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Introducing the Ancient Greeks: Ten Ways They Shaped the Modern World

Introducing the Ancient Greeks: Ten Ways They Shaped the Modern World

Edith Hall

$24.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JUNE 2016 ----- They gave us democracy, philosophy, poetry, rational science, the joke. They built the Parthenon and the Library of Alexandria. They wrote the timeless myths of Odysseus and Oedipus, and the histories of Leonidas' three hundred Spartans and Alexander the Great. But who were the ancient Greeks? And what was it that enabled them to achieve so much? Here, Edith Hall gives us a revelatory way of viewing this geographically scattered people, visiting different communities at various key moments during twenty centuries of ancient history. Identifying ten unique traits central to the widespread ancient Greeks, Hall unveils a civilization of incomparable richness and a people of astounding complexity - and explains how they made us who we are today.  A thoroughly readable and illuminating account of this fascinating people.
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Germany: Memories of a Nation

Germany: Memories of a Nation

Neil MacGregor

$26.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JUNE 2016 ----- From Neil MacGregor, the author of A History of the World in 100 Objects, this is a view of Germany like no other. For the past 140 years, Germany has been the central power in continental Europe. Twenty-five years ago a new German state came into being. How much do we really understand this new Germany, and how do its people now understand themselves?

Neil MacGregor argues that uniquely for any European country, no coherent, over-arching narrative of Germany's history can be constructed, for in Germany both geography and history have always been unstable. Its frontiers have constantly floated. Konigsberg, home to the greatest German philosopher, Immanuel Kant, is now Kaliningrad, Russia; Strasbourg, in whose cathedral Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Germany's greatest writer, discovered the distinctiveness of his country's art and history, now lies within the borders of France. For most of the five hundred years covered by this book Germany has been composed of many separate political units, each with a distinct history. And any comfortable national story Germans might have told themselves before 1914 was destroyed by the events of the following thirty years. 

German history may be inherently fragmented, but it contains a large number of widely shared memories, awarenesses and experiences; examining some of these is the purpose of this book. Beginning with the fifteenth-century invention of modern printing by Gutenberg, MacGregor chooses objects and ideas, people and places which still resonate in the new Germany - porcelain from Dresden and rubble from its ruins, Bauhaus design and the German sausage, the crown of Charlemagne and the gates of Buchenwald - to show us something of its collective imagination. There has never been a book about Germany quite like it.
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The Story of Egypt

The Story of Egypt

Joann Fletcher

$22.99

The story of the world's greatest civilisation spans more than 4000 years of history that has shaped the world. It is full of spectacular sites and epic stories, an evolving society rich in heroes and villains, inventors and intellectuals, artisans and pioneers. Now Professor Joann Fletcher pulls together the complete Story of Egypt - charting the rise and fall of the ancient Egyptians while putting their whole world into a context that we can all relate to. Joann Fletcher uncovers some fascinating revelations, from Egypt's oldest art to the beginnings of mummification almost two thousand years earlier than previously believed. She also looks at the women who became pharaohs on at least 10 occasions, and the evidence that the Egyptians built the first Suez Canal, circumnavigated Africa and won victories at the original Olympic games. From Ramses II's penchant for dying his greying hair to how we know Montuhotep's wife bit her nails and the farmer Baki liked eating in bed, Joann Fletcher brings alive the history and people of ancient Egypt as nobody else can.
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Xerxes, King of Kings: The True Story

Xerxes, King of Kings: The True Story

Ian Macgregor Morris

$59.99

Xsaya-rsa (Khshayarsha) to the Persians, Ahasuerus to the Jews, Xerxes to the Greeks. So great was his power, that he was hailed by the Persians as 'King of Kings', and by the Greeks as simply  The King.

Famed for his beauty and magnificence, he ruled over the greatest empire the world had known, and built cities the like of which the world had never seen. He was the king who re-conquered Egypt and subdued the rebels of Babylon; he was the king who captured Athens and burnt the temples of the Acropolis; and he was the king who defeated Leonidas, the greatest of the Warrior-Kings of Sparta. Some claim that he was the king who saved the Jews. The life of Xerxes, however, has never been told - until now.

Ian Macgregor Morris brings together a variety of evidence, literary and archaeological, to create a nuanced account that fully takes into account the context of fifth-century Persia. Macgregor Morris reviews the background of Xerxes' upbringing and his early taste of power, the problems of the succession, and the challenges he faced as a new king. 

The Greek expedition will be considered from a Persian perspective, while the effect of its failure on Persian policy in general, and on Xerxes in particular, forms a major theme of the later chapters. The character of Xerxes, so often depicted as hubristic, will be re-examined in terms of notions of Persian kingship, while his domestic policies on issues such as religious tolerance and the ambitious building programmes will be seen in light of the political events of the period.
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SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome

Mary Beard

$24.99

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Sunday Times Top 10 Bestseller Shortlisted for a British Book Industry Book of the Year Award 2016 The new series Ultimate Rome: Empire Without Limit is on BBC2 now Ancient Rome matters. Its history of empire, conquest, cruelty and excess is something against which we still judge ourselves. Its myths and stories - from Romulus and Remus to the Rape of Lucretia - still strike a chord with us. And its debates about citizenship, security and the rights of the individual still influence our own debates on civil liberty today. SPQR is a new look at Roman history from one of the world's foremost classicists. It explores not only how Rome grew from an insignificant village in central Italy to a power that controlled territory from Spain to Syria, but also how the Romans thought about themselves and their achievements, and why they are still important to us. Covering 1,000 years of history, and casting fresh light on the basics of Roman culture from slavery to running water, as well as exploring democracy, migration, religious controversy, social mobility and exploitation in the larger context of the empire, this is a definitive history of ancient Rome. SPQR is the Romans' own abbreviation for their state: Senatus Populusque Romanus, 'the Senate and People of Rome'.
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Offshore: Behind the Wire on Manus and Nauru

Offshore: Behind the Wire on Manus and Nauru

Madeline Gleeson

$29.99

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SIGNED COPIES SHIPPING NOW!

What has happened on Nauru and Manus since Australia began its most recent offshore processing regime in 2012?

This essential book provides a comprehensive and uncompromising overview of the first three years of offshore processing since it recommenced in 2012. It explains why offshore processing was re-established, what life is like for asylum seekers and refugees on Nauru and Manus, what asylum seekers, refugees and staff in the offshore detention centres have to say about what goes on there, and why the truth has been so hard to find.

In doing so, it goes behind the rumours and allegations to reveal what is known - and what still is not known - about Australia's offshore detention centres.

Offshore:

More of the latest releases for Social Issues in Today's World
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Quarterly Essay #62: James Brown on Going to War

Quarterly Essay #62: James Brown on Going to War

James Brown

$22.99

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Going to war may be the gravest decision a nation and its leaders make. At the moment, Australia is at war with the Islamic State. We also live in a region that has become much more volatile, as China asserts itself and America seeks to hold the line. What is it like to go to war? How do we decide to go to war? Where might we go to war in the future? Will we get that decision right? In this vivid, urgent essay, James Brown looks to history, strategy and his own experience to explore these questions. He examines the legacy of the Iraq War and argues that it has prevented a clear view of Australia's future conflicts. He looks at how we plug into the US war machine, now that American troops are based in Darwin. He sheds fascinating light on the extraordinary concentration of war powers in the hands of the Prime Minister - and how this might go wrong. This powerful essay argues that we have not yet begun to think through the choices that may confront us in years ahead.
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Bolt: Worth Fighting for: Insights and Reflections

Bolt: Worth Fighting for: Insights and Reflections

Andrew Bolt

$24.99

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Andrew Bolt confronts the biggest issues dividing Australia. Whatever the response to his views, there can be no denying his passion and conviction. In short, he believes these issues are worth fighting for. No one speaks so clearly or challenges the media pack so often. Whether it's Islam, terrorism, asylum seekers, global warming, Tony Abbott v Malcolm Turnbull, or so many other issues, Bolt - Worth Fighting For is Andrew Bolt at the front-line of these most urgent debates. No other columnist in Australia generates the level of discussion that Andrew Bolt can. Anyone engaged in these debates must read this book. For some it will be ammunition, and for others it's fair warning. But for everyone, it's a test of their own values - and the reason they hold them.
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The Private Lives of the Tudors: Uncovering the Secrets of Britain's Greatest Dynasty

The Private Lives of the Tudors: Uncovering the Secrets of Britain's Greatest Dynasty

Tracy Borman

$35.00

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'I do not live in a corner. A thousand eyes see all I do.' Elizabeth I

The Tudor monarchs were constantly surrounded by an army of attendants, courtiers and ministers. Even in their most private moments, they were accompanied by a servant specifically appointed for the task. A groom of the stool would stand patiently by as Henry VIII performed his daily purges, and when Elizabeth I retired for the evening, one of her female servants would sleep at the end of her bed.
 
These attendants knew the truth behind the glamorous exterior. They saw the tears shed by Henry VII upon the death of his son Arthur. They knew the tragic secret behind 'Bloody' Mary's phantom pregnancies. And they saw the 'crooked carcass' beneath Elizabeth I's carefully applied makeup, gowns and accessories.
 
It is the accounts of these eyewitnesses, as well as a rich array of other contemporary sources that historian Tracy Borman has examined more closely than ever before. With new insights and discoveries, and in the same way that she brilliantly illuminated the real Thomas Cromwell - The Private Life of the Tudors will reveal previously unexamined details about the characters we think we know so well.
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The Mistress of Paris: The 19th-Century Courtesan Who Built an Empire on a Secret

The Mistress of Paris: The 19th-Century Courtesan Who Built an Empire on a Secret

Catherine Hewitt

$22.99

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Valtesse de la Bigne was a celebrated nineteenth-century Parisian courtesan. She was painted by Manet and inspired Emile Zola, who immortalised her in his scandalous novel Nana. Her rumoured affairs with Napoleon III and the future Edward VII kept gossip columns full. But her glamourous existence hid a dark secret: she was no Comtesse. She was born into abject poverty, raised on a squalid Paris backstreet; the lowest of the low. Yet she transformed herself into an enchantress who possessed a small fortune, three mansions, fabulous carriages, and art the envy of connoisseurs across Europe. A consummate show-woman, she ensured that her life - and even her death - remained shrouded in just enough mystery to keep her audience hungry for more. Catherine Hewitt's biography tells, for the first time ever in English, the forgotten story of a remarkable woman who, though her roots were lowly, never stopped aiming high.
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Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble

Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble

Antony Beevor

$35.00

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On 16 December, 1944, Hitler launched his 'last gamble' in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes. He believed he could split the Allies by driving all the way to Antwerp, then force the Canadians and the British out of the war.

Although his generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east. Many were exultant at the prospect of striking back.

The Ardennes offensive, with more than a million men involved, became the greatest battle of the war in western Europe. American troops, taken by surprise, found themselves fighting two panzer armies. Belgian civilians fled, justifiably afraid of German revenge. Panic spread even to Paris. While many American soldiers fled or surrendered, others held on heroically, creating breakwaters which slowed the German advance. The harsh winter conditions and the savagery of the battle became comparable to the eastern front. 

And after massacres by the Waffen-SS, even American generals approved when their men shot down surrendering Germans. The Ardennes was the battle which finally broke the back of the Wehrmacht.
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The House by the Lake

The House by the Lake

Thomas Harding

$24.99

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In the summer of 1993, Thomas Harding travelled to Berlin with his grandmother to visit a small house by a lake. It was her ‘soul place' she said – a sanctuary she had been forced to leave when the Nazis swept to power. The trip was a chance to see the house one last time, to remember it as it was. But the house had changed.

Twenty years later Thomas returned to Berlin. The house now stood empty, derelict, and soon to be demolished. A concrete footpath cut through the garden, marking where the Berlin Wall had stood for nearly three decades. Elsewhere were signs of what the house had once been – blue tiles showing behind wallpaper, phographs fallen between floorboards, flagstones covered in dirt. Evidence of five families who had made the house their home over a tumultuous century.

The House by the Lake is a groundbreaking work of history, revealing the story of Germany through the inhabitants of one small wooden building: a nobleman farmer, a prosperous Jewish family, a renowned Nazi composer, a widow and her children, a Stasi informant. Moving from the late nineteenth century to the present day, from the devastation of two world wars to the dividing and reuniting of a nation, it is a story of domestic joy and contentment, of terrible grief and tragedy, and of a hatred handed down through the generations.

Breathtaking in scope, intimate in detail, it is the long-awaited new history from the author of the bestselling Hanns and Rudolf.
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In Pursuit: The Men and Women Who Hunted the Nazis

In Pursuit: The Men and Women Who Hunted the Nazis

Andrew Nagorski

$35.00

More than seven decades after the end of the Second World War, the era of the Nazi Hunters is drawing to a close as they and the hunted die off. Their saga can now be told almost in its entirety. After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Many of the lower-ranking perpetrators quickly blended in with the millions who were seeking to rebuild their lives in a new Europe, while those who felt most at risk fled the continent. In Pursuit focuses on the small band of men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten-and who were determined to track them down to the furthest corners of the earth. The story of the Nazi hunters is coming to a natural end. It was unprecedented in so many ways, especially the degree to which the initial impulse of revenge was transformed into a struggle for justice. The Nazi hunters have transformed our fundamental notions of right and wrong. Andrew Nagorski's book is a richly reconstructed odyssey and an unforgettable tale of gritty determination, at times reckless behavior, and relentless pursuit.
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Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning

Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning

Timothy Snyder

$29.99

This book is long listed for the 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize. We have come to see the Holocaust as a factory of death, organised by bureaucrats. Yet by the time the gas chambers became operation more than a million European Jews were already dead: shot at close range over pits and ravines. They had been murdered in the lawless killing zones created by the German colonial war in the East, many on the fertile black earth that the Nazis believed would feed the German people. It comforts us to believe that the Holocaust was a unique event. But as Timothy Snyder shows, we have missed basic lessons of the history of the Holocaust, and some of our beliefs are frighteningly close to the ecological panic that Hitler expressed in the 1920s. As ideological and environmental challenges to the world order mount, our societies might be more vulnerable than we would like to think. Timothy Snyder's Bloodlands was an acclaimed exploration of what happened in eastern Europe between 1933 and 1945, when Nazi and Soviet policy brought death to some 14 million people. Black Earth is a deep exploration of the ideas and politics that enabled the worst of these policies, the Nazi extermination of the Jews. Its pioneering treatment of this unprecedented crime makes the Holocaust intelligible, and thus all the more terrifying.
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Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS

Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS

Joby Warrick

$24.99

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In a thrilling dramatic narrative, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Joby Warrick traces how the strain of militant Islam behind ISIS first arose in a remote Jordanian prison and spread to become the world's greatest threat.

When the government of Jordan granted amnesty to a group of political prisoners in 1999, it little realized that among them was Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a terrorist mastermind and soon the architect of an Islamist movement bent on dominating the Middle East. In Black Flags, an unprecedented character-driven account of the rise of ISIS, Joby Warrick shows how the zeal of this one man and the strategic mistakes of Western governments led to the banner of ISIS being raised over huge swathes of Syria and Iraq.

Zarqawi began by directing terror attacks from a base in northern Iraq, but it was the allied invasion in 2003 that catapulted him to the head of a vast insurgency. By falsely identifying him as the link between Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden, Western officials inadvertently spurred like-minded radicals to rally to his cause. Their wave of brutal beheadings and suicide bombings persisted until American and Jordanian intelligence discovered clues that led to a lethal airstrike on Zarqawi's hideout in 2006. His movement, however, endured.

First calling themselves al-Qaeda in Iraq, then Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, his followers sought refuge in unstable, ungoverned pockets on the Iraq-Syria border. When the Syrian civil war broke out in 2011, and the rest of the world largely stood by, ISIS seized its chance to pursue Zarqawi's dream of an ultra-conservative Islamic caliphate.

Drawing on unique high-level access to global intelligence sources, Warrick weaves gripping, moment-by-moment operational details with the perspectives of diplomats and spies, generals and heads of state, many of whom foresaw a menace worse than al Qaeda and tried desperately to stop it.

Black Flags is a brilliant and definitive history that reveals the long arc of today's most dangerous extremist threat.
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The Wright Brothers: The Dramatic Story Behind the Legend

The Wright Brothers: The Dramatic Story Behind the Legend

David McCullough

$24.99

On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe what had happened: the age of flight had begun, with the first heavier-than-air, powered machine carrying a pilot.

Who were these men and how was it that they achieved what they did?

David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, tells the surprising, profoundly human story of Wilbur and Orville Wright. Far more than a couple of unschooled Dayton bicycle mechanics who happened to hit on success, they were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity, much of which they attributed to their upbringing.

In this thrilling book, McCullough draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including private diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence to tell the human side of the Wright Brothers' story, including the little-known contributions of their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them.
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Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets

Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets

Svetlana Alexievich ,  Bela Shayevich

$34.99

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From the 2015 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, Svetlana Alexievich, comes the first English translation of her latest work, an oral history of the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the emergence of a new Russia. Bringing together dozens of voices in her distinctive documentary style, Second-Hand Time is a monument to the collapse of the USSR, charting the decline of Soviet culture and speculating on what will rise from the ashes of Communism. As in all her books, Alexievich gives voice to women and men whose stories are lost in the official narratives of nation-states, creating a powerful alternative history from the personal and private stories of individuals.
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The Secret War: Spies, Codes and Guerrillas 1939-1945

The Secret War: Spies, Codes and Guerrillas 1939-1945

Sir Max Hastings

$24.99

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In 'The Secret War', Max Hastings presents a worldwide cast of characters and extraordinary sagas of intelligence and Resistance to create a new perspective on the greatest conflict in history. The book links tales of high courage ashore, at sea and in the air to the work of the brilliant 'boffins' battling the enemy's technology. Here are not only the unheralded codebreaking geniuses of Bletchley Park, but also their German counterparts who achieved their own triumphs and the fabulous espionage networks created, and so often spurned, by the Soviet Union. With its stories of high policy and human drama, the book has been acclaimed as the best history of the secret war ever written.
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East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Philippe Sands

$32.99

When human rights lawyer Philippe Sands received an invitation to deliver a lecture in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv, he began to uncover a series of extraordinary historical coincidences. It set him on a quest that would take him halfway around the world in an exploration of the origins of international law and the pursuit of his own secret family history, beginning and ending with the last day of the Nuremberg trial.
 
