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Towards the Flame: Empire, War and the End of Tsarist Russia

Towards the Flame: Empire, War and the End of Tsarist Russia

Dominic Lieven

$55.00

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JULY 2015 ----- The Russian decision to mobilize in July 1914 may have been the single most catastrophic choice of the modern era.

Some articulate, thoughtful figures around the Tsar understood Russia's fragility, and yet they were shouted down by those who were convinced that, despite Germany's patent military superiority, Russian greatness required decisive action. Russia's rulers thought they were acting to secure their future, but in fact - after millions of deaths and two revolutions - they were consigning their entire class to death or exile and their country to a uniquely terrible generations - long experiment under a very different regime.

Dominic Lieven is a Senior Research Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge University, and a Fellow of the British Academy. His book Russia Against Napoleon (Penguin) won the Wolfson Prize for History and the Prize of the Fondation Napoleon for the best foreign work on the Napoleonic era.
The Silk Road: A New History

The Silk Road: A New History

Valerie Hansen

$26.95

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The Silk Road is as iconic in world history as the Colossus of Rhodes or the Suez Canal. But what was it, exactly? It conjures up a hazy image of a caravan of camels laden with silk on a dusty desert track, reaching from China to Rome. The reality was different - and far more interesting - as revealed in this new history. 

In The Silk Road, Valerie Hansen describes the remarkable archeological finds that revolutionize our understanding of these trade routes. For centuries, key records remained hidden-sometimes deliberately buried by bureaucrats for safe keeping. But the sands of the Taklamakan Desert have revealed fascinating material, sometimes preserved by illiterate locals who recycled official documents to make insoles for shoes or garments for the dead. Hansen explores seven oases along the road, from Xi'an to Samarkand, where merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers mixed in cosmopolitan communities, tolerant of religions from Buddhism to Zoroastrianism. There was no single, continuous road, but a chain of markets that traded between east and west. China and the Roman Empire had very little direct trade. 

China's main partners were the peoples of modern-day Iran, whose tombs in China reveal much about their Zoroastrian beliefs. Silk was not the most important good on the road; paper, invented in China before Julius Caesar was born, had a bigger impact in Europe, while metals, spices, and glass were just as important as silk. Perhaps most significant of all was the road's transmission of ideas, technologies, and artistic motifs. 

The Silk Road is a fascinating story of archeological discovery, cultural transmission, and the intricate chains across Central Asia and China.
The Mongol Empire: Genghis Khan, His Heirs and the Founding of Modern China

The Mongol Empire: Genghis Khan, His Heirs and the Founding of Modern China

John Man

$22.99

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Genghis Khan is one of history's immortals: a leader of genius, driven by an inspiring vision for peaceful world rule. Believing he was divinely protected, Genghis united warring clans to create a nation and then an empire that ran across much of Asia. Under his grandson, Kublai Khan, the vision evolved into a more complex religious ideology, justifying further expansion. Kublai doubled the empire's size until, in the late 13th century, he and the rest of Genghis' 'Golden Family' controlled one fifth of the inhabited world. Along the way, he conquered all China, gave the nation the borders it has today, and then, finally, discovered the limits to growth. Genghis' dream of world rule turned out to be a fantasy. And yet, in terms of the sheer scale of the conquests, never has a vision and the character of one man had such an effect on the world. Charting the evolution of this vision, John Man provides a unique account of the Mongol Empire, from young Genghis to old Kublai, from a rejected teenager to the world's most powerful emperor.
Saladin: The Life, the Legend and the Islamic Empire

Saladin: The Life, the Legend and the Islamic Empire

John Man

$32.99

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Saladin remains one of the most iconic figures of his age. As the man who united the Arabs and saved Islam from Christian crusaders in the 12th century, he is the Islamic world's preeminent hero. Ruthless in defence of his faith, brilliant in leadership, he also possessed qualities that won admiration from his Christian foes. He knew the limits of violence, showing such tolerance and generosity that many Europeans, appalled at the brutality of their own people, saw him as the exemplar of their own knightly ideals. 

But Saladin is far more than a historical hero. Builder, literary patron and theologian, he is a man for all times, and a symbol of hope for an Arab world once again divided. Centuries after his death, in cities from Damascus to Cairo and beyond, to the Arabian Peninsula and the Gulf, Saladin continues to be an immensely potent symbol of religious and military resistance to the West. He is central to Arab memories, sensibilities and the ideal of a unified Islamic state. In this authoritative biography, historian John Man brings Saladin and his world to life in vivid detail. 

Charting his rise to power, his struggle to unify the warring factions of his faith, and his battles to retake Jerusalem and expel Christian influence from Arab lands, Saladin explores the life and the enduring legacy of this champion of Islam, and examines his significance for the world today.
The First Fleet

The First Fleet

Rob Mundle

$29.99

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The First Fleet - the creation of a nation. Rob Mundle, bestselling maritime biographer of Bligh, Flinders and Cook, is back on the ocean to tell one of the great stories of expedition under sail: the extraordinary eight-month, 17,000-nautical-mile voyage of the First Fleet. With customary sweep and swell, Mundle puts you alongside 48-year-old Captain Arthur Phillip on the quarterdeck of the Royal Navy escort HMS Sirius, as he commands his small armada of eleven ships, carrying over 1400 men, women and children, to the other side of the world. At the heart of Mundle's story of the First Fleet is the extraordinary seamanship of the masters and their crews in their day-to-day workings on individual ships, battling all that nature could throw at them - from disastrous conditions to disease - in order to fulfil the grand plans and strategic visions of politicians and authorities. To arrive in Sydney Cove in January 1788 with all ships intact and such a low loss of life is a tribute to Phillip, his officers and crews, and to the wherewithal and brilliance of eighteenth-century seamanship.
Kin: The Real Story of Who We are

Kin: The Real Story of Who We are

Nick Brodie

$29.95

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When author and historian Nick Brodie traced his own family tree, he began to see the pattern of European settlement in Australia. As he learnt about the generations of his family, Nick uncovered the social and cultural contexts and historic circumstances that shaped his ancestors: the Irish, the convicts, the early settlers, Cobb & Co coachmen, the men from Snowy River, the Boer war, Galipolli, the Depression and the second world war. His quest is full of suspense, frustrations and red herrings, and makes a gripping story.

As Brodie tracks down where key characters lived, what they did, and the decisions they made - to commit treason, immigrate, marry, or move - he pieces together a complex and entertaining puzzle of Australia's history told through the very people who made it: the everyday Australians who contributed to Australia's rich and varied story.

