Nation

Australia on Horseback: The Story of the Horse and the Making of a Nation

Cameron Forbes

$44.99

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The first horse set foot in Australia on 30 January 1788, one of seven aboard the First Fleet's Lady Penrhyn, which also carried a cargo of female convicts.

From then on, horses carried explorers who opened up the country to settlement. They carried Aboriginal mounted police, trained as ruthless killers of their own people. Horses, often fine stolen animals, carried bushrangers who ruled the roads and bailed up townships: 'gentleman' Matthew Brady, 'brave' Ben Hall and the towering, controversial Ned Kelly.

Horses carried men to war. Some 120,000 horses were sent to World War I battlefields: only one was brought home. Horses helped build the nation, marshalling the great flocks and herds, helping to create its myths. As they have since the early days of the colony, they carry our bets and, like the mighty Phar Lap in the Depression days, they have the power to lift our spirits. Cameron Forbes, author of the acclaimed Hellfire and The Korean War, uses the motif of the horse to tell the wider Australian story of settlement, exploration, dispossession and warfare.

Australia on Horseback is a masterful achievement, a comprehensively researched and beautifully told history of a developing nation and a powerful tribute to the horse - bearer of men, hopes, fears and dreams.
Australian Soldiers in Asia-Pacific in World War II

Australian Soldiers in Asia-Pacific in World War II

Lachlan Grant

$39.99

The hidden story of how Australian troops' close encounters with the cultures of our nearest neighbours altered our national identity. 

Half a million Australians encountered a new world when they entered Asia and the Pacific during World War II: different peoples, cultures, languages and religions chafing under the grip of colonial rule. 

This book paints a picture not only of individual lives transformed, but of dramatically shifting national perceptions, as the gaze of Australia turned from Britain to Asia.
Charles Bean's Gallipoli Illustrated

Charles Bean's Gallipoli Illustrated

Phillip Bradley

$59.99

Charles Bean and Gallipoli are forever closely bound. Serving as the official Australian war correspondent from the landing to the evacuation, Charles Bean was able to dedicate his days and nights to witnessing and recording the events that would form the Anzac legend. In writing his diaries, Bean also provided an extraordinary insight into his own emotions - his joys and sorrows, hopes and fears, loves and hates - and those he admired or disdained, the heroes and villains of the Anzac story. Charles Bean's Gallipoli extracts the essence of Gallipoli from his diaries and rewards the reader with a clearer understanding of what it was like to live and die there. Charles Bean's Gallipoli also showcases a remarkable collection of photographs, the majority of which were obtained from the private collections of soldiers who took their cameras to war. Most of these photographs, selected to illustrate Charles Bean's diary extracts, have not previously been published and provide another fascinating perspective on the Gallipoli campaign.
The Nashos' War: Australian National Servicemen in Vietnam

The Nashos' War: Australian National Servicemen in Vietnam

Mark Dapin

$39.99

On 10 March 1965, the first nasho's birthdate was drawn from a lottery barrel at the Department of Labour and National Service in Melbourne. Over the next seven years, a total of 63740 young Australian men would be drafted into the army and face the prospect of being sent to war.

The nashos came from all walks of life: plumbers and dentists, footballers and musicians, Christians and Jews, willing and unwilling. Some spent their two years square-bashing in Singleton. Others went to Vietnam to fight - and die - in Australia's bloodiest battles, including the slaughter at Long Tan.

But our ideas of national service contain strange contradictions and inaccuracies: that the draft was unpopular but militarily necessary; that the nashos in Vietnam all volunteered to go to war; and that they were met by protesters and demonstrations on their return to Australia, rather than the huge welcome-home parades reported at the time.

Here, Mark Dapin dramatically deconstructs the folklore of Vietnam and national service. Drawing on the accounts of over one hundred and fifty former national servicemen, The Nashos' War tells a vastly more personal and nuanced story of national service and Australia's Vietnam War than that previously heard.

Most powerfully, it records with extraordinary intensity what it was like to be a bank clerk one day, and fighting for your life in the jungles of Vietnam soon afterwards.
Maestro John Monash: Australia's Greatest Citizen General

Maestro John Monash: Australia's Greatest Citizen General

Tim Fischer

$29.95

'A perfected modern battle plan is like nothing so much as a score for an orchestral composition, where the various arms and units are the instruments, and the tasks they perform are their respective musical phrases. Every individual unit must make its entry precisely at the proper moment and play its phrase in the general harmony.' - John Monash

Who was the most innovative general of World War One? For Tim Fischer, the answer has to be Australia's John Monash, a man who, for all the recognition he received in his lifetime and after, has arguably not been given his proper due within the major military histories of this conflict.

Fischer also asks why Monash was never promoted to Field Marshal, as international precedent suggested was most appropriate, pointing the finger primarily at the Australian prime minister from 1915 to 1923, Billy Hughes, within a wider context of establishment suspicion towards this son of a German Jewish migrant. Might not a posthumous granting of the Field Marshal rank now constitute a due reward for this great servant of the Australian nation, and a salutary reminder of his legacy?
The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse

The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse

Piu Marie Eatwell

$29.99

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The extraordinary story of the Druce-Portland affair, one of the most notorious, tangled and bizarre legal cases of the late Victorian and Edwardian eras.

In 1897 an elderly widow, Anna Maria Druce, made a strange request of the London Ecclesiastical Court: it was for the exhumation of the grave of her late father-in-law, T.C. Druce. Behind her application lay a sensational claim: that Druce had been none other than the eccentric and massively wealthy 5th Duke of Portland, and that the - now dead - Duke had faked the death of his alter ego.

When opened, Anna Maria contended, Druce's coffin would be found to be empty. And her children, therefore, were heirs to the Portland millions. The legal case that followed would last for ten years. Its eventual outcome revealed a dark underbelly of lies lurking beneath the genteel facade of late Victorian England.
The Queen, Her Lover and the Most Notorious Spy in History

The Queen, Her Lover and the Most Notorious Spy in History

Roland Perry

$32.99

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Long before her successful marriage to Prince Albert, Princess Victoria had an affair with the dashing Scottish 13th Lord Elphinstone. After the liaison was exposed, Elphinstone was banished to India, appointed Governor of Madras, which allowed Victoria's mother to engineer a royal union for her with Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg. After five years pining for Elphinstone, Victoria finally gave in and married Albert.

Despite a successful marriage, Victoria never forgot Elphinstone and after a decade in India he returned to her side as Lord-in-Waiting at Court. He only left her to take up the critical role of Governor of Bombay during the Indian Uprising of 1857. Elphinstone died soon after in June 1860 from a fever.

Many attempts were made to bury the memory of Lord Elphinstone, his long-running relationship with the monarch and his grand service for the Empire, but Victoria recorded it in letters to her confidant, her first- born, the Princess Royal: 'Vicky'.

The revealing correspondence, like a ticking time-bomb, sat in a German castle attic until 1945 when King George VI, Victoria's great-grandson, sent a courtier, MI5 operative Anthony Blunt, on seven special missions to gather the letters.
Elizabeth: Renaissance Prince

Elizabeth: Renaissance Prince

Lisa Hilton

$29.99

Lisa Hilton's majestic biography of The Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I, provides vibrant new insights into the monarch's compelling, enthralling life story. It is a book that challenges readers to reassess Elizabeth's reign and the colourful drama, scandal and intrigue to which it is always linked. Using new research from sources in France and Italy, Hilton presents a fresh interpretation of Elizabeth as a queen who saw herself primarily as a Renaissance prince. She delivers a new perspective on the most intimate details of her life and her attempts to fashion England into a Renaissance state. Elizabeth was not an exceptional woman, but an exceptional ruler, and Hilton redraws English history with this animated portrait of an astounding life. Her biography maps the dramatic journey that Elizabeth took from being a timid, meek newly-crowned queen to one of the most powerful and vivid monarchs ever to rule England.
The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians

The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians

Janice Hadlow ,  Martin Davidson

$49.99

An intensely moving account of George III's doomed attempt to create a happy, harmonious family, written with astonishing emotional force by a stunning new history writer. George III came to the throne in 1760 as a man with a mission. He wanted to be a new kind of king, one whose power was rooted in the affection and approval of his people. And he was determined to revolutionise his private life too - to show that a better man would, inevitably, make a better ruler. Above all he was determined to break with the extraordinarily dysfunctional home lives of his Hanoverian forbears. For his family, things would be different. And for a long time it seemed as if, against all the odds, his great family experiment was succeeding. His wife, Queen Charlotte, shared his sense of moral purpose, and together they did everything they could to raise their tribe of 13 young sons and daughters in a climate of loving attention. But as the children grew older, and their wishes and desires developed away from those of their father, it became harder to maintain the illusion of domestic harmony. The king's episodes of madness, in which he frequently expressed his repulsion for the queen, undermined the bedrock of their marriage; his disapproving distance from the bored and purposeless princes alienated them; and his determination to keep the princesses at home, protected from the potential horrors of the continental marriage market, left them lonely, bitter and resentful at their loveless, single state. At one level, 'The Strangest Family' is the story of how the best intentions can produce unhappy consequences. But the lives of the women in George's life - and of the princesses in particular - were shaped by a kind of undaunted emotional resilience that most modern women will recognise. However flawed George's great family experiment may have been, in the value the princesses placed on the ideals of domestic happiness, they were truly their father's daughters.
In These Times: Living in Britain Through Napoleon's Wars, 1793-1815

In These Times: Living in Britain Through Napoleon's Wars, 1793-1815

Jenny Uglow

$49.99

The sharply-observed characters and constant pricks of humour make this book seem almost as if Jane Austen had written a history of her own times. (Lucy Worsley The Times). We know the thrilling, terrible stories of the battles of the Napoleonic wars - but what of those left behind? The people on a Norfolk farm, in a Yorkshire mill, a Welsh iron foundry, an Irish village, a London bank or a Scottish mountain? The aristocrats and paupers, old and young, butchers and bakers and candlestick makers - how did the war touch their lives? Every part of Britain felt the long twenty years of war against the French: one in five families had people in the services and over 300,000 men died. As the years passed, so the bullish, flamboyant figure of Napoleon - Boney, the bogeyman - came to dominate so much that the whole long conflict was given his name. Jenny Uglow, the prize-winning author of The Lunar Men and Nature's Engraver, follows the gripping back-and-forth of the first global war, but turns the news upside down, seeing how it reached the people. Illustrated by the satires of Gillray, Rowlandson and the paintings of Turner and Constable, and combining the familiar voices of Jane Austen, Wordsworth, Scott and Byron with others lost in the crowd, In These Times delves into the archives to tell the moving story of how people lived and loved and sang and wrote, struggling through hard times and opening new horizons that would change their country for a century ahead.
Joan of Arc: A History

Joan of Arc: A History

Helen Castor

$39.99

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Fresh from telling the story of England's queens before Elizabeth in her bestseller She-Wolves, acclaimed historian and broadcaster Helen Castor tells the story of Joan of Arc as you have never read it before. Popular history at its best. Daily Telegraph

Helen Castor brings us afresh a gripping life of Joan of Arc. Instead of the icon, she gives us a living, breathing young woman; a roaring girl fighting the English, and taking sides in a bloody civil war that was tearing fifteenth century France apart. Here is a portrait of a 19-year-old peasant who hears voices from God; a teenager transformed into a warrior leading an army to victory, in an age that believed women should not fight. And it is also the story behind the myth we all know, a myth which began to take hold at her trial: that of the Maid of Orleans, the saviour of France, a young woman burned at the stake as a heretic, a woman who five hundred years later would be declared a saint. Joan and her world are brought vividly to life in this refreshing new take on the medieval world.

Helen Castor brings us to the heart of the action, to a woman and a country in turmoil, a world where no-one - not Joan herself, nor the people around her, princes, bishops, soldiers or peasants - knew what would happen next.
The Essence of Survival: How Jewish Doctors Survived Auschwitz

The Essence of Survival: How Jewish Doctors Survived Auschwitz

Ross Halpin

$20.00

How do victims of extreme adversity survive? How did Senator John McCain survive six years a prisoner of the Vietcong, approximately two of which were in a windowless room with a light on twenty four hours a day without little if any human contact? How did Jewish doctors survive Auschwitz for an average of twenty months? They witnessed and were subject to unspeakable cruelty, evil, suffering and humiliation. Some survivors of the Holocaust explained their escape by attributing the power of God, miracles and luck. However did luck, for example, allow a prisoner to survive two years in Auschwitz, particularly Birkenau the worst camp in human history, where death was only seconds away? Or for survival to take place must a structure be in place, as the author presents, to ensure there is a chance of survival. The author argues there are three pillars for survival - status (essential for life - food, clothing), personal traits (resiliance, self esteem) and defence mechanisms (altruism, humour, suppression, anticipation) all of which must work together - they are dependent on each other. The author has researched the life of five Jewish doctors who survived the camp and written biographies of their lives before during and after Auschwitz using them as models of survival.
Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer

Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer

Bettina Stangneth ,  Ruth Martin

$45.00

A total re-assessment of the life of Adolf Eichmann that reveals his activities and notoriety amongst a global network of National Socialists following the collapse of the Third Reich, and that permanently undermines Hannah Arendt's often-cited notion of the 'banality of evil'. Smuggled out of Europe after the collapse of Germany, Eichmann managed to live a peaceful and active exile in Argentina for years before his capture by the Mossad. Though once widely known by nicknames such as 'Manager of the Holocaust', he was able to portray himself, from the defendant's box in Jerusalem in 1960, as an overworked bureaucrat following orders - no more, he said, than 'just a small cog in Adolf Hitler's extermination machine'. How was this carefully crafted obfuscation possible? How did a principal architect of the Final Solution manage to disappear? And how had he occupied himself in hiding? Drawing upon an astounding trove of newly discovered documentation, Stangneth gives us a chilling portrait not of a reclusive, taciturn war criminal on the run, but of a highly skilled social manipulator with an inexhaustible ability to reinvent himself - an unrepentant murderer eager for acolytes to discuss past glories, who was vigorously planning future goals. 'Thrilling in its purpose ...there is no doubt of its importance: Stangneth's research, full of forgotten papers, lost interviews, and buried evidence, turns the conventional wisdom about Eichmann on its head.' Publishers Weekly 'A riveting reconstruction of a fanatical National Socialist's obdurate journey in exile and appalling second career in Argentina ...Stangneth masterfully sifts through the information ...A rigorously documented, essential work not only about Eichmann's masterly masquerade, but also about how we come to accept appearances as truth.' Kirkus Reviews
An Inconvenient Genocide: Who Now Remembers the Armenians?

An Inconvenient Genocide: Who Now Remembers the Armenians?

Geoffrey Robertson, QC

$34.99

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The most controversial issue left over from the First World War - was there an Armenian Genocide? - comes to a head on 24 April 2015, when Armenians throughout the world commemorate the centenary of the murder of 1.5 million - over half - of their people, at the hands of the Ottoman Turkish government.

Turkey continues to deny it ever happened - or if it did, that the killings were justified. This has become a vital international issue. Twenty national parliaments have voted to recognise the genocide, but Britain equivocates and President Obama is torn between Congress, which wants recognition, and the US military, afraid of alienating an important NATO ally. In Australia three state governments have recognised the genocide (despite threats to ban their MPs from Gallipoli), but the Abbott government has told the Turks that Australia does not.

Geoffrey Robertson QC despises this mendacity. His book proves beyond reasonable doubt that the horrific events of 1915 - witnessed by Australian POWs - constituted the crime against humanity that is known today as genocide.  In this book he explains how democratic countries can combat genocide denial without denying free speech, and makes a major contribution to understanding and preventing this worst of all crimes. His renowned powers of advocacy are on full display, as he condemns all those - from Sri Lanka to the Sudan, from Old Anatolia to modern Gaza - who try to justify the mass murder of children and civilians in the name of military necessity.
Midnight at the Pera Palace: The Birth of Modern Istanbul

Midnight at the Pera Palace: The Birth of Modern Istanbul

Charles King

$35.95

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When the Ottoman Empire collapsed, so many spies mingled in the lobby of Istanbul's Pera Palace Hotel that the manager put up a sign asking them to relinquish seats to paying guests. As the multi-ethnic empire became a Turkish republic, Russian emigres sold family heirlooms, an African American impresario founded a jazz club and Miss Turkey became the first Muslim beauty queen.

Turkey's president Kemal Ataturk, Muslim feminist Halide Edip, the exiled Leon Trotsky and the future Pope John XXIII fought for new visions of human freedom. During the Second World War, German intellectuals ran from the Nazis while Jewish activists spirited refugees out of occupied Europe. This pioneering portrait of urban reinvention re-creates an era when an ancient city became a global crossroads - a moment when Europe's closest Muslim metropolis became its vital port of refuge.
Fire and Light: How the Enlightenment Transformed Our World

Fire and Light: How the Enlightenment Transformed Our World

James MacGregor Burns

$22.99

In this engaging, provocative history, James MacGregor Burns brilliantly illuminates the two-hundred-year conflagration of the Enlightenment, when audacious questions and astonishing ideas tore across Europe and the New World, transforming thought, overturning governments, and inspiring visionary political experiments. Fire and Light brings to vivid life the galaxy of revolutionary leaders of thought and action who, armed with a new sense of human possibility, driven by a hunger for change, created the modern world. Burns discovers the origins of a distinctive American Enlightenment in men like Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison, and their early encounters with incendiary European ideas about liberty and equality. It was these thinker-activists who framed the United States as a grand and continuing experiment in Enlightenment principles. Today the same questions Enlightenment thinkers grappled with have taken on new urgency around the world: in the turmoil of the Arab Spring, in the former Soviet Union, and China, as well as in the United States itself. What should a nation be? What should citizens expect from their government? Who should lead and how can leadership be made both effective and accountable? What is happiness, and what can the state contribute to it? Burns's exploration of the ideals and arguments that formed the bedrock of our modern world shines a new light on these ever-important questions.
Stalin, Volume 1: Paradoxes of Power 1878-1928

Stalin, Volume 1: Paradoxes of Power 1878-1928

Stephen Kotkin

$59.95

A magnificent new biography that revolutionises our understanding of Stalin and his world.

It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler’s son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivisation of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts.

Where did such power come from?  In Stalin, Stephen Kotkin offers a biography that, at long last, is equal to this shrewd, sociopathic, charismatic dictator in all his dimensions. The character of Stalin emerges as both astute and blinkered, cynical and true believing, people oriented and vicious, canny enough to see through people but prone to nonsensical beliefs. We see a man inclined to despotism who could be utterly charming, a pragmatic ideologue, a leader who obsessed over slights yet was a precocious geostrategic thinker—unique among Bolsheviks—and yet who made egregious strategic blunders. Through it all, we see Stalin’s unflinching persistence, his sheer force of will—perhaps the ultimate key to understanding his indelible mark on history.

Stalin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime’s inner geography of power, bringing to the fore fresh materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin’s psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin’s near paranoia was fundamentally political, and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution’s structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin demonstrates the impossibility of understanding Stalin’s momentous decisions outside of the context of the tragic history of imperial Russia.