Part historical detective story, part family history, part legal thriller, Philippe Sands guides us between past and present as several interconnected stories unfold in parallel. The first is the hidden story of two Nuremberg prosecutors who discover, only at the end of the trial, that the man they are prosecuting may be responsible for the murder of their entire families in Nazi-occupied Poland, in and around Lviv. The two prosecutors, Hersch Lauterpacht and Rafael Lemkin, were remarkable men, whose efforts led to the inclusion of the terms 'crimes against humanity' and 'genocide' in the judgement at Nuremberg. The defendant, Hans Frank, Hitler's personal lawyer and Governor-General of Nazi-occupied Poland, turns out to be an equally compelling character.
 
The lives of these three men lead Sands to a more personal story, as he traces the events that overwhelmed his mother's family in Lviv and Vienna during the Second World War. At the heart of this book is an equally personal quest to understand the roots of international law and the concepts that have dominated Sands' work as a lawyer. Eventually, he finds unexpected answers to his questions about his family, in this powerful meditation on the way memory, crime and guilt leave scars across generations, and the haunting gaps left by the secrets of others.
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Crusade and Jihad: Origins, History, Aftermath

Crusade and Jihad: Origins, History, Aftermath

Malcolm Lambert

$44.99

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Malcolm Lambert's investigation of the medieval origins of crusade and jihad casts a clear light on their contemporary meanings in the West and Middle East.

Malcolm Lambert looks afresh at the Christian and Islamic struggle to control the holy places of Palestine and the Middle East between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. Crusade and jihad are often reckoned to be two sides of the same coin: both resonate on opposing sides in the war on terror. This simple opposition, Dr Lambert argues, ignores crucial differences in their origins and meanings. He compares their early development in a narrative that places an equal emphasis on the complex inner histories of both Christendom and Islam, each of which were and are subject to internal tensions and dissent.

The final chapters consider their long afterlife, including the nineteenth-century French imperial crusade to bring what they saw as their enlightened civilisation to a benighted world; the benign heritage of the Knights Hospitallers and the Royal National Lifeboat Association and the St John Ambulance Brigade; and the terrorists operating in the name of holy jihad in the Middle East, Africa, Europe and elsewhere.
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Sicily: Culture and Conquest

Sicily: Culture and Conquest

Dirk Booms ,  Peter Higgs

$60.00

Sicily's central location and natural resources have meant that various peoples have sought to conquer, control and settle on the island throughout its 3000 - year history. Its Italian identity, with which we are familiar today, emerges only comparatively recently. It was under the rule of the ancient Greeks and medieval Normans that Sicily really flourished - golden eras when it became a serious political player and one of the wealthiest and most culturally prosperous places in Europe. Through an engaging text, exploring themes such as art, architecture and culture, and a remarkable selection of objects, from monumental metopes and beautiful mosaics to reliquary pendants and chess pieces (many revealing a distinct Sicilian character and style), this book provides a visually stunning insight into the key periods of Sicily's extraordinary past.
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The Tale of the Axe: How the Neolithic Revolution Transformed Britain

The Tale of the Axe: How the Neolithic Revolution Transformed Britain

David Miles

$40.00

Focusing on the British Isles, the author explores a period of huge societal change - the Neolithic, or 'New Stone Age' - through the most iconic artifact of its time: the polished stone axe, using his own ancient stone axe-head, given to him by a local quarry worker, as a guide to the revolution that changed the world. These formidable creations were not only crucial tools that enabled the first farmers to clear the forests, but also objects of great symbolic importance, signifying status and power, wrapped up in expressions of religion and politics. Mixing anecdote, ethnography and archaeological analysis, the author vividly demonstrates how the archaeology on the ground reveals to us the evolving worldview of a species increasingly altering their own landscape; settling down together, investing in agricultural plots, and collectively erecting massive ceremonial monuments to cement new communal identities. As a direct result of the invention, and intensification, of agriculture, the planet entered the Anthropocene, or the current 'age of humanity': an era in which we are changing the world around us in significant, accelerating and often unpredictable ways. As the author poignantly concludes, our ancestors set us on the path to the modern world we live in; now seven billion humans must face the challenges that presents.
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Nectar and Illusion: Nature in Byzantine Art and Literature

Nectar and Illusion: Nature in Byzantine Art and Literature

Henry Maguire

$41.95

Nature and Illusion is the first extended treatment of the portrayal of nature in Byzantine art and literature.

In this richly illustrated study, Henry Maguire shows how the Byzantines embraced terrestrial creation in the decoration of their churches during the fifth to seventh centuries but then adopted a much more cautious attitude toward the depiction of animals and plants in the middle ages, after the iconoclastic dispute of the eighth and ninth centuries.

In the medieval period, the art of Byzantine churches became more anthropocentric and less accepting of natural images. The danger that the latter might be put to idolatrous use created a constant state of tension between worldliness, represented by nature, and otherworldliness, represented by the portrait icons of the saints.

The book discusses the role of iconoclasm in affecting this fundamental change in Byzantine art, as both sides in the controversy accused the other of "worshipping the creature rather than the Creator." An important theme is the asymmetrical relationship between Byzantine art and literature with respect to the portrayal of nature.

A series of vivid texts described seasons, landscapes, gardens, and animals, but these were more sparingly illustrated in medieval art. Maguire concludes by discussing the abstraction of nature in the form of marble floors and revetments and with a consideration of the role of architectural backgrounds in medieval Byzantine art.

Throughout Nature and Illusion, medieval Byzantine art is compared with that of Western Europe, where different conceptions of religious imagery allowed a closer engagement with nature.
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In Search of the Irish Dreamtime: Archaeology and Early Irish Literature

In Search of the Irish Dreamtime: Archaeology and Early Irish Literature

J.P. Mallory

$42.00

Following his account of Irish origins as evidenced by archaeology, genetics and linguistics, J. P. Mallory returns to the subject to interrogate what he calls the 'Irish Dreamtime': the native Irish retelling of their own origins, as related by medieval manuscripts. He attempts to explore the reality of this version of the earliest history of Ireland, which places apparently 'mythological' events on a concrete timeline of invasions, colonizations and royal reigns that extends even further back in time than the history of Classical Greece. Can the accounts of this 'Dreamtime' really inform us of the way of life in Iron Age Ireland? By comparing the world depicted in the earliest Irish literary tradition with the archaeological evidence available on the ground, Mallory explores Ireland's rich mythological tradition and tests its claims to represent reality.
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Greek Homosexuality: Updated and with a New Postscript

Greek Homosexuality: Updated and with a New Postscript

K. J. Dover

$54.99

Hailed as magisterial when it first appeared, Greek Homosexuality remains an academic milestone and continues to be of major importance for students and scholars of gender studies. Kenneth Dover explores the understanding of homosexuality in ancient Greece, examining a vast array of material and textual evidence that leads him to provocative conclusions. This new release of the 1989 second edition, for which Dover wrote an epilogue reflecting on the impact of his book, includes two specially commissioned forewords assessing the author's legacy and the place of his text within modern studies of gender in the ancient world.
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Magna Carta: The True Story Behind the Charter

Magna Carta: The True Story Behind the Charter

David Starkey

$19.99

At Runnymede, on the banks of the River Thames, on 15 June 1215, the seal of King John was attached to the Magna Carta, and peace descended upon the land. Or that's what successive generations have believed. But is it true? And have we been persuaded (or persuaded ourselves) that the events of 15 June 1215 not only ended a civil war between the king and the barons but - as if by magic - established a British constitution beloved and copied throughout the world?  Informative, entertaining and controversial, Magna Carta: The True Story Behind the Charter challenges centuries of myth-making to demonstrate how important it is we understand the true significance of that day beside the Thames, eight hundred years ago.
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Henry the Young King, 1155-1183

Henry the Young King, 1155-1183

Matthew Strickland

$81.00

This first modern study of Henry the Young King, eldest son of Henry II but the least known Plantagenet monarch, explores the brief but eventful life of the only English ruler after the Norman Conquest to be created co-ruler in his father's lifetime. Crowned at fifteen to secure an undisputed succession, Henry played a central role in the politics of Henry II's great empire and was hailed as the embodiment of chivalry. Yet, consistently denied direct rule, the Young King was provoked first into heading a major rebellion against his father, then to waging a bitter war against his brother Richard for control of Aquitaine, dying before reaching the age of thirty having never assumed actual power. In this remarkable history, Matthew Strickland provides a richly colored portrait of an all-but-forgotten royal figure tutored by Thomas Becket, trained in arms by the great knight William Marshal, and incited to rebellion by his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine, while using his career to explore the nature of kingship, succession, dynastic politics, and rebellion in twelfth-century England and France.
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The Life and Reign of Edward the Fourth: King of England and of France and Lord of Ireland: Volume One

The Life and Reign of Edward the Fourth: King of England and of France and Lord of Ireland: Volume One

Cora L. Scofield ,  Ralph A. Griffiths

$55.00

Edward IV, (1442-1483) was King of England from 4 March 1461 until 3 October 1470, and again from 11 April 1471 until his death on 9 April 1483.

In a turbulent world marred by civil war, Edward, 4th Duke of York - with good title to the throne - overthrew the corrupt government of the weak and feeble-minded Henry VI, setting the foundation stones for a strong and prosperous England. He was an able and successful king who rescued England from the misery of war and created her with a firm, judicious and popular government. Like his grandson, Henry VIII, he was tall and handsome as a young man. Also like his grandson he was pleasure-loving, and in his later years he was increasingly arbitrary and avaricious. Not withstanding this, he proved capable of creating a successful and highly personal monarchy which in many ways set the scene for the Tudor monarchs who ruled throughout the sixteenth century through the bloodline of his eldest daughter, Elizabeth.

Cora L. Scofield's two volumes are a magisterial record of this reign. Although other biographies have appeared, none have replaced this solid work of scholarship. In his authoritative and best-selling biography of Edward IV in 1975, Professor Charles Ross said '...my attempt... has necessarily involved some foreshortening, and for details one must still refer to Miss C. L. Scofield's elaborate... account of Yorkist foreign policy.'
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The Life and Reign of Edward the Fourth: King of England and of France and Lord of Ireland: Volume Two

The Life and Reign of Edward the Fourth: King of England and of France and Lord of Ireland: Volume Two

Cora L. Scofield ,  Ralph A. Griffiths

$55.00

Edward IV, (1442-1483) was King of England from 4 March 1461 until 3 October 1470, and again from 11 April 1471 until his death on 9 April 1483.

In a turbulent world marred by civil war, Edward, 4th Duke of York-with good title to the throne-overthrew the corrupt government of the weak and feeble-minded Henry VI, setting the foundation stones for a strong and prosperous England. He was an able and successful king who rescued England from the misery of war and created her with a firm, judicious and popular government. Like his grandson, Henry VIII, he was tall and handsome as a young man. Also like his grandson he was pleasure-loving, and in his later years he was increasingly arbitrary and avaricious.

Notwithstanding this, he proved capable of creating a successful and highly personal monarchy which in many ways set the scene for the Tudor monarchs who ruled throughout the sixteenth century through the bloodline of his eldest daughter, Elizabeth.

Cora L. Scofield's two volumes are a magisterial record of this reign. Although other biographies have appeared, none have replaced this solid work of scholarship.  In his authoritative and best-selling biography of Edward IV in 1975, Professor Charles Ross said '...my attempt... has necessarily involved some foreshortening, and for details one must still refer to Miss C. L. Scofield's elaborate... account of Yorkist foreign policy.'
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A Short History of the Normans

A Short History of the Normans

Leonie V. Hicks

$31.95

The Battle of Hastings in 1066 is the one date forever seared on the British national psyche. It enabled the Norman Conquest that marked the end of Anglo-Saxon England. But there was much more to the Normans than the invading army Duke William shipped over from Normandy to the shores of Sussex. How a band of marauding warriors established some of the most powerful kingdoms in Europe - in Sicily and France, as well as England - is an improbably romantic idea. In exploring Norman culture in all its regions, Leonie V Hicks places the Normans in the context of early medieval society. Her comparative perspective enables the Norman story to be told in full, so that the societies of Rollo, William, Robert and Roger Guiscard are given the focused attention they deserve. From Hastings to the martial exploits of Bohemond and Tancred on the First Crusade; from castles and keeps to Romanesque cathedrals; and from the founding of the Kingdom of Sicily (1130) to cross-cultural encounters with Byzantines and Muslims, this is a fresh and lively survey of one of the most popular topics in European history.
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A Thyme and Place: Medieval Feasts and Recipes for the Modern Table

A Thyme and Place: Medieval Feasts and Recipes for the Modern Table

Lisa Graves ,  Tricia Cohen

$24.99

Revive your inner period cook and master the art of gode cookery with thirty-five recipes celebrating festivals throughout the year!

Fancy a leap back in time to the kitchens in the Middle Ages, where cauldrons bubbled over hearths, whole oxen were roasted over spits, and common cooking ingredients included verjuice, barley, peafowl, frumenty, and elder flowers? You, too, can learn the art of gode cookery - or, at least, come close to it.

With gorgeous and whimsical hand-drawn illustrations from beginning to end, A Thyme and Place is both a cookbook and a history for foodies and history buffs alike. Cohen and Graves revive old original medieval recipes and reimagine and modify them to suit modern palates and tastes.
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Frederick Barbarossa: A Prince and the Myth

Frederick Barbarossa: A Prince and the Myth

John Freed

$83.00

Frederick Barbarossa, born of two of Germany's most powerful families, swept to the imperial throne in a coup d'etat in 1152. A leading monarch of the Middle Ages, he legalized the dualism between the crown and the princes that endured until the end of the Holy Roman Empire. This new biography, the first in English in four decades, paints a rich picture of a consummate diplomat and effective warrior. John Freed mines Barbarossa's recently published charters and other sources to illuminate the monarch's remarkable ability to rule an empire that stretched from the Baltic to Rome, and from France to Poland. Offering a fresh assessment of the role of Barbarossa's extensive familial network in his success, the author also considers the impact of Frederick's death in the Third Crusade as the key to his lasting heroic reputation. In an intriguing epilogue, Freed explains how Hitler's audacious attack on the Soviet Union in 1941 came to be called Operation Barbarossa.
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Caesar's Heirs: Wolves in the Forum

Caesar's Heirs: Wolves in the Forum

John Bassett

$59.99

Caesar's Heirs is the first full-length English-language military history in recent times of the wars that wracked Rome from the assassination of Caesar to the Battle of Actium. 

Volume I, Wolves in the Forum covers events down to the defeat of the last Republicans at Philippi. It is the story of how ruthless warlords gambled everything and broke every rule in their quest for power. The book describes and analyses the objectives, strategies and forces of such figures as the rakish and implacable Mark Antony, the sinister and brilliant Octavian, Brutus, Cassius and Lepidus. Battles, from the Alps to Syria and across the Mediterranean Sea are described in great detail. Characters such as Cleopatra of Egypt and the doomed orator Cicero also appear in the story. It draws on extensive research, a detailed understanding of the original sources in Latin and Greek and knowledge of the ground where many of these remarkable events took place. 

The book is written in a crisp, compelling style, with incidental insights into matters such as Roman food, sex and wine, as well as the great generals and battles of the time.
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Roman Conquests: The Danube Frontier

Roman Conquests: The Danube Frontier

Michael Schmitz ,  Graham Sumner

$59.99

The Roman conquests of Macedonia in the 2nd century BC led directly to the extension of their authority over the troublesome tribes of Thrace to the south of the Danube. But their new neighbour on the other side of the mighty river, the kingdom of the Dacians, was to pose an increasing threat to the Roman empire. Inevitably this eventually provoked Roman attempts at invasion and conquest. 

It is a measure of Dacian prowess and resilience that several tough campaigns were required over more than a century before their kingdom was added to the Roman Empire. It was one of the Empire's last major acquisitions (and a short-lived one at that). Dr Michael Schmitz traces Roman involvement in the Danube region from first contact with the Thracians after the Third Macedonian War in the 2nd century BC to the ultimate conquest of Dacia by Trajan in the early years of the 2nd Century AD.

Like the other volumes in this series, this book gives a clear narrative of the course of these wars, explaining how the Roman war machine coped with formidable new foes and the challenges of unfamiliar terrain and climate.  Specially-commissioned colour plates bring the main troop types vividly to life in meticulously-researched detail.
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Daily Life in Ancient Rome: A Sourcebook

Daily Life in Ancient Rome: A Sourcebook

Brian K. Harvey

$38.00

One really must admire Harvey's achievement in this sourcebook. With just 350 passages (more than half of them consisting of Latin inscriptions, from all over Rome's empire), Harvey manages to give his readers a real sense of Roman private values and behaviors. His translations of the original texts are superb-both accurate and elegant. And he contextualizes his chosen passages with a series of remarkably economical but solidly reliable introductions.
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Roman Army Units in the Western Provinces 1: 31 BC-AD 195

Roman Army Units in the Western Provinces 1: 31 BC-AD 195

Raffaele D'Amato ,  Raffaele Ruggeri

$22.99

At its height the Roman Empire stretched across Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, maintained by an army of modest size but great diversity. In popular culture these soldiers are often portrayed in a generic fashion, but continuing research indicates significant variations in Roman armour and equipment not only between different legions and the provincially-raised auxiliary cohorts that made up half of the army, but also between different regions within the empire. With reference to the latest archaeological and documentary evidence Dr D'Amato investigates how Roman Army units in the Western provinces were equipped, exploring the local influences and traditions that caused the variations in attire.
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The Roman Law of Obligations

The Roman Law of Obligations

Peter Birks ,  Eric Descheemaeker

$52.95

The Roman Law of Obligations presents a series of lectures delivered by the late Peter Birks as an introductory course in Roman law. Discovered in complete manuscript form following his death, the lectures are published here for the first time. The lectures present a clear conceptual map of the Roman law of obligations, guiding readers through the institutional structure of contract, delict, quasi-contract, and quasi-delict. They introduce readers to the terminology needed to understand the foundations of Roman law, and the conceptual framework of the law of obligations that left an enduring legacy on European private law. The lectures offer an invaluable introduction to Roman private law for those coming to the subject for the first time. They will also make stimulating reading for academics and lawyers interested in Roman law, European legal history, and the lasting influence of Roman law on modern private law.
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Rome Spreads Her Wings: Territorial Expansion Between the Punic Wars

Rome Spreads Her Wings: Territorial Expansion Between the Punic Wars

Gareth Sampson

$80.00

The two decades between the end of the First Punic War and the beginning of the Second represent a key period in the development of Rome's imperial ambitions, both within Italy and beyond. Within Italy, Rome faced an invasion of Gauls from Northern Italy, which threatened the very existence of the Roman state. This war culminated at the Battle of Telamon and the final Roman victory against the Gauls of Italy, giving Rome control of the peninsula up to the Alps for the first time in her history.