In the same way Bill Bryson’s A History of Nearly Everything tells the history of the world through the characters who make the discoveries, Kin is well-written, absolutely accessible (think Tom Keneally’s The Australians) but also invigorated with detailed insights that will delight intelligent lovers of history and a good read.
Dangerous Games: Australia at the 1936 Nazi Olympics

Dangerous Games: Australia at the 1936 Nazi Olympics

Larry Writer

$32.99

'Larry Writer has delivered a gem in Dangerous Games' - Roland Perry, author of Bill the Bastard..'Writer has faithfully recreated the 1936 Olympics - the most controversial in history...Hitler, the host, represented the darkest evil...those Australians, the purest innocence.' - Harry Gordon, author of Australia and the Olympic Games..This is a tale of innocents abroad. Thirty-three athletes left Australia in May 1936 to compete in the Hitler Olympics in Berlin. Believing sporting competition was the best antidote to tyranny, they put their qualms on hold. Anything to be part of the greatest show on earth...Dangerous Games drops us into a front row seat at the 100,000-capacity Olympic stadium to witness some of the finest sporting performances of all time - most famously the African American runner Jesse Owens, who eclipsed the best athletes the Nazis could pit against him in every event he entered. The Australians, with their antiquated training regimes and amateur ethos, valiantly confronted the intensely focused athletes of Germany, the United States and Japan. Behind the scenes was cut-throat wheeling and dealing, defiance of Hitler, and warm friendships among athletes...What they did and saw in Berlin that hot, rainy summer influenced all that came after until their dying days.
God's Traitors: Terror and Faith in Elizabethan England

God's Traitors: Terror and Faith in Elizabethan England

Jessie Childs

$19.99

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A woman awakes in a prison cell. She has been on the run but the authorities have tracked her down and taken her to the Tower of London - where she is interrogated about the Gunpowder Plot.

The woman is Anne Vaux - one of the ardent, brave and exasperating members of the aristocratic Vauxes of Harrowden Hall. Through the eyes of this remarkable family, award-winning author Jessie Childs explores the Catholic predicament in Elizabethan England - an age in which their faith was criminalised and almost two hundred Catholics were executed. From dawn raids to daring escapes, stately homes to torture chambers, God's Traitors exposes the tensions masked by the cult of Gloriana - and is a timely reminder of the terrible consequences when religion and politics collide.

This book was longlisted for The Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. It was awarded a Sunday Times Book of the Year, a Daily Telegraph Book of the Year, a Times Book of the Year, and, an Observer Book of the Year.
The Angel and the Cad: Love, Loss and Scandal in Regency England

The Angel and the Cad: Love, Loss and Scandal in Regency England

Geraldine Roberts

$32.99

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At the age of sixteen, Catherine Tylney Long became the wealthiest heiress in England, and the public found their 'angel'. Witty, wealthy and beautiful, Catherine was the most eligible of young ladies and was courted by royalty but, ignoring the warnings of her closest confidantes, she married for love. Her choice of husband was the charming but feckless dandy William Wellesley Pole, nephew of the Duke of Wellington. The pair excited the public's interest on an unprecedented scale with gossip columns reporting every detail of their magnificent home in Wanstead, where they hosted glittering royal fetes, dinners and parties. But their happiness was short-lived; just a decade later William had frittered away Catherine's inheritance and the couple were forced to flee into exile. As they travelled across Europe, they became embroiled in a series of scandals that shocked the public and culminated in a landmark court case. Meticulously researched and rich with dazzling detail, The Angel and the Cad is a gripping and tragic tale of love and drama that twists and turns until the final page.
The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians

The Strangest Family: The Private Lives of George III, Queen Charlotte and the Hanoverians

Janice Hadlow

$19.99

An intensely moving account of George III's doomed attempt to create a happy, harmonious family, written with astonishing emotional force by a stunning new history writer.

George III came to the throne in 1760 as a man with a mission. He was determined to break with the extraordinarily dysfunctional home lives of his Hanoverian predecessors. He was sure that as a faithful husband and a loving father, he would be not just a happier man but a better ruler as well. During the early part of his reign it seemed as if, against all the odds, his great family project was succeeding. His wife, Queen Charlotte, shared his sense of moral purpose, and together they raised their fifteen children in a climate of loving attention. But as the children grew older, and their wishes and desires developed away from those of their father, it became harder to maintain the illusion of domestic harmony.

The Strangest Family is an epic, sprawling family drama, filled with intensely realised characters who leap off the page as we are led deep inside the private lives of the Hanoverians. Written with astonishing emotional force by a stunning new voice in history writing, it is both a window on another world and a universal story that will resonate powerfully with modern readers.
What's Wrong with Diplomacy?: The Future of Diplomacy and the Case of China and the UK

What's Wrong with Diplomacy?: The Future of Diplomacy and the Case of China and the UK

Kerry Brown

$9.99

Traditional methods of diplomacy are fast becoming antiquated. Secrecy, pomp and elitism may have dictated diplomatic strategy of the Cold War era, but in a digitised twenty-first century, inclusivity and transparency are values of increasing importance. Access to information is being democratised for a global citizenry, and nowadays everyone is a potential diplomat. From the handover of Hong Kong to recent high-profile political scandal, former diplomat Kerry Brown explores the chequered relationship between the UK and China, offering fresh insights into the fraught and ever-changing dynamic between these two countries. What's Wrong with Diplomacy? is a call to arms and a probing indictment of diplomacy's failure to adapt to a changing world.
The History of Modern France: From The Revolution to the Present Day

The History of Modern France: From The Revolution to the Present Day

Jonathan Fenby

$49.99

With the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815, the next two centuries for France would be tumultuous. Bestselling historian and political commentator Jonathan Fenby provides an expert and riveting journey through this period as he recounts and analyses the extraordinary sequence of events of this period from the end of the First Revolution through two others, a return of Empire, three catastrophic wars with Germany, periods of stability and hope interspersed with years of uncertainty and high tensions. 

As her cross-Channel neighbour Great Britain would equally suffer, France was to undergo the wrenching loss of colonies in the post-Second World War as the new modern world we know today took shape. Her attempts to become the leader of the European union is a constant struggle, as was her lack of support for America in the two Gulf Wars of the past twenty years. Alongside this came huge social changes and cultural landmarks but also fundamental questioning of what this nation, which considers itself exceptional, really stood - and stands - for. 

That saga and those questions permeate the France of today, now with an implacable enemy to face in the form of Islamic extremism which so bloodily announced itself this year in Paris. Fenby will detail every event, every struggle and every outcome across this expanse of 200 years. It will prove to be the definitive guide to understanding France.
How to Ruin a Queen: Marie Antoinette, the Stolen Diamonds and the Scandal That Shook the French Throne

How to Ruin a Queen: Marie Antoinette, the Stolen Diamonds and the Scandal That Shook the French Throne

Jonathan Beckman

$19.99

On 5 September 1785, a trial began in Paris that would divide the country, captivate Europe and send the French monarchy tumbling down the slope towards the Revolution.

Cardinal Louis de Rohan, scion of one of the most ancient and distinguished families in France, stood accused of forging Marie Antoinette's signature to fraudulently obtain the most expensive piece of jewellery in Europe - a 2,400-carat necklace worth 1.6 million francs. Where were the diamonds now? Was Rohan entirely innocent? Was, for that matter, the queen? What was the role of the charismatic magus, the comte de Cagliostro, who was rumoured to be two-thousand-years old and capable of transforming metal into gold?

This is a tale of political machinations and extravagance on an enormous scale; of kidnappings, prison breaks and assassination attempts; of hapless French police disguised as colliers, reams of lesbian pornography and a duel fought with poisoned pigs. It is a detective story, a courtroom drama, a tragicomic farce, and a study of credulity and self-deception in the Age of Enlightenment.
Agents of Empire: Knights, Corsairs, Jesuits and Spies in the Late Sixteenth-Century Mediterranean World

Agents of Empire: Knights, Corsairs, Jesuits and Spies in the Late Sixteenth-Century Mediterranean World

Noel Malcolm

$65.00

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In the sixteenth century, the Christian states of Western Europe were on the defensive against a Muslim superpower - the Empire of the Ottoman sultans. There was violent conflict, from raiding and corsairing to large-scale warfare, but there were also many kinds of peaceful interaction across the surprisingly porous frontiers of these opposing power-blocs.