The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement, a work that recasts the way we think about the Soviet Union, revolution, dictatorship, the twentieth century, and indeed the art of history itself.
Abducting a General: The Kreipe Operation and SOE in Crete

Abducting a General: The Kreipe Operation and SOE in Crete

Patrick Leigh Fermor

$32.99

One of the greatest feats in Patrick Leigh Fermor's remarkable life was the kidnapping of General Kreipe, the German commander in Crete, on 26 April 1944. He and Captain Billy Moss hatched a daring plan to abduct the general, while ensuring that no reprisals were taken against the Cretan population. Dressed as German military police, they stopped and took control of Kreipe's car, drove through twenty-two German checkpoints, then succeeded in hiding from the German army before finally being picked up on a beach in the south of the island and transported to safety in Egypt on 14 May. Abducting a General is Leigh Fermor's own account of the kidnap, published for the first time. Written in his inimitable prose, and introduced by acclaimed SOE historian Professor Roderick Bailey, it is a glorious first-hand account of one of the great adventures of the Second World War. Also included in this book are Leigh Fermor's intelligence reports, sent from caves deep within Crete yet still retaining his remarkable prose skills, which bring the immediacy of SOE operations vividly alive, as well as the peril which the SOE and Resistance were operating under; and a guide to the journey that Kreipe was taken on from the abandonment of his car to the embarkation site so that the modern visitor can relive this extraordinary event.
If This is A Woman: Inside Ravensbruck - Hitler's Concentration Camp For Women

If This is A Woman: Inside Ravensbruck - Hitler's Concentration Camp For Women

Sarah Helm

$32.99

Ravensbruck Concentration Camp is the worst atrocity ever committed solely against women, but today the name of the camp is barely known. From Ravensbruck's earliest days, when Himmler offered his own land for the camp, this book follows every stage of the story through to the camp's liberation by the Red Army. Based on meticulous research, If This Is A Woman lays bare the systematic brutalisation of mothers, pregnant women, children and babies. It details the extremes of cruelty enacted by SS guards and of suffering experienced by the prisoners, who were themselves reduced to inhuman acts. But at the heart of If This Is A Woman are stories of heroism and survival. The narrative centres on the experiences of women - from the farmer's wife to the aristocratic intellectual - who had the resilience, the mental and physcial strength to withstand their ordeal and to emerge from the camp alive.
Death by Mustard Gas: How Military Secrecy and Lost Weapons Can Kill

Death by Mustard Gas: How Military Secrecy and Lost Weapons Can Kill

Geoff Plunkett

$34.99

In 1943 a top secret consignment of chemical weapons, including deadly mustard gas, arrived in Australia by ship. But there was a problem - it was leaking. Military authorities quickly realised this but, in the interests of secrecy, sent unprotected and unsuspecting wharf labourers into a lethal environment. The result was catastrophic: permanent disability and death.

This shocking narrative includes accounts of official deceit, intimidation of gassed labourers and denial of natural justice. The truth, buried in classified documents and the testimony of the few survivors, is that human life was sacrificed for the sake of secrecy. Almost 70 years after war stocks of chemical weapons were apparently totally destroyed, mustard gas is still present on the Australian mainland, in her oceans and along her coastal fringed.

The total destruction of chemical stocks is simply another military assumption. The truth is that these deadly weapons were incompletely destroyed, buried or simply lost. Many retain their effectiveness despite the passing of time, a fact that cost one man his life and saw staff and children at a school badly burned. Mustard gas weapons have been retrieved as recently as 2012 and more may lie in shallow graves waiting to be uncovered.

This is a very real lesson for the military today.
The Making of Home

The Making of Home

Judith Flanders

$45.00

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The idea that 'home' is a special place, a separate place, a place where we can be our true selves, is so obvious to us today that we barely pause to think about it. But, as Judith Flanders shows in her fascinating new book, 'home' is a relatively new idea. When in 1900 Dorothy assured the citizens of Oz that 'There is no place like home', she was expressing a view that was the climax of 300 years of change.

In The Making of Home, Flanders traces the evolution of the house from the sixteenth to the early twentieth century across northern Europe and America, and shows how the 'homes' we know today bear only a faint resemblance to 'homes' though history. Along the way she investigates the development of ordinary household items - from cutlery, chairs and curtains, to the fitted kitchen, plumbing and windows - while also dismantling many domestic myths.
The Edge of the World: How the North Sea Made Us Who We are

The Edge of the World: How the North Sea Made Us Who We are

Michael Pye

$49.99

This is a story of saints and spies, of fishermen and pirates, traders and marauders - and of how their wild and daring journeys across the North Sea built the world we know.

When the Roman Empire retreated, northern Europe was a barbarian outpost at the very edge of everything. A thousand years later, it was the heart of global empires and the home of science, art, enlightenment and money. We owe this transformation to the tides and storms of the North Sea. The water was dangerous, but it was far easier than struggling over land; so it was the sea that brought people together. Boats carried food and raw materials, but also new ideas and information. The seafarers raided, ruined and killed, but they also settled and coupled. With them they brought new tastes and technologies - books, clothes, manners, paintings and machines.  In this dazzling historical adventure, we return to a time that is largely forgotten and watch as the modern world is born.

We see the spread of money and how it paved the way for science. We see how plague terrorised even the rich and transformed daily life for the poor. We watch as the climate changed and coastlines shifted, people adapted and towns flourished. We see the arrival of the first politicians, artists, lawyers: citizens.

From Viking raiders to Mongol hordes, Frisian fishermen to Hanseatic hustlers, travelling as far west as America and as far east as Byzantium, we see how the life and traffic of the seas changed everything. Drawing on an astonishing breadth of learning and packed with human stories and revelations, this is the epic drama of how we came to be who we are.
World Order: Reflections on the Character of Nations and the Course of History

World Order: Reflections on the Character of Nations and the Course of History

Henry A. Kissinger

$49.99

In World Order, Henry Kissinger - one of the leading practitioners of world diplomacy and author of On China - makes his monumental investigation into the 'tectonic plates' of global history and state relations.

World Order is the summation of Henry Kissinger's thinking about history, strategy and statecraft. As if taking a perspective from far above the globe, it examines the great tectonic plates of history and the motivations of nations, explaining the attitudes that states and empires have taken to the rest of the world from the formation of Europe to our own times. Kissinger identifies four great 'world orders' in history - the European, Islamic, Chinese and American.

Since the end of Charlemagne's empire, and especially since the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, Europeans have striven for balance in international affairs, first in their own continent and then globally. Islamic states have looked to their destined expansion over regions populated by unbelievers, a position exemplified today by Iran under the ayatollahs. For over 2000 years the Chinese have seen 'all under Heaven' as being tributary to the Chinese Emperor.

America views itself as a 'city on a hill', a beacon to the world, whose values have universal validity. How have these attitudes evolved and how have they shaped the histories of their nations, regions, and the rest of the world? What has happened when they have come into contact with each other? How have they balanced legitimacy and power at different times? What is the condition of each in our contemporary world, and how are they shaping relations between states now? To answer these questions Henry Kissinger draws upon a lifetime's historical study and unmatched experience as a world statesman. His account is shot through with observations about how historical change takes place, how some leaders shape their times and others fail to do so, and how far states can stray from the ideas which define them.

World Order is a masterpiece of narrative, analysis and portraits of great historical actors that only Henry Kissinger could have written.

World Order: Reflections on the Character of Nations and the Course of History by Henry A. Kissinger at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
Attila the Hun

Attila the Hun

Nic Fields ,  Steve Noon

$33.00  $29.70

One of the most powerful men in late antiquity, Attila's peerless Hunnic empire stretched from the Ural to the Rhine river. In a series of epic campaigns dating from the AD 430s until his death in AD 453, he ravaged first the Eastern and later the Western Roman Empire, invading Italy in AD 452 and threatening Rome itself. Lavishly illustrated, this new analysis of his military achievements examines how Attila was able to sweep across Europe, the tactics and innovations he employed and the major battles he faced, including one of his few major setbacks, the defeat at the battle of Chalons in AD 451.
Food and Drink in Antiquity: A Sourcebook: Readings from the Graeco-Roman World

Food and Drink in Antiquity: A Sourcebook: Readings from the Graeco-Roman World

John F. Donahue

$45.99

Amid growing interest in food and drink as an academic discipline in recent years, Food and Drink in Antiquity emerges as the only source to provide insight into eating and drinking by focusing on what the ancients themselves actually had to say about this important topic. This thorough and varied sourcebook offers a thematic approach to eating and drinking in antiquity and is a unique asset to any course on food and foodways. The chronological scope of the material extends from Greece of the Eighth Century BCE to the Late Roman Empire of the Fourth Century CE. Each thematic chapter consists of an introduction along with a concluding bibliography of suggested readings. The excerpts themselves, rendered in clear and readable English that remains faithful to the original Latin or Greek, are set in their proper social and historical context, with the author of each passage fully identified. This volume provides a compilation of essential source material for classics courses focusing on ancient social history, for introductory courses on the history of food and drink, as well as for those offerings with a strong sociological or anthropological approach. A wide range of evidence, drawing upon literary, inscriptional, legal and religious testimony, makes Food and Drink in Antiquity an essential source and one that is particularly well suited to the interdisciplinary focus of modern food studies. The chronological scope of the excerpts extends from Homer in the Eighth Century BCE to the Roman emperor Constantine in the Fourth Century CE. Each thematic chapter consists of an introduction along with a bibliography of suggested readings. Translated excerpts are then presented accompanied by an explanatory background paragraph identifying the author and context of each passage. A wide range of evidence is included, the majority is literary, but also includes inscriptional, legal and religious, making this volume the essential source for the relevant food and classics courses.
Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble

Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble

Marilyn Johnson

$39.99

Finding Life in RuinsJump into a battered Indiana Jones-style Jeep with the intrepid Marilyn Johnson and head down bone-rattling roads in search of those who dig up the past. Johnson, the author of two acclaimed books about quirky subcultures-The Dead Beat (about obituary writers) and This Book Is Overdue! (about librarians)-brings her irrepressible wit and curiosity to bear on yet another strange world, that of archaeologists. Who chooses to work in ruins? What's the allure of sifting through layers of dirt under a hot sun? Why do archaeologists care so passionately about what's dead and buried-and why should we?Johnson tracks archaeologists around the globe from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean, from Newport, Rhode Island to Machu Picchu. She digs alongside experts on an eighteenth-century sugar plantation and in a first-century temple to Apollo. She hunts for bodies with forensics archaeologists in the vast and creepy Pine Barrens of New Jersey, drinks beer with an archaeologist of ancient beverages, and makes stone tools like a caveman. By turns amusing and profound, Lives in Ruins and its wild cast of characters find new ways to consider what is worth salvaging from our past.Archaeologists are driven by the love of history and the race to secure its evidence ahead of floods and bombs, looters and thieves, and before the bulldozers move in. Why spend your life in ruins? To uncover our hidden stories before they disappear.
Byzantium and the Crusades

Byzantium and the Crusades

Jonathan Harris

$45.99

This new edition of Byzantium and the Crusades provides a fully-revised and updated version of Jonathan Harris's landmark text in the field of Byzantine and crusader history. The book offers a chronological exploration of Byzantium and the outlook of its rulers during the time of the Crusades. It argues that one of the main keys to Byzantine interaction with Western Europe, the Crusades and the crusader states can be found in the nature of the Byzantine Empire and the ideology which underpinned it, rather than in any generalised hostility between the peoples. Taking recent scholarship into account, this new edition includes an updated notes section and bibliography, as well as significant additions to the text: - New material on the role of religious differences after 1100 - A detailed discussion of economic, social and religious changes that took place in 12th-century Byzantine relations with the west - In-depth coverage of Byzantium and the Crusades during the 13th century - New maps, illustrations, genealogical tables and a timeline of key dates Byzantium and the Crusades is an important contribution to the historiography by a major scholar in the field that should be read by anyone interested in Byzantine and crusader history.
The Crusader States

The Crusader States

Malcolm Barber

$49.95

When the armies of the First Crusade wrested Jerusalem from control of the Fatimids of Egypt in 1099, they believed their victory was an evident sign of God's favour. It was, therefore, incumbent upon them to fulfill what they understood to be God's plan: to reestablish Christian control of Syria and Palestine. This book is devoted to the resulting settlements, the crusader states, that developed around the eastern shores of the Mediterranean and survived until Richard the Lionheart's departure in 1192. Focusing on Jerusalem, Antioch, Tripoli and Edessa, Malcolm Barber vividly reconstructs the crusaders' arduous process of establishing and protecting their settlements, and the simultaneous struggle of vanquished inhabitants to adapt to life alongside their conquerors. Rich with colorful accounts of major military campaigns, the book goes much deeper, exploring in detail the culture of the crusader states - the complex indigenous inheritance; the architecture; the political, legal and economic institutions; the ecclesiastical framework through which the crusaders perceived the world; the origins of the Knights Templar and the Hospitallers; and more. With the zest of a scholar pursuing a lifelong interest, Barber presents a complete narrative and cultural history of the crusader states while setting a new standard for the term total history . It was selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 in the Western Europe Category.
Ancient Egyptian Art and Architecture: A Very Short Introduction

Ancient Egyptian Art and Architecture: A Very Short Introduction

Christina Riggs

$15.95

From Berlin to Boston, and St Petersburg to Sydney, ancient Egyptian art fills the galleries of some of the world's greatest museums, while the architecture of Egyptian temples and pyramids has attracted tourists to Egypt for centuries. But what did Egyptian art and architecture mean to the people who first made and used it - and why has it had such an enduring appeal? In this Very Short Introduction, Christina Riggs explores the visual arts produced in Egypt over a span of some 4,000 years. The stories behind these objects and buildings have much to tell us about how people in ancient Egypt lived their lives in relation to each other, the natural environment, and the world of the gods. Demonstrating how ancient Egypt has fascinated Western audiences over the centuries with its impressive pyramids, eerie mummies, and distinctive visual style, Riggs considers the relationship between ancient Egypt and the modern world. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
The Tomb of Tutankhamun: Search, Discovery and Clearance of the Antechamber

The Tomb of Tutankhamun: Search, Discovery and Clearance of the Antechamber

Howard Carter ,  A. C. Mace

$29.99

The discovery of the resting place of the great Egyptian King Tutankhamun [Tut.ankh.Amen] in November 1922 by Howard Carter and the fifth Earl of Carnarvon was the greatest archaeological find the world had ever seen. Despite its plundering by thieves in antiquity, the burial of the king lay intact with its nest of coffins and funerary shrines, surrounded by a mass of burial equipment arranged in three peripheral chambers. Published in 1923, this is the first volume of Carter's trilogy, describing the years of frustration in search of the burial site, the triumph of its eventual discovery and the long, painstaking process of exploring and cataloguing its treasures. Containing over 100 images from the site itself, this volume also includes Carter's short article, 'The Tomb of the Bird,' which inadvertently spawned the legend of the great curse of Tutankhamun's tomb.
The Tomb of Tutankhamun: The Burial Chamber

The Tomb of Tutankhamun: The Burial Chamber

Howard Carter

$29.99

The discovery of the resting place of the great Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun [Tut.ankh.Amen] in November 1922 by Howard Carter and the fifth Earl of Carnarvon was the greatest archaeological find the world had ever seen. Despite its plundering by thieves in antiquity, the burial of the king lay intact with its nest of coffins and funerary shrines, surrounded by a mass of burial equipment arranged in three peripheral chambers. Following on from the first volume's account of the search for and initial discovery of the team, in the second volume Howard Carter recounts the discovery of the king's burial chamber: the breakthrough to the four protective shrines, the revelation of the quartz-sandstone sarcophagus, the king's three coffins (his own of pure gold) and the bejewelled mummy of the Pharaoh himself. Now available in the Bloomsbury Revelations series, the book includes over 150 photographs of the treasures that lay within the great burial chamber of Tutankhamun.
The Tomb of Tutankhamun: The Annexe and Treasury

The Tomb of Tutankhamun: The Annexe and Treasury

Howard Carter

$29.99

The discovery of the resting place of the great Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun [Tut.ankh.Amen] in November 1922 by Howard Carter and the fifth Earl of Carnarvon was the greatest archaeological find the world had ever seen. Despite its plundering by thieves in antiquity, the burial of the king lay intact with its nest of coffins and funerary shrines, surrounded by a mass of burial equipment arranged in three peripheral chambers. After the long search for the tomb and its initial discovery and excavation (volume 1), after the discovery of the king's resting place and body (volume 2), the third and final volume of Howard Carter's account sees him reach the treasury, full of the incredible riches that the Pharaoh had sort to take with him to the world beyond and which had seemed lost to time before Carter's historic discovery. Now available in the Bloomsbury Revelations series, the book includes over 150 photographs of the treasury and its contents.
Sparta at War: Strategy, Tactics and Campaigns, 950-362 BC

Sparta at War: Strategy, Tactics and Campaigns, 950-362 BC

Dr Scott M. Rusch

$44.99

During the eighth century bc, Sparta became one of the leading cities of ancient Greece, conquering the southern Peloponnese, and from the mid-sixth century bc until the mid-fourth, Sparta became a military power of recognized importance. For almost two centuries the massed Spartan army remained unbeaten in the field. Spartan officers also commanded with great success armies of mercenaries or coalition allies, as well as fleets of war galleys. Although it is the stand of the Three Hundred at Thermopylae that has earned Sparta undying fame, it was her victories over both Persian invaders and the armies and navies of Greek rivals that upheld her position of leadership in Greece. Even a steady decline in Spartiate numbers, aggravated by a terrible earthquake in 464 bc, failed to end their dominance. Only when the Thebans learned how to defeat the massed Spartan army in pitched battle was Sparta toppled from her position of primacy. Scott Rusch examines what is known of the history of Sparta, from the settlement of the city to her defeat at Theban hands, focusing upon military campaigns and the strategic circumstances that drove them. Rusch offers fresh perspectives on important questions of Spartan history, and illuminate some of antiquity's most notable campaigns.
Edward III and the Triumph of England: The Battle of Crecy and the Company of the Garter

Edward III and the Triumph of England: The Battle of Crecy and the Company of the Garter

Richard Barber

$29.99

The destruction of the French army at Crecy in 1346 and the subsequent siege and capture of Calais marked a new era in European history. The most powerful, glamorous and respected of all western monarchies had been completely humiliated by England, a country long viewed either as a chaotic backwater or a mere French satellite. The young Edward III's triumph would launch both countries, as we now know, into a grim cycle of some 90 years of further fighting ending with English defeat, but after Crecy anything seemed possible - Edward's claim to be King of France could be pressed home and, in any event, enormous rewards of land, treasure and prestige were available both to the king and to the close companions who had made the victory possible. It was to enshrine this moment that Edward created one of the most famous of all knightly orders, the Company of the Garter. Barber writes about both the great campaigns and the individuals who formed the original membership of the Company - and through their biographies makes the period tangible and fascinating. This is a book about knighthood, battle tactics and grand strategy, but it is also about fashion, literature and the privates lives of everyone from queens to freebooters. Barber's book is a remarkable achievement - but also an extremely enjoyable one.
Res Gestae Saxonicae (Deeds of the Saxons)