Beyond the shores of Italy, Rome acquired her first provinces, in the form of Sardinia and Corsica, established footholds in Sicily and Spain and crossed the Adriatic to establish a presence on the Greek mainland, bringing Rome into the orbit of the Hellenistic World. Yet this period is often treated as nothing more than an intermission between the two better known Punic Wars, with each Roman campaign being made seemingly in anticipation of a further conflict with Carthage.

Such a view overlooks two key factors that emerge from these decades: firstly, that Rome faced a far graver threat in the form of the Gauls of Northern Italy than she had faced at the hands of the Carthaginians in the First Punic War; secondly, that the foundations for Rome's overseas empire were laid in these very decades. 

This work seeks to redress the balance and view these wars in their own right, analyse how close Rome came to being defeated in Italy and asses the importance of these decades as a key period in the foundation of Rome's future empire.
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Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori: Dulka Warngiid - Land of All

Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori: Dulka Warngiid - Land of All

Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA)

$34.95

This beautifully illustrated publication will feature some 50 works drawn from public and private collections in an exhibition surveying the life and work of the late Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda (Sally Gabori) c.1924–2015, the distinguished senior Kaiadilt woman artist from Bentinck Island in the Queensland’s Gulf of Carpentaria. One of Australia’s most extraordinary practitioners, Mrs Gabori was incredibly prolific over her short career.

Her indefatigable zeal to communicate her stories, knowledge, and experiences accumulated over an incredible life - spanning over 90 years from traditional life to the coming of the Australian frontier to contemporary globalised Australia - won her great admiration and has left an astonishing cultural legacy. Mrs Gabori’s works had undergone significant stylistic changes over the past decade and groups of works from these periods will be assembled to illustrate the development of Mrs Gabori’s practice. These include her early paintings as featured in the 2006 ‘Xstrata Coal Emerging Indigenous Art Award’ exhibition at the Queensland Art Gallery, her more abstract works of the following years, her iconic large-scale collaborative works with other Kaiadilt women, collaborative works painted with her daughters, through to her almost monochromatic paintings and works on paper produced at the end of her career.

Most of Mrs Gabori’s works celebrate Dibirdibi Country, on Bentinck Island, the land associated with Dibirdibi (The Rock Cod Ancestor), that Mrs Gabori maintained along with her husband Dibirdibi (Pat Gabori) before moving to Mornington Island. Mrs Gabori’s intense focus on this place of stories is transcendent. Dibirdibi is not only her country, but a place of deep and intense personal connection.
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A Country Too Far: Writings on Asylum Seekers

A Country Too Far: Writings on Asylum Seekers

Rosie Scott ,  Tom Keneally

$24.99

One of the central moral issues of our time is the question of asylum seekers, arguably the most controversial subject in Australia today.

In this landmark anthology, twenty-seven of Australia's finest writers have focused their intelligence and creativity on the theme of the dispossessed, bringing a whole new perspective of depth and truthfulness to what has become a fraught, distorted war of words. This anthology confirms that the experience of seeking asylum – the journeys of escape from death, starvation, poverty or terror to an imagined paradise – is part of the Australian mindset and deeply embedded in our culture and personal histories.

A Country Too Far is a tour de force of stunning fiction, memoir, poetry and essays. Edited by award-winning writers Rosie Scott and Tom Keneally, and featuring contributors including Anna Funder, Christos Tsiolkas, Elliot Perlman, Gail Jones, Raimond Gaita, Les Murray, Rodney Hall and Geraldine Brooks, this rich anthology is by turns thoughtful, fierce, evocative, lyrical and moving, and always extraordinarily powerful.

A Country Too Far makes an indispensable contribution to the national debate.
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Gay and Lesbian, Then and Now: Australian Stories from a Social Revolution

Gay and Lesbian, Then and Now: Australian Stories from a Social Revolution

Robert Reynolds ,  Shirleene Robinson

$29.99

This is the story of a peaceful revolution. Drawing on in-depth interviews, it tells the intimate life stories of thirteen gay and lesbian Australians ranging in age from twenties to eighties. From the underground beats of 1950s Brisbane and illicit relationships in the armed services, to Grindr, foster parenting and wedding sin the twenty-first century, Gay & Lesbian, Then & Now reveals the remarkable social shifts from one generation to the next. Gay & Lesbian, Then & Now reveals the legacies of homophobia, the personal struggles and triumphs involved in coming out, and the many different ways of being gay or lesbian in Australia i then and now. It is a moving account of a quiet revolution.
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Meanjin Vol 75, No 2: Culture Wars

Meanjin Vol 75, No 2: Culture Wars

Jonathan Green

$24.99

The Meanjin winter issue takes on the culture wars. It's an essential primer in this election season written by Melbourne academic Mark Davis, the man who brought you Gangland, the book that revealed the baby boomer cultural monopoly. Now Davis turns his attention to the shady world of cultural politics, a world dominated by race, climate, and irrational fear. Why does our public debate keep retreating to the familiar tropes of the culture wars, and why does this conversation feature so many recurring themes and characters?

Elsewhere in the issue, Clive James muses on writing, death and epitaphs ahead of the publication of his Collected Poems. Jenny Hocking traces the profound links between Australian Rules football and the Indigenous Australian game of Marngrook, while Robyn Annear marvels at her mother's hair. There's a critical essay on a favourite piece of fiction from Anna Funder, and a serious piece of research from Denis Muller that details just what the Australian public really thinks about immigration and asylum seekers. Katharine Murphy reflects on a working life punctuated by election campaigns and the lessons they offer, Osman Faruqi wonders just why it is.
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Only in Australia: The History, Politics, and Economics of Australian Exceptionalism

Only in Australia: The History, Politics, and Economics of Australian Exceptionalism

William Coleman

$71.95

This edited volume is about the Australian difference and how Australia's economic and social policy has diverged from the approach of other countries.

Australia seems to be following a 'special path' of its own that it laid down more than a century ago. Australia's distinctive bent is manifested in a tightly regulated labour market; a heavy reliance on means testing and income taxation; a geographical centralization of political power combined with its dispersal amongst autonomous authorities, and electoral singularities such as compulsory and preferential voting.

In seeking to explain this Australian Exceptionalism, the book covers a diverse range of issues: the strength and weakness of religion, democratic and undemocratic tendencies, the poverty of public debate, the role of elites, the exploitation of Australian sports stars, the politics of railways, the backwardness of agriculture, deviation from the Westminster system, the original encounter between European and Aboriginal cultures, and the heavy taxation of tobacco.

Bringing together contributions from economists, economic historians, and political scientists, the volume seeks to understand why Australia is different. It offers a range of explanations from the 'historical legacy', to material factors, historical chance, and personalities.
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Trouble: On Trial in Central Australia

Trouble: On Trial in Central Australia

Kieran Finnane

$29.95

Violence, often fatal, is at the heart of these stories, yet go into any courthouse and you will find examples of the same. If they demand attention here, it is in part because of their prevalence. The Northern Territory has the worst homicide rate in the country. On the streets of Alice Springs, in town camps, drinking camps and out on the highway, in gatherings awash with alcohol, men kill one another in seemingly senseless acts of aggression and revenge. Men kill their wives, families feud, women join the fighting and, in the wings, children watch and learn. From the ordered environment of the courtroom, Trouble lays out in detail some of this deep disorder in the towni s recent history. Drawing on her decades as a journalist in Central Australia, as well as experience of its everyday life, Kieran Finnane recognises a story beyond the horror and tragedy of the events, the guilt or innocence of perpetrators, to witness a town and region being painfully remade. In this groundbreaking book, we hear the voices from Australiai s troubled heart and gain a unique insight into the challenges and potential of this hard and beautiful place.
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Libyan Air Wars, Part 3: 1985-1989

Libyan Air Wars, Part 3: 1985-1989

Arnaud Delande ,  Albert Grandolini ,  Tom Cooper

$42.95

Confrontations between Libya, and the USA and France reached their highest point in the period between April 1986 and early 1989. In response to a Libyan-instigated and supported series of terror attacks against US citizens and interests in Europe, in April 1986 the USA launched Operation El Dorado Canoyon - a series of raids against carefully selected targets in Libya.

Simultaneously, the USA and France bolstered the military of the Chadian government, enabling it to subsequently launch an all-out advance against Libyan troops and proxy forces in the north of Libya. This culminated in the series of spectacular campaigns better known as 'Toyota Wars', characterised by high speed of operations and surprise. The Chadian Army defeated its opponents in 1987 and nearly launched an invasion of Libya in 1988, successfully concluding this conflict. This title closes the Libyan Air Wars mini-series with a detailed insight into the final US-Libyan confrontation, which took place in early 1989, and culminated in another high-profile air combat between the most modern jet fighters of the Libyan Arab Air Force, and the US Navy. 

As usual, the volume is richly illustrated by well over 150 contemporary and exclusive photographs, colour profiles, and maps, detailing the history, training, equipment, markings and tactics of the involved air forces.
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The Looting Machine: Warlords, Tycoons, Smugglers and the Systematic Theft of Africa's Wealth

The Looting Machine: Warlords, Tycoons, Smugglers and the Systematic Theft of Africa's Wealth

Tom Burgis

$24.99

A shocking investigative journey into the way the resource trade wreaks havoc on Africa, 'The Looting Machine' explores the dark underbelly of the global economy. 'The Looting Machine' is a searing expose of the global web of traders, bankers, middlemen, despots and corporate raiders that is pillaging Africa's vast natural wealth. From the killing fields of Congo to the crude-slicked creeks of Nigeria, a great endowment of oil, diamonds, copper, iron, gold and coltan has become a curse that condemns millions to poverty, violence and oppression. That curse is no accident. This gripping investigative journey takes us into the shadows of the world economy, where secretive networks conspire with Africa's kleptocrats to bleed the continent dry. And like their victims, the beneficiaries of this grand looting have names.
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The Lost Tomb of King Arthur: The Search for Camelot and the Isle of Avalon

The Lost Tomb of King Arthur: The Search for Camelot and the Isle of Avalon

Graham Phillips

$31.95

One of the most enigmatic figures in world history, King Arthur has been the subject of many fantastical tales over the past 1500 years, leading many scholars to regard him and his fabled city of Camelot simply as myth. But, as Graham Phillips shows through a wealth of literary and scientific evidence, King Arthur was a real man, Camelot a real place, and the legendary Excalibur a real sword - and Phillips has located them all. The culmination of 25 years of research, including new translations of primary source material, this book provides the necessary evidence to allow King Arthur to finally be accepted as the authentic British king he was.
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Weapons of the Gods: How Ancient Alien Civilizations Almost Destroyed the Earth

Weapons of the Gods: How Ancient Alien Civilizations Almost Destroyed the Earth

Nick Redfern

$31.99

In 1945, the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki became the first and last victims of the atom bomb, the most destructive man-made force our planet has ever known.

Or were they just the latest in a long line of Armageddon-level events? Is it possible that our civilization is, in reality, just one of many? Did previous cultures blossom, develop, and thrive, only to destroy themselves, tens or hundreds of thousands of years ago, with the same atomic technology?

These are the controversial and thought-provoking questions at the heart of Nick Redfern's Weapons of the Gods, which argues that many ancient civilizations cracked the secrets of the atom, only to become the victims of its awesome, terrifying power. Still others may have been destroyed by hostile aliens with their own nuclear arsenals.

Where is the evidence? The answer is shockingly simple: it's everywhere. It's just a matter of knowing where to look for it, from the biblical cities of Sodom and Gomorrah and the ancient Pakistani culture of Mohenjo-daro, Pakistan, to the Lonar Crater in India and the revelations in the Ramayana and Mahabharata, two ancient Sanskrit texts that describe nuclear warfare thousands of years ago.
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Fromelles: Our Darkest Day

Fromelles: Our Darkest Day

Patrick Lindsay

$29.99

One hundred years ago, on 19 July 1916, in the French village of Fromelles, Australia suffered its worst ever military defeat when a British officer ordered 15,000 of Australia's best and bravest to go 'over the top' and attack the German lines. Eight hours later more than 5500 Diggers lay dead or wounded - the equivalent of all Australian casualties from the Boer, Korean and Vietnam wars combined. Many of those who died disappeared from the official record, their fate remaining unknown for close to a century. In this evocative and enthralling retelling, Patrick Lindsay takes us back to the killing fields of northern France. Fromelles is also the story of the quest to find the missing Diggers from the WWI battle. Covering the archaeological dig at Pheasant Wood which confirmed, at last, the final resting place of up to 400 missing Diggers and Tommies buried by the Germans after the battle. This discovery was the largest mass grave found since the Second World War. The recovery of the missing Diggers remains and the names of those who have been identified from their DNA, as well as the opening of the new Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) Military Cemetary are also included.
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Maralinga: The Chilling Expose of Our Secret Nuclear Shame and Betrayal of Our Troops and Country

Maralinga: The Chilling Expose of Our Secret Nuclear Shame and Betrayal of Our Troops and Country

Frank Walker

$19.99

This edition contains a new author note with shocking new material that has come to light as a result of the groundbreaking original publication.

Investigative journalist Frank Walker's Maralinga is a must-read true story of the abuse of our servicemen, scientists treating the Australian population as lab rats, and politicians sacrificing their own people in the pursuit of power.

During the Menzies era, with the blessing of the Prime Minister, the British government exploded twelve atomic bombs on Australian soil. RAAF pilots were ordered to fly into nuclear mushroom clouds, soldiers told to walk into radioactive ground zero, sailors retrieved highly contaminated debris - none of them aware of the dangers they faced.

But the betrayal didn't end with these servicemen. Secret monitoring stations were set up around the country to measure radiation levels and a clandestine decades-long project stole bones from dead babies to see how much fallout had contaminated their bodies - their grieving parents were never told. This chilling expose drawn from extensive research and interviews with surviving veterans reveals the betrayal of our troops and our country.
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Australians on the Somme 1916: Pozieres

Australians on the Somme 1916: Pozieres

Graham Keech

$19.99

The village sits on top of the ridge that bears its name, a ridge that was an objective on the 1st July 1916. As it was, the whole position was not finally cleared until early September 1916 as German, Australian and British troops fought tenaciously over it.

This edition of Pozieres joins over 140 published titles in the acclaimed Battleground series. These well written and highly illustrated guide books not only bring the battlefields alive for visitors but inform and entertain readers at home.
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Ford Australia

Ford Australia

Doug Wallace ,  Michele Cook

$60.00

This book chronicles the 88 years in which Ford built cars in Australia for Australian conditions and interviews many of the people who worked for the company. It constitutes the complete history of Ford production in this country, with many rare images and essential production statistics. The perfect book for every Ford enthusiast, or anyone with an affinity for cars or industrial Australia.
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Why Australia Prospered: The Shifting Sources of Economic Growth

Why Australia Prospered: The Shifting Sources of Economic Growth

Ian W. McLean

$48.95

How did Australia attain the world's highest living standards within a few decades of European settlement? And how has the nation sustained an enviable level of income to the present? Beginning with the Aboriginal economy at the end of the eighteenth century, Ian McLean reveals the striking elements of continuity that have underpinned the evolution of the country's economy since the nineteenth century.
 
In this comprehensive account, McLean argues that Australia's prosperity was reached and maintained through several shifting factors, including British imperial policies, abundant natural resources, and strategic growth-enhancing responses to major economic shocks such as war and depression. Even the country's proximity to Asia and notorious origins as a convict settlement positively influenced Australia's remarkable development. Why Australia Prospered is a fascinating historical examination of how Australia cultivated and sustained economic growth and success.
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Health, Medicine, and the Sea: Australian Voyages, c.1815-60

Health, Medicine, and the Sea: Australian Voyages, c.1815-60

Katherine Foxhall

$41.95

During the nineteenth century, over 1.5 million migrants set sail from the British Isles to begin new lives in the Australian colonies. Health, medicine and the sea follows these people on a fascinating journey around half the globe to give a rich account of the creation of lay and professional medical knowledge in an ever-changing maritime environment. From consumptive convicts who pleaded that going to sea was their only chance of recovery, to sailors who performed macabre 'medical' rituals during equatorial ceremonies off the African coast, to surgeons' formal experiments with scurvy in the southern hemisphere oceans, to furious letters from quarantined emigrants just a few miles from Sydney, this wide-ranging and evocative study brings the experience and meaning of voyaging to life. Katherine Foxhall makes an important contribution to the history of medicine, imperialism and migration which will appeal to students and researchers alike.
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The  London Treasury

The London Treasury

Lucinda Hawksley

$19.99

London is now some 2,000 years old, and for the last thousand has been one of the greatest cities on earth. Engulfed in calamities that seemed to mark its end - fire, plague, riot, civil war, mass bombing - it has emerged from each crisis stronger than ever. Its cultural life and long heritage has made London one of the most visited and best-loved places in the world today. With intriguing facts and stories, The London Treasury looks at the minutiae of everyday life, as well as the major London events that affected the world. It uncovers what it is like to live in London, both through the ages and today, and reveals: which is London's oldest pub; the legend of the Tower of London; the origins of London's famous Notting Hill Carnival; the average life expectancy of a Londoner; and, what qualifies a person as a Cockney.
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The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood: The Spy Who Stole the Crown Jewels and Became the King's Secret Agent

The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood: The Spy Who Stole the Crown Jewels and Became the King's Secret Agent

Robert Hutchinson

$22.99

The gripping story of Colonel Thomas Blood: dangerous double agent and Irish rogue at the court of Charles II.

One morning in May 1671, Colonel Thomas Blood daringly attempted to seize the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. Astonishingly, he managed to escape with St Edward's Crown and the Coronation Regalia before being apprehended. Fervently and religiously nonconformist, Blood had been involved in many plots to assassinate King Charles II and overthrow the Stuart government. He had also participated in an attempted coup d' tat in Ireland and was publicly labelled the 'Father of all Treasons'.