Agents of Empire describes the paths taken through the eastern Mediterranean and its European hinterland by members of two closely related Venetian-Albanian families, the Brunis and the Brutis, almost all of them previously invisible to history. They include an archbishop in the Balkans, the captain of the papal flagship at the battle of Lepanto, the power behind the throne in the Ottoman province of Moldavia, and a dragoman (interpreter) at the Venetian embassy in Istanbul. Through the life-stories of three generations of Brunis and Brutis, Noel Malcolm casts the world between Venice, Rome and the Ottoman Empire in a fresh light, illuminating subjects as diverse as espionage, anti-Ottoman rebellion, diplomacy, slave-ransoming and the grain trade.  He describes the conflicting strategies of the Christian powers, and the extraordinarily ambitious plans of the sultans and their viziers.

Few works since Fernand Braudel's classic account of the sixteenth-century Mediterranean, published more than sixty years ago, have ranged so widely through this vital period of Mediterranean and European history. A masterpiece of scholarship as well as story-telling, Agents of Empire builds up a panoramic picture, both of Western power-politics and of the interrelations between the Christian and Ottoman worlds.
The Labouring Men: Studies in the History of Labour

The Labouring Men: Studies in the History of Labour

Eric Hobsbawm

$29.99

The topics covered in this book can be divided into four broad groups: studies of labour conditions up to the middle of the nineteenth century; studies in the 'new trade unionism' of 1889 to 1914; studies in the late nineteenth-century revival of Socialism in Britain; and more general topics covering a wider chronological span. The common factor in this wide-ranging work is that, unlike much other work of labour history, it concentrates on the working classes as such, and on the economic and technical conditions which allowed labour movements to be effective or which prevented their effectiveness. This work is notable not only for its clarity and incisiveness, but also for the richness and variety of the material, which ranges from Marx to Methodism and from labour traditions to the machine breakers.
A Life of Lies and Spies: Tale of a CIA Ops Polygraph Interrogator

A Life of Lies and Spies: Tale of a CIA Ops Polygraph Interrogator

Alan B. Trabue

$34.99

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Alan Trabue unveils the CIA's use of covert ops polygraph and interrogation of foreign spies in this fascinating and thrilling memoir of his 38-year career spanning 40 countries Alan Trabue chose a bizarre, dangerous way to make a living.

In A Life of Lies and Spies, Trabue exposes the often perilous world of polygraphing foreign spies in support of CIA espionage programs. He recounts his incredible, true-life globe-trotting adventures, from his induction in the CIA in 1971 to directing the CIA's world-wide covert ops polygraph program. A Life of Lies and Spies brings readers into the high-stakes world of covert operations and the quest to uncover deceit, featuring a high-speed car chase, blown clandestine meetings, surreptitious room searches, tear-gassing by riot police, and confrontations with machine gun-armed soldiers.

Liberally sprinkled with side anecdotes-such as debriefing an agent though a torturous swarm of mosquitoes in a jungle shack - Trabue's story highlights both the humour and the intrinsic danger of conducting CIA covert activities.
No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State

No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State

Glenn Greenwald

$24.99

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This is the inside account of the events documented in Laura Poitras Citizenfour. Glenn Greenwald's No Place to Hide is the story of one of the greatest national security leaks in US history.

In June 2013, reporter and political commentator Glenn Greenwald published a series of reports in the Guardian which rocked the world. The reports revealed shocking truths about the extent to which the National Security Agency had been gathering information about US citizens and intercepting communication worldwide, and were based on documents leaked by former National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden to Greenwald. 

Including new revelations from documents entrusted to Greenwald by Snowden, this essential book tells the story of Snowden and the NSA and examines the far-reaching consequences of the government's surveillance program, both in the US and abroad.
Spain: The Centre of the World 1519-1682

Spain: The Centre of the World 1519-1682

Robert Goodwin

$50.00

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In the sixteenth century, the Spaniards became the first nation in history to have worldwide reach; across most of Europe to the Americas, the Philippines, and India. Goodwin tells the story of Spain and the Spaniards, from great soldiers like the Duke of Alba to literary figures and artists such as El Greco, Velazquez, Cervantes, and Lope de Vega, and the monarchs who ruled over them. At the beginning of the modern age, Spaniards were caught between the excitement of change and a medieval world of chivalry and religious orthodoxy, they experienced a turbulent existential angst that fueled an exceptional Golden Age, a fluorescence of art, literature, poetry, and which inspired new ideas about International Law, merchant banking, and economic and social theory.
Secret Warriors: Key Scientists, Code Breakers and Propagandists of the Great War

Secret Warriors: Key Scientists, Code Breakers and Propagandists of the Great War

Taylor Downing

$22.99

The First World War is often viewed as a war fought by armies of millions living and fighting in trenches, aided by brutal machinery that cost the lives of many. But behind all of this a scientific war was also being fought between engineers, chemists, physicists, doctors,mathematicians and intelligence gatherers. This hidden war was to make a positive and lasting contribution to how war was conducted on land, at sea and in the air, and most importantly life at home. Secret Warriors provides an invaluable and fresh history of the First World War, profiling a number of the key figures who made great leaps in science for the benefit of 20th Century Britain. Told in a lively, narrative style, Secret Warriors reveals the unknown side of the war.
The Great Explosion: Gunpowder, the Great War, and a Disaster on the Kent Marshes

The Great Explosion: Gunpowder, the Great War, and a Disaster on the Kent Marshes

Brian Dillon

$39.99

The Great Explosion by Brian Dillon: a masterful account of a terrible disaster in a remarkable place. In April 1916, shortly before the commencement of the Battle of the Somme, a fire started in a vast munitions works located in the Kentish marshes. The resulting series of explosions killed 108 people and injured many more. In a brilliant piece of storytelling, Brian Dillon recreates the events of that terrible day - and, in so doing, sheds a fresh and unexpected light on the British home front in the Great War. He offers a chilling natural history of explosives and their effects on the earth, on buildings, and on human and animal bodies. And he evokes with vivid clarity one of Britain's strangest and most remarkable landscapes - where he has been a habitual explorer for many years. The Great Explosion is a profound work of narrative, exploration and inquiry from one of our most brilliant writers.
Intercept: The Secret History of Computers and Spies

Intercept: The Secret History of Computers and Spies

Gordon Corera

$32.99

Gordon Corera's compelling narrative, rich with historical details and characters, takes us from the Second World War to the internet age, with astonishing revelations about espionage carried out today.

The computer was born to spy. Under the intense pressure of the Second World War and in the confines of Britain's code-breaking establishment at Bletchley Park, the work of Alan Turing and others led to the birth of electronic espionage. It was a breakthrough that helped win the war. In the following decades, computers transformed espionage from the spy hunting of the Cold War years to the data-driven pursuit of terrorists and the industrial-scale cyber-espionage against corporations in the twenty-first century. Together, computers and spies are shaping the future, and from the rise of China to the phones in our pockets, what was once the preserve of a few intelligence agencies now matters for us all. 