Res Gestae Saxonicae (Deeds of the Saxons)

Bernard S. Bachrach ,  David S. Bachrach

$46.95

Widukind, a monk at the prominent monastery of Corvey in Saxony during the middle third of the tenth century, is known to posterity through his Res gestae Saxonicae, an exceptionally rich account of the Saxon people and the reigns of the first two rulers of the Ottonian dynasty, Henry I (919-936) and Otto I (936-973). Widukind, likely of noble birth, received a thorough education in both biblical and classical texts. When writing the Gestae, Widukind also had available the extensive library at Corvey, with its large collection of ancient texts as well as numerous works from the eighth and ninth centuries. Widukind drew on these, and even more contemporary written sources to complement and inform orally transmitted information that he received from many sources including people closely associated with the Ottonian royal court. Widukind wrote the Res gestae from the 950s to the 970s, incorporating additional material as he obtained further information and as major new events took place in the German kingdom and beyond. After providing a historical background for the Saxon people Widukind devotes most of his attention to the political and military affairs of the German kingdom, concentrating heavily on affairs of the royal court. Widukind provides information that can be found in no other source. His close relationship with the royal court enabled him to provide an insider's view of the people and events that shaped the political and military history of the most powerful kingdom in Europe. As a consequence, the Res gestae is an indispensable account for the history of the German kingdom during the tenth century. Bernard S. Bachrach and David Bachrach provide an introduction to the text that contextualizes the author, his historical methods, and the information that he provides. They draw on a large number of other written sources of information, including both narrative works and the political, economic, social, and military affairs of the day, and provide an extensive apparatus of notes.
Mamluk 'Askari 1250-1517

Mamluk 'Askari 1250-1517

David Nicolle ,  Peter Dennis

$24.99

New archaeological material and research underpins this extensive, detailed and beautifully illustrated account of the famous Mamluk Askars who are credited with finally defeating and expelling the Crusaders, halting the Mongol invasion of the Islamic Middle East, and facing down Tamerlane. Probably the ultimate professional soldiers of the medieval period they were supposedly recruited as adolescent slaves, though recent research has begun to undermine this oversimplified interpretation of what has been called the Mamluk phenomenon .
The Middle Ages: A Very Short Introduction

The Middle Ages: A Very Short Introduction

Miri Rubin

$15.95

The Middle Ages is a term coined around 1450 to describe a thousand years of European History. In this Very Short Introduction, Miri Rubin provides an exploration of the variety, change, dynamism, and sheer complexity that the period covers. From the provinces of the Roman Empire, which became Barbarian kingdoms after c.450-650, to the northern and eastern regions that became increasingly integrated into Europe, Rubin explores the emergence of a truly global system of communication, conquest, and trade by the end of the era. Presenting an insight into the challenges of life in Europe between 500-1500 - at all levels of society - Rubin looks at kingship and family, agriculture and trade, groups and individuals. Conveying the variety of European experiences, while providing a sense of the communication, cooperation, and shared values of the pervasive Christian culture, Rubin looks at the legacies they left behind. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Roman Women: The Women Who Influenced the History of Rome

Roman Women: The Women Who Influenced the History of Rome

Paul Chrystal

$34.99

Generally women in ancient Rome led modest, unobtrusive and restricted lives - apart, that is, from a number who broke the mould.Using historical sources ( Livy, Suetonius, et al) as well as numismatic and sculptural evidence, Rome Women details the lives of Rome's most influential women to examine, uniquely, what effect they had on contemporary politics, and or how far they and their reputations and actions reflected and affected women generally in Roman society.No existing book provides biographies of these extraordinary women and then examines the contemporary and later socio-political effects they had. Existing titles look at the bad women - notably the wives and mothers of emperors; Rome Women does that but also, uniquely, examines the good women too: the icons and the role models. No other book puts all if this in a socio-political context to form valuable conclusions about the effect these women had on Roman politics and society down the years. Good women such as Lucretia and Cornelia and the loyal wives described by Tacitus and Pliny are covered as are less virtuous but sophisticated and permissive women such as Clodia, Sempronia, Cynthia and Delia. The bad but politically significant are represented by Fulvia and Cleopatra (not a Roman but embroiled in things Roman) and many of the wives and daughter of the Emperors.
Wars and Battles of the Roman Republic: The Military, Political and Social Fallout

Wars and Battles of the Roman Republic: The Military, Political and Social Fallout

Paul Chrystal

$34.99

Wars and Battles of the Roman Republic: The Military, Political and Social Fallout covers the decisive battles from the founding of Rome in 753 BC to the Battle of Actium in 28 BC, taking in, for example, legendary battles such as 497 BC - Battle of Lake Regillus; 482 BC - Battle of Antium; 480 BC - Battle of Veii; the Samnite Wars; 261-146 BC - the three Punic Wars against Carthage (Hannibal and Hasdrubal); 191 BC - Battle of Thermpolyae; Battle of Corinth; the Macedonian wars; 89 BC - the Social Wars; 85 BC - the Mithridatic Wars; the Civil Wars; 72 BC - the Spartacus Revolt; Battle of Carrhae; 48 BC - Battle of Pharsalus; 42 BC Battles of Philippi; 41 BC - Battle of Perugia; and 31 - BC Battle of Actium (Cleopatra). Wars and Battles of the Roman Republic: The Military, Political and Social Fallout examines events leading up to these conflicts and the social and political consequences as well as the military aspects. Each had wide-ranging consequences leading Rome from kingdom to republic, from local power to international superpower, and from republic to empire.It makes full use of the accounts of historians and political writers, contemporary and otherwise, including Livy, Sallust, Caesar, Cicero, Polybius, Plutarch and Dio including sculptural and architectural evidence. The unique feature of the book is its focus on the causes of the wars and battles and the socio-political consequences of each for Rome and its allies.
The Roman Empire: Economy, Society and Culture

The Roman Empire: Economy, Society and Culture

Peter Garnsey ,  Richard Saller

$39.99

During the Principate (roughly from 27 BC to AD 235), when the empire reached its maximum extent, Roman society and culture were radically transformed. But how was the vast territory of the empire controlled? Did the demands of central government stimulate economic growth or endanger survival? What forces of cohesion operated to balance the social and economic inequalities and high mortality rates? How did the official religion react in the face of the diffusion of alien cults and the emergence of Christianity? These are some of the many questions posed here, in an expanded edition of the original, pathbreaking account of the society, economy and culture of the Roman empire. As an integrated study of the life and outlook of the ordinary inhabitants of the Roman world, it deepens our understanding of the underlying factors in this important formative period of world history. Additions to the second edition include an introductory chapter which sets the scene and explores the consequences for government and the governing classes of the replacement of the Republic by the rule of emperors. A second extra chapter assesses how far Rome's subjects resisted her hegemony. Addenda to the chapters throughout offer up-to-date bibliography and point to new evidence and approaches which have enlivened Roman history in recent decades.
The Novella Project II - Forgotten Stories

The Novella Project II - Forgotten Stories

Julianne Schultz

$27.99

The Novella Project II - Forgotten Stories: Griffith REVIEW 46 explores in fiction forgotten stories with a historical dimension, delving beyond the handful of iconic tales that have grown threadbare. The massive migration of the past generation is not only changing Australia but reviving the need to find new ways to tell forgotten stories. Stories that are part of a shared, but often overlooked, cultural heritage of this country. Forgotten Stories will redefine what it means to be Australian in the twenty-first century. A sea-change couple dig into the past of their newly adopted small town, and discover a secret better left undisturbed in a masterful story by Cate Kennedy. Tensions simmer between Afghan cameleers, Aborigines and white Australians at the time of Federation in a story by John Kinsella. A newly-arrived Japanese family remembers World War II and confronts 1960s Australia's narratives of themselves in a novella by Masako Fukui. Emma Hardman's fourteen-year-old Margaret gets more than she bargains for as she heads into the country to help her sister in flu-ravaged post-WWI Australia. Megan McGrath's moving story returns the reader to Australia's recent whaling past; it is a story about the mistakes we continue to make, about the crippling power of love and the grip of small towns.
Education and the Arts: Creativity in the Promised New Order

Education and the Arts: Creativity in the Promised New Order

Naomi Edwards ,  Meg Upton

$15.99

As the National Curriculum gears up to offer fresh opportunities to teachers and students, our arts institutions are considering what a national arts curriculum will mean for them. Arts and education strategists Naomi Edwards and Meg Upton have been studying the new landscape and urge a radical rethink of arts companies' education programs and their purpose. At present they are largely aimed at performing required works and increasing audiences. The opportunity is there to reposition their company at the centre of innovation and social value by placing the participation of young people at the core of their business.
Homelessness in Australia

Homelessness in Australia

Chris Chamberlain ,  Guy Johnson ,  Shelley Mallett ,  Catherine Robinson

$69.99

The first book to explore the complexities of homelessness in Australia - and the future policies likely to improve the situation. What is homelessness? Who counts as homeless? Whose responsibility is homelessness? In Homelessness in Australia experts in the sector offer timely insights into the history, causes and extent of homelessness in this country - and the future policy directions most likely to have a positive impact. Covering issues such as gender, Indigenous homelessness, family violence, young people and the effects of trauma, the book aims to improve both the understanding of the complexities involved and the outcomes for those experiencing homelessness.
Emerging Africa: How the Global Economy's 'Last Frontier' Can Prosper and Matter

Emerging Africa: How the Global Economy's 'Last Frontier' Can Prosper and Matter

Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu

$22.99

A rare and timely intervention from Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu, Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria, on development in Africa. To many, Africa is the new frontier. As the West lies battered by financial crisis, Africa is seen as offering limitless opportunities for wealth creation in the march of globalization. But what is Africa to today's Africans? Are its economies truly on the rise? And what is its likely future? In this pioneering book, leading international strategist Kingsley Moghalu challenges conventional wisdoms about Africa's quest for growth. Drawing on philosophy, economics and strategy, he ranges from capitalism to technological innovation, finance to foreign investment, and from human capital to world trade to offer a new vision of transformation. Ultimately he demonstrates how Africa's progress in the twenty-first century will require nothing short of the reinvention of the African mindset. Africans seriously analyzing Africa's opportunities are all too rare. Kingsley Moghalu writes with insight and authority . (Paul Collier). Savvy ...distinguished . (Mark Malloch-Brown). Unique in the depth of its insight, the ambition of its scope, and the clarity of its argument. Kingsley Moghalu brings a remarkable intellect and his vast experience to this tour de force on Africa's economic transformation. This is a truly weighty contribution to understanding Africa's developmental dilemma and its quest for a more prosperous future . (Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala). Insightful and analytical ...sheds instructive light on Africa's position in the world. It is a testament to the palpable optimism that encompasses Africa while frankly addressing the myriad challenges that lie ahead for its economic transformation . (Shashi Tharoor). Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu is Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria. He was the Founder and CEO of Sogato Strategies S.A., a global strategy and risk management consulting firm in Geneva, Switzerland. He has previously worked for the United Nations for 17 years in strategic planning, legal, development finance and executive management. His previous books include Global Justice and Rwanda's Genocide.
The Bright Continent: Breaking Rules and Making Change in Modern Africa

The Bright Continent: Breaking Rules and Making Change in Modern Africa

Dayo Olapade

$29.99

For years Dayo Olopade struggled to reconcile the media's image of Africa as warring, impoverished and pitiful with the Africa she's known since childhood: resilient, joyful and innovative, a continent of impassioned community leaders. She reports first-hand on the explosion of commercial opportunities and technological innovations that are improving outcomes for families, children and the environment. The Bright Continent joins the conversation started by authors such as Jeffrey Sachs, Nicholas Kristof and Dambisa Moyo. Olopade rejects stale and ineffectual foreign interventions, arguing that the increasingly globalised challenges the continent faces can and must be addressed with the tools Africans are already using to solve these problems themselves. In many ways, Africa's model of doing more with less - of working around dysfunctional institutions to establish strong informal networks - can be a powerful model for the rest of the world. Behind the dire headlines, Olopade discovers many convincing rays of hope.
Emperor Haile Selassie

Emperor Haile Selassie

Bereket Habte Selassie

$29.95

Emperor Haile Selassie was an iconic figure of the twentieth century, a progressive monarch who ruled Ethiopia from 1916 to 1974. This book, written by a former state official who served in a number of important positions in Selassie's government, tells both the story of the emperor's life and the story of modern Ethiopia. After a struggle for the throne in 1916, the young Selassie emerged first as regent and then as supreme leader of Ethiopia. Over the course of his nearly six-decade rule, the emperor abolished slavery, introduced constitutional reform, and expanded educational opportunity. The Italian invasion of Ethiopia in the 1930s led to a five-year exile in England, from which he returned in time to lead his country through World War II. Selassie was also instrumental in the founding of the Organization of African Unity in 1963, but he fell short of the ultimate goal of a promised democracy in Ethiopia. The corruption that grew under his absolute rule, as well as his seeming indifference to the famine that gripped Ethiopia in the 1970s, led finally to his overthrow by the armed forces that he had created. Haile Selassie was an enlightened monarch in many ways, but also a man with flaws like any other. This short biography is a sensitive portrayal of Selassie as both emperor and man, by one who knew him well.
Ancient Aliens on Mars

Ancient Aliens on Mars

Mike Bara

$29.99

In ANCIENT ALIENS ON MARS II, New York Times bestselling author, Mike Bara, returns the reader to Mars to examine the enduring mysteries of the Red Planet. Building on the case made in Ancient Aliens on Mars and, using data acquired from sophisticated new scientific instruments like the Mars Odyssey THEMIS infrared imager, Bara shows that the region of Cydonia overlays a vast underground city full of enormous structures and devices that may still be operating. He peels back the layers of mystery to show images of tunnel systems, temples and ruins and exposes the sophisticated NASA conspiracy designed to hide them and discredit the researchers that discovered these exotic ruins. Bara, also, tackles the enigma of Mars' hollowed out moon Phobos and exposes evidence from over 30 years of observations that it is artificial. Long-held myths about Mars, including claims that it is protected by a sophisticated UFO defense system, are examined and illuminated. Data from the Mars rovers Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity is examined; everything from fossilised plants to mechanical debris is exposed in images taken directly from NASA's own archives. Finally, the author offers his take on the secret history of the Red Planet and what happened to the highly advanced civilisation that once flourished there.
The Seasons of Trouble

The Seasons of Trouble

Rohini Mohan

$32.99

For three decades, Sri Lanka's civil war tore communities apart. In 2009, the Sri Lankan army finally defeated the separatist Tamil Tigers guerrillas in a fierce battle that swept up about 300,000 civilians and killed more than 40,000. More than a million had been displaced by the conflict, and the resilient among them still dared to hope. But the next five years changed everything. Rohini Mohan's searing account of three lives caught up in the devastation looks beyond the heroism of wartime survival to reveal the creeping violence of the everyday. When city-bred Sarva is dragged off the streets by state forces, his middle-aged mother, Indra, searches for him through the labyrinthine Sri Lankan bureaucracy. Meanwhile, Mugil, a former child soldier, deserts the Tigers in the thick of war to protect her family. Having survived, they struggle to live as the Sri Lankan state continues to attack minority Tamils and Muslims, frittering away the era of peace. Sarva flees the country, losing his way - and almost his life - in a bid for asylum. Mugil stays, breaking out of the refugee camp to rebuild her family and an ordinary life in the village she left as a girl. But in her tumultuous world, desires, plans, and people can be snatched away in a moment. The Seasons of Trouble is a startling, brutal, yet beau-tifully written debut from a prize-winning journal-ist. It is a classic piece of reportage, five years in the making, and a trenchant, compassionate examina-tion of the corrosive effect of conflict on a people.
Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia's Female Publicans

Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia's Female Publicans

Clare Wright

$29.99

Clare Wright's award-winning research challenges the myth that the Australian pub is a male domain, revealing the enduring and dynamic presence of female publicans behind the bar. Wright takes the reader on a pub crawl through this history: from Sarah Bird, the 27-year-old convict who was Australia's first female licensee, to Big Poll the Grog Seller, the miners' darling on the goldfields, to Cheryl Barassi and Dawn Fraser in recent years. Handsomely illustrated and weaving oral history interviews, archival sources, folk songs, bush ballads and other popular literature throughout the narrative, this groundbreaking book exposes the remarkable visibility and dominance of women in Austalian hotel-keeping culture.
It Happened in a Holden: A Celebration of the Holden and the Australians Who Drive, Ride, Love and Bicker in it

It Happened in a Holden: A Celebration of the Holden and the Australians Who Drive, Ride, Love and Bicker in it

Paddy O'Reilly

$29.99

The Holden rolled into our lives in 1948 and has been firmly rooted in the Australian psyche ever since. The FJ, the EH, the Torana, the Kingswood, the panel van, the Monaro, the ute - each car is like a tuning fork for eras of Australian family, city and bush life. Almost every Australian has a Holden story, and this book is packed with tales from all walks of Australian life. They are funny, brave, warm, sad and sometimes ridiculous. Bruce Beresford, Jamie Whincup, Cate Kennedy, Father Bob Maguire, Kerry Greenwood, Shane Jacobson, Bev Brock, John Romeril, Anna Krien, Anson Cameron, Christine Nixon, Frankie J Holden, Tara June Winch, Peter Corris, Yassmin Abdel-Magied, Gary Poole, And many more.
Ned Kelly: The Story of Australia's Most Notorious Legend

Ned Kelly: The Story of Australia's Most Notorious Legend

Peter FitzSimons

$34.99

Love him or loathe him, Ned Kelly has been at the heart of Australian culture and identity since he and his gang were tracked down in bushland by the Victorian police and came out fighting, dressed in bulletproof iron armour made from farmers' ploughs. History comes to life with Peter Fitzsimons. Historians still disagree over virtually every aspect of the eldest Kelly boy's brushes with the law. Did he or did he not shoot Constable Fitzpatrick at their family home? Was he a lawless thug or a noble Robin Hood, a remorseless killer or a crusader against oppression and discrimination? Was he even a political revolutionary, an Australian republican channelling the spirit of Eureka? Peter FitzSimons, bestselling chronicler of many of the great defining moments and people of this nation's history, is the perfect person to tell this most iconic of all Australian stories. From Kelly's early days in Beveridge, Victoria, in the mid-1800s, to the Felons' Apprehension Act, which made it possible for anyone to shoot the Kelly gang, to Ned's appearance in his now-famous armour, prompting the shocked and bewildered police to exclaim 'He is the devil!' and 'He is the bunyip!' , FitzSimons brings the history of Ned Kelly and his gang exuberantly to life, weighing in on all of the myths, legends and controversies generated by this compelling and divisive Irish-Australian rebel.
Royal Australian Navy Fleet Review: Celebrating 100 Years of Pride in the Fleet

Royal Australian Navy Fleet Review: Celebrating 100 Years of Pride in the Fleet

Royal Australian Navy

$49.99

Celebrate 100 years of pride in the Fleet and discover the rich history of the Royal Australian Navy with this superbly designed and crafted full colour book. The entry into Sydney Harbour of the Royal Australian Fleet on the 4th of October 1913 was an even of national significance and great achievement by the young Australian nation.