And yet he was not instantly executed for treason. Instead, the king granted him a generous income from lands in Ireland and he became a familiar strutting figure in the glittering state apartments of the royal court.

Bestselling historian Robert Hutchinson tells the gripping tale of one of the most enigmatic and alluring figures in the history of Britain. Blood was a hunted man across the kingdom, and Hutchinson explores the dangerous life of a double agent during the Restoration. While serving as the king's personal spy, Blood was supporting those who conspired to murder him. In an age when gossip and intrigue ruled the coffee houses, he also hired himself out as a freelance agent for those wishing to further their ambitions in the cockpit of late seventeenth-century politics.

The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood is the compelling story of a man bent on ambiguous political and personal motivation, as well as an extraordinary account of the court of Charles II and the perils and conspiracies that constantly surrounded the 'Merry Monarch'.
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Restoration: The Year of the Great Fire

Restoration: The Year of the Great Fire

Alexander Larman

$44.99

In an England inhabited by Pepys, Evelyn, Dryden, Hobbes and the young Isaac Newton, Charles II is king, and the nation is beginning to relax a little after the tough, joyless years of Cromwell's Protectorate. In Restoration, Alex Larman paints a fascinating portrait of a country in the throes of social, political and cultural change following the convulsions of the Interregnum. Exploring every level of English society, from innkeepers and upholsterers to lawyers and courtiers, and examining themes as diverse as marriage, sexuality and religion, he creates a pointilliste and multi-faceted portrait of Restoration England. By looking at the year 1666 through the eyes of the people of the time, by revealing what they ate and drank, how they loved, lived and died and how they interacted, Alex Larman brings alive the England of 300 years ago as you have never seen it before: exciting, tangible, and fully comprehensible.
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How Fat Was Henry VIII?: And 100 Other Questions on Royal History

How Fat Was Henry VIII?: And 100 Other Questions on Royal History

Raymond Lamont-Brown

$24.99

Ever wondered how fat Henry VIII really was? Or what made Mary I 'Bloody'? Over many hundreds of years royalty has had its fair share of accidents, rumours, scandals, misrepresentations and misconceptions. For instance, was George III's 'madness' caused by porphyria, or was it due to arsenic poisoning? Or what really happened between Queen Victoria and her Highland servant John Brown? In today's world, where newspapers clamour to report new revelations about the Royal Family, this informative and quirky book gives the inquisitive reader an in-depth look at the secrets of our past royals. For anyone interested in royal matters, or curious about what went on behind the palace walls, Raymond Lamont-Brown helps answer all those intriguing, confusing, mysterious and entertaining questions we might have about our monarchs.
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Insurrection: Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell and the Pilgrimage of Grace

Insurrection: Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell and the Pilgrimage of Grace

Susan Loughlin

$49.99

Autumn 1536. Katherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn are dead. Henry VIII has married Jane Seymour, and still awaits his longed for male heir. Disaffected conservatives in England see an opportunity for a return to Rome and an end to religious experimentation, but Thomas Cromwell has other ideas. The Dissolution of the Monasteries has begun and the publication of the Lutheran influenced Ten Articles of the Anglican Church has followed. The obstinate monarch, enticed by monastic wealth, is determined not to change course. Fear and resentment is unleashed in northern England in the largest spontaneous uprising against a Tudor monarch - the Pilgrimage of Grace - in which 30,000 men take up arms against the king. This book examines the evidence for that opposition and the abundant examples of religiously motivated dissent. It also highlights the rhetoric, reward and retribution used by the Crown to enforce its policy and crush the opposition.
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The Ludicrous Laws of Old London

The Ludicrous Laws of Old London

Nigel Cawthorne

$24.99

London abounds with all manner of ludicrous laws, and not all of these curious statutes have been relegated to the past. Despite the efforts of the Law Commission there are medieval laws that are still in force, and the City of London and its livery companies have their own legal oddities. Laws are made in the capital because parliament is here; so are the Old Bailey, the Law Courts, the House of Lords and, now, the Supreme Court. The privy council, which sometimes has to decide cases, also sits in London, and there were other courts that used to sit in London, from prize courts concerning war booty to ecclesiastical courts.

Having maintained its 'ancient rights and freedoms' under Magna Carta, the City felt free to enact its own laws, many of which seem to have had to do with what people could wear. Until quite recently, for example, a man could be arrested for walking down the street wearing a wig, a robe and silk stockings - unless he was a judge. And all human folly has been paraded through the law courts of London, to the extent that it is difficult to know where the serious business of administering justice ends and where farce begins. As law is made in the courtroom as well as in parliament and elsewhere, judges like to keep a firm hand, but sometimes so-called jibbing juries will simply not do what they are told.

All sorts of oddities get swept up into the law. Legislators particularly love to pass Acts about sex. If sexual services are being offered in a London massage parlour, for example, a police officer must then search the premises for school children. According to The Children and Young Persons Act of 1933 it is against the law for children and 'yowling persons' between the age of four and sixteen to frequent a brothel. A writ was introduced under both Edward III and Henry IV to ban lawyers from parliament as there were too many of them, the reason being that it was easier for a lawyer to spend his time in London attending parliament that it was for a knight of the shires.

But because parliament was already packed with lawyers it was difficult to make any such rule stick. Then an effective way of excluding them was found. They were denied the wages paid to members in those days. Sadly, these days, parliament and the government are packed with lawyers once again. And they are being paid. A law passed in 1540 - and still in force today - makes it illegal for barbers in the City of London to practise surgery; with impeccable impartiality, the Act also forbids surgeons to cut hair. Finally, never forget that under the Vagrancy Act of 1824, you can be convicted of being 'an idle and disorderly person, or a rogue, vagabond, or incorrigible rogue'.

The same act also outlaws people 'professing to tell fortunes', including 'palmistry'. Under the Act, it is an offence merely to be suspected.
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The Other Tudor Princess: Margaret Douglas, Henry VIII's Niece

The Other Tudor Princess: Margaret Douglas, Henry VIII's Niece

Mary McGrigor

$24.99

The Other Tudor Princess brings to life the story of Margaret Douglas, a shadowy and mysterious character in Tudor history - but who now takes centre stage in this tale of the bitter struggle for power during the reign of Henry VIII. Margaret is Henry's beloved niece, but she defies the king by indulging in two scandalous affairs and is imprisoned in the Tower of London on three occasions 'not for matters of treason, but for love'. Yet, when Henry turns against his second wife Anne Boleyn and declares his daughters, Mary and Elizabeth, bastards, it is Margaret he appoints as his heir to the throne. The arrangement of the marriage of Margaret's son, Lord Darnley, to his cousin, Mary, Queen of Scots unites their claim to the throne and infuriates Queen Elizabeth. Yet this match brings tragedy, as Margaret's son is brutally murdered. As Margaret reaches old age, her place in the dynasty is still not safe, and she dies in mysterious circumstances - was Margaret poisoned on the orders of Queen Elizabeth? Mary McGrigor tells this compelling and exciting part of Tudor history for the first time with all the passion and thrill of a novel, but this is no fiction - the untold story runs through the course of history, and Margaret secured the throne for her Stuart ancestors for years to come.
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Through the Keyhole: Sex, Scandal and the Secret Life of the Country House

Through the Keyhole: Sex, Scandal and the Secret Life of the Country House

Susan Law

$44.99

Scandal existed long before celebrity gossip columns, often hidden behind the closed doors of the Georgian aristocracy. But secrets were impossible to keep in a household of servants who listened at walls and spied through keyholes. The early mass media pounced on these juicy tales of adultery, eager to cash in on the public appetite for sensation and expose the shocking moral corruption of the establishment. Drawing on a rich collection of original and often outrageous sources, this book brings vividly to life stories of infidelity in high places - passionate, scandalous, poignant and tragic. It reveals how the flood of print detailing sordid sexual intrigues created a national outcry and made people question whether the nobility was fit to rule. Susan C. Law is a journalist and historian. Her work has been published in a wide range of newspapers and magazines, including The Times Higher Education Supplement and London Evening Standard. Dr Law completed her PhD in History at Warwick University, and has spent many years researching the lives of the eighteenth and nineteenth-century British aristocracy.
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After the Fire: London Churches in the Age of Wren, Hooke, Hawksmoor and Gibbs

After the Fire: London Churches in the Age of Wren, Hooke, Hawksmoor and Gibbs

Angelo Hornak ,  Stephen Platten

$79.99

'London was but is no more!' In these words diarist John Evelyn summed up the destruction wreaked by the Great Fire that swept through the City of London in 1666. The losses included St Paul's Cathedral and eight-seven parish churches (as well as at least thirteen thousand houses).

But London rose from the ashes, more beautiful - and certainly more spectacular - than ever before. The catastrophe offered a unique opportunity to Christopher Wren and his colleagues - including Robert Hooke and Nicholas Hawksmoor - who, in the course of remarkably few years, rebuilt St Paul's and fifty-one other London churches in a dramatic new style inspired by the European Baroque. Forty years after the Fire, the Fifty New Churches Act of 1710 gave Nicholas Hawksmoor the opportunity to build breathtaking (and controversial) new churches including St Anne's Limehouse, Christ Church Spitalfields and St George's Bloomsbury. But by the 1720s the pendulum was already swinging away from Wren and Hawksmoor's Baroque towards the less extravagant Palladian style.  It was the more restrained churches built by James Gibbs (including St Martin-in the-Fields) that were to provide the prototype for churches the world over - but especially in North America - for the next hundred years.

In After the Fire, celebrated photographer and architectural historian Angelo Hornak explores, with the help of his own stunning photographs, the churches built in London during the sixty years that followed the Great Fire.
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The Blitzed City: The Destruction of Coventry, 1940

The Blitzed City: The Destruction of Coventry, 1940

Karen Farrington

$24.99

The Luftwaffe's targetting and destruction of Coventry city remains the biggest and most destructive air raid on British soil during the Second World War. Seen as a centre of British armaments production, the German high command wished to inflict terror and panic on the British public, a plan that had paid dividends during their relentless conquest of France that year. Attacking over two nights in November, 1940 they systematically bombed and destroyed the bulk of the city, making thousands homeless, and killing over 400 men, women and children.

Such was the devastation, panic and disorder it wrought, that Winston Churchill ordered a news blackout for three weeks in order to quell the unease and morale-sapping effect that the raid had. But people at the time acted with great bravery to save those trapped in bombed out and burning buildings, as well as caring for those badly injured (of which there were thousands), and fighting the Nazi planes coming in to attack the city itself.

Now, for the very first time we interview those veterans who survived the raid and helped fight the flames and bombs to tell the story of this iconic event. Such was the effect it had on the country that when Bomber Command began night time raids against German cities - Hamburg, Cologne and most famously, Dresden - the call 'Remember Coventry!' went up.
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The Lost Tommies

The Lost Tommies

Ross Coulthart

$70.00

For much of the First World War, the small French village of Vignacourt was always behind the front lines – as a staging point, casualty clearing station and recreation area for troops of all nationalities moving up to and then back from the battlefields on the Somme. Here, one enterprising photographer took the opportunity of offering portrait photographs. A century later, his stunning images were discovered, abandoned, in a farm house. Captured on glass, printed into postcards and posted home, the photographs enabled soldiers to maintain a fragile link with loved ones at home.

In ‘Lost Tommies’, this collection covers many of the significant aspects of British involvement on the Western Front, from military life to the friendships and bonds formed between the soldiers and civilians. With servicemen from around the world these faces are gathered together for what would become the front line of the Battle of the Somme. Beautifully reproduced, it is a unique collection and a magnificent memorial.
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Mr Darley's Arabian: High Life, Low Life, Sporting Life: A History of Racing in 25 Horses

Mr Darley's Arabian: High Life, Low Life, Sporting Life: A History of Racing in 25 Horses

Chris McGrath

$35.00

Mr Darley's Arabian traces an extraordinary bloodline of outstanding racehorses - 95% of all thoroughbreds in the world are descended from one horse, the so-called Darley Arabian, shipped from Aleppo to Yorkshire in 1704 by a second son who failed to make his fortune and died before he could follow his horse home.

Chris McGrath tells the story of the men and women who owned and traded and bred the horses descended from that first stallion. He also follows the men they hired to train them, and the jockeys who rode them, and sometimes rescued them from the knacker's yard, unwittingly preserving the genetic line of winners that currently resides with the champion Frankel.

With a canvas that spreads across England and Europe, from Argentina to America, with a cast that takes in aristocrats and nouveaux riches, playboys and industrialists, Smithfield meat salesmen and the rulers of Dubai, Mr Darley's Arabian expertly and wittily sweeps us through 300 years and twenty-five generations of champion thoroughbreds, in a unique history of a particular passion.
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Out of Time: 1966 and the End of Old-Fashioned Britain

Out of Time: 1966 and the End of Old-Fashioned Britain

Peter Chapman

$40.99

In the summer of 1966 Peter Chapman was a naive 18-year-old from the Angel in north London. He was just about to enter the world of work, having flunked his A Levels and recently discovered that he would not be fulfilling his dream of becoming a professional footballer at Leyton Orient. As a young man on the brink of adulthood, he found himself in a country also on the brink of huge change - and about to have one of the most significant sporting successes in its history. Focused around England's one and only World Cup victory, Out of Time tells the story of that summer - both the football and the country's broader political, social and economic picture - through his 18-year-old eyes, and offers a vivid and beautifully written portrait of what life was like in 1966.
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Squares of London

Squares of London

John Coulter

$99.00

Its garden squares distinguish London most clearly from other great cities. All have their ceremonial and market squares, but none the quantity, quality, and variety of residential squares that sets London apart. The history of the London square begins in 1631 with the great name of Inigo Jones, whose houses and church in Covent Garden were both started in that year. Lincoln's Inn Fields followed from 1638, before the Restoration and the Hanoverian Succession gave the political impetus to the first and second great waves of square building. This book provides an alphabetical guide to all the London squares, large, small, famous, obscure, existing or long vanished, founded before 1900. For each of the 578 identified there is a brief history, a description of the architecture and an account of notable former residents; for many, a photograph or engraving, and for the major squares several. This comprehensive and unique study also includes an index of notable residents, architects, builders, and developers, and a select bibliography.
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Nightwalking: A Nocturnal History of London

Nightwalking: A Nocturnal History of London

Matthew Beaumont

$21.99

In Nightwalking Matthew Beaumont recounts an alternative history of London-populated by the poor, the mad, the lost, the vagrant and the noctambulant. He shines a light on the shadowy perambulations of poets, novelists and thinkers: Chaucer and Shakespeare; William Blake and his ecstatic peregrinations and the feverish ramblings of opium addict Thomas De Quincey; and, among the lamp-lit literary throng, the supreme nightwalker Charles Dickens. We discover how the nocturnal city has inspired some and served as a balm or narcotic to others.
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Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe

Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe

James K. Galbraith

$45.95

The economic crisis in Greece is a potential international disaster and one of the most extraordinary monetary and political dramas of our time. The financial woes of this relatively small European nation threaten the long-term viability of the Euro while exposing the flaws in the ideal of continental unity. Solutions proposed by Europe's combined leadership have sparked a war of prideful words and stubborn one-upmanship, and they are certain to fail, according to renowned economist James K. Galbraith, because they are designed for failure. It is this hypocrisy that prompted former finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, when Galbraith arrived in Athens as an adviser, to greet him with the words Welcome to the poisoned chalice. In this fascinating, insightful, and thought-provoking collection of essays-which includes letters and private memos to both American and Greek officials, as well as other previously unpublished material-Galbraith examines the crisis, its causes, its course, and its meaning, as well as the viability of the austerity program imposed on the Greek citizenry. It is a trenchant, deeply felt commentary on what the author calls economic policy as moral abomination, and an eye-opening analysis of a contemporary Greek tragedy much greater than the tiny economy of the nation itself.
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Dreams of a Great Small Nation: The Mutinous Army That Threatened a Revolution, Destroyed an Empire, Founded a Republic, and Remade the Map of Europe

Dreams of a Great Small Nation: The Mutinous Army That Threatened a Revolution, Destroyed an Empire, Founded a Republic, and Remade the Map of Europe

Kevin J. McNamara

$42.99

In 1917, two empires that had dominated much of Europe and Asia teetered on the edge of the abyss, exhausted by the ruinous cost in blood and treasure of the First World War. As Imperial Russia and Habsburg-ruled Austria-Hungary began to succumb, a small group of Czech and Slovak combat veterans stranded in Siberia saw an opportunity to realize their long-held dream of independence.

While their plan was audacious and complex, and involved moving their 50,000-strong army by land and sea across three-quarters of the earth?s expanse, their commitment to fight for the Allies on the Western Front riveted the attention of Allied London, Paris, and Washington.

On their journey across Siberia, a brawl erupted at a remote Trans-Siberian rail station that sparked a wholesale rebellion. The marauding Czecho-Slovak Legion seized control of the Trans-Siberian Railroad, and with it Siberia. In the end, this small band of POWs and deserters, whose strength was seen by Leon Trotsky as the chief threat to Soviet rule, helped destroy the Austro-Hungarian Empire and found Czecho-Slovakia.