Drawing on unique access to Western intelligence agencies, on the ground reporting from China and insights into the most powerful technology companies, Corera has gathered compelling stories from heads of state, hackers and spies of all stripes.
The Viking Diaspora

The Viking Diaspora

Judith Jesch

$58.99

The Viking Diaspora presents the early medieval migrations of people, language and culture from mainland Scandinavia to new homes in the British Isles, the North Atlantic, the Baltic and the East as a form of 'diaspora'. It discusses the ways in which migrants from Russia in the east to Greenland in the west were conscious of being connected not only to the people and traditions of their homelands, but also to other migrants of Scandinavian origin in many other locations. Rather than the movements of armies, this book concentrates on the movements of people and the shared heritage and culture that connected them. This on-going contact throughout half a millennium can be traced in the laws, literatures, material culture and even environment of the various regions of the Viking diaspora. Judith Jesch considers all of these connections, and highlights in detail significant forms of cultural contact including gender, beliefs and identities. Beginning with an overview of Vikings and the Viking Age, the nature of the evidence available, and a full exploration of the concept of 'diaspora', the book then provides a detailed demonstration of the appropriateness of the term to the world peopled by Scandinavians. This book is the first to explain Scandinavian expansion using this model, and presents the Viking Age in a new and exciting way for students of Vikings and medieval history.
The Anthology of Ancient Egyptian Texts: Life Through Literature

The Anthology of Ancient Egyptian Texts: Life Through Literature

Constanze Holler

$49.99

This book provides a small collection of love stories, biographies, fairy tales, reports of military campaigns and other textual accounts of life in Ancient Egypt. They range widely and so provide a varied and interesting view of life in Ancient Egypt for many areas of society and so gives an insight into daily life. This is a welcome and insightful view into the world of the pyramids and the pharaohs which can easily seem so far detached from our own lives that it can be hard to understand. This book is aimed at anyone with an interest in Ancient Egypt and everyday life as well as those with a specific interest in literature. The lack of any scholarly commentary plus the inclusion of a glossary means that the book is very accessible to those with no prior knowledge of Ancient texts and their scholarly study, making it a great taster and introduction to the area.
The Priest, the Prince, and the Pasha: The Life and Afterlife of an Ancient Egyptian Sculpture

The Priest, the Prince, and the Pasha: The Life and Afterlife of an Ancient Egyptian Sculpture

Lawrence M. Berman

$33.00

Sometime in the early fourth century bc, an unknown Egyptian master carved an exquisite portrait in dark-green stone. The statue that included this remarkably lifelike head of a priest, who was likely a citizen of ancient Memphis, may have been damaged when the Persians conquered Egypt in 343 bc before it was ritually buried in a temple complex dedicated to the worship of the sacred Apis bull. Its adventures were not over, though: after almost two millennia, the head was excavated by August Mariette, a founding figure in French Egyptology, under a permit from the Ottoman Pasha. Returned to France as part of a collection of antiquities assembled for the inimitable Bonaparte prince known as Plon-Plon, it found a home in his faux Pompeian palace. After disappearing again, it resurfaced in the personal collection of Edward Perry Warren, a turn-of-the-twentieth-century American aesthete, who sold it to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Along the way, this compelling and mysterious sculpture, known worldwide as the Boston Green Head, has reflected the Wests evolving understanding of Egyptian art from initial assertions that it was too refined to be the product of a lesser civilization, to recognition of the sophistication of the culture that produced it.
Language and Society in the Greek and Roman Worlds

Language and Society in the Greek and Roman Worlds

James Clackson

$54.95

Texts written in Latin, Greek and other languages provide ancient historians with their primary evidence, but the role of language as a source for understanding the ancient world is often overlooked. Language played a key role in state-formation and the spread of Christianity, the construction of ethnicity, and negotiating positions of social status and group membership. Language could reinforce social norms and shed light on taboos. This book presents an accessible account of ways in which linguistic evidence can illuminate topics such as imperialism, ethnicity, social mobility, religion, gender and sexuality in the ancient world, without assuming the reader has any knowledge of Greek or Latin, or of linguistic jargon. It describes the rise of Greek and Latin at the expense of other languages spoken around the Mediterranean and details the social meanings of different styles, and the attitudes of ancient speakers towards linguistic differences.
Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens

Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens

David M Pritchard

$82.95

In his  On the Glory of Athens,  Plutarch complained that the Athenian people spent more on the production of dramatic festivals and  the misfortunes of Medeas and Electras than they did on maintaining their empire and fighting for their liberty against the Persians. This view of the Athenians' misplaced priorities became orthodoxy with the publication of August Bockh's 1817 book  Die Staatshaushaltung der Athener, which criticized the classical Athenian  demos  for spending more on festivals than on wars and for levying unjust taxes to pay for their bloated government. But were the Athenians' priorities really as misplaced as ancient and modern historians believed?

Drawing on lines of evidence not available in Bockh's time,  Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens  calculates the real costs of religion, politics, and war to settle the long-standing debate about what the ancient Athenians valued most highly. David M. Pritchard explains that, in Athenian democracy, voters had full control over public spending. When they voted for a bill, they always knew its cost and how much they normally spent on such bills. Therefore, the sums they chose to spend on festivals, politics, and the armed forces reflected the order of the priorities that they had set for their state. By calculating these sums, Pritchard convincingly demonstrates that it was not religion or politics but war that was the overriding priority of the Athenian people.
The Madness of Alexander the Great: And the Myth of Military Genius

The Madness of Alexander the Great: And the Myth of Military Genius

Richard A. Gabriel

$59.99

Over the years, some 20,000 books and articles have been written about Alexander the Great, the vast majority hailing him as possibly the greatest general that ever lived. Richard A. Gabriel, however, argues that, while Alexander was clearly a succesful soldier-adventurer, the evidence of real greatness is simply not there. The author presents Alexander as a misfit within his own warrior society, attempting to overcompensate. Thoroughly insecure and unstable, he was given to episodes of uncontrollable rage and committed brutal atrocities that would today have him vilified as a monstrous psychopath. The author believes some of his worst excesses may have been due to what we now call Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, of which he displays many of the classic symptoms, brought on by extended exposure to violence and danger. Above all the author thinks that Alexander's military ability has been flattered by History. Alexander was tactically competent but contributed nothing truly original, while his strategy was often flawed and distorted by his obsession with personal glory. This radical reappraisal is certain to provoke debate.
Issus & Gaugamela: Alexander the Great versus Darius III

Issus & Gaugamela: Alexander the Great versus Darius III

Frederic Bey

$49.99

In just three years and two battles against the 'king of kings' Darius III, the young monarch of Macedonia brought the great Persia to its knees. Alexander the Great, with the help of the mighty Macedonian war machine phalanx, heavy cavalry overcame the Persian army at Issus (-333), opening the doors of Phenicia, Syria and Egypt. At Gaugamela (-331), the two rivals and their soldiers fight again a decisive battle which see the death of Darius and the accession of Alexander as the new ruler of the ancient East. From a military point of view, the victories of Alexander show both a tactical genius and a personal involvement - sometimes risking his own life - from the young leader in the heart of battle. The technique of Alexander was to form the model of some of the great generals in history, from Ceasar to Napoleon.
Magna Carta: Third Editon