Led by the flagship, the battlecruiser HMAS Australia, HMA Ships Melbourne, Sydney, Encounter, Warrego, Parramatta and Yarra were the pride of the nation and quickly proved themselves in war the next year. In October 2013, exactly 100 years later, the spotlight again shone on Sydney when over 8,000 naval personnel and dozens of warships from around the world conducted a fleet entry and ceremonial review. 

This book is and inspirational record, both past and present of the accomplishments of one of the world’s leading Navies. This book captures and records the International Fleet Review, providing a spectacular photographic record of the celebrations. To compliment this is a brief history of the Navy’s operations over the last 100 years as well as details on today’s Fleet, Establishments and People. This magnificent book is available in both paperback or limited edition boxed hardback.
The Secrets of the Anzacs: The Untold Story of Venereal Disease in the Australian Army, 1914-1919

The Secrets of the Anzacs: The Untold Story of Venereal Disease in the Australian Army, 1914-1919

Raden Dunbar

$29.99

Here is a truly astonishing statistic: during World War I, about 60,000 soldiers in the Australian Imperial Force were treated by army doctors in Egypt, Europe, and Australia for venereal diseases - almost the same number of diggers who were killed during the war. This silent, secret scourge took hold in Cairo in 1914, and continued until 1919 when survivors of the war waited in Europe to be repatriated. Nobody wanted to know about it, at first - and the general public back home was, of course, kept in the dark. Moralistic commanders in Egypt ordered strict punishments for men with VD, and the young victims were sent back to Australia in disgrace, most of them inventing amazing excuses for their inexplicable return. Many of them re-enlisted, but some felt they had to change their names to do so. Medical officers couldn't afford to be puritanical, though. They tried to prevent the diseases, as well to cure them with toxic drugs in army VD hospitals in Cairo, England, and at Langwarrin near Melbourne. Eventually, even the army had to face facts, and, after the AIF arrived in Europe in 1916, commanders ordered that huge quantities of prophylactics be distributed, and that safe-sex education be given as well. The Secrets of the Anzacs reveals all these secrets, and more. But perhaps the most remarkable revelation it contains is that many of the re-enlisted men went on to perform deeds of battlefield bravery - even, in one case, to the extent of being awarded a Victoria Cross under a false name. This fascinating book also contains numerous original photographs, artworks, and documents, most of which have never been published before. 'Going against the grain of an iconic narrative that reduces human beings to convenient national archetypes, Raden Dunbar gives us real men fighting a real war - not only against a military enemy, but also against the self-inflicted comforts of the flesh. The Secrets of the Anzacs is a full-frontal assault on our senses and our historical sensibilities. Deeply researched and always fascinating, Dunbar helps restore the Anzac legend to something more tangible, more complex, and, oddly, more heroic.' Clare Wright author of The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka 'Written with such candour and realism, you might want to wash your hands afterwards.' Peter Stanley author of Lost Boys of Anzac and Bad Characters 'Within the army, venereal diseases weakened the force and drained medical resources. But venereal disease was also a human problem, where one act of recklessness could ruin a man's life. Raden Dunbar tells the story of the generals, the doctors, and the victims with clarity and compassion. A timely and necessary contribution to the centenary of Anzac.' Janet McCalman author of Sex and Suffering
To Kokoda

To Kokoda

Nick Anderson

$19.99

When the Japanese war machine swept through South-East Asia in early 1942, it was inevitable that conflict would reach Australian territory on the island of New Guinea. The ultimate Japanese target was Port Moresby. Conquering the capital would sever communication between Australia and her American ally and allow Japanese air power to threaten Australia’s northern cities. 

When a seaborne invasion was thwarted at the Battle of the Coral Sea, the Nankai Shitai landed in Papua on 21 July and lunched an overland attack. Having captured the village of Kokoda with its vital airstrip, the Japanese headed for Port Moresby, traversing the treacherous Kokoda trail that winds across the might Owen Stanley Range. 

The Australian Army was ill prepared to confront the Japanese. Poorly equipped, undertrained, and unaccustomed to jungle warfare, the untested militia battalions were the first to face the battle-hardened invading forces. Later, when veteran AIF brigades were rushed forward to bolster the militia, they also fell in the path of the Japanese onslaught. But the over-extension of supply lines and disaster on Guadalcanal eventually cruelled Japanese aspirations and the Kokoda campaign became a bloody and protracted struggle as the Australian troops fought to drive the Japanese off the Owen Stanleys and out of Papua. 

While the front-line troops were engaged in a bitter fight for survival, a power struggle erupted at the top of the Allied command hierarchy resulting in a series of sackings, the competing ambitions of the Allied commanders clouding their judgement at a critical time. It was under these conditions, against a determined enemy and on one of the harshest battlefields on earth, that the Australian forces began to learn the crucial lessons that would be needed to break the back of the Japanese Army in New Guinea.
When War Came to Fremantle 1899 to 1945

When War Came to Fremantle 1899 to 1945

Deborah Gare ,  Madison Lloyd-Jones

$45.00

As Australia's largest wartime port, Fremantle played a unique role in the nation's story. Featuring extraordinary photographs, this volume is a fascinating account of our homefront during the Boer War, World War I, World War II and more. It records our history of departure and reunion, victory and celebration, grief and loss, and dissent and activism.
Battle Scarred - ANZAC Centenary Commemorative Release: The 47th Battalion in the First World War

Battle Scarred - ANZAC Centenary Commemorative Release: The 47th Battalion in the First World War

Craig Deayton

$19.99

One of the shortest lived and most battle hardened of the 1st Australian Imperial Forces battalions, the 47th was formed in Egypt in 1916 and disbanded two years later having suffered one of the highest casualty rates of any Australian unit.

Their story is remarkable for many reasons. Dogged by command and discipline troubles and bled white by the desperate attrition battles of 1916 and 1917, they fought on against a determined and skilful enemy in battles where the fortunes of war seemed stacked against them at every turn. Not only did they have the misfortune to be called into some of the A.I.F.s most costly campaigns, chance often found them in the worst places within those battles. Though their story is one of almost unrelieved tragedy, it is also story of remarkable courage, endurance and heroism.

It is the story of the 1st A.I.F. itself - punished, beaten, sometimes reviled for their indiscipline, they fought on - fewer, leaner and harder - until final victory was won. And at its end, in an extraordinary gesture of mateship, the remnants of the 47th Battalion reunited. Having been scattered to other units after their disbandment, the survivors gathered in Belgium for one last photo together. Only 73 remained.
Crumps and Camouflets - ANZAC Centenary Commemorative Release: Australian Tunnelling Companies on the Western Front

Crumps and Camouflets - ANZAC Centenary Commemorative Release: Australian Tunnelling Companies on the Western Front

Damien Finlayson

$19.99

Below the shattered ground that separated the British and German infantry on the Western Front in World War I, an unseen and largely unknown war was raging, fought by miners, tunnellers as they were known. They knew at any moment their lives could be extinguished without warning by hundreds of tonnes of collapsed earth and debris.
Endurance: Australian Stories of Drought

Endurance: Australian Stories of Drought

Deb Anderson

$45.00

Endurance presents stories of ordinary Australians grappling with extraordinary circumstances, providing insight into their lives., their experiences with drought and their perceptions of climate change. The book opens with the physical impacts, science, politics and economics of drought and climate change in rural Australia. It then highlights the cultural and historical dimensions - taking us to the Mallee wheat-belt, where researcher Deb Anderson interviewed farm families from 2004 to 2007, as climate change awareness grew. Each story is grouped into one of three themes: Survival, Uncertainty and Adaptation. Illustrated with beautiful colour photographs from Museum Victoria, Endurance will appeal to anyone with an interest in life stories, rural Australia and the environment.
Game to the Last - ANZAC Centenary Commemorative Release: The 11th Australian Infantry Battalion at Gallipoli

Game to the Last - ANZAC Centenary Commemorative Release: The 11th Australian Infantry Battalion at Gallipoli

James Hurst

$19.99

Game to the Last reveals the story of the men who would become one of the finest battalions which served in the war , the West Australian 11th Infantry Battalion, AIF, during the gruelling Gallipoli Campaign of 1915. The narrative follows the battalion members as they leave their homes and lives in Western Australia, embark for overseas, ...
Gallipoli

Gallipoli

Les Carlyon

$39.99

Les Carlyon's Gallipoli is the epic story of the fighting men who forged the legend of Anzac in 1915. Taking the reader behind the lines and into the trenches, Gallipoli not only brings an infamous battlefield to vivid life but puts poignant breath in the bones of the ordinary heroes who lived and died there. War stories are rarely this personal but Carlton's meticulous research and mesmeric storytelling take readers up-close with the conflict like never before, poetically evoking an ancient landscape rooted in myth, a theatre for Alexander the Great, St Paul and the Trojan Wars, and then intimately populating it with soldiers, generals and politicians from the Allied and Turkish forces. A century on from the Anzac landing on 25 April 1915, Les Carlyon's Gallipoli endures, a masterpiece every bit as haunting and heartbreaking as the events it records. Once read, it is never forgotten.
The Great War

The Great War

Les Carlyon

$39.99

Les Carlyon's The Great War is the epic story of the fighting men who wove themselves into legend as part of the largest tragedy in Australian history - 179,000 dead and wounded - leaving a nation to mourn its fallen heroes in 'one long national funeral' into the 1930s and, now again, a century later. As he did with the best-seller Gallipoli, Carlyon leads the reader behind the lines, across the western front and other theatres of battle, and deep into the minds of the men who are witnesses to war. Having walked the fields of France, Belgium and Turkey on his quest for a truth beyond the myth, Carlyon weaves us a mesmerising narrative that shifts seamlessly from the hatching of grand strategies in the political salons of London and St Petersburg to the muddy, bloody trenches of Pozieres and Passchendaele where ordinary soldiers descended into a maelstrom unimaginable. The Great War is history at its best - a brilliant account of the most vital event in Australian history.
Remembering Georges: Stories from Melbourne's Most Elegant Store

Remembering Georges: Stories from Melbourne's Most Elegant Store

Annette Cooper

$89.95

When Georges closed its doors on 5 October 1995, it had been trading for 115 years. Yet this famous department store, situated in the 'Paris End' of Collins Street, still lingers in the minds of many today. Remembering Georges documents the memories of staff and clients before this living connection fades. The unique 'voice' of each interviewee shines through, because the memories are in their own words. This richly illustrated book displays some of the fabulous images associated with Georges, reflecting the style and elegance of the store itself. Georges devotees, as well as those interested in fashion, design, and Melbourne's retail and social history, will revel in the stories held within. ' I, like many other people, remember Georges very fondly. I wanted to document the memories of staff and clients, and display some of the fabulous images associated with the store, before this living connection is lost. Alan Black, for example, is 94 years old, and has some wonderful stories about the store during his long time spent there as Buyer for Georg Jensen, Stuart Devlin, Waterford and Marghab linen. Nancy Balding worked at Georges between 1948 and 1989, and served in the famous Front Showroom, which carried the most fabulous of fashion and clientele. Michael Shmith, son of the photographer Athol and model 'Bambi' Shmith, talks of his devotion to the store almost being ruined by the sight of a price-tag on a handkerchief displayed in the windows. The 'voice' of each interviewee comes through, because the memories are in their own words.' Annette Cooper
Dangerous Days in Elizabethan England: Thieves, Tricksters, Bards and Bawds

Dangerous Days in Elizabethan England: Thieves, Tricksters, Bards and Bawds

Terry Deary

$24.99

The reign of Elizabeth I - a Golden Age? Try asking her subjects...Elizabethans did all they could to survive in an age of sin and bling, of beddings and beheadings, galleons and guns. Explorers set sail for new worlds, risking everything to bring back slaves, gold and the priceless potato. Elizabeth lined her coffers while her subjects lived in squalor with hunger, violence and misery as bedfellows. Shakespeare shone and yet the beggars and thieves, the doxies and bawdy baskets, kinchins and fraters scraped and cheated to survive in the shadows. These were dangerous days. If you survived the villains, and the diseases didn't get you, then the lawmen might. Pick the wrong religion and the scaffold or stake awaited you. The toothless, red-wigged queen sparkled in her jewelled dresses, but the Golden Age was only the surface of the coin. The rest was base metal. Once again, what we think we know about our history is revealed to be a mish-mash of misconceptions, glory-hogging and downright untruths as Terry Deary explodes the myths that permeate our understanding of the past - with a healthy dash of pitch-black humour.
The British Spy Manual: The Authentic Special Operations Executive (SOE) Guide for WW II

The British Spy Manual: The Authentic Special Operations Executive (SOE) Guide for WW II

Imperial War Museum (Great Britain) ,  Sinclair McKay

$39.99

Imagine sitting behind a desk, in a classroom, miles from anywhere in the English countryside, alongside dozens of fellow students, dreaming of being parachuted into Occupied France to undertake daring missions against Hitler's forces. What were you taught? What text books did they give you, and what homework and exams were you expected to pass in order to make the grade? We now publish the classroom dossier that all secret agents being trained for missions against the Axis forces in the Second World War were supplied with and expected to implement when on service. Full of colourful and imaginative drawings, photographs and diagrams the two-volume set represents a unique piece of British military history at your finger tips. From techniques in camouflage, to setting up communications, concealing weapons caches and constructing booby traps - this is the original text book our heroes learned, to ply their trade to deadly effect.
Jumbo: The Unauthorised Biography of a Victorian Sensation

Jumbo: The Unauthorised Biography of a Victorian Sensation

John Sutherland

$18.99

The first comprehensive 'biography' of one of the first celebrity animals who gave us one of our favourite words. Jumbo, Victorian England's favourite elephant, was born in 1861 in French Sudan, imported to a Parisian zoo and later sold on to London, where - for seventeen years - he dutifully gave children rides and ate buns from their hands, all the while being tortured at night to keep him docile. Worldwide fame came when he was bought by the American showman and scam artist P.T. Barnum in 1881, despite letters from 100,000 British schoolchildren who wrote to Queen Victoria begging her to prevent the sale. Barnum went on to transform Jumbo into a lucrative circus act and one of the most loved animals of all time, establishing elephants as a regular feature of funhouses and menageries the world over. Using the heartwrenching story of Jumbo's celebrity life, tragic death in Canada in 1885, and his enduring cultural legacy, Jumbo is personal and fascinating reflection on our cultural elephantiasis by one of our most distinguished literary-critical detectives, which is guaranteed to amuse, stimulate, provoke and delight in equal measure.
The Six Wives & Many Mistresses of Henry VIII: The Women's Stories

The Six Wives & Many Mistresses of Henry VIII: The Women's Stories

Amy Licence

$49.95

For a king renowned for his love life, Henry VIII has traditionally been depicted as something of a prude, but the story may have been different for the women who shared his bed. How did they take the leap from courtier to lover, to wife? What was Henry really like as a lover? Henry's women were uniquely placed to experience the tension between his chivalric ideals and the lusts of the handsome, tall, athletic king; his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, was, on one level, a fairy-tale romance but his affairs with Anne Stafford, Elizabeth Carew and Jane Popincourt undermined it early on. Later, his more established mistresses, Bessie Blount and Mary Boleyn, risked their good names by bearing him illegitimate children. Henry did not see that casual liaisons might threaten his marriage, until he met the one woman who held him at arms length. Anne Boleyn's seductive eyes helped rewrite history. After their passionate marriage turned sour, the king rapidly married Jane Seymour. Her death in childbirth left him alone, without wife or lover, for the first time in decades. In the quest for a new queen, he scoured the courts of Europe, obsessed with the beautiful Christina of Milan, whose rejection of him spurred him into the arms of Anne of Cleves and soon after the lively teenager Catherine Howard. Henry's final years were spent with the elegant and accomplished widow Catherine Parr, who sacrificed personal pleasure for duty by marrying him while her heart was bestowed elsewhere. What was it like for these women to share Henry's bed, bear his children or sit on the English throne? He was a man of great appetites, ready to move heaven and earth for a woman he desired; their experiences need to be readdressed in a frank, modern take on the affairs of his heart. What was it really like to be Mrs Henry VIII?
The Real Tudors: Kings and Queens Rediscovered

The Real Tudors: Kings and Queens Rediscovered

Tarnya Cooper ,  Charlotte Bolland

$29.99

Who were the Tudor kings and queens and what did they really look like? Mention Henry VIII and the familiar image of the rotund, bearded fellow of Hans Holbein the Youngers portraits immediately springs to mind reinforced, perhaps, by memories of a monochromatic Charles Laughton wielding a chicken leg in a fanciful biopic. With Elizabeth I its frilly ruffs, white make-up and pink lips in fact, just as she appears in a number of very well-known portraits held in the Collection of the National Portrait Gallery in London. But the familiarity of these representations has overshadowed the other images of the Tudor monarchs that were produced throughout their reigns. During the sixteenth century the market for portraits grew and so the monarchs images multiplied as countless versions and copies of their likeness were produced to satisfy demand. Taken together, these images chart both the changing iconography of the ruler and the development of portrait painting in England. In considering the context in which these portraits were made, the motivations of the sitters and the artists who made them, the purposes to which they were put, and the physical transformations and interventions they have undergone in the intervening five centuries, the authors present a compelling and illuminating investigation into the portraiture of the Tudor monarchs.
The Lost Pre-Raphaelite: The Secret Life and Loves of Robert Bateman

The Lost Pre-Raphaelite: The Secret Life and Loves of Robert Bateman

Nigel Daly

$49.99

When the author bought a falling down fortified house on the Staffordshire moorlands, he had no reason to anticipate the astonishing tale that would unfold as it was restored. An increasingly mysterious, set of relationships emerged amongst its former owners, revolving round a now almost forgotten artist. Robert Bateman, in his youth was a prominent Pre-Raphaelite and friend of Burne Jones. The son of a local millionaire, he was to marry the granddaughter of the Earl of Carlisle, and to be associated with both Disraeli and Gladstone, and other prominent political and artistic figures. But he had abandoned his life as a public artist in mid-career for no obvious reason, to live as a recluse, while his father lost his money, and his rich and glamorous wife-to-be had married the local vicar, already in his sixties and shortly to die. The discovery of two paintings by Bateman, both clearly autobiographical, led to an utterly absorbing forensic investigation into Bateman's life. The story moves from Staffordshire to Lahore in India, to Canada, to Wyoming, and then, via Buffalo Bill to Peru and back to England. It leads to the improbable respectability of the Wills (now Imperial Tobacco) cigarette business in Bristol, and then, less respectably, to a car park in Stoke on Trent. En route the author pieces together, and illustrates, an astonishing and deeply moving story of love and loss, of art and politics, of morality and hypocrisy, of family secrets, concealed but never quite completely obscured. The result is a page-turning combination of detective story and tale of human frailty, endeavour and love. It is also a portrait of a significant artist, a reassessment of whose work is long overdue
Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750

Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750

Odd Arne Westad

$19.99

Over the past 250 years of momentous change and dramatic upheaval, China has proved itself to be a Restless Empire. Tracing China's course from the eighteenth-century Qing Dynasty to today's People's Republic, Restless Empire shows how the country's worldview has evolved. It explains how Chinese attitudes have been determined by both receptiveness and resistance to outside influence and presents the preoccupations that have set its foreign-relations agenda. Within two decades China is likely to depose the United States as the world's largest economy. By then the country expects to have eradicated poverty among its population of more than one and a half billion, and established itself as the world's technological powerhouse. Meanwhile, some - especially its neighbours - are afraid that China will strengthen its military might in order to bend others to its will. A new form of Chinese nationalism is rising. Many Chinese are angry about perceived past injustices and fear a loss of identity to commercial forces and foreign influences. So, will China's attraction to world society dwindle, or will China continue to engage? Will it attempt to recreate a Sino-centric international order in Eastern Asia, or pursue a more harmonious diplomatic route? And can it overcome its lack of democracy and transparency, or are these characteristics hard-wired into the Chinese system? Whatever the case, we ignore China's international history at our peril. Restless Empire is a magisterial and indispensible history of the most important state in world affairs today. It is the winner of the 2013 Asia Society Bernard Schwartz Book Award.
Ming: 50 Years That Changed China

Ming: 50 Years That Changed China

Craig Clunas ,  Jessica Harrison-Hall

$60.00

Ask anyone what single object they associate with China and the most common answer will be a Ming vase. Probably without even knowing the dates of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), people are aware of the fragility of its porcelain, its rarity and value. But porcelain is just one part of the story of one of the most glorious epoques of Chinas past. By focusing on the significant years of the early Ming dynasty and through the themes of court people and their lives, extraordinary developments in culture, the military, religion, diplomacy and trade, this magnificent book brings the wider history of this fascinating period to colourful life. This was an age of great voyages of exploration, undertaken for many reasons including trade and diplomacy. Long before the regular arrivals of Europeans in China, court-sponsored expeditions were sent to Asia, the Middle East and the African coast, bringing back knowledge of and objects from lands thousands of miles away gold, gems and foreign fashions. This period also saw the compilation of the worlds first comprehensive encyclopaedia (worked on by over 2000 scholars); the undertaking of major building projects such as the Forbidden City and Ming tombs; the creation of beautiful textiles, paintings, ceramics, gold, jewellery, furniture, jade and lacquer. The engaging narrative is richly illustrated with over 250 images, drawing on the objects specially selected for the British Museums major exhibition. Some of these are the finest pieces ever made in China.
Ming: Art, People and Places

Ming: Art, People and Places

Jessica Harrison-Hall

$19.99

The Ming dynasty (1368-1644) is regarded as Chinas golden age, equivalent in British history to the Elizabethan era. Through the themes of people and places and a wealth of objects, this beautifully illustrated little book provides a concise and fascinating introduction to the Ming period. The colourful and rich nature of life for the emperors and their families within the vast palaces of Nanjing, Beijing and beyond is captured in the exquisite imperial portraits, paintings, costumes and jewellery. Beyond the courts, outdoor spaces were enjoyed by many people, and journeys into the countryside undertaken for different purposes. Parties were held in gardens with friends and sports such as football and golf kept people fit. Amongst other goods, Chinese porcelain and silk were highly regarded throughout the world at this time. The author looks at the main production centres, the extensive distribution networks, and the roles of craftsmen, salesmen and customers. As so much of our knowledge of Ming China derives from archaeology, tombs of royals and non-royals are featured and major finds from them illustrated. Religious sites monasteries, temples and mosques are also explored; rare surviving examples of architecture from the Ming period. The book concludes with an introduction to some of the imagined spaces of the Ming, including realms for various gods. Here are palaces and parks; tombs and temples; silk-production sites and sacred mountains; emperors and empresses; soldiers and salesmen; princes and potters: a visual feast that captures the flavour of the remarkable Ming dynasty.
The Ugly Wife is a Treasure at Home: True Stories of Love and Marriage in Communist China

The Ugly Wife is a Treasure at Home: True Stories of Love and Marriage in Communist China

Melissa Margaret Schneider

$29.99

A collection of intimate and remarkable stories presents a rare view of Chinese history, social customs, and Communism during the Cultural Revolution from the perspective of ordinary citizens.
Phantom Terror: The Threat of Revolution and the Repression of Liberty 1789-1848

Phantom Terror: The Threat of Revolution and the Repression of Liberty 1789-1848

Adam Zamoyski

$55.00

A magnificent and timely examination of an age of fear, subversion, suppression and espionage, Adam Zamoyski explores the attempts of the governments of Europe to police the world in a struggle against obscure forces, seemingly dedicated to the overthrow of civilisation. The French Revolution and the blood-curdling violence it engendered terrified the ruling and propertied classes of Europe. Unable to grasp how such horrors could have come about, many concluded that it was the result of a devilish conspiracy hatched by Freemasons inspired by the ideas of the Enlightenment with the aim of overthrowing the entire social order, along with the legal and religious principles it stood on. Others traced it back to the Reformation or the Knights Templar and ascribed even more sinister aims to it. Faced by this apparently occult threat, they resorted to repression on an unprecedented scale, expanding police and spy networks in the process. Napoleon managed to contain the revolutionary elements in France and those parts of Europe he controlled, but while many welcomed this, others saw in him no more than the spawn of the Revolution, propagating its doctrines by other means. After his defeat at Waterloo in 1815, his victors united to maintain the old order, suppress of all opposition, and ferret out of the conspirators whom they believed to be plotting mayhem and murder in the shadows. In this ground-breaking study best-selling historian Adam Zamoyski exposes their pusillanimous yet cynical recourse to the police spy and the bayonet, which only intensified their own fears and pushed ordinary people towards subversion, building up the pressure of opposition to their rule. When it came, with the revolutions of 1848, the dreaded cataclysm revealed their fears to have been groundless; the masses stirred into revolt by hunger and oppressive living conditions were leaderless and easily pacified. There never had been any conspiracy. But the police were there to stay, and the paradigm of an order threatened by dark forces is also still with us today. This compelling history, occasionally chilling and often hilarious, tells how the modern state evolved through the expansion of its organs of control, and holds urgent lessons for today.
Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power 1799-1815

Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power 1799-1815

Philip Dwyer

$32.99

'Napoleon's legend is so persistent that it confounds the historical reality in the popular imagination. He himself contributed much towards the construction of his own myth, from his youth even until after he fell from power, when, while in exile, he dictated his memoirs to a group of disciples who took down his every word in the hope that his version of history would prevail. Such were Napoleon's skills as a chronicler that much of the legend is still unquestioningly accepted...' This second volume of Philip Dwyer's outstanding biography sheds further fresh light on one of the great figures of modern history. After a meteoric rise, a military-political coup in 1799 established Napoleon Bonaparte in government, aged just thirty. This meticulously researched study examines the man in power, from his brooding obsessions and capacity for violence, to his ability to inspire others and realise his visionary ideas. One of the first truly modern politicians, Napoleon skilfully fashioned the image of himself that laid the foundation of the legend that endures to this day; Philip Dwyer's ambitious, definitive work separates myth from history to offer us anew one of history's most charismatic and able leaders.
Waterloo 1815: Quatre Bras

Waterloo 1815: Quatre Bras

John Franklin ,  Gerry Embleton

$34.99

To commemorate the 2015 bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo, one of the defining campaigns in European History, Osprey is replacing its single volume Campaign title covering the whole of the battle with three highly detailed volumes. Based on new research drawn from unpublished first-hand accounts these volumes will provide a comprehensive resource for every aspect of the battle. The first of this trilogy details the battle of Quatre Bras where an initial 8,000 Allied troops faced 48,000 men of the French Armee du Nord under Marshal Ney. Realising his error, Wellington concentrated his troops at the strategic crossroads of Quatre Bras where they just managed to hold off Ney's attacks. The battle ended in a tactical stalemate but, unable to link up with Blucher's Prussians, Wellington retreated back along the road to Brussels to new positions at Waterloo. Featuring extensive photographs, full colour artworks, maps and bird's-eye-views, this first instalment is not to be missed.
Enemy in the East: Hitler's Secret Plans to Invade the Soviet Union

Enemy in the East: Hitler's Secret Plans to Invade the Soviet Union

Rolf-Dieter Muller

$54.95

Operation Barbarossa, Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, led to one of the most brutal campaigns of World War II: of the estimated 70 million people who died in World War II, over 30 million died on the Eastern Front. Although it has previously been argued that the campaign was a pre-emptive strike, in fact, Hitler had been planning a war of intervention against the USSR ever since he came to power in 1933. Using previously unseen sources, acclaimed military historian Rolf-Dieter Muller shows that Hitler and the Wehrmacht had begun to negotiate with Poland and had even considered an alliance with Japan soon after taking power. Despite the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, at the declaration of war in September 1939, military engagement with the Red Army was still a very real and imminent possibility. In this book, Muller takes us behind the scenes of the Wehrmacht High Command, providing a fascinating insight into an unknown story of World War II.
The Nazi and the Psychiatrist: Hermann Goring, Dr. Duglas M. Kelley, and a Fatal Meeting of Minds at the End of WWII

The Nazi and the Psychiatrist: Hermann Goring, Dr. Duglas M. Kelley, and a Fatal Meeting of Minds at the End of WWII

Jack El-Hai

$19.99

In 1945, after his capture at the end of the Second World War, Hermann Goring arrived at an American-run detention center in war-torn Luxembourg, accompanied by sixteen suitcases and a red hatbox. The suitcases contained all manner of paraphernalia: medals, gems, two cigar cutters, silk underwear, a hot water bottle, and the equivalent of $1 million in cash. Hidden in a coffee can, a set of brass vials housed glass capsules containing a clear liquid and a white precipitate: potassium cyanide. Joining Goring in the detention center were the elite of the captured Nazi regime--Grand Admiral Donitz; armed forces commander Wilhelm Keitel and his deputy Alfred Jodl; the mentally unstable Robert Ley; the suicidal Hans Frank; the pornographic propagandist Julius Streicher--fifty-two senior Nazis in all, of whom the dominant figure was Goring. To ensure that the villainous captives were fit for trial at Nuremberg, the US army sent an ambitious army psychiatrist, Captain Douglas M. Kelley, to supervise their mental well-being during their detention. Kelley realized he was being offered the professional opportunity of a lifetime: to discover a distinguishing trait among these arch-criminals that would mark them as psychologically different from the rest of humanity. So began a remarkable relationship between Kelley and his captors, told here for the first time with unique access to Kelley's long-hidden papers and medical records. Kelley's was a hazardous quest, dangerous because against all his expectations he began to appreciate and understand some of the Nazi captives, none more so than the former Reichsmarshall, Hermann Goring. Evil had its charms.
Hitler's Will

Hitler's Will

Herman Rothman

$22.99

Herman Rothman arrived in Britain from Germany as a Jewish refugee in the early years of WWII. He joined the British Army and in 1945 was posted to Westertimke and Fallingbostel PoW camps to interrogate high-ranking Nazi war criminals. When papers were discovered sewn into the shoulders of a jacket belonging to Heinz Lorenz, who had been Goebbels' press secretary, he and a team of four others were charged with translating under conditions of the deepest secrecy. The documents turned out to be the originals of Hitler's personal and political wills, and Goebbels' addendum. Later on, in Rottenburg hospital, Rothman interrogated Hermann Karnau, who had been Hitler's valet, to establish information about the Fuhrer's death in the bunker. Hitler's Will is the amazing true story of Herman Rothman's remarkable life, including how he managed to escape from Nazi Germany before the war began, and his role in bringing to light Hitler's personal and political testaments, which shed important light on his final thoughts. Click here to read a review featured on the BBC website on 30th April 2010 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8635541.stm
Born in the GDR: Living in the Shadow of the Wall

Born in the GDR: Living in the Shadow of the Wall

Hester Vaizey

$40.95

The changes that followed the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 were particularly dramatic for East Germans. With the German Democratic Republic effectively taken over by West Germany in the reunification process, nothing in their lives was immune from change and upheaval: from the way they voted, the newspapers they read, to the brand of butter they bought. But what was it really like to go from living under communism one minute, to capitalism the next? What did the East Germans make of capitalism? And how do they remember the GDR today? Are their memories dominated by fear and loathing of the Stasi state, or do they look back with a measure of fondness and regret on a world of guaranteed employment and low living costs? This is the story of eight citizens of the former German Democratic Republic, and how these dramatic changes affected them. All of the people in the book were born in East Germany after the Berlin Wall was put up in August 1961, so they knew nothing other than living in a socialist system when the GDR fell apart. Their stories provide a fascinating insight not only into everyday life in East Germany, but also into how this now-vanished state is remembered today, a quarter of a century after the fall of the Wall.
Writing History in the Global Era

Writing History in the Global Era

Lynn Hunt

$32.95

George Orwell wrote that history is written by the winners . Even if that seems a bit too cut-and-dried, we can say that history is always written from a viewpoint but that viewpoints change, sometimes radically. The history of workers, women and minorities challenged the once unquestioned dominance of the tales of great leaders and military victories. Then cultural studies brought fresh perspectives but those too have run their course. With globalisation emerging as a major economic, cultural and political force, Lynn Hunt examines whether it can reinvigorate the telling of history. In tandem, she proposes a sweeping re-evaluation of individuals' agency and their place in society as the keys to understanding the way people and ideas interact. Writing History in the Global Era is bound to shake up the discipline and break new ground for historical studies.
The World of Saint Patrick

The World of Saint Patrick

Philip Freeman

$26.95

The legend of Saint Patrick is irresistibly captivating-he drove the snakes out of Ireland, battled the druids, and used the three-leaf Shamrock to convert the pagan Irish to belief in the Christian Trinity. Yet, as so often happens, these stories are mere myths that fold under closer scrutiny. Snakes never plagued the Irish countryside, and the Emerald Isle's most beloved saint wasn't even Irish but a Briton of the Roman nobility. Fortunately, the truth is even more fascinating. In The World of Saint Patrick, classical scholar Philip Freeman offers the definitive account of Saint Patrick's life through new and vibrant translations of the greatest works of early Christian Ireland. This story of great violence, brutality, and even greater faith begins with two letters Patrick wrote describing his kidnapping by pirates at age sixteen and subsequent slavery. Although his grandfather was a priest and his father a deacon, at the time of his kidnapping Patrick had rejected his childhood faith in favor of atheism. Yet in this deeply moving narrative, Patrick recounts how he regained his faith during his captivity, and how the voice of God guided him both in his escape from bondage and in his eventual return to Ireland as a missionary to the very people who had enslaved him. The World of Saint Patrick delves into colorful tales of Patrick's struggles with pagan kings, soaring hymns of praise, and a prayer of protection against forces of evil such as the magic of women, blacksmiths, and druids. Freeman also examines the life of Saint Brigid, Ireland's first female saint, and the legendary voyage of Saint Brendan and his monks across the western ocean. Both general readers with an interest in Ireland's saints and scholars studying religion or medieval history will be unable to put down this captivating tale of Ireland's greatest saint and the remarkable times in which he lived.
Bending Adversity: Japan and the Art of Survival

Bending Adversity: Japan and the Art of Survival

David Pilling

$22.99

This is a both definitive and highly enjoyable book on how modern Japan works, from Asia expert David Pilling. Despite years of stagnation, Japan remains one of the world's largest economies and a country which exerts a remarkable cultural fascination. David Pilling's new book is an entertaining, deeply knowledgeable and surprising analysis of a group of islands which have shown great resilience, both in the face of financial distress and when confronted with the overwhelming disaster of the 2011 earthquake and resulting tsunami. Bending Adversity is a superb work of reportage and the essential book even for those who already feel they know the country well.
Japanese Swords: Cultural Icons of a Nation

Japanese Swords: Cultural Icons of a Nation

Colin M. Roach ,  Nicklaus Suino

$36.99

Tracks the fundamental transition from the sword as a mythological instrument to a functional tool for war, and finally to the display art commodity it is today. -- Publishers Weekly Author Colin M. Roach collaborated with top-level artisans, historians, and martial arts experts to create a unique, in-depth study of these magnificent weapons from a historical, iconographical, and technological perspective. In addition to a foreword by seventh degree iaido black belt Nicklaus Suino and a sidebar by Mukansa-level polisher Abe Kazunori, Japanese Swords includes rare looks into the world of Mukansa-level swordsmiths Kawachi Kunihira and Gassan Sadatoshi. Complemented by hundreds of stunning high-resolution photos and a DVD, Japanese Swords is a must-have addition to any Japanophile's library.
Gideon's Spies: The Inside Story of Israel's Legendary Secret Service the Mossad

Gideon's Spies: The Inside Story of Israel's Legendary Secret Service the Mossad

Gordon Thomas

$28.95

'Literally impossible to put down' New York Times Book Review Gordon Thomas has a grasp of history...this is one of the few books to have captured the true nature of the Israeli Government and the thorough process of the Israeli power elite. Ari Ben-Menashe, Former Adviser on Intelligence to the Israeli Government Created in 1951 to ensure an embattled Israel's future, the Mossad has been responsible for the most audacious and thrilling feats of espionage, counterterrorism and assassination ever ventured. Gideon's Spies has been created from closed-door interviews with Mossad agents, informants and spymasters, and drawing from classified documentsand top-secret sources, revealing previously untold truths about the Israeli intelligence agency. Bang-up-to-date, this new paperback edition of this best-selling book includes startling new information on subjects ranging from Weapons of Mass Destruction, international terrorism, North Korea's bird-flu war games and 'ethnic bombs'. The riveting text is supported by glossaries, appendices and shows a Mossad as it has historically been: brilliant, ruthless, flawed but ultimately fascinating.
Crossroads of War

Crossroads of War

Ian Barnes ,  Malise Ruthven (University of Aberdeen)

$54.95

From the Bronze Age to the twenty-first century, vying armies have clashed over the territory stretching from the Upper Nile to modern-day Iraq and Iran. Crossroads of War captures five millennia of conflict and conquest in detailed full-color maps, accompanied by incisive, accessible commentary. The lands of the Middle East were home to a succession of empires Egyptian, Babylonian, Assyrian, and Persian that rose and declined with the fortunes of battle. Kings and generals renowned in history bestrode the region: Nebuchadnezzar, David, Alexander the Great, Saladin, Napoleon. The religions of Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam were born here and from the beginning became embroiled in conflicts ranging from the Maccabean Revolt to Muhammad s Arabian conquests to the Christian Crusades. In the twentieth century, the Middle East witnessed the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and played a role in the grim dramas of two world wars, as T. E. Lawrence helped spark the Arab Revolt and General Bernard Montgomery defeated Hitler s Desert Fox, General Erwin Rommel, at El Alamein. From the Yom Kippur War and Operation Desert Storm to a Global War on Terror that still looms over the twenty-first century, the Middle East continues to be shaped by the vagaries and vicissitudes of military conflict. Crossroads of War offers valuable insights into the part of the world that first cradled civilization and then imagined its demise in a final clash of armies at Armageddon.
Inside the Brotherhood