British prime minister David Lloyd George called their adventure "one of the greatest epics of history", and former US president Teddy Roosevelt declared that their accomplishments were "unparalleled, so far as I know, in ancient or modern warfare".
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China's Future

China's Future

David Shambaugh

$33.95

China's future is arguably the most consequential question in global affairs. Having enjoyed unprecedented levels of growth, China is at a critical juncture in the development of its economy, society, polity, national security, and international relations. The direction the nation takes at this turning point will determine whether it stalls or continues to develop and prosper. Will China be successful in implementing a new wave of transformational reforms that could last decades and make it the world's leading superpower? Or will its leaders shy away from the drastic changes required because the regime's power is at risk? If so, will that lead to prolonged stagnation or even regime collapse? Might China move down a more liberal or even democratic path? Or will China instead emerge as a hard, authoritarian and aggressive superstate? In this new book, David Shambaugh argues that these potential pathways are all possibilities - but they depend on key decisions yet to be made by China's leaders, different pressures from within Chinese society, as well as actions taken by other nations. Assessing these scenarios and their implications, he offers a thoughtful and clear study of China's future for all those seeking to understand the country's likely trajectory over the coming decade and beyond.
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China Through the Lens of John Thomson 1868 - 1972

China Through the Lens of John Thomson 1868 - 1972

Betty Yao

$69.99

Scottish photographer John Thomson (1837-1921) was one of the most influential photographers of the 19th century and a pioneer of photojournalism. Over 150 high quality black-and-white photographs from late 19th century China illustrate stunning vistas of Chinese landscapes, architecture and city scenes, intimate portraits of Manchu brides in full wedding costumes and Mandarin officials in government attire. Three informative chapters introduce the photographer and his work with detailed captions accompanying each illustration. This revised version is in a new more accessible format. Text in English and Chinese AUTHOR: Betty Yao curated the exhibition that forms the basis of this book and worked closely with the Wellcome Institute who own the original negatives. 157 b/w photos
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The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China

The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China

Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom

$50.95

This lavishly illustrated volume explores the history of China during a period of dramatic shifts and surprising transformations, from the founding of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) through to the present day. The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China promises to be essential reading for anyone who wants to understand this rising superpower on the verge of what promises to be the 'Chinese century', introducing readers to important but often overlooked events in China's past, such as the bloody Taiping Civil War (1850-1864), which had a death toll far higher than the roughly contemporaneous American Civil War. It also helps readers see more familiar landmarks in Chinese history in new ways, such as the Opium War (1839-1842), the Boxer Uprising of 1900, the rise to power of the Chinese Communist Party in 1949, and the Tiananmen protests and Beijing Massacre of 1989. This is one of the first major efforts - and in many ways the most ambitious to date - to come to terms with the broad sweep of modern Chinese history, taking readers from the origins of modern China right up through the dramatic events of the last few years (the Beijing Games, the financial crisis, and China's rise to global economic pre-eminence) which have so fundamentally altered Western views of China and China's place in the world.
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The Dynamite Club: How a Bombing in Fin-de-Siecle Paris Ignited the Age of Modern Terror

The Dynamite Club: How a Bombing in Fin-de-Siecle Paris Ignited the Age of Modern Terror

John M. Merriman

$34.95

Distinguished historian John Merriman maintains that the Age of Modern Terror began in Paris on February 12, 1894, when anarchist Emile Henry set off a bomb in the Cafe Terminus, killing one and wounding twenty French citizens. The true story of the circumstances that led a young radical to commit a cold-blooded act of violence against innocent civilians makes for riveting reading, shedding new light on the terrorist mindset and on the subsequent worldwide rise of anarchism by deed. Merriman's fascinating study of modern history's first terrorists, emboldened by the invention of dynamite, reveals much about the terror of today.
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Hitler's Berlin: Abused City

Hitler's Berlin: Abused City

Thomas Friedrich

$41.95

From his first visit to Berlin in 1916, Hitler was preoccupied and fascinated by Germany's great capital city. In this vivid and entirely new account of Hitler's relationship with Berlin, Thomas Friedrich explores how Hitler identified with the city, how his political aspirations were reflected in architectural aspirations for the capital, and how Berlin surprisingly influenced the development of Hitler's political ideas. A leading expert on the twentieth-century history of Berlin, Friedrich employs new and little-known German sources to track Hitler's attitudes and plans for the city. Even while he despised both the cosmopolitan culture of the Weimar Republic and the profound Jewish influence on the city, Hitler was drawn to the grandiosity of its architecture and its imperial spirit. He dreamed of transforming Berlin into a capital that would reflect his autocracy, and he used the city for such varied purposes as testing his anti-Semitic policies and demonstrating the might of the Third Reich. Illuminating Berlin's burdened years under Nazi subjection, Friedrich offers new understandings of Hitler and his politics, architectural views, and artistic opinions.
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Fall of the Red Baron: World War I Aerial Tactics and the Death of Richthofen

Fall of the Red Baron: World War I Aerial Tactics and the Death of Richthofen

Leon Bennett

$54.95

Fighter pilot Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron) lacked innate aerobatic ability. As a tyro, he attempted to solve this problem through denial, going so far as to sneer at stunting as pointless. Great War air combat experience proved quite the reverse, and so we would anticipate a short and sad fighting life for the fellow. Yet the Red Baron became the Great War's single greatest scorer, as measured by total victories. How did he do it?

This book is concerned with tactics, especially those tactics used by the Red Baron and his opponents. It offers the how and why of Great War aerial combat. The author leans heavily on his expertise in engineering and aerodynamic techniques to explain this, with his reasoning presented in a readable, non-mathematical style. Absent are both the usual propaganda-laced Air Service reports and psychobabble. Offered instead is the logic behind Great War aerial combat; i.e., those elements determining success or failure in the Red Baron's air war. Gunnery experience led to the machine gun as the weapon best suited for aerial combat. Joined with a suitable aircraft, the extremely successful Fokker diving attack resulted. 

In reaction, effective defensive techniques arose, using forms of shrewd tactical cooperation by two-seater crews: pilot and gunner. These are detailed. Numbers mattered, establishing the level of assault firepower. Tactics of machines flying together in formation are given, as well as those of 'formation busters', intent upon reversing the odds and turning large numbers into a disadvantage. A pilot's nature and emotions had much to do with choosing between the options defining tactics. What were the aces like? How were tactics tailored to suit personality? What traits made for the ability to grapple with a jammed machine gun? A dozen high achievers are examined in terms of tactics and background.

In a fascinating study Leon Bennett covers all of these aspects of WWI aerial combat, and more. Similarly, the author turns his attention to examining the cause of von Richthofen's death, employing the tools of logic, rather than merely accept one of the many conflicting eyewitness reports as truth. In doing so, much testimony is exposed as unlikely. The bullet scatter to be expected from ground anti-aircraft fire matters greatly, and is developed, along with the odds against lone riflemen hoping to hit a fast-moving low altitude target. The most dangerous altitude for front-line crossing is established. The author concludes by rating the possibility of a rifleman downing the Red Baron as quite realistic - certainly as likely as any of the more celebrated possibilities.

This is an important book, offering a groundbreaking account of WWI aerial tactics, and a thorough examination of the final combat and death of the Red Baron.
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Krishna in the Garden of Assam: The History and Context of a Much-Travelled Textile

Krishna in the Garden of Assam: The History and Context of a Much-Travelled Textile

T. Richard Blurton

$12.99

This beautiful and rare textile, now in the British Museum, was produced in the late seventeenth century in the wake of the remarkable outflow of Krishna veneration resulting from the ministry of the great eastern Indian saint, Sankaradava (died 1568). Nine metres in length, it is made up of twelve strips, all now sown together, and woven with captioned scenes from the life of Krishna as recorded in the tenth-century text, the Bhagavata Purana, and elaborated in the dramas of Sankaradeva. The author looks at the art, technique and iconography of the textile and also place it within its wider religious, cultural and geographical contexts. He traces, too, its fascinating history and its journey from Assam to London.
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Independence or Union: Scotland's Past and Scotland's Present

Independence or Union: Scotland's Past and Scotland's Present

T. Devine

$49.99

'Deserves to be read by everyone interested in the future of the United Kingdom' Andrew Marr, The Sunday Times There can be no relationship in Europe's history more creative, significant, vexed and uneasy than that between Scotland and England. From the Middle Ages onwards the island of Britain has been shaped by the unique dynamic between Edinburgh and London, exchanging inhabitants, monarchs, money and ideas, sometimes in a spirit of friendship and at others in a spirit of murderous dislike. Tom Devine's seminal new book explores this extraordinary history in all its ambiguity, from the seventeenth century to the present. When not undermining each other with invading armies, both Scotland and England have broadly benefitted from each other's presence - indeed for long periods of time nobody questioned the union which joined them. But as Devine makes clear, it has for the most part been a relationship based on consent, not force, on mutual advantage, rather than antagonism - and it has always held the possibility of a political parting of the ways. With the United Kingdom under a level of scrutiny unmatched since the eighteenth century Independence or Union is the essential guide.
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The Famine Irish: Emigration and the Great Hunger

The Famine Irish: Emigration and the Great Hunger

Ciaran Reilly

$49.99

From a range of leading academics and historians, this collection of essays examines Irish emigration during the Great Famine of the 1840s. From the mechanics of how this was arranged to the fate of the men, women and children who landed on the shores of the nations of the world, this work provides a remarkable insight into one of the most traumatic and transformative periods of Ireland's history. More importantly, this collection of essays demonstrates how the Famine Irish influenced and shaped the worlds in which they settled, while also examining some of the difficulties they faced in doing so.
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'Sir, They're Taking the Kids Indoors': The British Army in Northern Ireland 1973-74

'Sir, They're Taking the Kids Indoors': The British Army in Northern Ireland 1973-74

Ken Wharton

$49.95

This is Ken Wharton's eagerly awaited new book chronicling the Northern Ireland troubles from the British soldier's perspective. His finest book to date, surpassing his 2011 work The Bloodiest Year - Northern Ireland 1972 , looks at the bloody period of 1973/4 and features many contributions from those who were there besides superb and painstaking research.

'Sir, they're taking the kids indoors' was a cry heard by most if not all of the British soldiers who served on either the 4 month emergency or the 2 year resident battalion tours of Northern Ireland. It refers to the IRA tactic of warning the civilian population in Republican areas of the impending arrival of one of their gunmen. Clearly, as witnessed by the number of civilian deaths among the Catholic population directly or indirectly at the hands of their 'protectors' in the IRA, they were not averse to killing or causing the deaths of Catholics.
 
By focusing exclusively on the 1973-74 period, Ken has been able to write in greater detail than hitherto possible about the British Army and their experience during this bloody and important period of 'the Troubles'.
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The Devil That Never Dies: The Rise and Threat of Global Antisemitism

The Devil That Never Dies: The Rise and Threat of Global Antisemitism

Daniel Jonah Goldhagen

$39.99

Antisemitism never went away, but since the turn of the century it has multiplied beyond what anyone would have predicted. It is openly spread by intellectuals, politicians and religious leaders in Europe, Asia, the Arab world, America and Africa and supported by hundreds of millions more. Indeed, today antisemitism is stronger than any time since the Holocaust. In this book, Daniel Jonah Goldhagen reveals the unprecedented, global form of this age-old hatred; its strategic use by states; its powerful appeal to individuals and groups; and how technology has fueled the flames that had been smoldering prior to the millennium. A remarkable work of intellectual brilliance, moral stature, and urgent alarm, this book is destined to be one of the most provocative and talked-about books of the year.
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Orchestra of Exiles: The Story of Bronislaw Huberman, the Israel Philharmonic, and the One Thousand Jews He Saved from Nazi Horrors

Orchestra of Exiles: The Story of Bronislaw Huberman, the Israel Philharmonic, and the One Thousand Jews He Saved from Nazi Horrors

Denise George

$49.99

At fourteen, Bronislaw Huberman played the Brahms Violin Concerto in Vienna - winning high praise from the composer himself, who was there. Instantly famous, Huberman began touring all over the world and received invitations to play for royalty across Europe. But after witnessing the tragedy of World War I, he committed his phenomenal talent and celebrity to aid humanity.

After studying at the Sorbonne in Paris, Huberman joined the ranks of Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein in calling for peace through the Pan European Movement. But when hope for their noble vision was destroyed by the rise of Nazism, Huberman began a crusade that would become his greatest legacy - the creation, in 1936, of the Palestine Symphony, which twelve years later became the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra.

In creating this world-level orchestra, Huberman miraculously arranged for the very best Jewish musicians and their families to emigrate from Nazi-threatened territories. His tireless campaigning for the project - including a marathon fundraising concert tour across America - ultimately saved nearly a thousand Jews from the approaching Holocaust. Inviting the great Arturo Toscanini to conduct the orchestra's first concert, Huberman's clarion call of art over cruelty was heard around the world. His story contains estraordinary adventures, riches and royalty, politicians and broken promises, losses and triumphs.

Against near impossible obstacles, Huberman refused to give up on his dream to create a unique and life-saving orchestra of exiles which was one of the great cultural achievements of the 20th century.
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Final Solution: The Fate of the Jews 1933-1949

Final Solution: The Fate of the Jews 1933-1949

David Cesarani

$59.99

The Holocaust has never been so widely commemorated, but our understanding of the accepted narrative has rarely, if ever, been questioned.

David Cesarani's sweeping reappraisal challenges accepted explanations for the anti-Jewish politics of Nazi Germany and the inevitability of the 'Final Solution'. The persecution of the Jews was not always the Nazis' central preoccupation, nor was it an inevitable process. Cesarani also reveals that in German-occupied countries it unfolded erratically, often due to local initiatives. Ghettos were improvised while the mass shooting of Jews during the invasion of Russia owed as much to the security situation as to anti-semitism.

In this new interpretation, war is critical to the Jewish fate. Military failure denied the Germans opportunities to expel Jews into a distant territory and created a crisis of resources that led to starvation of the ghettos and intensified anti-Jewish measures. It was global war that eventually triggered genocide in Europe.

Cesarani disputes the iconic role of railways, deportation trains and even Auschwitz, and reveals that plunder was more a cause of anti-Jewish feeling than a consequence of it. Using diaries and reports written in ghettos and camps, he exposes the extent of sexual violence and abuse of Jewish women by the Germans, their collaborators and, shockingly, by Jews themselves. But Cesarani also reveals the courage and ingenuity of those who struggled to evade capture and fought back wherever they could. And unlike previous histories, he follows the Jews' journey to the 'Displaced Persons' camps; camps which have so often been merely a footnote in the story but where Jews languished behind barbed wire for years after 'liberation'.

This moving and dramatic account captures the fate of the Jews, the horror and the heroism, in their own words. Resting on decades of scholarship it is compelling, authoritative, and profoundly disturbing.
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Zionism: The Birth and Transformation of an Ideal

Zionism: The Birth and Transformation of an Ideal

Milton Viorst

$39.99

Beginning with the shattering of the traditional Jewish society during the Enlightenment, Viorst covers the recent history of the Jews, from the spread of Jewish Emancipation during the French Revolution Era to the rise of the exclusionary anti-Semitism that overwhelmed Europe in the late nineteenth century. Viorst examines how Zionism was born and follows its development through the lives and ideas of its dominant leaders, who all held only one tenet in common: that Jews, for the first time in two millennia, must determine their own destiny to save themselves. But, in regards to creating a Jewish state with a military that dominates the region, Viorst argues that Israel has squandered the goodwill it enjoyed at its founding, and thus the country has put its own future on very uncertain footing. With the expertise and knowledge garnered from decades of studying this contentious region, Milton Viorst deftly exposes the risks that Israel faces today.
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Viva La Revolucion: Eric Hobsbawm on Latin America

Viva La Revolucion: Eric Hobsbawm on Latin America

Eric Hobsbawm

$55.00

In his autobiography Interesting Times: A Twentieth Century Life, published in 2002 when he was eighty-five years old, the historian Eric Hobsbawm (1917-2012) wrote that Latin America was the only region of the world outside Europe which he felt he knew well and where he felt entirely at home. He claimed this was because it was the only part of the Third World whose two principal languages, Spanish and Portuguese, were within his reach. But he was also, of course, attracted by the potential for social revolution in Latin America. After the triumph of Fidel Castro in Cuba in January 1959, and even more after the defeat of the American attempt to overthrow him at the Bay of Pigs in April 1961, 'there was not an intellectual in Europe or the USA', he wrote, 'who was not under the spell of Latin America, a continent apparently bubbling with the lava of social revolutions'. The Third World 'brought the hope of revolution back to the First in the 1960s'. The two great international inspirations were Cuba and Vietnam, 'triumphs not only of revolution, but of Davids against Goliaths, of the weak against the all-powerful'.
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Rio De Janeiro: Extreme City

Rio De Janeiro: Extreme City

Luiz Eduardo Soares

$29.99

A book as rich and sprawling as the seductive metropolis it evokes, Rio de Janeiro builds a kaleidoscopic portrait of this city of extremes, and its history of conflict and corruption. Award-winning novelist, ex-government minister and sociologist Luiz Eduardo Soares tells the story of Rio through the everyday lives of its people: gangsters and police, activists, politicians and struggling migrant workers, each with their own version of the city. Taking us on a journey into Rio's intricate world of favelas, beaches and corridors of power, Soares reveals one of the most extraordinary cities in the world in all its seething, agonistic beauty. Luiz Eduardo Soares is the most insightful observer of Rio I have ever read. He had the unique combination of expert analysis, a compassionate gaze, and a gripping writing style. This is a book that will take its place among the great city chronicles of our time.
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Syrian Dust: Reporting from the Heart of the War

Syrian Dust: Reporting from the Heart of the War

Francesca Borri ,  Anne Appel

$32.99

In 2013, hundreds of journalists rush to Damascus after a chemical weapons attack brings the war in Syria to the front page. When Obama decides not to bomb, they go, leaving behind them 200,000 estimated victims and more than half of the 22 million population dispersed or refugeed. Francesca Borri is a journalist. But she does not leave. For months she covers the battle of Aleppo as a freelance reporter. And she quickly realises the truth of what it means to report a war. This haunting and shocking memoir exposes the reality of war and pays homage to its many victims.
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Pumpkinflowers: A Soldier's Story

Pumpkinflowers: A Soldier's Story

Matti Friedman

$22.99

It was one small hilltop in a small, unnamed war in the late 1990s, but it would send out ripples still felt worldwide today. The hill, in Lebanon, was called the Pumpkin; ‘flowers’ was the military code word for casualties.

Award-winning writer Matti Friedman re-creates the harrowing, otherworldly experiences of a band of young men, plucked by conscription from westernised boyhoods, and charged with holding this remote outpost - a pointless task that changed them forever and foreshadowed the unwinnable conflicts the United States would soon confront in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere.

Part memoir, part reportage, part elegy for lost youth, this powerful narrative captures the birth of today’s chaotic Middle East and the rise of a 21st century type of war in which there is never a clear victor, and innocence is not the only casualty.