Magna Carta: Third Editon

J. C. Holt ,  George Garnett ,  John Hudson

$65.95

A revised edition of J. C. Holt's classic study of Magna Carta, the Great Charter, offering the most authoritative analysis of England's most famous constitutional text. The book sets the events of 1215 and the Charter itself in the context of the law, politics and administration of England and Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Additionally, a lengthy new introduction by two of Holt's former pupils, George Garnett and John Hudson, examines a range of issues raised by scholarship since publication of the second edition in 1992. These include the possible role of Archbishop Stephen Langton; the degree of influence of Roman and Canon Law upon those who drafted the Charter; other aspects of the intellectual setting of the Charter, in particular political thinking in London; the Continental context of the events of 1212-15; and the legal and jurisdictional issues that affected the Charter's clauses on justice.
Brutus: Caesar's Assassin

Brutus: Caesar's Assassin

Kirsty Corrigan

$59.99

Although Marcus Junius Brutus is one of the most famous, or infamous, conspirators of Rome and the ancient world, if not of all time, knowledge of this historical figure has principally been passed to the modern world through the literary medium of Shakespeare's tragedy, Julius Caesar. Furthermore, any interest in Brutus has tended to focus only on events surrounding his most legendary act, Caesar's murder. This biography instead considers Brutus in his historical context, gathering details from ancient evidence and piecing together, as far as possible, his whole life. While his actions played a pivotal role in Roman history, ultimately, although completely unintentionally, bringing about the downfall of the Roman republic, Brutus has often been neglected. Indeed, he has rarely been considered on his own merits, instead featuring as part of the biographies and studies of other leading political figures of the time, especially those of Julius Caesar, Cicero and Octavian. As the first dedicated biography in over 30 years, this full and balanced reconsideration of this significant Roman republican is long overdue.
Old Man's Story: The Last Thoughts of Kakadu Elder Bill Neidjie

Old Man's Story: The Last Thoughts of Kakadu Elder Bill Neidjie

Bill Neidjie ,  Bill Lang

$34.95

'Right then,' he said with a sigh, and then turned to me with a grin. 'I tell you story, eh!' Then he said something which really floored me: 'I been waiting for you. You been waiting for me.' And so began Bill Neidjie's relationship with English photographer, Mark Lang. Known as 'Old Man' in this book, but often called 'Big Bill Neidjie' throughout his life because of his imposing height and strength, Bill Neidjie wanted to record aspects of his life for a younger generation of Gagadju, to help them look after their country and remember its stories - and for balanda, non-Aboriginal people. Told in the old man's words, this beautifully nuanced, impressionistic account allows Neidjie to gently emphasise the issues of importance to him. Old man's story has a very personal inflection with Neidjie's words complemented by Lang's beautiful landscape photos. Structured in the cycle of the seasons, Old man's story provides readers with insights into the annual trans-formation of landscape that are so integral to Neidjie's life story.
Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation

Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation

Gaye Sculthorpe

$55.00

Published to accompany major exhibitions at the British Museum and the National Museum of Australia in 2015, Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation uses objects from the extraordinary collection of the British Museum to celebrate the unique and ongoing relationship that Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders have to place and country. This groundbreaking new publication also explores the profound impact and legacy of colonialism, the nature of collecting and the changing meaning of objects now in the collection of the British Museum. This richly illustrated book challenges pre-existing ideas about Indigenous Australian culture and highlights its beauty, diversity and vitality.
Fortunes of Africa: A 5,000 Year History of Wealth, Greed and Endeavour

Fortunes of Africa: A 5,000 Year History of Wealth, Greed and Endeavour

Martin Meredith

$19.99

In this vast and vivid panorama of history, Martin Meredith, bestselling author of The State of Africa, follows the fortunes of Africa over a period of 5,000 years. With compelling narrative, he traces the rise and fall of ancient kingdoms and empires; the spread of Christianity and Islam; the enduring quest for gold and other riches; the exploits of explorers and missionaries; and the impact of European colonisation. He examines, too, the fate of modern African states and concludes with a glimpse into their future. This is history on an epic scale.
A Carefree War: The Hidden History of Australian WWII Child Evacuees

A Carefree War: The Hidden History of Australian WWII Child Evacuees

Ann Howard

$24.99

During World War II Australia was under threat of invasion. Could Australia be invaded by the Japanese? Even with the heavy censorship by the government many certainly thought so.

Stunned families had followed the bombings and atrocities of war that were taking place in Europe, and the nation was gripped by fear that the danger would soon be on their doorstep. The Japanese appeared to be looming closer; there were submarines in Sydney Harbour, Japanese planes flying overhead and harassment on our coastline. Australians were fearful for their safety. Anxious parents made decisions to protect their children, with or without government sanction. Small children, some just out of babyhood, were sent away, often unaccompanied, by concerned parents to friends, relatives, or even strangers living in safer parts of the country. Many had little comprehension of what was happening and thought they were going on a holiday to the country.

The history of these child evacuees in Australia remains largely hidden and their experiences untold. Author Ann Howard, who was evacuated with her mother from the UK during World War II, is setting the records straight. A combination of extensive research and the first-hand stories of the evacuees captures the mood of the time and the social and political environment that they lived in.
The Savage Shore: Extraordinary Stories of Survival and Tragedy from the Early Voyages of Discovery to Australia

The Savage Shore: Extraordinary Stories of Survival and Tragedy from the Early Voyages of Discovery to Australia

Graham Seal

$32.99

The search for the great south land began in ancient times and was a matter of colourful myth and cartographical fantasy until the Dutch East India Company started sending ships in the early seventeenth century. Graham Seal tells stories from the centuries it took to discover Australia through many voyages by the Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, French and Macassans. Captain Cook arrived long after the continent had been found. This is a gripping account of danger at sea, dramatic shipwrecks, courageous castaways, murder, much missing gold, and terrible loss of life. It is also a period of amazing feats of navigation and survival against the odds. We now know the Dutch were far more active in the early exploration of Australia than is generally understood, and were most likely the first European settlers of the continent.
Abandoned Women: Scottish Convicts Exiled Beyond the Seas

Abandoned Women: Scottish Convicts Exiled Beyond the Seas

Lucy Frost

$22.99

In the early nineteenth century, crofters and villagers streamed into the burgeoning cities of Scotland, and families splintered. Orphan girls, single mothers and women on their own all struggled to feed and clothe themselves. For some, petty theft became a part of life. Any woman deemed 'habite & repute a thief' might find herself before the High Court of Justiciary, tried for yet another minor theft and sentenced to transportation 'beyond Seas'...Lucy Frost memorably paints the portrait of a boatload of women and their children who arrived in Hobart in 1838. Instead of serving time in prison, the women were sent to work as unpaid servants in the houses of settlers. Feisty Scottish convicts, unaccustomed to bowing and scraping, often irritated their middle-class employers, who charged them with insolence, or refusing to work, or getting drunk. A stint in the female factory became their punishment...Many women survived the convict system and shaped their own lives once they were free. They married, had children and found a place in the community. Others, though, continued to be plagued by errors and disasters until death.
Power for the People: An (Uncensored) Story of Electricity in Australia 1770-2015

Power for the People: An (Uncensored) Story of Electricity in Australia 1770-2015

Sandra Darroch

$39.99

This tells the story of electricity in Sydney and Australia, and how it has influenced the development of our cities, and shaped our lives.