Inside the Brotherhood

Hazem Kandil

$41.95

This is the first in-depth study of the relationship between the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood and its own members. Drawing on years of participant observation, extensive interviews, previously inaccessible organizational documents, and dozens of memoirs and writings, the book provides an intimate portrayal of the recruitment and socialization of Brothers, the evolution of their intricate social networks, and the construction of the peculiar ideology that shapes their everyday practices. Kandil shows why attempts to compare the Brotherhood to secular social movements or typical forms of religious activism obscure its unique nature, and he seeks instead to unlock the organization's unique logic. Building on his original research, Kandil reinterprets the Brotherhood's slow rise and rapid downfall from power in Egypt, and compares it to the Islamist subsidiaries it created and the varieties it inspired around the world. This timely book will be of great interest to students and scholars of the politics of the Middle East and to anyone who wants to understand the dramatic events unfolding in Egypt and elsewhere in the wake of the Arab uprisings.
The Yezidis: The History of a Community, Culture and Religion

The Yezidis: The History of a Community, Culture and Religion

Birgul Acikyildiz

$42.96

Yezidism is a fascinating part of the rich cultural mosaic of the Middle East. The Yezidi faith emerged for the first time in the twelfth century in the Kurdish mountains of northern Iraq. The religion, which has become notorious for its associations with 'devil worship', is in fact an intricate syncretic system of belief, incorporating elements from proto-Indo-European religions, early Iranian faiths like Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism, Sufism and regional paganism like Mithraism. Birgul Acikyildiz here offers a comprehensive appraisal of Yezidi religion, society and culture. Written without presupposing any prior knowledge about Yezidism, and in an accessible and readable style, her book examines Yezidis not only from a religious point of view but as a historical and social phenomenon. She throws light on the origins of Yezidism, and charts its development and changing fortunes - from its beginnings to the present- as part of the general history of the Kurds. Her book is the first to place Yezidism in its complete geographical setting in Northern Iraq, Turkey, Syria and Transcaucasia. The author describes the Yezidi belief system (which considers Tawusi Melek - the 'Peacock Angel' - to be ruler of the earth) and its religious practices and observances, analysing the most important facets of Yezidi religious art and architecture (including funerary monuments and zoomorphic tombstones) and their relationship to their neighbours throughout the Middle East. Acikyildiz also explores the often misunderstood connections between Yezidism and the Satan/Sheitan of Christian and Muslim tradition. Richly illustrated, with accompanying maps, photographs and illustrations, this pioneering book will have strong appeal to all those with an interest in the culture of the Kurds, as well as the wider region.
Everyday Life in the Muslim Middle East

Everyday Life in the Muslim Middle East

Donna Lee Bowen ,  Evelyn A. Early ,  Becky Lyn Schulthies ,  Becky Schulthies

$46.95

The substantially revised and updated third edition of Everyday Life in the Muslim Middle East focuses on the experiences of ordinary men, women, and children from the region. Readers will gain a grassroots appreciation of Middle East life, culture, and society that recognizes the impact of wars and uprisings as well as changes to Islamic practice due to advances in technology. The book also explores the influence of social media on politics and labor relations and the changing status of women, family values, marriage, childrearing, gender, and gay rights. This dynamic and imaginative volume continues to provide a rich resource for understanding contemporary Muslim culture in the Middle East.
Middle East Authoritarianisms: Governance, Contestation, and Regime Resilience in Syria and Iran

Middle East Authoritarianisms: Governance, Contestation, and Regime Resilience in Syria and Iran

Steven Hydemann ,  Dr Reinoud Leenders (Universiteit van Amsterdam) ,  Steven Heydemann

$46.95

The developments of early 2011 changes the political landscape of the Middle East. But even as urgent struggles continue, it remains clear that authoritarianism will survive this transformational moment. The study of authoritarian governance, therefore, remains essential for our understanding of the political dynamics and inner workings of regimes across the region. This volume considers the Syrian and Iranian regimes--what they share in common and what distinguishes them. Too frequently, authoritarianism has been assumed to be a generic descriptor of the region and differences among regimes have been overlooked. But as the political trajectories of Middle Eastern states diverge in years ahead, with some perhaps consolidating democratic gains while others remaining under distinct and resilient forms of authoritarian rule, understanding variations in modes of authoritarian governance and the attributes that promote regime resilience becomes an increasingly urgent priority.
Terror Tunnels: The Case for Israel's Just War Against Hamas

Terror Tunnels: The Case for Israel's Just War Against Hamas

Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law Alan M Dershowitz (Harvard University)

$39.95

At a time when Israel is under persistent attack on the battlefield, by international organizations, and in the court of public opinion Alan Dershowitz presents a powerful case for Israel s just war against terrorism. In the spirit of his international bestseller The Case for Israel, Dershowitz shows why Israel s struggle against Hamas is a fight not only to protect its own citizens, but for all democracies. The nation-state of the Jewish people is providing a model for all who are threatened by terrorist groups such as ISIS, al-Qaeda and Boko Haram. Having himself been in one of the Hamas terror tunnels, Dershowitz explains why Israel had no choice but to send in ground troops to protect its civilians against Hamas death squads. Dershowitz wrote this book to warn the world that unless Hamas s strategy of building terror tunnels and firing rockets from behind human shields is denounced and stopped by the international community, the media, the academy, and good people of all religions, ethnicities, and nationalities it will be coming soon to a theater near you. Covering all the hot-button issues from the BDS movement, to the rise of anti-Semitism, to the charge of war crimes, to the prospects of peace Terror Tunnels: The Case for Israel s Just War Against Hamas is a must-read for all who care about Israel, peace in the Mideast, human rights, and fairness.
The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring

The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring

Paul Danahar

$19.99

In 2011 the Arab revolts changed the Middle East forever. The toppling of a generation of dictators left the region in turmoil. Has the promise of the Arab Spring been lost? What does the rise of religious extremism on Europe's doorstep mean for the West and its allies? Is America giving up on the region and, if so, who will lead the new Middle East? Drawing on compelling first-hand reporting, a deep knowledge of the region's history and access to many of the key players, BBC Bureau Chief Paul Danahar lays bare the forces that are shaping the region.
Under Fire: The Untold Story of the Attack in Benghazi

Under Fire: The Untold Story of the Attack in Benghazi

Fred Burton ,  Samuel M. Katz

$19.99

Benghazi, Libya. 9/11/2012. Just over a year after the fall of Gaddafi, and on the eleventh anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, a group of heavily armed Islamic terrorists had their sights set on the U.S. diplomatic and intelligence presence in the city. In the prolonged attack, four Americans died, including the American ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens, the Information Officer Sean Smith, and two former Navy SEALs, Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty, working for the Central Intelligence Agency. Based on confidential eyewitness sources within the intelligence, diplomatic, and military communities, Under Fire is the terrifying account of that night, and of a desperate last stand amid the chaos of rebellion.
The Congress of Vienna: Power and Politics After Napoleon

The Congress of Vienna: Power and Politics After Napoleon

Brian E. Vick

$71.00

Convened following Napoleon s defeat in 1814, the Congress of Vienna is remembered as much for the pageantry of the royals and elites who gathered there as for the landmark diplomatic agreements they brokered. Historians have nevertheless generally dismissed these spectacular festivities as window dressing when compared with the serious, behind-the-scenes maneuverings of sovereigns and statesmen. Brian Vick finds this conventional view shortsighted, seeing these instead as two interconnected dimensions of politics. Examining them together yields a more complete picture of how one of the most important diplomatic summits in history managed to redraw the map of Europe and the international system of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Congress of Vienna investigates the Vienna Congress within a broad framework of influence networks that included unofficial opinion-shapers of all kinds, both men and women: artists and composers, entrepreneurs and writers, hosts and attendees of fashionable salons. In addition to high-profile negotiation and diplomatic wrangling over the post-Napoleonic fates of Germany, Italy, and Poland, Vick brings into focus other understudied yet significant issues: the African slave trade, Jewish rights, and relations with Islamic powers such as the Ottoman Empire and Barbary Corsairs. Challenging the usual portrayal of a reactionary Congress obsessed with rolling back Napoleon s liberal reforms, Vick demonstrates that the Congress s promotion of limited constitutionalism, respect for religious and nationality rights, and humanitarian interventions was influenced as much by liberal currents as by conservative ones.
Clipper Ships and the Golden Age of Sail: Races and Rivalries on the Nineteenth Century High Seas

Clipper Ships and the Golden Age of Sail: Races and Rivalries on the Nineteenth Century High Seas

Sam Jefferson

$50.00

In the era of commercial sail, clipper ships were the ultimate expression of speed and grace. Racing out to the gold fields of America and Australia, and breaking speed records carrying tea back from China, the ships combined beauty with breathtaking performance. With over 200 gorgeous paintings and illustrations, and thrilling descriptions of the adventures and races on the water, this beautiful book brings the era vividly to life. Chapters include: The origins of the clippers - from the gold rush to the tea trade A hell ship voyage with 'Bully' Waterman, one of the most successful and notorious captains of the era Marco Polo, the fastest ship in the world - her rise to prominence and subsequent decline Mary Patten's battle with Cape Horn - a lady captain takes charge in a very male world Mutiny aboard the 'wild boat of the Atlantic' The great China tea race of 1866 - an amazingly close race across the world, only decided in the final few miles The Sir Lancelot defies the odds - her eccentric captains and rivalry with the legendary Thermopylae The Cutty Sark's longest voyage First-hand accounts, newspaper reports and log entries add fascinating eyewitness detail, whilst the stunning images show how the designs of these thoroughbreds developed over the years. A wonderful read and worthy celebration of these racehorses of the sea.
Eisenhower: A Life

Eisenhower: A Life

Paul Johnson

$29.99

Acclaimed historian Paul Johnson's lively, succinct biography of Dwight D. Eisenhower explores how his legacy endures today In the rousing style he's famous for, celebrated biographer Paul Johnson offers a fascinating portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower, focusing particularly on his years as a five-star general and his time as the thirty-fourth President of the United States. Johnson chronicles President Eisenhower's modest childhood in Kansas, his college years at West Point, and his rapid ascent through the military ranks, culminating in his appointment as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe during World War II. Beginning when Eisenhower assumed the presidency from Harry Truman in 1952, Johnson paints a rich portrait of his two consecutive terms, exploring his volatile relationship with then-Vice President Richard Nixon, his abhorrence of isolationism, and his position on the Cold War, McCarthyism, and the Civil Rights Movement. Johnson notes that when Eisenhower left the White House at age 70, reluctantly passing the torch to President-elect John F. Kennedy, he feared for the country's future and prophetically warned of the looming military-industrial complex. Many elements of Eisenhower's presidency speak to American politics today, including his ability to balance the budget and skill in managing an oppositional Congress. This brief yet comprehensive study will appeal to biography lovers as well as to enthusiasts of presidential history and military history alike.
The American Revolution of 1800: How Jefferson Rescued Democracy from Tyranny and Faction - And What This Means Today

The American Revolution of 1800: How Jefferson Rescued Democracy from Tyranny and Faction - And What This Means Today

Dan Sisson ,  Thom Hartmann

$49.99

In this brilliant historical classic, Dan Sisson provides the definitive window into key concepts that have formed the backdrop of our democracy: the nature of revolution, stewardship of power, liberty, and the ever-present danger of factions and tyranny. Most contemporary historians celebrate Jefferson's victory over Adams in 1800 - which Jefferson firmly maintained was as real a revolution ...as that of 1776 - as the beginning of the two-party system, but Sisson believes it is entirely the wrong lesson. Jefferson saw his election as a peaceful revolution by the American people overturning an elitist faction that was stamping out cherished constitutional rights and trying to transform our young democracy into an authoritarian state. If anything, our current two-party system is a repudiation of Jefferson's theory of revolution, and his earnest desire that the people as a whole, not any faction or clique, would triumph in government. Sisson's book makes clear that key ideas of the American Revolution did not reach their full fruition until the Revolution of 1800, to which we owe the preservation of many of our key rights. With new contributions from the author and Thom Hartmann, this fortieth anniversary edition contains fresh insights and reflections on how Jefferson's vision can help us in our own era of polarization, corruption, government overreach, and gridlock.
Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

Sheri Lee Fink

$21.99

In the tradition of the best writing on human behaviour and moral choices in the face of disaster, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs five days at New Orleans' Memorial Medical Center during Hurricane Katrina and draws the reader into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amidst chaos. After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths. Five Days at Memorial, the culmination of six years of reporting, unspools the mystery of what happened in those days, bringing the reader into a hospital fighting for its life and into a conversation about the most terrifying form of health care rationing. In a voice at once involving and fair, masterful and intimate, Fink exposes the hidden dilemmas of end-of-life care and reveals just how ill-prepared we are for the impact of large-scale disasters - and how we can do better. A remarkable book, engrossing from start to finish, Five Days at Memorial radically transforms our understanding of human nature in crisis.
The Internal Enemy - Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832

The Internal Enemy - Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832

Alan Taylor

$23.95

National Book Award Finalist: 'Impressively researched and beautifully crafted ...a brilliant account of slavery in Virginia during and after the Revolution.'-Mark M. Smith, Wall Street Journal Frederick Douglass recalled that slaves living along Chesapeake Bay longingly viewed sailing ships as 'freedom's swift-winged angels.
Pat and Dick: The Nixons, an Intimate Portrait of a Marriage

Pat and Dick: The Nixons, an Intimate Portrait of a Marriage

Will Swift

$22.99

In the most humanizing portrait of the Nixons we're likely to have (Douglas Brinkley, author of Cronkite ), a leading historian presents a sweeping portrait of the relationship between Richard and Pat Nixon throughout their turbulent fifty-three-year marriage. When Americans remember the controversial Nixons, they usually focus on the political triumphs, the turbulent White House years, and the humiliating public downfall. But a very different image of the polarizing president emerges in this fascinating portrait of the relationship between Richard and Pat Nixon. Now, the couple's recently released love letters and other private documents reveal that as surely as unremitting adversity can fray the fabric of a marriage, devotion can propel it to surmount disgrace and defeat. In Pat and Dick, biographer Will Swift brings his years of experience as a historian and marital therapist to this unique examination of a long-misunderstood marriage. Nixon the man was enormously complicated: brilliant, insecure, sometimes coldly calculating, and capable of surprising affection with his wife. Much less is known about Pat. With the help of personal writings and interviews with family and friends, Swift unveils a woman who was warm and vivacious, yet much shrewder and more accomplished than she has been given credit for. From Dick's unrelenting crusade to marry the glamorous teacher through the myriad crises of his political career, the Nixons' story is filled with hopes and disappointments, both intimate and global. Written by a leading presidential biographer who narrates with grace and style ( Kirkus Reviews ), this remarkable biography shows us a couple who, despite their trials, managed to find the strength, courage, and resilience to sustain a true connection for more than half a century.
No Hero

No Hero

Mark Owen

$29.99

Mark Owen's instant #1 New York Times bestseller, No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden, focused on the high-profile targets and headline-grabbing chapters of the author's thirteen years as a Navy SEAL. His follow-up, No Hero, offers a rare counterpoint: an account of Owen's most personally meaningful missions, missions that never made headlines, including the moments in which he learned the most about himself and his teammates in both success and failure.
 
'I want No Hero to offer something most books on war don't: the intimate side of it, the personal struggles and hardships and what I learned from them,' says Owen. 'The stories in No Hero are a testament to my teammates and to all the other active and former SEALs who have dedicated their lives to freedom. In our community, we are constantly taught to mentor the younger generation and to pass the lessons and values we've learned on to others so that they can do the same for the guys coming up after them. This is what I hope I have done for readers of No Hero.'
 
Every bit as action-packed as No Easy Day, and featuring stories from the training ground to the battlefield, No Hero offers readers a never-before-seen close-up view of the experiences and values that make Mark Owen and the SEALs he served with capable of executing the missions we read about in the headlines.
Between Two Worlds: How the English Became Americans

Between Two Worlds: How the English Became Americans

Malcolm Gaskill

$40.95

Between Two Worlds is a story teeming with people on the move, making decisions, indulging or resisting their desires and dreams. In the seventeenth century a quarter of a million men, women, and children left England's shores for America. Some were explorers and merchants, others soldiers and missionaries; many were fugitives from poverty and persecution. All, in their own way, were adventurers, risking their lives and fortunes to make something of themselves overseas. They irrevocably changed the land and indigenous peoples they encountered - and their new world changed them. But that was only half the story. The plantations established from Maine to the Caribbean needed support at home, especially royal endorsement and money, which made adventurers of English monarchs and investors too. Attitudes to America were crucial, and evolved as the colonies grew in size, prosperity, and self-confidence. Meanwhile, for those who had crossed the ocean, America forced people to rethink the country in which they had been raised, and to which they remained attached after emigration. In tandem with new ideas about the New World, migrants pondered their English mother country's traditions and achievements, its problems and its uncertain future in an age of war and revolution. Using hundreds of letters, journals, reports, pamphlets and contemporary books, Between Two Worlds recreates this fascinating transatlantic history - one which has often been neglected or misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic in the centuries since.
The Deluge: The Great War, America and the Remaking of the Global Order, 1916-1931

The Deluge: The Great War, America and the Remaking of the Global Order, 1916-1931

Adam Tooze (Yale University, Connecticut) ,  J Adam Tooze (Jesus College, Cambridge)

$62.00  $55.80

A searing and highly original analysis of the First World War and its anguished aftermath In the depths of the Great War, with millions dead and no imaginable end to the conflict, societies around the world began to buckle. The heart of the financial system shifted from London to New York. The infinite demands for men and materiel reached into countries far from the front. The strain of the war ravaged all economic and political assumptions, bringing unheard-of changes in the social and industrial order. A century after the outbreak of fighting, Adam Tooze revisits this seismic moment in history, challenging the existing narrative of the war, its peace, and its aftereffects. From the day the United States enters the war in 1917 to the precipice of global financial ruin, Tooze delineates the world remade by American economic and military power. Tracing the ways in which countries came to terms with America's centrality--including the slide into fascism-- The Deluge is a chilling work of great originality that will fundamentally change how we view the legacy of World War I.
Continental vs Redcoat - American Revolutionary War