Raw and beautifully rendered, Pumpkin flowers will take its place among classic war narratives by George Orwell, Philip Caputo, Vasily Grossman and Micahel Herr. It is an unflinching look at the way we conduct war today.
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What Went Wrong in Afghanistan?: Understanding Counter-Insurgency Efforts in Tribalized Rural and Muslim Environments

What Went Wrong in Afghanistan?: Understanding Counter-Insurgency Efforts in Tribalized Rural and Muslim Environments

Metin Gurcan

$49.95

Since 20 December 2001 - the date which marked the authorisation of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to assist the Afghan Government - hundreds of thousands of coalition soldiers from around 50 different states have physically been and served in Afghanistan. Roughly 20 rotation periods have been experienced; billions of US dollars have been spent; and almost 3,500 coalition soldiers and 7,400 Afghani security personnel have fallen for Afghanistan.

In this badly-managed success story, the true determiner of both tactical outcomes on the ground and strategic results was always the tribal and rural parts of Muslim-populated Afghanistan. Although there has emerged a vast literature on counterinsurgency theories and tactics, we still lack reliable information about the motivations and aspirations of the residents of Tribalised Rural Muslim Environments (TRMEs) that make up most of Afghanistan. The aim of this book is to describe some on-the-ground problems of counterinsurgency (COIN) efforts in TRMEs - specifically in rural Afghanistan - and then to propose how these efforts might be improved. 

Along the way, it will be necessary to challenge many current assumptions about the conduct of counterinsurgency in Afghanistan. Most generally, the book will show how counterinsurgency succeeds or fails at the local level (at the level of tactical decisions by small-unit leaders) and that these decisions cannot be successful without understanding the culture and perspective of those who live in TRMEs.

Although engaging issues of culture, the author is not an anthropologist or an academic of any kind. He is a Muslim who spent his childhood in a TRME - a remote village in Turkey - and he offers his observations on the basis of 15 years' worth of field experience as a Turkish Special Forces officer serving in rural Iraq, Turkey, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Afghanistan. Cultures in these areas are not the same, but there are sufficient similarities to suggest some overall characteristics of TRMEs and some general problems of COIN efforts in these environments. 

In summary, this book not only challenges some of the fundamentals of traditional counterinsurgency wisdom and emphasises the importance of the tactical level - a rarely-studied field from the COIN perspective - but also blends the first-hand field experiences of the author with deep analyses. In this sense, it is not solely an autobiography, but something much more.
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Britain in the Middle East: 1619-1971

Britain in the Middle East: 1619-1971

Robert T. Harrison

$39.99

Britain in the Middle East provides a comprehensive survey of British involvement in the Middle East, exploring their mutual construction and influence across the entire historical sweep of their relationship. In the 17th century, Britain was establishing trade links in the Middle East, using its position in India to increasingly exclude other European powers. Over the coming centuries this commercial influence developed into political power and finally formal empire, as the British sought to control their regional hegemony through military force. Robert Harrison charts this relationship, exploring how the Middle East served as the launchpad for British offensive action in the World Wars, and how resentment against colonial rule in the region led ultimately to political and Islamic revolutions and Britain's demise as a global, imperial power.
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The News from Waterloo: The Race to Tell Britain of Wellington's Victory

The News from Waterloo: The Race to Tell Britain of Wellington's Victory

Brian Cathcart

$24.99

The Duke of Wellington's victory over Napoleon in 1815 at Waterloo ensured British dominance for the rest of the nineteenth century. It took three days and two hours for word to travel from Belgium in a form that people could rely upon. This is a tragi-comic midsummer's tale that begins amidst terrible carnage and weaves through a world of politics and military convention, enterprise and roguery, frustration, doubt and jealousy, to end spectacularly in the heart of Regency society at a grand soiree in St James' Square after feverish journeys by coach and horseback, a Channel crossing delayed by falling tides and a flat calm, and a final dash by coach and four from Dover to London. At least five men were involved in bringing the news or parts of it to London, and their stories are fascinating. Brian Cathcart, a brilliant storyteller and historian, has visited the battlefield, travelled the messengers' routes, and traced untapped British, French and Belgian records. This is a strikingly original perspective on a key moment in British history.
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Of Living Valour: The Story of the Soldiers of Waterloo

Of Living Valour: The Story of the Soldiers of Waterloo

Barney White-Spunner

$24.99

For the first time a modern British historian tells the story of the against-the-odds triumph through the accounts of the regimental officers and soldiers whose bravery and resolution achieved victory. The author has used many unpublished sources, letters and diaries of ordinary British soldiers, in the vein of Stephen Ambrose's highly successful Band of Brothers.

With a concise, fast-moving account covering, ex-Commander of the British Army Barney White-Spunner tells the story through the experiences of those who fought there and their families, offering his unique perspective on the events. The story focuses on mens' personal feelings and their relationships, with each other, their families, their leaders and their enemies. It tells the stories of their lives, what they had left behind and why and what they went back to. It vividly captures their daily routine, their life in camp and how they fought at first hand, their fear, excitement and exhaustion.

The Battle of Waterloo was one of the most significant ever fought by a British army, but it was also one of the most bloody with about 50,000 men losing their lives over three days. What was it like for those who fought and for their families waiting at home? This is their story.
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Cabin 'Boys' to Captains: 250 Years of Women at Sea

Cabin 'Boys' to Captains: 250 Years of Women at Sea

Jo Stanley

$49.99

Revealing the hidden history of women on ships, from early cabin 'boys' to modern cruise ship captains. This lively yet scholarly book reveals an unsuspected history of women at sea, from women pirates and daring cabin 'boys' under sail to today's rear-admirals and weapons experts on nuclear submarines. Historically, women wanting to sail in their own right faced many challenges. They were rejected as nuisances and outsiders, trespassing into the male maritime tribe. Today they command cruise ships and are becoming commodores. This comprehensive work looks at both the merchant and royal navies, explaining women's progression from outsider to 'master' - with male shipmates as obstacles and helping hands. Using interviews and sources never before published, Jo Stanley vividly reveals the incredible journey across time taken by women at sea.
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Remember the Alamo?: American History in Bite-Sized Chunks

Remember the Alamo?: American History in Bite-Sized Chunks

Alison Rattle ,  Allison Vale

$15.99

An entertaining and informative romp through America's history, without the boring bits. For most people the details of the American Revolution, the history of Thanksgiving and the Battle of the Alamo are sketchy at best. However, help is at hand. Remember the Alamo? contains all the American history you learnt at school and promptly forgot, and perhaps some things that you were never taught in the first place. Broken down into easily digested bite-sized chunks, this book will teach you the basics of over 150 key events from Columbus to Nixon and from cowboys to cosmonauts. This helpful guide assumes no other knowledge of world history and doesn't contain anything but the most salient points, so that anyone can become clued up on the history of one of the world's most developed nations. Concise and informative, yet entertaining and engagingly written, Remember the Alamo? contains everything you will ever need to know about the United States.
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American Rhapsody: Writers, Musicians, Millionaires, Movie Stars, and One Great Building

American Rhapsody: Writers, Musicians, Millionaires, Movie Stars, and One Great Building

Claudia Roth Pierpont

$39.99

Claudia Roth Pierpont expertly mixes biography and criticism, history and reportage, to bring these portraits to life and to link them in surprising ways. It isn't far from Wharton's brave new women to F. Scott Fitzgerald's giddy flappers, and on to the big screen command of Katharine Hepburn and the dangerous dames of Dashiell Hammett's hard-boiled world. The improvisatory jazziness of George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue has its counterpart in the great jazz baby of the New York skyline, the Chrysler Building. Questions of an American acting style are traced from Orson Welles to Marlon Brando, while the new American painting emerges in the gallery of Peggy Guggenheim. And we trace the arc of racial progress from Bert Williams's blackface performances to James Baldwin's warning of the fire next time, however slow and bitter and anguished this progress may be. American Rhapsody offers a history of twentieth-century American invention and genius. It is about the joy and profit of being a heterogeneous people, and the immense difficulty of this human experiment.
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Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union

Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union

Stephen Budiansky

$49.95

A sweeping, in-depth history of NSA, whose famous cult of silence has left the agency shrouded in mystery for decades.

The National Security Agency was born out of the legendary codebreaking programs of World War II that cracked the famed Enigma machine and other German and Japanese codes, thereby turning the tide of Allied victory. In the postwar years, as the United States developed a new enemy in the Soviet Union, our intelligence community found itself targeting not soldiers on the battlefield, but suspected spies, foreign leaders, and even American citizens. Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, NSA played a vital, often fraught and controversial role in the major events of the Cold War, from the Korean War to the Cuban Missile Crisis to Vietnam and beyond.

In  Code Warriors,   Stephen Budiansky a longtime expert in cryptology tells the fascinating story of how NSA came to be, from its roots in World War II through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Along the way, he guides us through the fascinating challenges faced by cryptanalysts, and how they broke some of the most complicated codes of the twentieth century. With access to new documents, Budiansky shows where the agency succeeded and failed during the Cold War, but his account also offers crucial perspective for assessing NSA today in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations. Budiansky shows how NSA s obsession with recording every bit of data and decoding every signal is far from a new development; throughout its history the depth and breadth of the agency's reach has resulted in both remarkable successes and destructive failures.

Featuring a series of appendixes that explain the technical details of Soviet codes and how they were broken, this is a rich and riveting history of the underbelly of the Cold War, and an essential and timely read for all who seek to understand the origins of the modern NSA.
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Five Presidents: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford

Five Presidents: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford

Clint Hill ,  Lisa McCubbin

$45.00

A rare and fascinating portrait of the American presidency from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Kennedy and Me and Five Days in November.

Secret Service agent Clint Hill brings history intimately and vividly to life as he reflects on his seventeen years protecting the most powerful office in the nation. Hill walked alongside Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, and Gerald R. Ford, seeing them through a long, tumultuous era—the Cold War; the Cuban Missile Crisis; the assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy; the Vietnam War; Watergate; and the resignations of Spiro Agnew and Richard M. Nixon.

Some of his stunning, never-before-revealed anecdotes include:

    * Eisenhower’s reaction at Russian Prime Minister Khrushchev’s refusal to talk following the U-2 incident
    * The torture of watching himself in the Zapruder film in a Secret Service training
    * Johnson’s virtual imprisonment in the White House during violent anti-Vietnam protests
    * His decision to place White House files under protection after a midnight phone call about Watergate
    * The challenges of protecting Ford after he pardoned Nixon

With a unique insider’s perspective, Hill sheds new light on the character and personality of these five presidents, revealing their humanity in the face of grave decisions.
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The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism

The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism

Edward E. Baptist

$33.95

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution - the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. 

As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. 

Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery's end - and created a culture that sustains America's deepest dreams of freedom.
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Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination

Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination

Annette Gordon-Reed ,  Peter S. Onuf

$39.95

Thomas Jefferson is still presented today as an enigmatic figure, despite being written about more than any other Founding Father. Lauded as the most articulate voice of American freedom, even as he held people in bondage, Jefferson is variably described as a hypocrite, an atheist and a simple-minded proponent of limited government. Now, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and leading Jefferson scholar team up to present an absorbing and revealing character study that finally clarifies the philosophy of Jefferson. The authors explore what they call the empire of Jefferson's imagination-his expansive state of mind born of the intellectual influences and life experiences that led him into public life as a modern avatar of the enlightenment, who often likened himself to an ancient figure- the most blessed of the patriarchs .
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The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942

The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942

Nigel Hamilton

$49.99

A dramatic, eye-opening account of how FDR took personal charge of the military direction of World War II.Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving Roosevelt aides and family members, The Mantle of Command offers a radical new perspective on Franklin Delano Roosevelt's masterful - and underappreciated - role as U.S. commander in chief during the Allied war effort.After the disaster of Pearl Harbor, we see Roosevelt devising a global strategy that will defeat Hitler and the Japanese, rescue Churchill and the UK, and begin to turn the tide of war in the Allies' favour. All the while, Hamilton's account drives toward Operation Torch - the invasion of French Northwest Africa - and reveals FDR's genius for psychology and military affairs.Hamilton takes readers inside FDR's Oval Office - his personal command center - and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war.The first part of a major trilogy, The Mantle of Command explores the life of a man whose towering importance to the war is overlooked because of his untimely death. It is an intimate, sweeping examination of a great President in history's greatest conflict.
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Oneida: From Free Love Utopia to the Well-Set Table - An American Story

Oneida: From Free Love Utopia to the Well-Set Table - An American Story

Ellen Wayland-Smith

$39.99

Amidst the religious fervor of the Second Great Awakening, John Humphrey Noyes, a spirited but socially awkward young man, attracted a group of devoted followers with his fiery sermons about creating Jesus' millennial kingdom here on earth. Noyes and his followers built a large communal house in rural New York where they engaged in what Noyes called complex marriage, an elaborate system of free love where sexual relations with multiple partners was encouraged. Noyes was eventually inspired to institute a program of eugenics, known as stirpiculture, to breed a new generation of Oneidans from the best members of the Community - many fathered by him. When Noyes died in 1886, the Community disavowed Noyes' disreputable sexual theories and embraced their thriving business of flatware. Oneida Community Limited would go on to become one of the nation's leading manufacturers of silverware, and their brand a coveted mark of middle-class respectability in pre- and post-WWII America. Told by a descendant of one of the Community's original families, Oneida is a captivating story that straddles two centuries to reveal how a radical, free-love sect, turning its back on its own ideals, transformed into a purveyor of the white picket fence American dream.
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Where Divers Dare: The Hunt for the Last U-Boat

Where Divers Dare: The Hunt for the Last U-Boat

Randall S. Peffer

$49.99

On April 16, 1944, the tanker SS Pan Pennsylvania was torpedoed and sunk by the U-550. In return the sub was sent to the bottom by three destroyer escorts which were guarding the convoy. For more than 60 years the location of the U-boat's wreck eluded divers. In 2012, a team found it. This was the last undiscovered U-boat in diveable waters, more than three hundred feet below the surface. This is the story of their 20 year quest to find the 'Holy Grail' of deep sea diving and the tenacious efforts to dive on this treacherous wreck.
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Forts of the American Revolution 1775-83

Forts of the American Revolution 1775-83

Rene Chartrand ,  Donato Spedaliere

$22.99

Though primarily fought in the field, the American Revolution saw fortifications play an important part in some of the key campaigns of the war. Field fortifications were developed around major towns including Boston, New York and Savannah, while the frontier forts at Stanwix, Niagara and Cumberland were to all be touched by the war. This book details all the types of fortification used throughout the conflict, the engineers on all sides who constructed and maintained them, and the actions fought around and over them.
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The Race Whisperer: Barack Obama and the Political Uses of Race

The Race Whisperer: Barack Obama and the Political Uses of Race

Melanye T. Price

$49.95

Nearly a week after George Zimmerman was found not guilty of killing Trayvon Martin, President Obama walked into the press briefing room and shocked observers by saying that  Trayvon could have been me.  

He talked personally and poignantly about his experiences and pointed to intra-racial violence as equally serious and precarious for black boys. He offered no sweeping policy changes or legislative agendas; he saw them as futile. Instead, he suggested that prejudice would be eliminated through collective efforts to help black males and for everyone to reflect on their own prejudices. Obama's presidency provides a unique opportunity to engage in a discussion about race and politics.

In The Race Whisperer, Melanye Price analyzes the manner in which Barack Obama uses race strategically to engage with and win the loyalty of potential supporters. This book uses examples from Obama's campaigns and presidency to demonstrate his ability to authentically tap into notions of blackness and whiteness to appeal to particular constituencies. By tailoring his unorthodox personal narrative to emphasize those parts of it that most resonate with a specific racial group, he targets his message effectively to that audience, shoring up electoral and governing support.

The book also considers the impact of Obama's use of race on the ongoing quest for black political empowerment. Unfortunately, racial advocacy for African Americans has been made more difficult because of the intense scrutiny of Obama's relationship with the black community, Obama's unwillingness to be more publicly vocal in light of that scrutiny, and the black community's reluctance to use traditional protest and advocacy methods on a black president. 

Ultimately, though, The Race Whisperer argues for a more complex reading of race in the age of Obama, breaking new ground in the study of race and politics, public opinion, and political campaigns.
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The President's Book of Secrets: The Untold Story of Intelligence Briefings to America's Presidents from Kennedy to Obama

The President's Book of Secrets: The Untold Story of Intelligence Briefings to America's Presidents from Kennedy to Obama

David Priess ,  George H. W. Bush

$49.99

Every president has had a unique and complicated relationship with the intelligence community. While some have been coolly distant, even adversarial, others have found their intelligence agencies to be among the most valuable instruments of policy and power.

Since John F. Kennedy’s presidency, this relationship has been distilled into a personalized daily report: a short summary of what the intelligence apparatus considers the most crucial information for the president to know that day about global threats and opportunities. This top–secret document is known as the President’s Daily Brief, or, within national security circles, simply "the Book". Presidents have spent anywhere from a few moments (Richard Nixon) to a healthy part of their day (George W. Bush) consumed by its contents; some (Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush) consider it far and away the most important document they saw on a regular basis while commander in chief.

David Priess, a former intelligence officer and daily briefer, has interviewed every living president and vice president as well as more than one hundred others intimately involved with the production and delivery of the president's book of secrets. He offers an unprecedented window into the decision making of every president from Kennedy to Obama, with many character–rich stories revealed here for the first time.
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Ronald Reagan: The 40th President, 1981-1989

Ronald Reagan: The 40th President, 1981-1989

Jacob Weisberg

$39.99

In the second half of the twentieth century, no American president defined his political era as did Ronald Reagan. He ushered in an age that extolled smaller government, tax cuts, and strong defense, and to this day politicians of both political parties operate within the parameters of the world he made. His eight years in office from 1981 to 1989 were a time of economic crisis and recovery, a new American assertiveness abroad, and an engagement with the Soviet Union that began in conflict but moved in surprising new directions.

Jacob Weisberg provides a bracing portrait of America's fortieth president and the ideas that animated his political career, offering a fresh psychological interpretation and showing that there was more to Reagan than the usual stereotypes. Reagan, he observes, was a staunch conservative but was also unafraid to compromise and cut deals where necessary. And Reagan espoused a firm belief, just as firm as his belief in small government and strong defense, that nuclear weapons were immoral and ought to be eliminated. Weisberg argues that these facets of Reagan were too often ignored in his time but reveal why his presidency turned out to be so consequential.

In the years since Reagan left office, he has been cast in marble by the Republican Party and dismissed by the Democrats. Weisberg shows why we need to move past these responses if we wish truly to appreciate his accomplishments and his legacy.
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American Constitutional History: A Brief Introduction

American Constitutional History: A Brief Introduction

Jack Fruchtman, Jr.