The book begins in 1770 with the arrival of electricity aboard Captain Cook's Endeavour. It traces the trials and tribulations of a new and pervasive technology which transformed our nation. The author describes the selling of "the all-electric home" to the thousands of housewives who attended cookery demonstrations compered by "Radio Uncles" in the 1920s. It also shows how electricity liberated women from the back-breaking drudgery of housework, freeing them to have a life outside the home. And it paved the way for the sprawling suburbs of our modern cities. The book also introduces the reader to the shady underworld of the "boodler" and the "joke," revealing the seemingly endemic stain of corruption that has haunted the power industry to this day, confirming Lord Acton's famous dictum that "Power tends to Corrupt."

During the course of her 20 years of research, Sandra Darroch has also monitored the sweeping developments that have revolutionised Australia's multi-billion-dollar electricity industry in revent times. This brings the story of electricity up to the present-day controversies over privatisation of the "poles-and-wires" - and then takes a glimpse at what the future may hold at the cutting-edge of the energy sector in Australia.
Tomorrow We Escape

Tomorrow We Escape

Tom Trumble

$22.99

On a November morning in 1943, escaped Australian POW Ian Busst comes within a day's march of Allied lines after journeying hundreds of miles on foot through war-torn Italy. The young man is starving and hypothermic, and the German 10th Army stands between him and freedom. Years later, 95-year-old Busst - the unlikely survivor - can still recall his wartime experiences in the Royal Australian Engineers in incredible detail, from the sound of a strafing Messerschmitt to the appalling vision of his two mates blown apart by a high-calibre bomb. Busst's odyssey took him through the dark days of the Battle of Britain and fighting in the Western Desert. Captured near Tobruk during a daring night mission ahead of the German advance into Libya, he was sent to the prison camps of Italy and eventually to the dreaded Campo 57. Subjected to appalling conditions, Busst - known as 'Mad Bugger' - became obsessed with one objective: escape. This is a thriller set amid the great battlefields and prison camps of the Second World War. Tom Trumble brings to life one man's extraordinary story of high adventure, courage, resilience and, above all, mateship.
The Western Front Diaries: The Anzacs' Own Story, Battle by Battle

The Western Front Diaries: The Anzacs' Own Story, Battle by Battle

Jonathan King

$39.99

A special 100th-anniversary edition. Long overshadowed by the national obsession with the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign, the breathtaking story of what really happened on the Western Front has finally been brought into the bright light of day. The ANZACs' Western Front campaign had a greater impact than Gallipoli in almost every respect: five times more soldiers served and were killed there, more than five times as many battles took place - and it was there that an astounding 53 Victoria crosses were awarded to Australians. The diggers serving on the Western Front also helped win the war, but it was at an almost unfathomable cost. Using hundreds of brutally honest and extraordinary eyewitness accounts, The Western Front Diaries reproduces private diaries, letters, postcards, and photographs to reveal what it was really like at the Front, battle by bloody battle. Straight from the mouths of the men who fought there, it doesn't get more honest, raw, or heartbreaking than this.
A Little America in Western Australia: The US Naval Communication Station at North West Cape and the Founding of Exmouth

A Little America in Western Australia: The US Naval Communication Station at North West Cape and the Founding of Exmouth

Anthony Barker ,  Michael Ondaatje

$45.00

In 1963, the first US defence facility on Australian soil was established - the US Naval Communication Station at North West Cape in Western Australia. In the context of America's Cold War struggle against communism, North West Cape's primary function was to communicate with the US fleet serving in the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans, in particular nuclear missile submarines - the United States Navy's most powerful deterrent force. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the US Naval Communication Station at North West Cape in Western Australia came to be viewed as one of the most important outposts of US defence. In this important and long-overdue history, Ondaatje and Barker pursue the numerous implications that North West Cape had for Australia-US relations, Australian politics and its impact upon the social landscape of Western Australia.
The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood: The Spy Who Stole the Crown Jewels and Became the King's Secret Agent

The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood: The Spy Who Stole the Crown Jewels and Became the King's Secret Agent

Robert Hutchinson

$45.00

One morning in May 1671, a man disguised as a parson daringly attempted to seize the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. Astonishingly, he managed to escape with the regalia and crown before being apprehended. And yet he was not executed for treason. Instead, the king granted him a generous income and he became a familiar strutting figure in the royal court's glittering state apartments. This man was Colonel Thomas Blood, a notorious turncoat and fugitive from justice. Nicknamed the 'Father of all Treasons', he had been involved in an attempted coup d'etat in Ireland as well as countless plots to assassinate Charles II. In an age when gossip and intrigue ruled the coffee houses, the restored Stuart king decided Blood was more useful to him alive than dead. But while serving as his personal spy, Blood was conspiring with his enemies. At the same time he hired himself out as a freelance agent for those seeking to further their political ambition. Historian Robert Hutchinson paints a vivid portrait of a double agent bent on ambiguous political and personal motivation, and provides an extraordinary account of the perils and conspiracies that abounded in Restoration England.
Victoria: A Life

Victoria: A Life

A. N. Wilson

$24.99

When Queen Victoria died in 1901, she had ruled for nearly sixty-four years. She was mother of nine and grandmother of forty-two, and the matriarch of Royal Europe, through the marriages of her children. To many, Queen Victoria is a ruler shrouded in myth and mystique - an aging, stiff widow, paraded as the figurehead to an all-male imperial enterprise. But in truth, Britain's longest reigning monarch was one of the most passionate, expressive, humorous and unconventional women who ever lived, and the story of her life continues to fascinate. A. N. Wilson's exhaustively researched and definitive biography includes a wealth of new material from previously unseen sources, to show us Queen Victoria as she's never been seen before. It explores the curious set of circumstances that led to Victoria's coronation, her strange and isolated childhood, her passionate marriage, Prince Albert's pivotal influence, her widowhood and subsequent intimate friendship with John Brown, all set against the backdrop of this momentous epoch in Britain - and Europe's - history. Victoria is a towering achievement; a masterpiece of biography by a writer at the height of his powers.
At Home with the Soanes: Upstairs, Downstairs in 19th Century London

At Home with the Soanes: Upstairs, Downstairs in 19th Century London

Susan Palmer

$29.99

The product of many years' research by Susan Palmer, archivist to Sir John Soane's Museum, At Home with the Soanes paints a detailed picture of the social and domestic life at Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, in the early 19th century - how the buildings were heated, the servants' daily duties, what meals were cooked, wines purchased and teas drunk - even the fate of the family's pet dog. Family life with two children - in many ways as difficult as modern offspring - is brought vividly to life and the below-stairs relationships of the servants are poignantly recorded. The evening social whirl of visits to theatres and supper parties is chronicled, and the description of seaside holidays on the Kentish coast, when Margate was in vogue, portrays the social niceties of promenades and dances. Originally published in 1997, At Home with the Soanes has been updated to include the latest discoveries that have come to light during restoration of the house and re-designed to include over 100 illustrations, mostly in colour, from the extensive Museum archive, including photographs of the newly-recreated 'lost' private apartments. At Home with the Soanes offers a fascinating insight into this London family's life, both upstairs and downstairs.
Exploring English Castles: Evocative, Romantic, and Mysterious True Tales of the Kings and Queens of the British Isles

Exploring English Castles: Evocative, Romantic, and Mysterious True Tales of the Kings and Queens of the British Isles

Edd Morris

$39.99

A guide to some of the most historical and picturesque castles in England for romantics and Anglophiles alike. Castles have shaped England. For almost one thousand years, castles have been the settings of siege and battle, dens of plotting and intrigue, and refuges for troubled kings. Today, the romantic yet ruinous shapes of once grand fortresses stud the English countryside - a reminder of turbulent times past. 