Continental vs Redcoat - American Revolutionary War

David Bonk ,  Johnny Shumate

$24.99

The American Revolutionary War pitched the newly formed Continental Army against the professional British Redcoats - a highly trained organization manned by long-serving and experienced infantrymen with a formidable reputation forged on European battlefields during the Seven Years' War. So, how were the poorly trained, poorly supplied Continental infantry able to hold their own and shape the outcome of the Revolutionary War and establish the future of their young nation? David Bonk answers this question in a highly illustrated book that looks at the challenges facing both armies, weighing up how each side was able to cope with the day-to-day experiences of the war and using extensive first-hand accounts to allow a modern audience to experience what life was like for soldiers on and off the battlefield during the war.
Lee Harvey Oswald as I Knew Him

Lee Harvey Oswald as I Knew Him

Michael A. Rinella ,  George De Mohrenschildt

$46.95

Let us hope that this book, poorly written and disjointed, but sincere, will help to clear up our relationship with our dear, dead friend Lee. Thus concludes a largely forgotten manuscript appended to Volume XII of the House Select Committee on Assassinations. Lee, of course, was Lee Harvey Oswald, the man accused of having assassinated President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963--and whose closest friend, many have argued, was Dallas resident George de Mohrenschildt. For years following Kennedy's assassination there were rumors and assumptions--some started by de Mohrenschildt himself--that this colorful, larger-than-life European emigre possessed a key to understanding Oswald's alleged actions. The reflections presented here, recorded between 1969 and his death in 1977, was de Mohrenschildt's attempt to recover the humanity of a friend he believed had been demonized as simply an insane killer. In a series of recollections about his brief friendship with Oswald and his wife Marina between the fall of 1962 and the spring of 1963, de Mohrenschildt recalls conversations about Lee's time in Minsk, about political issues of the day, particularly Latin America, and the Oswalds' turbulent and troubled marriage. He discusses the assassination and its aftermath, including his lengthy 1964 Warren Commission testimony, appearance on NBC television, and concludes with his own speculations about the possibility of a conspiracy to assassinate Kennedy and the question of Oswald's involvement. Threaded throughout are de Mohrenschildt's reflections on the corrosive effects of his friendship with the Oswalds on his and his wife Jeanne's personal and professional lives, first in 1964 and then echoing right up to the completion of this manuscript in 1976. Deftly edited and annotated by Michael Rinella, whose introduction also supplies critical background information and context, this once unwieldy, grammatically quirky, and eccentrically organized text can now be seen for the valuable biographical, social, and historical document it actually is.
A Tale of Two Plantations: Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and Virginia

A Tale of Two Plantations: Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and Virginia

Richard S. Dunn

$66.00

Forty years ago, after publication of his pathbreaking book Sugar and Slaves, Richard Dunn began an intensive investigation of two thousand slaves living on two plantations, one in North America and one in the Caribbean. Digging deeply into the archives, he has reconstructed the individual lives and collective experiences of three generations of slaves on the Mesopotamia sugar estate in Jamaica and the Mount Airy plantation in tidewater Virginia, to understand the starkly different forms slavery could take. Dunn s stunning achievement is a rich and compelling history of bondage in two very different Atlantic world settings. From the mid-eighteenth century to emancipation in 1834, life in Mesopotamia was shaped and stunted by deadly work regimens, rampant disease, and dependence on the slave trade for new laborers. At Mount Airy, where the population continually expanded until emancipation in 1865, the surplus slaves were sold or moved to distant work sites, and families were routinely broken up. Over two hundred of these Virginia slaves were sent eight hundred miles to the Cotton South. In the genealogies that Dunn has painstakingly assembled, we can trace a Mesopotamia fieldhand through every stage of her bondage, and contrast her harsh treatment with the fortunes of her rebellious mulatto son and clever quadroon granddaughter. We track a Mount Airy craftworker through a stormy life of interracial sex, escape, and family breakup. The details of individuals lives enable us to grasp the full experience of both slave communities as they labored and loved, and ultimately became free.
American Politics For Dummies

American Politics For Dummies

Matthew Alan Hill ,  Wiley

$35.95

The simplest way to get to grips with the American political system American Politics For Dummies is an engaging and accessible guide to the inner workings of the U.S. government, cutting through the political jargon, to give you the facts. The book begins with the basics, including government structure and processes, and later covers current events that make the news. The world of American politics can be bewildering to anyone not born and bred in the U.S.A. This plain-English guide is perfect whether you are a student or simply fascinated by the world's most powerful democracy. From the electoral process to 'special relationships', you discover all you need to know with American Politics For Dummies. * The birth of America -- find out about the emergence of the US, from the ideas upon which America was founded to the creation of the US Constitution * Go government -- understand the powers of the President, how Congress operates, the function of the Supreme Court and how US laws are created and passed * Party on -- discover the ins and outs of elections and political parties, f rom the electoral process and the two-party system to the voting behaviour amongst Americans * One nation, many identities -- get to understand the workings of a truly multicultural society * All the world's a stage -- grasp the grand strategy of the US to understand why the nation acts as it does in international politics 2014 kicks off the latest round of U.S. Congressional election and marks the beginning the 2016 Presidential election cycle. There will be headlines, there will be debate and there will be news. If you're looking to keep up and understand it all, American Politics For Dummies is a great place to start.
Such Troops as These: The Genius and Leadership of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson

Such Troops as These: The Genius and Leadership of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson

Bevin Alexander

$29.99

Acclaimed military historian Bevin Alexander offers a fresh and cogent analysis of Stonewall Jackson's military genius and reveals how the Civil War might have ended differently if Jackson's strategies had been adopted. The Civil War of 1861-65 pitted the industrial North against the agricultural South, and remains the most catastrophic conflict in terms of loss of life in American history. With triple the population and eleven times the industry, the Union had a decided advantage over the Confederacy in terms of direct conflict and conventional warfare. One general had the vision of an alternative approach that could win the War for the South--his name was Thomas J. Stonewall Jackson. It was Jackson's strategy to always strike at the Union's vulnerabilities, not to challenge its power directly. He won a campaign against the North with a force only a quarter of the size of the Union army, and he was the first commander to recognize the overwhelming defensive power of the new rifles and cannons. With most of its military forces on the offensive in the South, the North was left virtually undefended on its own turf. Jackson believed invading the eastern states along the great industrial corridor from Baltimore to Maine could divide and cripple the Union, forcing surrender. But he failed to convince Confederate president Jefferson Davis or General Robert E. Lee of the viability of his plan. In Such Troops as These, Bevin Alexander presents a compelling case for Stonewall Jackson as a supreme military strategist and the greatest general in American history. Fiercely dedicated to the cause of Southern independence, Jackson would not live to see the end of the War. But his military legacy lives on and finds fitting tribute in this book.
Shiloh: Conquer or Perish

Shiloh: Conquer or Perish

Timothy B. Smith

$55.00

A critical moment in the Civil War, the Battle of Shiloh has been the subject of many books. However, none has told the story of Shiloh as Timothy Smith does in this volume, the first comprehensive history of the two-day battle in April 1862--a battle so fluid and confusing that its true nature has eluded a clear narrative telling until now. Unfolding over April 6th and 7th, the Battle of Shiloh produced the most sprawling and bloody field of combat since the Napoleonic wars, with an outcome that set the Confederacy on the road to defeat. Contrary to previous histories, Smith tells us, the battle was not won or lost on the first day, but rather in the decision-making of the night that followed and in the next day's fighting. Devoting unprecedented attention to the details of that second day, his book shows how the Union's triumph was far less assured, and much harder to achieve, than has been acknowledged. Smith also employs a new organization strategy to clarify the action. By breaking his analysis of both days' fighting into separate phases and sectors, he makes it much easier to grasp what was happening in each combat zone, why it unfolded as it did, and how it related to the broader tactical and operational context of the entire battle. The battlefield's diverse and challenging terrain also comes in for new scrutiny. Through detailed attention to the terrain's major features--most still visible at the Shiloh National Military Park--Smith is able to track their specific and considerable influence on the actions, and their consequences, over those forty-eight hours. The experience of the soldiers finally finds its place here too, as Smith lets us hear, as never before, the voices of the common man, whether combatant or local civilian, caught up in a historic battle for their lives, their land, their honor, and their homes. We must this day conquer or perish, Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston declared on the morning of April 6, 1862. His words proved prophetic, and might serve as an epitaph for the larger war, as we see fully for the first time in this unparalleled and surely definitive history of the Battle of Shiloh.
An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States

An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

$34.99

The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. In An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them. Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples' history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.
Easter Island: The Mystery Solved

Easter Island: The Mystery Solved

Thor Heyerdahl

$39.99

Easter Island is one of the most remote places in the world, and with its huge, mysterious statues, it has puzzled archaeologists for centuries. How were the statues made and moved in a pre-mechanized age, by whom and why? Thor Heyerdahl made the first scientific excavation of the statues in 1955 and in this he outlines his discoveries, as well as what still remains a mystery.
Leningrad: Siege and Symphony

Leningrad: Siege and Symphony

Brian Moynahan

$29.99

Shostakovich's Seventh Symphony was first played in the city of its birth on 9 August, 1942. There has never been a first performance to match it. Pray God, there never will be again. Almost a year earlier, the Germans had begun their blockade of the city. Already many thousands had died of their wounds, the cold, and most of all, starvation. The assembled musicians - scrounged from frontline units and military bands, for only twenty of the orchestra's 100 players had survived - were so hungry, many feared they'd be too weak to play the score right through. In these, the darkest days of the Second World War, the music and the defiance it inspired provided a rare beacon of light for the watching world. Setting the composition of Shostakovich's most famous work against the tragic canvas of the siege itself and the years of repression and terror that preceded it, Leningrad: Siege and Symphony is a magisterial and moving account of one of the most tragic periods in history.
Imprudent King: A New Life of Philip II

Imprudent King: A New Life of Philip II

Geoffrey Parker

$61.00

Philip II is not only the most famous king in Spanish history, but one of the most famous monarchs in English history: the man who married Mary Tudor and later launched the Spanish Armada against her sister Elizabeth I. This compelling biography of the most powerful European monarch of his day begins with his conception (1526) and ends with his ascent to Paradise (1603), two occurrences surprisingly well documented by contemporaries. Eminent historian Geoffrey Parker draws on four decades of research on Philip as well as a recent, extraordinary archival discovery--a trove of 3,000 documents in the vaults of the Hispanic Society of America in New York City, unread since crossing Philip's own desk more than four centuries ago. Many of them change significantly what we know about the king. The book examines Philip's long apprenticeship; his three principal interests (work, play, and religion); and the major political, military, and personal challenges he faced during his long reign. Parker offers fresh insights into the causes of Philip's leadership failures: was his empire simply too big to manage, or would a monarch with different talents and temperament have fared better?
The Real Great Escape: The Story of the First World War's Most Daring Mass Breakout

The Real Great Escape: The Story of the First World War's Most Daring Mass Breakout

Jacqueline Cook

$19.99

Situated in Lower Saxony, Germany, Holzminden swung open its barbed wire gates to welcome its first guests in September 1917. It was here that the transient population of officers and orderlies from Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, India and Argentina found themselves at the mercy of the despotic Kommandant, Karl Niemeyer, who prided himself on his unblemished breakout record. Serial escapees who had attempted multiple escapes from other camps were sent here for containment. A group of intrepid officers hatched a daring breakout plan that was to become the blueprint for escape attempts in subsequent wars. Under the feet of their German captors, the officers dug a 55m long tunnel through concrete foundations, rock and packed earth with little more than ingenuity and kitchen cutlery. Nine months later, twenty-nine officers emerged from the exit hole in a nearby rye field and melted into the darkness of the German countryside. Running the gamut of a furious kommandant, search parties and townspeople eager to claim the reward for their recapture, ten escapees managed to reach neutral Holland -- and ultimately the safety of England. To write this extraordinary book, Jacqueline Cook called for contributions from descendants of Holzminden POWs, who opened their treasure chests to offer personal anecdotes, wartime journals, unpublished photographs and artwork. The Real Great Escape illuminates the amazing lives of a group of courageous men, from the victorious to the tragic.
Unexplained Mysteries of World War II

Unexplained Mysteries of World War II

Jeremy Harwood

$34.99

Who torched the crack french liner Normandie in New York Harbour? What happened to the priceless art treasures the Nazis looted from across occupied Europe? Was Hitler incurably ill? Did British and american naval experts unwittingly help the Japanese to plan their devastating attack on Pearl Harbor? How close did the Third Reich get to building an atomic bomb first? Intriguing questions like these are all part of the rich mixture of World War II history. Sometimes, however, there are riddles that still have not been fully deciphered. Unexplained Mysteries of World War II showcases the best of the best, drawing on the latest historical research to come up with at least some of the answers. The result is a fascinating, informative read that is as much adventure story as it is straight history.
The World's War

The World's War

David Olusoga

$39.99

A unique account of the millions of colonial troops who fought in the First World War, and why they were later air-brushed out of history. David Olusoga quotes extensively from soldiers' diaries and other eye-witness sources, bringing to life the searing experiences of these non-white troops. THE WORLD'S WAR unveils shocking truths such as: - The first soldier of the British Army to fire a shot in World War One was a black African. - By the end of 1914 one third of the British sector of the Western Front was held by Indian soldiers. - By 1917 the Western Front was the most multi-national, multi-racial, multi-faith place that had ever existed - a strange portent of Europe's future. - Germany created a special camp with a mosque and halal food in an attempt to persuade Muslim P.O.W.s to defect.
Zero Night: The Untold Story of the Second World War's Most Daring Great Escape

Zero Night: The Untold Story of the Second World War's Most Daring Great Escape

Mark Felton

$27.99

Oflag VI-B, Warburg, Germany: On the night of 30 August 1942 - 'Zero Night' - 40 officers from Britain, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa staged the most audacious mass escape of the Second World War. It was the first 'Great Escape' - but instead of tunnelling, the escapers boldly went over the huge perimeter fences using wooden scaling contraptions. This was the notorious 'Warburg Wire Job', described by fellow prisoner and fighter ace Douglas Bader as 'the most brilliant escape conception of this war'. Months of meticulous planning and secret training hung in the balance during three minutes of mayhem as prisoners charged the camp's double perimeter fences. Telling this remarkable story in full for the first time, historian Mark Felton brilliantly evokes the suspense of the escape itself and the adventures of those who eluded the Germans, as well as the courage of the civilians who risked their lives to help them in enemy territory. Fantastically intimate and told with a novelist's eye for drama and detail, this is a rip-roaring adventure story, all the more thrilling for being true.
Churchill's Secret Warriors: The Explosive True Story of the Special Forces Desperadoes of WWII

Churchill's Secret Warriors: The Explosive True Story of the Special Forces Desperadoes of WWII

Damien Lewis

$32.99

In the bleak moments after defeat on mainland Europe in winter 1939, Winston Churchill knew that Britain had to strike back hard. So Britain's wartime leader called for the lightning development of a completely new kind of warfare, recruiting a band of eccentric free-thinking warriors to become the first 'deniable' secret operatives to strike behind enemy lines, offering these volunteers nothing but the potential for glory and all-but-certain death. Churchill's Secret Warriors tells the story of the daring victories for this small force of 'freelance pirates', undertaking devastatingly effective missions against the Nazis, often dressed in enemy uniforms and with enemy kit, breaking all previously held rules of warfare. Master storyteller Damien Lewis brings the adventures of the secret unit to life, weaving together the stories of the soldiers' brotherhood in this compelling narrative, from the unit's earliest missions to the death of their leader just weeks before the end of the war.
Force Benedict

Force Benedict

Eric Carter ,  Anthony Loveless

$22.99

Second World War fighter pilot Eric Carter is one of only four surviving members of a secret mission, code-named 'Force Benedict'. Sanctioned by Winston Churchill in 1941 Force Benedict was dispatched to defend Murmansk, the USSR's only port not under Nazi occupation. If Murmansk fell, Soviet resistance against the Nazis would be hard to sustain and Hitler would be able to turn all his forces on Britain...Force Benedict was under the command of New Zealand-born RAF Wing Commander Henry Neville Gynes Ramsbottom-Isherwood, who led two squadrons of Hurricane fighters, pilots and ground crew which were shipped to Russia in total secrecy on the first ever Arctic Convoy. They were told to defend Murmansk against the Germans 'at all costs'. 'We all reckoned the government thought we'd never survive' - but Eric Carter did, and was threatened with Court Martial if he talked about where he'd been or what he'd done. Now he reveals his experiences of seventy years ago in the hell on earth that was Murmansk, the largest city north of the Arctic Circle. It will also include previously unseen photos and documents, as well as exploring - for the first time - other intriguing aspects of Force Benedict.
Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy

Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy

Eri Hotta

$32.99

A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of the Year A groundbreaking history that considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and is certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific. When Japan launched hostilities against the United States in 1941, argues Eri Hotta, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. Drawing on material little known to Western readers, and barely explored in depth in Japan itself, Hotta poses an essential question: Why did these men--military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor--put their country and its citizens so unnecessarily in harm's way? Introducing us to the doubters, schemers, and would-be patriots who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a Japan rarely glimpsed--eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, blinded by reckless militarism couched in traditional notions of pride and honor, tempted by the gambler's dream of scoring the biggest win against impossible odds and nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable. In an intimate account of the increasingly heated debates and doomed diplomatic overtures preceding Pearl Harbor, Hotta reveals just how divided Japan's leaders were, right up to (and, in fact, beyond) their eleventh-hour decision to attack. We see a ruling cadre rich in regional ambition and hubris: many of the same leaders seeking to avoid war with the United States continued to adamantly advocate Asian expansionism, hoping to advance, or at least maintain, the occupation of China that began in 1931, unable to end the second Sino-Japanese War and unwilling to acknowledge Washington's hardening disapproval of their continental incursions. Even as Japanese diplomats continued to negotiate with the Roosevelt administration, Matsuoka Yosuke, the egomaniacal foreign minister who relished paying court to both Stalin and Hitler, and his facile supporters cemented Japan's place in the fascist alliance with Germany and Italy--unaware (or unconcerned) that in so doing they destroyed the nation's bona fides with the West. We see a dysfunctional political system in which military leaders reported to both the civilian government and the emperor, creating a structure that facilitated intrigues and stoked a jingoistic rivalry between Japan's army and navy. Roles are recast and blame reexamined as Hotta analyzes the actions and motivations of the hawks and skeptics among Japan's elite. Emperor Hirohito and General Hideki Tojo are newly appraised as we discover how the two men fumbled for a way to avoid war before finally acceding to it. Hotta peels back seventy years of historical mythologizing--both Japanese and Western--to expose all-too-human Japanese leaders torn by doubt in the months preceding the attack, more concerned with saving face than saving lives, finally drawn into war as much by incompetence and lack of political will as by bellicosity. An essential book for any student of the Second World War, this compelling reassessment will forever change the way we remember those days of infamy.
Stopping the Panzers: The Untold Story of D-Day