$42.95

American Constitutional History presents a concise introduction to the constitutional developments that have taken place over the past 225 years, treating trends from history, law, and political science. * Presents readers with a brief and accessible introduction to more than two centuries of U.S. constitutional history * Explores constitutional history chronologically, breaking U.S. history into five distinct periods * Reveals the full sweep of constitutional changes through a focus on issues relating to economic developments, civil rights and civil liberties, and executive power * Reflects the evolution of constitutional changes all the way up to the conclusion of the June 2015 Supreme Court term
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Deadlock and Disillusionment: American Politics Since 1968

Deadlock and Disillusionment: American Politics Since 1968

Gary W. Reichard

$39.95

Deadlock and Disillusionment: American Politics Since 1968 is an insightful consideration of the events people, and policy debates that have shaped and continue to influence, even control, the current political era. * Rejects conventional wisdom that the dominant force shaping recent American politics in the last half century has been the rise of the Right * Considers the achievements and frustrations of each administration, from Nixon to Obama, in its assessment of contemporary U.S. politics * Features authorship by an expert scholar in the field who takes a thematic rather than a partisan approach to recent American politics * Offers a concise, comprehensive, and thoroughly up-to-date synthesis of the literature in the field and concludes with a comprehensive bibliographical essay, an aid to student research
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Mission Failure: America and the World in the Post-Cold War Era

Mission Failure: America and the World in the Post-Cold War Era

Michael Mandelbaum

$37.95

Unbeknownst to just about all observers of international affairs, America's decision in 1991 to provide air defense to oppressed Kurds in Iraq after the Gulf War had ended ushered in an entirely new era in American foreign policy.

Until that moment, the United States used military power to defend against threats (real and perceived) that its leaders thought would either weaken America's position in the world order or - in the worst case - threaten the homeland. For the first time ever, the United States militarily was now actively involved in states that represented no threat, and with missions that were largely humanitarian and socio-political. After establishing the Kurdish no-fly zone, the US in quick succession intervened in Somalia, Haiti, and Kosovo. Even after 9/11, it decided that it had a duty to not just invade Iraq, but reconstruct Iraqi society along Western lines.

In Mission Failure, the eminent international relations scholar Michael Mandelbaum provides a sweeping interpretive history of American foreign policy in the post-Cold War era to show why this new approach was doomed to failure. America had always adhered to a mission-based foreign policy, but in the post-Cold War era it swung away from security concerns to a near-exclusive emphasis on implanting Western institutions wherever it could. Many good things happened in this era, including a broad expansion of democracy and strong growth in the global economy. But the U.S. never had either the capacity or the will to change societies that were dramatically different from our own. Over two decades later, we can see the wreckage: a broken Iraq a teetering Afghanistan, a China that laughs at our demands that they adopt a human rights regime, and a still-impoverished Haiti.

Mandelbaum does not deny that American foreign policy has always had a strong ideological component. Instead, he argues that emphasizing that particular feature generally leads to mission failure. We are able to defend ourselves well and effectively project power, but we have very little capacity to change other societies. If nothing else, that is what the last quarter century has taught us.
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A Short History of U.S. Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean

A Short History of U.S. Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean

Alan McPherson

$42.95

A Short History of U.S. Interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean presents a concise account of the full sweep of U.S. military invasions and interventions in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean from 1800 up to the present day. * Engages in debates about the economic, military, political, and cultural motives that shaped U.S. interventions in Cuba, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Guatemala, Mexico, and elsewhere * Deals with incidents that range from the taking of Florida to the Mexican War, the War of 1898, the Veracruz incident of 1914, the Bay of Pigs, and the 1989 invasion of Panama * Features also the responses of Latin American countries to U.S. involvement * Features unique coverage of 19th century interventions as well as 20th century incidents, and includes a series of helpful maps and illustrations
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Chattanooga 1863: Grant and Bragg in Central Tennessee

Chattanooga 1863: Grant and Bragg in Central Tennessee

Mark Lardas ,  Adam Hook

$29.99

Following the disastrous defeat at Chickamauga, Union forces were in disarray and the tactically vital Chattanooga was under siege and on the brink of falling. Secretary of War William Stanton ordered Ulysses Grant to send the Army of Tennessee to reinforce Chattanooga. Grant had already reacted. The situation was dire. It required outstanding leadership to rescue the situation. President Abraham Lincoln decided Grant was the man for the occasion. In early October, Grant was promoted to command of the Military District of Mississippi and told to clean up the mess created by Chickamauga. With those orders a new campaign began: the Chattanooga Campaign. This book tracks how over the next three months Grant would orchestrate the movements of three Union Armies - The Army of the Cumberland, The Army of the Tennessee, and two Corps from the Army of the Potomac. He would lead them into a series of battles that saw them break the siege of Chattanooga before in three battles in three days the Union forces broke the Confederate army entrenched in the heights overlooking Chattanooga.
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Hitler's Nordic Ally?: Finland and the Total War 1939 - 1945

Hitler's Nordic Ally?: Finland and the Total War 1939 - 1945

Claes Johansen

$80.00

Finland was the only nation with an elected and democratic government to fight on the German side in WWII. Despite being small, poorly armed and made up of conscripts, the Finnish army was probably the most effective fighting force at the time, managing with practically no outside help to keep the mighty Red Army at bay for more than three months during the Winter War of 1939-40. In 1944, the devastating Soviet mass attack against the Finnish army involved the largest artillery assault of the entire WWII theatre of operations up until this point. Nevertheless, the Finns eventually managed to halt the attack. Most English books on Finland in WWII concentrate on the brief Winter War and make very little mention of the country's involvement in the remainder of the war, where it fought for more than three years alongside the Germans against the Soviet Union, and later against Germany in the Lapland War. This book examines this extremely important, highly dramatic and often overlooked and misunderstood chapter of WWII to a broad, English-reading audience.Building on the latest historical research, Claes Johansen's ground-breaking work explains how the Finnish war effort was planned and executed, how it was connected to the overall events of the era, and how the waging of a total war can affect a modern democratic society militarily, politically, diplomatically and on various levels of civilian life.
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Defending the Motherland: The Soviet Women Who Fought Hitler's Aces

Defending the Motherland: The Soviet Women Who Fought Hitler's Aces

Lyuba Vinogradova ,  Antony Beevor ,  Arch Tait

$22.99

Plucked from every background, and led by an N.K.V.D. Major, the new recruits who boarded a train in Moscow on 16th October 1941 to go to war had much in common with millions of others across the world. What made the 586th Fighter Regiment, the 587th Heavy-bomber Regiment and the 588th Regiment of light night-bombers unique was their gender: the Soviet Union was creating the first all-female active combat units in modern history. Drawing on original interviews with surviving airwomen, Lyuba Vinogradova weaves together the untold stories of the female Soviet fighter pilots of the Second World War. From that first train journey to the last tragic disappearance, Vinogradova's panoramic account of these women's lives follows them from society balls to unmarked graves, from landmark victories to the horrors of Stalingrad. Battling not just fearsome Aces of the Luftwaffe but also patronising prejudice from their own leaders, women such as Lilya Litvyak and Ekaterina Budanova are brought to life by the diaries and recollections of those who knew them, and who watched them live, love, fight and die.
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Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped

Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped

Garry Kasparov

$23.99

The ascension of Vladimir Putin - a former lieutenant colonel of the KGB - to the presidency of Russia in 1999 was a strong signal that the country was headed away from democracy. Yet in the intervening years - as America and the world's other leading powers have continued to appease him - Putin has grown not only into a dictator but an international threat. With his vast resources and nuclear arsenal, Putin is at the centre of a worldwide assault on political liberty and the modern world order. For Garry Kasparov, none of this is news. He has been a vocal critic of Putin for over a decade, even leading the pro-democracy opposition to him in the farcical 2008 presidential election. Yet years of seeing his Cassandra-like prophecies about Putin's intentions fulfilled have left Kasparov with a darker truth: Putin's Russia, like ISIS or Al Qaeda, defines itself in opposition to the free countries of the world. As Putin has grown ever more powerful, the threat he poses has grown from local to regional and finally to global. In this urgent book, Kasparov shows that the collapse of the Soviet Union was not an endpoint - only a change of seasons, as the Cold War melted into a new spring. But now, after years of complacency and poor judgement, winter is once again upon us. Argued with the force of Kasparov's world-class intelligence, conviction and hopes for his home country, Winter Is Coming reveals Putin for what he is: an existential danger hiding in plain sight.
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Nicholas and Alexandra: The Last Tzar and His Family

Nicholas and Alexandra: The Last Tzar and His Family

Robert K. Massie

$24.99

A superbly crafted and humane portrait of the last days - and last rulers - of the Russian Empire. Complementing his Pulitzer prize-winning Peter the Great, in this commanding book Robert K. Massie sweeps readers back to the extraordinary world of imperial Russia to tell the story of the decline and fall of the ruling Romanov family: Tsar Nicholas II's political naivete; his wife Alexandra's obsession with the corrupt mystic Rasputin; and their son Alexis's battle with haemophilia. Against a lavish backdrop of luxury and intrigue, Massie unfolds a family tragedy played out on the brutal stage of early twentieth-century Russian history - the tale of a doomed empire and the death-marked royals who watched it crumble.
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Peter the Great: His Life and Work

Peter the Great: His Life and Work

Robert K. Massie

$24.99

Against the monumental canvas of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe and Russia, Robert K. Massie unfolds the extraordinary story of Peter the Great. A volatile feudal tsar with a taste for barbaric torture; a progressive and enlightened reformer of government and science; a statesman of vision who recreated his country's army and navy and founded St Petersburg as his imperial capital: Peter the Great embodied the greatest strengths and weaknesses of Russia while being at the very forefront of her development. Robert K. Massie delves deep into Peter's life and character, chronicling the pivotal events that transformed the boy tsar into a national icon. His portrayal of the complexities and contradictions of this most energetic of Russian rulers - a man both impetuous and stubborn, generous and cruel - brings a towering historical figure triumphantly to life.
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Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman

Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman

Robert K. Massie

$24.99

The extraordinary story of an obscure German princess who became one of the most powerful women in history. Born into a minor noble family, Catherine transformed herself into empress of Russia by sheer determination. For thirty-four years, the government, foreign policy, cultural development and welfare of the Russian people were in her hands. She dealt with domestic rebellion, foreign wars and the tidal wave of political change and violence churned up by the French Revolution. History offers few stories richer than that of Catherine the Great. Robert K. Massie brings an eternally fascinating woman together with her family, friends, ministers, generals, lovers and enemies - vividly and triumphantly to life.
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No Pasaran: Writings from the Spanish Civil War

No Pasaran: Writings from the Spanish Civil War

Pete Ayrton

$39.99

Hope, resignation, despair, sadness, humour, confusion, ruthlessness, compassion, kindness, generosity and love inhabit Pete Ayrton's anthology of writings from the Spanish Civil War: there is little sense of certainty and still less of triumphalism among the bewilderingly diverse Republican and Nationalist coalitions, all shades of which are represented here. Previous collections privileged the writings of the International Brigades over those of the Spanish, sometimes excluding them altogether. !No Pasaran! corrects the balance: by far the largest contingent of its thirty-five writers are Spanish, including Luis Bunuel, Manuel Rivas, Javier Cercas, Arturo Barea, Joan Sales and Chaves Nogales. The remainder offer contrasting perspectives of participants in the conflict from America (among them John Dos Passos, Muriel Rukeyser and Langston Hughes); Italy (Curzio Malaparte and Leonardo Sciascia); France (Jean-Paul Sartre, Andre Malraux and others); Germany (Gustav Regler); Russia (Victor Serge); Great Britain (including Arthur Koestler, George Orwell and Laurie Lee); Cuba, Argentina and Mexico. Pete Ayrton brings together hauntingly vivid stories from a bitterly fought war. This is powerful writing that allows the reader to witness life behind and at the front lines of both sides.
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Pyramids and Poppies: The 1st South African Infantry Brigade in Libya, France and Flanders 1915-1919

Pyramids and Poppies: The 1st South African Infantry Brigade in Libya, France and Flanders 1915-1919

Peter Digby

$85.00

This re-issue of  Pyramids and Poppies  coincides with the hundredth anniversary of the formation of the First SA Brigade, in August 1915. The book tells the very personal story of the Brigade on the Western Front during the Great War 1914-1918:  The war to end all wars. On this  front of all fronts, as it was called by the millions of men who lived and died in the mud of trench warfare, South Africans were present. Nearly four and a half thousand men of the South African Brigade were never to return.

John Buchan rated the 1st SA Brigade 'to have had no superior and not many equals'. Yet, since Buchan wrote The South African Forces in France in 1920, no book has been written that covers the whole spectrum of the 1st SA Brigade in the First World War. Pyramids and Poppies  updates and expands Buchan's work with a wealth of new material which includes many hitherto unknown photographs and drawings. These are enhanced with previously unpublished personal accounts by the men of the South African Brigade, which the author has been fortunate enough to access. They bring the reader face to face with the frontline and battlefield realities. 

The exploits of the Brigade went far beyond the normal expectations from a single Brigade on the Western Front. The huge casualties suffered at Delville Wood were a first. It brought home the real tragedy of the First World War experience to the people of South Africa and made Delville Wood the most famous battle fought by South Africans. Because of this, history has tended to overlook other places and events that were, for the South African Brigade, of far greater significance in terms of achievement and sacrifice. In the broad sweep of the conflict, Delville Wood must take its place as a modest part of the courage of the Springboks, who fought from Libya to France and Belgium. The actions at Halazin and Agagia are covered, as is Delville Wood, and so too are Butte de Warlencourt, Arras, Fampoux, Third Ypes, the crowning achievement at Marrieres Wood, Messines, Meteren, Beaurevoir, The Crossing of the River Selle and Hestrud. 

Through the deserts of North Africa and stinking mud of Flanders bursts the bravery and compassion of men who offered themselves in innocence as volunteers and learned the cruel indifference of war waged, by armchair generals.
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Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Rooms: The Spyhunter, the Fashion Designer & the Man from Moscow

Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Rooms: The Spyhunter, the Fashion Designer & the Man from Moscow

Paul Willetts

$24.99

Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Rooms provides the first comprehensive account of what was once hailed by a leading American newspaper as the greatest spy story of World War II. This dramatic yet little-known saga, replete with telephone taps, kidnappings, and police surveillance, centres on the furtive escapades of Tyler Kent, a handsome, womanising 28-year-old Ivy League graduate, who doubles as a US Embassy code clerk and Soviet agent. Against the backdrop of London high society during the so-called Phoney War, Kent's life intersects with the lives of the book's two other memorably flamboyant protagonists. One of those is Maxwell Knight, an urbane, endearingly eccentric MI5 spyhunter. The other is Anna Wolkoff, a White Russian fashion designer and Nazi spy whose outfits are worn by the Duchess of Windsor and whose parents are friends of the British royal family. Wolkoff belongs to a fascist secret society called the Right Club, which aims to overthrow the British government. Her romantic entanglement with Tyler Kent gives her access to a secret correspondence between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, a correspondence that has the potential to transform the outcome of the war.
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MacArthur at War: World War II in the Pacific

MacArthur at War: World War II in the Pacific

Walter R. Borneman

$60.00

World War II changed the course of history. Douglas MacArthur changed the course of World War II. MACARTHUR AT WAR will go deeper into this transformative period of his life than previous biographies, drilling into the military strategy that Walter R. Borneman is so skilled at conveying, and exploring how personality and ego translate into military successes and failures. Architect of stunning triumphs and inexplicable defeats, General MacArthur is the most intriguing military leader of the twentieth century. There was never any middle ground with MacArthur. This in-depth study of the most critical period of his career shows how MacArthur's influence spread far beyond the war-torn Pacific.
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Unending War: The Australian Army's Struggle Against Malaria, 1885-2015

Unending War: The Australian Army's Struggle Against Malaria, 1885-2015

Ian Howie-Willis

$34.99

MALARIA is not only the greatest killer of humankind, the disease has been the relentless scourge of armies throughout history. Malaria thwarted the efforts of Alexander the Great to conquer India in the fourth century BC. Malaria frustrated the ambitions of Attila the Hun and Genghis Khan to rule all Europe in the fourth and thirteenth centuries AD; and malaria stymied Napoleon Bonaparte's plan to conquer Syria at the end of the eighteenth century. Malaria has also been the Australian Army's continuing implacable foe in almost all its overseas deployments formation of the Australian Army in 1901.

On at least three occasions malaria has halted Australian Army operations, bringing it to a standstill and threatening its defeat. The first time was in Syria in 1918, when a malaria epidemic cut a swathe through the Australian-led Desert Mounted Corps. The second time was in Papua New Guinea in 1942-43, when the Army was fighting malaria as well as the Japanese. The third time was in Vietnam in 1968, when malaria caused more casualties than did enemy action. Indeed the Australian Army has been fighting 'an unending war' against malaria ever since the Boer War at the end of the nineteenth century. The struggle against the disease continues 115 years later because virtually all Army's overseas deployments are to malarious regions. Fortunately for Australian troops serving in nations where malaria is endemic, the Australian Army Malaria Institute undertakes the scientific research necessary to protect our service personnel against the disease.

Ian Howie-Willis, in this very readable book, tells the dramatic story of the Army's long and continuing struggle against malaria. It breaks new ground by showing how just one disease, malaria, is as much the serving soldier's foe as any enemy force.
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Allenby's Gunners: Artillery in the Sinai and Palestine Campaigns 1916-1918

Allenby's Gunners: Artillery in the Sinai and Palestine Campaigns 1916-1918

Allan H. Smith

$34.99

Alan Smith's 'Allenby's Gunners' tells the story of artillery in the highly successful World War I Sinai and Palestine campaigns. Following Gallipoli and the reconstitution of the AIF, a shortage of Australian gunners saw British Territorial artillery allotted to the Australian Light Horse and New Zealand Mounted Rifle brigades. It was a relationship that would prove highly successful and 'Allenby's Gunners' provides a detailed and colourful description of the artillery war, cavalry and infantry operations from the first battles of Romani and Rafa, through the tough actions at Gaza, the Palestine desert, Jordan Valley and Amman to the capture of Jerusalem.