Exploring English Castles provides readers with a breathtaking tour through the grandest castles of England. It brings ruins to life through true stories of royalty, chivalry, deception, and intrigue, played out within formerly majestic walls.  Uncover the secret of Bodiam Castle, Sussex - a fortress seemingly from a fairy tale, built for a knight returning from the Hundred Years' War. Discover how Mary Tudor, first queen of England, took refuge in Framlingham Castle, Suffolk, overturning a wily plot to deny her the throne. Unearth a delicate love story between Queen Elizabeth I and Robert Dudley, which unfolds against the genteel backdrop of Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire. 

Filled with evocative photographs, awe-inspiring historical tales, and gentle humor, Exploring English Castles will delight any armchair historian, travel aficionado, or fan of historical fiction.
London Lives: Poverty, Crime and the Making of a Modern City, 1690-1800

London Lives: Poverty, Crime and the Making of a Modern City, 1690-1800

Tim Hitchcock ,  Robert Shoemaker

$47.95

London Lives is a fascinating new study which exposes, for the first time, the lesser-known experiences of eighteenth-century thieves, paupers, prostitutes and highwaymen. It charts the experiences of hundreds of thousands of Londoners who found themselves submerged in poverty or prosecuted for crime, and surveys their responses to illustrate the extent to which plebeian Londoners influenced the pace and direction of social policy. Calling upon a new body of evidence, the book illuminates the lives of prison escapees, expert manipulators of the poor relief system, celebrity highwaymen, lone mothers and vagrants, revealing how they each played the system to the best of their ability in order to survive in their various circumstances of misfortune. In their acts of desperation, the authors argue that the poor and criminal exercised a profound and effective form of agency that changed the system itself, and shaped the evolution of the modern state.
The Underground Girls of Kabul: The Hidden Lives of Afghan Girls Disguised as Boys

The Underground Girls of Kabul: The Hidden Lives of Afghan Girls Disguised as Boys

Jenny Nordberg

$22.99

An Afghan woman's life expectancy is just 44 years, and her life cycle often begins and ends in disappointment: being born a girl and finally, having a daughter of her own. For some, disguising themselves as boys is the only way to get ahead. Nordberg follows women such as Azita Rafaat, a parliamentarian who once lived as a Bacha Posh, the mother of seven-year-old Mehran, who she is raising as a Bacha Posh as well, but for different reasons than in the past. There's Zahra, a teenage student living as a boy who is about to display signs of womanhood as she enters puberty. And Skukria, a hospital nurse who remained in a bacha posh disguise until she was 20, and who now has three children of her own. Exploring the historical and religious roots of this tradition, The Underground Girls of Kabul is a fascinating and moving narrative that speaks to the roots of gender.
Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia's Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane

Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia's Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane

S. Frederick Starr

$39.95

In this sweeping and richly illustrated history, S. Frederick Starr tells the fascinating but largely unknown story of Central Asia's medieval enlightenment through the eventful lives and astonishing accomplishments of its greatest minds - remarkable figures who built a bridge to the modern world. Because nearly all of these figures wrote in Arabic, they were long assumed to have been Arabs. In fact, they were from Central Asia - drawn from the Persianate and Turkic peoples of a region that today extends from Kazakhstan southward through Afghanistan, and from the easternmost province of Iran through Xinjiang, China.

Lost Enlightenment recounts how, between the years 800 and 1200, Central Asia led the world in trade and economic development, the size and sophistication of its cities, the refinement of its arts, and, above all, in the advancement of knowledge in many fields. Central Asians achieved signal breakthroughs in astronomy, mathematics, geology, medicine, chemistry, music, social science, philosophy, and theology, among other subjects.  They gave algebra its name, calculated the earth's diameter with unprecedented precision, wrote the books that later defined European medicine, and penned some of the world's greatest poetry. One scholar, working in Afghanistan, even predicted the existence of North and South America - five centuries before Columbus. Rarely in history has a more impressive group of polymaths appeared at one place and time. No wonder that their writings influenced European culture from the time of St. Thomas Aquinas down to the scientific revolution, and had a similarly deep impact in India and much of Asia.

Lost Enlightenment chronicles this forgotten age of achievement, seeks to explain its rise, and explores the competing theories about the cause of its eventual demise. Informed by the latest scholarship yet written in a lively and accessible style, this is a book that will surprise general readers and specialists alike.
Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750

Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750

Odd Arne Westad

$29.99

As the twenty-first century dawns, China stands at a crossroads. The largest and most populous country on earth and currently the world's second biggest economy, China has recently reclaimed its historic place at the center of global affairs after decades of internal chaos and disastrous foreign relations. But even as China tentatively reengages with the outside world, the contradictions of its development risks pushing it back into an era of insularity and instability - a regression that, as China's recent history shows, would have serious implications for all other nations. 

In Restless Empire, award-winning historian Odd Arne Westad traces China's complex foreign affairs over the past 250 years, identifying the forces that will determine the country's path in the decades to come. Since the height of the Qing Empire in the eighteenth century, China's interactions - and confrontations - with foreign powers have caused its worldview to fluctuate wildly between extremes of dominance and subjugation, emulation and defiance. From the invasion of Burma in the 1760s to the Boxer Rebellion in the early 20th century to the 2001 standoff over a downed U.S. spy plane, many of these encounters have left Chinese with a lingering sense of humiliation and resentment, and inflamed their notions of justice, hierarchy, and Chinese centrality in world affairs. 

Recently, China's rising influence on the world stage has shown what the country stands to gain from international cooperation and openness. But as Westad shows, the nation's success will ultimately hinge on its ability to engage with potential international partners while simultaneously safeguarding its own strength and stability. 

An in-depth study by one of our most respected authorities on international relations and contemporary East Asian history, Restless Empire is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the recent past and probable future of this dynamic and complex nation.
Deng Xiaoping: A Revolutionary Life

Deng Xiaoping: A Revolutionary Life

Alexander Pantsov ,  Steven I. Levine

$41.95

Deng Xiaoping joined the Chinese Communist movement as a youth and rose in its ranks to become an important lieutenant of Mao's from the 1930s onward. Two years after Mao's death in 1976, Deng became the de facto leader of the Chinese Communist Party and the prime architect of China's post-Mao reforms. 

Abandoning the Maoist socio-economic policies he had long fervently supported, he set in motion changes that would dramatically transform China's economy, society, and position in the world. Three decades later, we are living with the results. China has become the second largest economy and the workshop of the world. And while it is essentially a market economy (socialism with Chinese characteristics), Deng and his successors ensured the continuation of CCP rule by severely repressing the democratic movement and maintaining an iron grip on power. When Deng died at the age of 92 in 1997, he had set China on the path it is following to this day. 