Stopping the Panzers: The Untold Story of D-Day

Marc Milner

$55.00

In the narrative of D-Day the Canadians figure chiefly--if at all--as an ineffective force bungling their part in the early phase of Operation Overlord. The reality is quite another story. As both the Allies and the Germans knew, only Germany's Panzers could crush Overlord in its tracks. The Canadians' job was to stop the Panzers--which, as this book finally makes clear, is precisely what they did. Rescuing from obscurity one of the least understood and most important chapters in the history of D-Day, Stopping the Panzers is the first full account of how the Allies planned for and met the Panzer threat to Operation Overlord. As such, this book marks nothing less than a paradigm shift in our understanding of the Normandy campaign. Beginning with the Allied planning for Operation Overlord in 1943, historian Marc Milner tracks changing and expanding assessments of the Panzer threat, and the preparations of the men and units tasked with handling that threat. Featured in this was the 3rd Canadian Division, which, treated so dismissively by history, was actually the most powerful Allied formation to land on D-Day, with a full armored brigade and nearly 300 artillery and antitank guns under command. Milner describes how, over four days of intense and often brutal battle, the Canadians fought to a literal standstill the 1st SS Panzer Corps--which included the Wehrmacht's 21st Panzer Division; its vaunted elite Panzer Lehr Division; and the rabidly zealous 12th SS Hitler Youth Panzer Division, whose murder of 157 Canadian POWs accounted for nearly a quarter of Canadian fatalities during the fighting. Stopping the Panzers sets this murderous battle within the wider context of the Overlord assault, offering a perspective that challenges the conventional wisdom about Allied and German combat efficiency, and leads to one of the freshest assessments of the D-Day landings and their pre-attack planning in more than a decade.
A Short History of the First World War

A Short History of the First World War

Professor Gary Sheffield

$19.99

The First World War was a watershed in world history. Tragic but far from futile, its origins, events and legacy have roused impassioned debate, creating multiple interpretations and confusion for those encountering the period for the first time. Synthesising the latest scholarship, acclaimed historian Gary Sheffield cuts to the heart of the conflict. He explores such key issues as: - the causes of war- the great battles on land, sea and in the air- the search for the peace and peace settlements- the political, social and economic consequences- the impact of 'total war' on the belligerents and the individual- and the place of the Great War in the history of warfare Accessible and authoritative, this is the ultimate introduction for anyone wanting a clear understanding of what happened and why.
Trains to the Trenches: The Men, Locomotives and Tracks That Took the Armies to War 1914-18

Trains to the Trenches: The Men, Locomotives and Tracks That Took the Armies to War 1914-18

Andrew Roden ,  Annie Winsland

$49.99

How Would the railways of today - across Germany, Belgium, France, Britain, Austria, and all other combatants - fare if they were faced with the challenges their counterparts a century earlier were? Without the railways for the Great Powers, the most terrible conflict the world has ever known would have taken a very different form - if it had happened at all. In a remarkable historical railway journey through Britain and Europe, author Andrew Roden tells the story of the men and women who manned the tracks and the trains, and who relied on them to get them to battle and back home again. Drawing on diaries, memoirs and archive material he reveals the personal stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary things, and pays tribute to their overlooked contribution. Supported with remarkable illustrations and photography, Roden interweaves memories of his own present day travels by train with diary excerpts of ambulance train nurses, returning POWs, drivers that put their lives in danger for everyone on board and other key voices. Roden takes the reader on a gripping journey, from the secret planning rooms in Berlin, through to the killing fields of the trenches, as well as the home fronts of the key combatants. Looking at defining moments of railway history on both sides of the Great War they build a unique and very human picture of a wartime railway across Europe.
World War II in Cartoons

World War II in Cartoons

Mark Bryant

$29.99

The cartoon has a special place in the history of World War II, and the power of its message was felt by all sides of the conflict. Acclaimed cartoon historian Dr Mark Bryant has amassed a marvellous collection of images in colour and black and white, some famous, others not so - from, amongst others, British, French, American, Italian, German, Soviet and Japanese sources - which now appear in paperback form for the first time. *Timed to co-incide with the 75th anniversary of the start of WWII.
The Assassination of Europe, 1918-1942: A Political History

The Assassination of Europe, 1918-1942: A Political History

Howard M. Sachar

$46.95

In this fascinating volume, renowned historian Howard M. Sachar relates the tragedy of twentieth-century Europe through an innovative, riveting account of the continent's political assassinations between 1918 and 1939 and beyond. By tracing the violent deaths of key public figures during an exceptionally fraught time period-the aftermath of World War I-Sachar lays bare a much larger history: the gradual moral and political demise of European civilization and its descent into World War II. In his famously arresting prose, Sachar traces the assassinations of Rosa Luxemburg, Kurt Eisner, Matthias Erzberger, and Walther Rathenau in Germany-a lethal chain reaction that contributed to the Weimar Republic's eventual collapse and Hitler's rise to power. Sachar's exploration of political fragility in Italy, Austria, the successor states of Eastern Europe, and France completes a mordant yet intriguing exposure of the Old World's lethal vulnerability. The final chapter, which chronicles the deaths of Stefan and Lotte Zweig, serves as a thought-provoking metaphor for the assassination of the Old World itself.
Dunkirk: From Disaster to Deliverance - Testimonies of the Last Survivors

Dunkirk: From Disaster to Deliverance - Testimonies of the Last Survivors

Sinclair McKay

$39.99

From the author of the Sunday Times bestseller The Secret Life of Bletchley Park When Churchill made one of the most inspiring speeches of the 20th century - 'we will fight them on the beaches' - he was giving thanks for the miracle of deliverance, the harrowing and breathless evacuation of over 338,000 troops from the beaches and harbour at Dunkirk. Churchill was determined it shouldn't be labelled a victory. He was already too late. Hours later, broadcaster JB Priestley was to call it 'an absurd English epic'. Those days of Dunkirk are still invoked now whenever the nation finds itself in any kind of crisis. But there is a wider story too that involves a very large number of civilians - from nurses to racing enthusiasts, trades union leaders to dance hall managers, novelists to seaside cafe owners. And even wider yet, a story that starts in September 1939: of young civilian men being trained for a war that was already 25 years out of date; and the increasing suspense - and occasional surrealism - of the Phoney War. The 'absurd epic' of Dunkirk - told here through fresh interviews with veterans, plus unseen letters and archival material - is the story of how an old-fashioned island was brutally forced into the modernity of World War Two.
Another Man's War: The Story of a Burma Boy in Britain's Forgotten African Army

Another Man's War: The Story of a Burma Boy in Britain's Forgotten African Army

Barnaby Phillips

$39.99

In December 1941 the Japanese invaded Burma. For the British, the longest land campaign of the Second World War had begun. 100,000 African soldiers were taken from Britain's colonies to fight the Japanese in the Burmese jungles. They performed heroically in one of the most brutal theatres of war, yet their contribution has been largely ignored. Isaac Fadoyebo was one of those 'Burma Boys'. At the age of sixteen he ran away from his Nigerian village to join the British Army. Sent to Burma, he was attacked and left for dead in the jungle by the Japanese. Sheltered by courageous local rice farmers, Isaac spent nine months in hiding before his eventual rescue. He returned to Nigeria a hero, but his story was soon forgotten. Barnaby Phillips travelled to Nigeria and Burma in search of Isaac, the family who saved his life, and the legacy of an Empire. Another Man's War is Isaac's story.
Armies of the Russo-Polish War 1919-21

Armies of the Russo-Polish War 1919-21

Nigel Thomas ,  Adam Hook

$19.99

In 1917 Poland was recognised as a state by Russia, but the Bolshevik coup threatened this. The Polish leader Marshal Pilsudski hurried to build an army around Polish World War I veterans, and in 1918 war broke out for Poland's independence, involving the Poles, the Red and White Russian armies, at least two different Ukrainian forces, and Allied intervention troops. The armies that fought these campaigns were extraordinarily varied in their uniforms and insignia, equipment and weapons, and when peace was signed in 1921, Poland had achieved recognised nationhood for the first time since 1794. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork, this engaging study explains and illustrates the armies that fought in the epic struggle for the rebirth of the independent Polish nation, in the bitter aftermath of World War I.
Arrival of Eagles: Luftwaffe Landings in Britain 1939-1945

Arrival of Eagles: Luftwaffe Landings in Britain 1939-1945

Andy Saunders

$45.00

During World War Two a great many Luftwaffe aircraft arrived on the ground in the UK or its coastal waters, but, as with Rudolf Hess, not all of them through 'conventional' combat circumstances. Some had got lost, others were brought by defectors; some were lured through electronic countermeasures by the RAF, others brought down in unusual combat circumstances. All manner of types appeared - He111, Go145, Me110, Ju88, Me109 F and G, FW 190, Do 217 - and all were of great interest to the RAF. In some cases aircraft were repaired and test flown, betraying vital and invaluable information. Distinguished author Andy Saunders examines a selection of such fascinating cases and draws upon his own research, interviews, official reports and eye-witness accounts to bring alive these truly unusual accounts, all richly illustrated with contemporary photographs.
Bolt Action: Battleground Europe: D-Day to Germany

Bolt Action: Battleground Europe: D-Day to Germany

Warlord Games ,  Peter Dennis

$47.15  $42.45

Take the fight to the enemy with this new theatre book for Bolt Action. From the D-Day landings to the final battle for Berlin, this volume gives players everything they need to focus their gaming on these final campaigns in the European Theatre of Operations. Scenarios and special rules offer something for all Bolt Action players, regardless of the armies they collect.
Victory Fever on Guadalcanal: Japan's First Land Defeat of World War II

Victory Fever on Guadalcanal: Japan's First Land Defeat of World War II

William H. Bartsch

$55.00

Following their rampage through Southeast Asia and the Pacific in the five months after Pearl Harbor, Japanese forces moved into the Solomon Islands, intending to cut off the critical American supply line to Australia. But when they began to construct an airfield on Guadalcanal in July 1942, the Americans captured the almost completed airfield for their own strategic use. The Japanese Army countered by sending to Guadalcanal a reinforced battalion under the command of Col. Kiyonao Ichiki. The attack that followed would prove to be the first of four attempts by the Japanese over six months to retake the airfield, resulting in some of the most vicious fighting of the Pacific War. During one such battle on the night of August 20-21, 1942, Marines wiped out Ichiki's men, who--imbued with victory fever --had expected a quick and easy victory. William H. Bartsch draws on correspondence, interviews, diaries, memoirs, and official war records, including those translated from Japanese sources, to offer an intensely human narrative of the failed attempt to recapture Guadalcanal's vital airfield.
The World in 1919: A Turning Point in History

The World in 1919: A Turning Point in History

T. G. Fraser ,  Alan Sharp

$38.95

1919 was a pivotal year. While the Paris Peace Conference dominated the headlines, events elsewhere in the world would have a major impact on the 20th century and beyond. In Ireland, Egypt, India, China and the Middle East, Britain, France and Japan faced gathering resistance to their rule. Nationalist leaders like Gandhi, Saad Zaghlul, and Ho Chi Minh made an early mark, whilst the leaders of the Irish rebellion against Britain enjoyed more immediate success. In 1919, the world seemed poised between triumphant imperialism and emerging nationalism. 1919 witnessed fear of communism on a global scale, fuelled by Bolshevik success in Russia, a short-lived revolutionary government in Munich and Bela Kun's seizure of power in Hungary. In Italy and Germany, Fascism and National Socialism emerged as alternative to both communism and the bourgeois status quo, whilst in the United States Attorney General Mitchell Palmer's attempts to quell radicalism and enforce Prohibition launched the career of J. Edgar Hoover.
Shores of Knowledge: New World Discoveries and the Scientific Imagination

Shores of Knowledge: New World Discoveries and the Scientific Imagination

Joyce Appleby

$19.95

When Columbus first returned to Europe from the Caribbean, he presented King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella with exotic parrots, tropical flowers and bits of gold. The search for riches spurred Columbus and others to voyage the oceans with similar ambitions and these seafarers continued to return with mysterious specimens encountered in the New World. Curiosity began to percolate through Europe. The Church, long fearful of challenges to its authority, could no longer suppress the mantra Dare to know! Recounting the triumphs and mishaps of these explorers, Joyce Appleby's book follows the naturalists, both famous and obscure, whose investigations of the world's fauna and flora fuelled the rise of science and technology that propelled Western Europe towards modernity.
Murderous Contagion: A Human History of Disease

Murderous Contagion: A Human History of Disease

Mary Dobson

$19.99

Disease is the true serial killer of human history: the horrors of bubonic plague, cholera, syphilis, smallpox, tuberculosis and the like have claimed more lives and caused more misery than the depredations of warfare, famine and natural disasters combined. Murderous Contagion tells the compelling and at times unbearably moving story of the devastating impact of diseases on humankind - from the Black Death of the 14th century to the Spanish flu of 1918-19 and the AIDS epidemic of the modern era. In this book Mary Dobson also relates the endeavours of physicians and scientists to understand and identify the causes of diseases and find ways of preventing them.This is a timely and revelatory work of popular history by a writer whose knowledge of, and enthusiasm for, her subject shines through her every word.
Inglorious Royal Marriages: A Demi-Millennium of Unholy Mismatrimony

Inglorious Royal Marriages: A Demi-Millennium of Unholy Mismatrimony

Leslie Carroll

$19.99

It's no secret that the marriages of monarchs are often made in hell. Here are some of the most spectacular mismatches in five hundred years of royal history.... In a world where many kings, queens, and princes lacked nothing but true love, marital mismatches could bring out the baddest, boldest behavior in the bluest of bloodlines. Margaret Tudor, her niece Mary I, and Catherine of Braganza were desperately in love with chronically unfaithful husbands, but at least they weren't murdered by them, as were two of the Medici princesses were. King Charles II's beautiful, high-spirited sister Minette wed Louis XIV's younger brother, who wore more makeup and perfume than she did. Forced to wed her boring, jug-eared cousin Ferdinand, Marie of Roumania--a granddaughter of Queen Victoria--proved herself one of the heroines of World War I by using her prodigious personal charm to regain massive amounts of land during the peace talks at Versailles. Brimming with outrageous real-life stories of royal marriages gone wrong, this is an entertaining, unforgettable book of dubious matches doomed from the start.
Maps: Their Untold Stories

Maps: Their Untold Stories

Rose Mitchell ,  Andrew Janes

$60.00

A map is a snapshot of a place, a city, a nation or even the world at a given point in time - fascinating for what they tell us about the way our ancestors saw themselves, their neighbours and their place in the world. This magnificent collection, drawn from seven centuries of maps held in the National Archives at Kew, looks at a variety of maps, from those found in 14th Century manuscripts, through early estate maps, to sea charts, maps used in military campaigns, and maps from treaties. The text explores who the mapmakers were, the purposes for which the maps were made, and what it tells us about the politics of the time. Great images are accompanied by compelling stories. Featured is a woodcut map of 16th Century London, a map of where the bombs fell during the Second World War, and a map the first American settlers' drew when they were attempting to establish a new empire on Roanoke Island, off the coast of what is now North Carolina. Richly illustrated with large scale reproductions of the maps, the book also includes some of the more amusing or esoteric maps from the National Archives, such as the map of the Great Exhibition in 1851 that was presented on a lady's glove, a London Underground map in the form of a cucumber, and a Treasure Island map used to advertise National Savings. This is a fascinating and unusual journey through the world of maps and mapmakers.
A Global History of War: From Assyria to the Twenty-First Century

A Global History of War: From Assyria to the Twenty-First Century

Gerard Chaliand ,  Michele Mangin-Woods ,  David Woods ,  R. Bin Wong

$39.95

While many books examine specific wars, few study the history of war worldwide and from an evolutionary perspective. A Global History of War is one of the first works to focus not on the impact of war on civilizations, but rather on how civilizations impact the art and execution of war. World-renowned scholar Gerard Chaliand concentrates on the peoples and cultures who have determined how war is conducted and reveals the lasting historical consequences of combat, offering a unique picture of the major geopolitical and civilizational clashes that have rocked our common history and made us who we are today. Chaliand's questions provoke a new understanding of the development of armed conflict. How did the foremost non-European empires rise and fall? What critical role did the nomads of the Eurasian steppes and their descendants play? Chaliand illuminates the military cultures and martial traditions of the great Eurasian empires, including Turkey, China, Iran, and Mongolia. Based on fifteen years of research, this book provides a novel military and strategic perspective on the crises and conflicts that have shaped the current world order.
Murder on the High Seas

Murder on the High Seas

Martin Baggoley

$34.99

Great Britain has for many centuries been one of the world's great sea-faring nations. The Royal Navy has defended her territory and the merchant fleet has been instrumental in creating the nation's wealth. The courage, industry and exploits of many of her sailors and the names of the ships in which they served have become legends. However, the sea has also provided the backdrop to great crimes and for this gripping book, the author has selected murders that have been committed in many parts of the globe, on board different types of vessels, over a period of more than 100 years. The motives behind these crimes have included revenge, lust, greed and survival. Nevertheless, they share one common feature as all of those accused of responsibility were brought back to Great Britain to stand trial. Among these fascinating accounts is a gruesome description of a trial where the cannibalistic survivors of a shipwreck murdered and ate their shipmate.
Teaching Big History

Teaching Big History

Richard B. Simon ,  Mojgan Behmand ,  Thomas Burke

$47.95

Big History is a new field on a grand scale: it tells the story of the universe over time through a diverse range of disciplines that spans cosmology, physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, evolutionary biology, anthropology, and archaeology, thereby reconciling traditional human history with environmental geography and natural history. Weaving the myriad threads of evidence-based human knowledge into a master narrative that stretches from the beginning of the universe to the present, the Big History framework helps students make sense of their studies in all disciplines by illuminating the structures that underlie the universe and the connections among them. Teaching Big History is a powerful analytic and pedagogical resource, and serves as a comprehensive guide for teaching Big History, as well for sharing ideas about the subject and planning a curriculum around it. Readers are also given helpful advice about the administrative and organizational challenges of instituting a general education program constructed around Big History. The book includes teaching materials, examples, and detailed sample exercises. This book is also an engaging first-hand account of how a group of professors built an entire Big History general education curriculum for first-year students, demonstrating how this thoughtful integration of disciplines exemplifies liberal education at its best and illustrating how teaching and learning this incredible story can be transformative for professors and students alike.
Twentieth-Century War and Conflict: A Concise Encyclopedia

Twentieth-Century War and Conflict: A Concise Encyclopedia

Gordon Martel

$41.95

Drawn from the award-winning 5-volume Encyclopedia of War, this valuable, one-volume reference provides readers with essential information on the conflicts and concepts that shaped global warfare in the twentieth-century and up to the present day. Provides essential coverage of twentieth-century warfare across the world Incorporates entries on all major wars, conflicts and concepts in the study of warfare during the period Features detailed coverage of the First and Second World Wars, along with conflicts including the Russo-Japanese War, the Greco-Turkish War, the Falklands Conflict, the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan, the Gulf Wars, the War Against Terrorism, and the Somalian Civil War Covers topics including chemical warfare, ethnic cleansing, psychological warfare, and women and war Creates an affordable and handy personal reference for students of modern and contemporary history, professional scholars, and military history enthusiasts Comprises authoritative, up-to-date content - each entry ranging from 1,000 to 6,000 words - written by the best international scholars
           
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