The story concludes with the superb victory at Megiddo and the taking of Damascus until the theatre armistice of October 1918. Smith covers the trials and triumphs of the gunners as they honed their art in one of the most difficult battlefield environments of the war. The desert proved hostile and unrelenting, testing the gunners, their weapons and their animals in the harsh conditions. The gunners' adversary, the wily and skilful Ottoman artillerymen, endured the same horrendous conditions and proved a tough and courageous foe. The light horsemen and gunners also owed much to the intrepid airmen of the AFC and RFC whose tactical and offensive bombing and counter-battery work from mid-1917 would prove instrumental in securing victory. This is an aspect of the campaign that is seamlessly woven throughout as the action unfolds.

The Sinai and Palestine campaigns generally followed a pattern of heavy losses and setbacks for an initial period before Allied forces eventually prevailed. This is a highly descriptive volume that tells an oft-neglected story and fills a gap in the record of a campaign in which Australians played a significant role. It is a welcome addition to the story of the Australians in the Middle Eastern campaigns of World War I.
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The Cooler King: The True Story of William Ash - The Greatest Escaper of World War II

The Cooler King: The True Story of William Ash - The Greatest Escaper of World War II

Patrick Bishop

$22.99

The Cooler King tells the astonishing story of William Ash, an American flier brought up in Depression-hit Texas, who after being shot down in his Spitfire over France in early 1942 spent the rest of the war defying the Nazis by striving to escape from every prisoner of war camp in which he was incarcerated. It is a saga full of incident and high drama, including a break out via a tunnel dug in the latrines of the Oflag XXIB prison camp in Poland - a great untold episode of the Second World War. Alongside William Ash is a cast of fascinating characters, including Douglas Bader, Roger Bushell, who would go on to lead the Great Escape, and Paddy Barthropp, a dashing Battle of Britain pilot who despite his very different background became Ash's best friend and shared many of his adventures. By weaving together contemporary documents and interviews with Ash's comrades, Patrick Bishop vividly recreates the multiple escape attempts, while also examining the P.O.W. experience and analysing the passion that drove some prisoners to risk death in repeated bids for freedom.The Cooler King is at once uplifting and inspirational, and stands as a testament to the durability of decent values and the invincible spirit of liberty.
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No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog, and Their Incredible Story of Courage and Survival in World War II

No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog, and Their Incredible Story of Courage and Survival in World War II

Robert Weintraub

$19.99

The two friends huddled close together, each of them the other's saving grace in a world gone to hell... There was nothing terribly unusual about POWs suffering horribly at the hands of their Japanese captors. All across the Pacific theatre, Allied captives were experiencing similar punishment. But there was one thing unusual about this particular duo of prisoners.

One of them was a dog.

Flight technician Frank Williams and Judy, a purebred pointer, met in the most unlikely of places: a World War II internment camp. Judy was a fiercely loyal dog, with a keen sense for who was friend and who was foe, and the pair's relationship deepened throughout their captivity. When the prisoners suffered beatings, Judy would repeatedly risk her life to intervene. She survived bombings and other near-death experiences and became a beacon not only for Frank but for all the men, who saw in her survival a flicker of hope for their own.

Using a wealth of new material including interviews with those who knew Frank and Judy, letters and firsthand accounts, Robert Weintraub expertly weaves a narrative of an unbreakable bond forged in the worst circumstances. Judy's devotion to the men she was interned with, including a host of characters from all around the world, from Australia to the UK, was so powerful that reports indicate she might have been the only dog spared in these camps - and their care for her helped keep them alive. At one point, deep in despair and starvation, Frank contemplated killing himself and the dog to prevent either from watching the other die. But both were rescued, and Judy spent the rest of her life with Frank. She became the war's only official canine POW, and after she died at the age of fourteen, Frank couldn't bring himself to ever have another dog. Their story of friendship and survival is one of the great sagas of World War II.
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The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal

The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal

David E. Hoffman

$29.95

A Washington Post Notable Book of the Year It was the height of the Cold War, and a dangerous time to be stationed in the Soviet Union. One evening, while the chief of the CIA s Moscow station was filling his gas tank, a stranger approached and dropped a note into the car. The chief, suspicious of a KGB trap, ignored the overture. But the man had made up his mind. His attempts to establish contact with the CIA would be rebuffed four times before he thrust upon them an envelope whose contents would stun U.S. intelligence. In the years that followed, that man, Adolf Tolkachev, became one of the most valuable spies ever for the U.S. But these activities posed an enormous personal threat to Tolkachev and his American handlers. They had clandestine meetings in parks and on street corners, and used spy cameras, props, and private codes, eluding the ever-present KGB in its own backyard until a shocking betrayal put them all at risk. Drawing on previously classified CIA documents and on interviews with firsthand participants, The Billion Dollar Spy is a brilliant feat of reporting and a riveting true story of intrigue in the final years of the Cold War.
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Phoenix: A Complete History of the Luftwaffe 1918-1945: Volume 1, The Phoenix is Reborn 1918-1934

Phoenix: A Complete History of the Luftwaffe 1918-1945: Volume 1, The Phoenix is Reborn 1918-1934

Richard Meredith

$75.00

Based on forty years of detailed research, the Phoenix Project is a unique history of the wartime German Luftwaffe. Going far beyond a simple description of famous air battles and operations the overall work draws extensively on original documents, secondary sources and contemporary accounts to place the Luftwaffe within its proper historical context, gather together its many disparate components and provide a hitherto unpublished balance to its diverse activities.

The Phoenix Reborn covers a particularly neglected area, specifically the post-war Reichswehr and the years of secrecy leading up to the unveiling of the Luftwaffe in 1935. Much of the key developmental work was completed at this time and the first volume examines the evolution of the uniquely German concept of operativer Luftkrieg, the work of the clandestine air staff and the key roles played by the German Transport Ministry and the Flight Centre Lipetsk in the technical development of military aircraft and the training of military aviators. It shows how Goring and Hitler essentially inherited an air arm in waiting - a product of covert military professional endeavour over a period of fifteen years.

The structure of the Phoenix Project is totally unique. Five major themes run throughout the history's constituent volumes - (A) Strategy and Command, (B) Ministerial Activity, (C) Technology and Production, (D) Infrastructure and Training, and (E) Operations.These divisions enable the reader to pursue particular areas of interest throughout the overall work or to look at the inter-relationships between the various aspects of Luftwaffe activity.
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Israeli Soldier vs Syrian Soldier: Golan Heights 1967-73

Israeli Soldier vs Syrian Soldier: Golan Heights 1967-73

David Campbell ,  Johnny Shumate

$22.99

Israel seized the strategically critical Golan Heights from Syria during the 1967 Six Day War in an audacious and determined operation, yet when the Yom Kippur War broke out the Israeli military were exposed by the effectiveness of the newly confident and dangerous Syrian army. In the Golan only luck, herculean Israeli efforts and tactical misjudgements by the Syrians were to allow the Israelis to maintain control. In this book, three pivotal encounters in the Golan are assessed, supported by artwork, maps and photographs, tracking how both sides' forces evolved over the period.
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Lavi: The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet

Lavi: The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet

John W. Golan

$69.99

The Lavi fighter program, the largest weapons-development effort ever undertaken by the State of Israel, envisioned a new generation of high-performance aircraft. In a controversial strategy, Israel Aircraft Industries intended to develop and manufacture the fighters in Israel with American financial support.

The sophisticated planes, developed in the mid-1980s, were unique in design and intended to make up the majority of the Israeli air force. Though considerable prestige and money were at stake, developmental costs increased and doubts arose as to whether the Lavi could indeed be the warplane it was meant to be. Eventually the program became a microcosm for the ambitions, fears, and internal divisions that shaped both the U.S.-Israeli relationship and Israeli society itself. But the fighter never made it to operational service, and until now, the full breadth and significance of the Lavi story have never been examined and presented. Lavi: The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet traces the evolution of the Lavi fighter from its genesis in the 1970s to its scrapping in August 1987.

John W.  Golan examines the roles of Israeli military icons and political leaders such as Ezer Weizman, Ariel Sharon, Menachem Begin, and Yitzhak Rabin in the program and in relation to their counterparts in the United States. On the American side, Golan traces the evolution of government policy toward the program, detailing the complex picture of the U.S. foreign policy apparatus and of U.S.-Israeli relations in general-from President Reagan's public endorsement of the program on the White House lawn to Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger's unremitting attempts to cancel it in succeeding years.
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Luftwaffe Over America: The Secret Plans to Bomb the United States in World War II

Luftwaffe Over America: The Secret Plans to Bomb the United States in World War II

Manfred Griehl

$39.99

This thought-provoking book examines the Nazi German plans to raid - and bomb - New York and the eastern seabord in the event of a successful invasion of the Soviet Union. The plans rested upon the use of transoceanic aircraft, such as the six-engined Ju 390, Me 264 or Ta 400. The Third Reich was unable to produce these machines in sufficient numbers, however, if the Soviet Union had been conquered, these plans would have become a reality. With the seizure of vital resources from the Soviet Union the Wehrmacht would have had enough fuel and material to mass-produce giant bomber aircraft: it was a near-run thing. The collapse of the Wehrmacht infrastructure and the premature end of the Thousand Year Reich ensured that plans for long-range remote-controlled missiles never got past the drawing board. This fascinating, thoroughly researched study offers valuable insights into how Germany developed new weapons and shows why the attempts to develop long range bombers were frustrated until they were terminated by the end of hostilities. Includes more than a hundred rarely seen photographs and original plans.
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Milestones of Aviation: The Epic of Aviation with the National Air and Space Museum

Milestones of Aviation: The Epic of Aviation with the National Air and Space Museum

Robert van der Linden

$45.00

Trace the incredible milestones in aviation with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum collection!

From the moment the Wright Brothers first took flight in 1903 to the modern-day reliance on stealth aircraft and drones, there have been significant advances made in aviation.Milestones of Aviation celebrates each era of advancements by showcasing the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's world-class aircraft collection. Authored by Dr. Robert van der Linden, a leading expert on aviation and Chairman of the Aeronautics Department at the NASM, this book is a stunning profile of the advancements in flight from decade to decade, illustrated with beautiful, large-scale photography and enhanced with little-known facts, anecdotes, and insights from major players in the aviation industry.

Climb inside the cockpit of the Spirit of St. Louis that Charles Lindbergh piloted solo across the Atlantic Ocean, making history. Contrast that with a Boeing B-29 Superfortress, the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb. The full-page photos of each milestone-making aircraft are accompanied by timelines to showcase related aircraft as well as sidebars with interesting and little-known facts, stories, and related research.
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Resistance: European Resistance to the Nazis, 1940-1945

Resistance: European Resistance to the Nazis, 1940-1945

M. R. D. Foot

$19.99

If you who read this can say, I am not under fire; I am not under torture; I am not on the run; if I hear a noise at six in the morning, I know it is a neighbour or a milkman, not the secret police; no one in my country is arrested and held without prompt charge and trial ...then you owe it, in a larger degree than most historians have so far allowed, to the resistance that occupied Europe put up to Hitler. An instant classic upon its initial publication in 1976, this fluent and persuasive book was the first to analyse the whole field of wartime resistance to the Nazis in Europe, to explain what resisters could and could not do, and to assess whether they achieved their aims. It is a truly epic theme, with its drama of intelligence, deception, escape and subversion. In gathering the threads of this important narrative into the fabric of a single volume, M. R. D. Foot, one of the most distinguished historians of his time, achieved a work of gripping and major significance.
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Operation Neptune: The D-Day Landings and the Allied Invasion of Europe

Operation Neptune: The D-Day Landings and the Allied Invasion of Europe

Craig L. Symonds

$25.95

Seventy years ago, more than six thousand Allied ships carried more than a million soldiers across the English Channel to a fifty-mile-wide strip of the Normandy coast in German-occupied France. It was the greatest sea-borne assault in human history. The code names given to the beaches where the ships landed the soldiers have become immortal: Gold, Juno, Sword, Utah, and especially Omaha, the scene of almost unimaginable human tragedy. The sea of crosses in the cemetery sitting today atop a bluff overlooking the beaches recalls to us its cost.

Most accounts of this epic story begin with the landings on the morning of June 6, 1944. In fact, however, D-Day was the culmination of months and years of planning and intense debate. In the dark days after the evacuation of Dunkirk in the summer of 1940, British officials and, soon enough, their American counterparts, began to consider how, and, where, and especially when, they could re-enter the European Continent in force. The Americans, led by U.S. Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall, wanted to invade as soon as possible; the British, personified by their redoubtable prime minister, Winston Churchill, were convinced that a premature landing would be disastrous. The often-sharp negotiations between the English-speaking allies led them first to North Africa, then into Sicily, then Italy. Only in the spring of 1943, did the Combined Chiefs of Staff commit themselves to an invasion of northern France. The code name for this invasion was Overlord, but everything that came before, including the landings themselves and the supply system that made it possible for the invaders to stay there, was code-named Neptune.

Craig L. Symonds now offers the complete story of this Olympian effort, involving transports, escorts, gunfire support ships, and landing craft of every possible size and function. The obstacles to success were many. In addition to divergent strategic views and cultural frictions, the Anglo-Americans had to overcome German U-boats, Russian impatience, fierce competition for insufficient shipping, training disasters, and a thousand other impediments, including logistical bottlenecks and disinformation schemes. Symonds includes vivid portraits of the key decision-makers, from Franklin Roosevelt and Churchill, to Marshall, Dwight Eisenhower, and Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay, who commanded the naval element of the invasion. Indeed, the critical role of the naval forces--British and American, Coast Guard and Navy--is central throughout.

In the end, as Symonds shows in this gripping account of D-Day, success depended mostly on the men themselves: the junior officers and enlisted men who drove the landing craft, cleared the mines, seized the beaches and assailed the bluffs behind them, securing the foothold for the eventual campaign to Berlin, and the end of the most terrible war in human history.
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Nights in the Big City: Paris, Berlin, London, 1840-1930

Nights in the Big City: Paris, Berlin, London, 1840-1930

Joachim Schlor ,  Matthew Beaumont

$39.99

This elegantly written book describes the changes in the perception and experience of the night in three great European cities: Paris, Berlin and London. The lighting up of the European city by gas and electricity in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries brought about a new relationship with the night, in respect of both work and pleasure.Nights in the Big City explores this new awareness of the city in all its ramifications. Joachim Schlor has spent his days sifting through countless police and church archives and first-hand accounts, and his nights exploring the highways and byways of these three great capitals. Illustrated with haunting and evocative photographs by Brandt and Kertesz, among others, and filled with contemporary literary references, Nights in the Big City has been acclaimed as a milestone in the cultural history of the city. This new edition features a Preface by Matthew Beaumont, author of Nightwalking: A Nocturnal History of London (Verso, 2015).
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Can it!: The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods

Can it!: The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods

Gary Allen

$39.99

What do beer, cheese, yogurt, bacon, sauerkraut, miso and jam have in common? They are all preserved foods, and come from a culinary need as old as human civilization itself: the problem of alternating food scarcity and seasonal overabundance. Can It! celebrates the miracle of preservation, which has done so much to create the diversity of cuisines found around the world.Today our preserved foods are often frozen, refrigerated, pasteurized, irradiated, vacuum-packed or pumped full of preservatives, but even before these methods were invented, our ancestors, knowing next to nothing about organic chemistry, found ingenious techniques not only to preserve the foods they grew but to alter them - to delicious effect. Wine is more than old grape juice, just as cheese is more than spoiled milk. These transformations resulted in new flavours, textures and, ultimately, new ways of defining the tastes and cultures of communities, who passed down their knowledge from generation to generation. Exploring the history and science of preservation, Gary Allen examines all the major methods, from drying to smoking, salting, canning and fermentation. Allaying the fears of the squeamish, Can It! serves up historic and modern recipes that will help any home cook participate in one of culinary history's most hallowed traditions.
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Luxury: A Rich History

Luxury: A Rich History

Giorgio Riello ,  Peter McNeil

$50.95

We live in a world obsessed by luxury. Long-distance airlines compete to offer first-class sleeping experiences and hotels recommend exclusive suites where you are never disturbed. Luxury is a rapidly changing global industry that makes the headlines daily in our newspapers and on the internet. More than ever, luxury is a pervasive presence in the cultural and economic life of the West - and increasingly too in the emerging super-economies of Asia and Latin America. Yet luxury is hardly a new phenomenon. Today's obsession with luxury brands and services is just one of the many manifestations that luxury has assumed. In the middle ages and the Renaissance, for example, luxury was linked to notions of magnificence and courtly splendour. In the eighteenth century luxury was at the centre of philosophical debates over its role in shaping people's desires and oiling the wheels of commerce. And it continues to morph today, with the growth of the global super-rich and increasing wealth polarization. From palaces to penthouses, from couture fashion to lavish jewellery, from handbags to red wine, from fast cars to easy money, Peter McNeil and Giorgio Riello present the first ever global history of luxury, from the Romans to the twenty-first century: a sparkling and ever-changing story of extravagance, excess, novelty, and indulgence.
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Treasures from the Map Room: A Journey Through the Bodleian Collections

Treasures from the Map Room: A Journey Through the Bodleian Collections

Debbie Hall

$91.00

This book explores the stories behind seventy-five extraordinary maps. It includes unique treasures such as the fourteenth-century Gough Map of Great Britain, exquisite portolan charts made in the fifteenth century, the Selden Map of China - the earliest example of Chinese merchant cartography - and an early world map from the medieval Islamic Book of Curiosities, together with more recent examples of fictional places drawn in the twentieth century, such as C.S. Lewis's own map of Narnia and J.R.R. Tolkien's map of Middle Earth. As well as the works of famous mapmakers Mercator, Ortelius, Blaeu, Saxton and Speed, the book also includes lesser known but historically significant works: early maps of the Moon, of the transit of Venus, hand-drawn estate plans and early European maps of the New World. There are also some surprising examples: escape maps printed on silk and carried by pilots in the Second World War in case of capture on enemy territory; the first geological survey of the British Isles showing what lies beneath our feet; a sixteenth-century woven tapestry map of Worcestershire; a map plotting outbreaks of cholera and a jigsaw map of India from the 1850s. Behind each of these lies a story, of intrepid surveyors, ambitious navigators, chance finds or military victories. Drawing on the unique collection in the Bodleian Library, these stunning maps range from single cities to the solar system, span the thirteenth to the twenty-first century and cover most of the world.
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