Alexander Pantsov and Steven Levine's new biography of Deng Xiaoping does what no other biography has done: based on newly discovered documents, it covers his entire life, from his childhood and student years to the post-Tiananmen era. This objective, balanced, and unprecedentedly rich biography changes our understanding of one of the most important figures in modern history.
The Kaiser's Army: The German Army in World War One

The Kaiser's Army: The German Army in World War One

David Stone

$59.99

In this comprehensive book, David Stone describes and analyses every aspect of the German Army as it existed under Kaiser Wilhelm II, encompassing its development and antecedents, organisation, personnel, weapons and equipment, its inherent strengths and weaknesses, and its victories and defeats as it fought on many fronts throughout World War I. The book deals in considerable detail with the origins and creation of the German army, examining the structure of power in German politics and wider society, and the nation's imperial ambitions, along with the ways in which the high command and general staff functioned in terms of strategy and tactical doctrine. The nature, background, recruitment, training and military experiences of the officers, NCOs and soldiers are examined, while personal and collective values relating to honour, loyalty and conscience are also analysed. There is also an evaluation of all aspects of army life such as conscription, discipline, rest and recuperation and medical treatment. In addition the army's operations are set in context with an overview of the army at war, covering the key actions and outcomes of major campaigns from 1914 to 1918 up to the signature of the Armistice at Compiegne. For anyone seeking a definitive reference on the German Army of the period - whether scholar, historian, serving soldier or simply a general reader - this remarkable book will prove an invaluable work.
The Gestapo: A History of Horror

The Gestapo: A History of Horror

Jacques Delarue

$44.99

Perhaps the most terrifying embodiment of a government's disregard for the value of human life, the Gestapo, Nazi Germany's secret police force, was a veritable killing machine. It was the iron fist that Hitler and his henchmen used to strangle dissent and smash resistance to his rule. In The Gestapo, Jacques Delarue unflinchingly probes the organisation's history, and explains how such a horrific institution could come into being, who was behind it, what they did and why. Drawing upon interviews with ex-Gestapo agents and the organisation's published and unpublished archives, Delarue delivers a complex history of the brutally efficient force whose work included murdering student resisters, soliciting denunciations of 'political criminals', establishing Aryan eugenic unions and running concentration camps. The Gestapo and its leaders - Himmler, Barbie, Eichmann, Heydrich, Muller, and others - devised and implemented some of the most abhorrent torture and extermination techniques the world has ever seen. This book offers a clear view of its crimes against humanity.
Hitler's Last Days

Hitler's Last Days

Bill O'Reilly

$19.99

By early 1945, the destruction of the German Nazi State seems certain. The Allied forces, led by American generals George S. Patton and Dwight D. Eisenhower, are gaining control of Europe, leaving German leaders scrambling. Facing defeat, Adolf Hitler flees to a secret bunker with his new wife, Eva Braun, and his beloved dog, Blondi. It is there that all three would meet their end, thus ending the Third Reich and one of the darkest chapters of history. Hitler's Last Days is a gripping account of the death of one of the most reviled villains of the 20th century-a man whose regime of murder and terror haunts the world even today. Adapted from Bill O'Reilly's historical thriller, Killing Patton, and this book will have young readers-and grown-ups too-hooked on history.
The Last Battle

The Last Battle

Cornelius Ryan

$19.99

The Battle for Berlin was the final struggle of World War II in the European theatre, the last offensive against Hitler's Third Reich, which devastated one of Europe's historic capitals and brought an end to the Nazi regime. It lasted more than two weeks across April - May 1945, and was one of the bloodiest and most pivotal episodes of the war, one which would play a part in determining the shape of international politics for decades to come. This is a story of brutal extremes, of stunning military triumph alongside the stark conditions that the civilians of Berlin experienced in the face of the Allied assault. It is history at its best, a masterful illumination of the effects of war on the lives of individuals, and one of the enduring works on World War II.
Inhumanities: Nazi Interpretations of Western Culture

Inhumanities: Nazi Interpretations of Western Culture

David B. Dennis

$46.95

Inhumanities is an unprecedented account of the ways Nazi Germany manipulated and mobilized European literature, philosophy, painting, sculpture and music in support of its ideological ends. David B. Dennis shows how, based on belief that the Third Reich represented the culmination of Western civilization, culture became a key propaganda tool in the regime's program of national renewal and its campaign against political, national and racial enemies. Focusing on the daily output of the Volkischer Beobachter, the party's official organ and the most widely circulating German newspaper of the day, he reveals how activists twisted history, biography and aesthetics to fit Nazism's authoritarian, militaristic and anti-Semitic world views. Ranging from National Socialist coverage of Germans such as Luther, Durer, Goethe, Beethoven, Wagner and Nietzsche to 'great men of the Nordic West' such as Socrates, Leonardo and Michelangelo, Dennis reveals the true extent of the regime's ambitious attempt to reshape the 'German mind'.
Heritage of the Mughal World: The Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme

Heritage of the Mughal World: The Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme

Philip Jodidio

$110.00

From 1526-1857, the Mughal Empire presided over an extended period of peace, prosperity and unprecedented artistic achievement in the Indian subcontinent. For more than a decade, the Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme has been working to preserve and restore historically significant sites to their original splendour. This book takes a close look at a wide variety of such projects, such as Bagh-e-Babur in Kabul; Humayun's tomb and garden in Delhi; and the walled city of Lahore; and places them in the wider context of the Empire's social, aesthetic and ethical mores. In addition, it includes contemporary projects being developed around the world that reflect aspects of Mughal and Islamic heritage. Filled with stunning colour photography, this book offers a detailed study of the myriad achievements of the Mughal world and their lasting effects throughout the globe. This book also includes texts written by leading specialists on the subject as well as those who were actually in charge of the restoration projects.
Teach Yoursel Scottish History: A Complete Introduction

Teach Yoursel Scottish History: A Complete Introduction

David Allan

$26.99

Scottish History: A Complete Introduction is a comprehensive guide to the exciting story of this nation, from pre-history right through to the present day. With the question of Scottish independence once again on the agenda, this book will allow you to trace the events, both peaceful and bloody, that have brought the country to this point. Tracing events from the pre-history of the land and the coming of the Scots to the rise of the Scottish National Party, it provides an informative and accessible introduction to Scotland's history. Whether it is the Jacobite Rebellion, the advances of the Scottish Enlightenment or its role in WWI and WWII, this is the perfect place to start.
The Long Defeat: Cultural Trauma, Memory, and Identity in Japan

The Long Defeat: Cultural Trauma, Memory, and Identity in Japan

Akiko Hashimoto

$29.95

In The Long Defeat, Akiko Hashimoto explores the stakes of war memory in Japan after its catastrophic defeat in World War II, showing how and why defeat has become an indelible part of national collective life, especially in recent decades. Divisive war memories lie at the root of the contentious politics surrounding Japan's pacifist constitution and remilitarization, and fuel the escalating frictions in East Asia known collectively as Japan's history problem. Drawing on ethnography, interviews, and a wealth of popular memory data, this book identifies three preoccupations - national belonging, healing, and justice - in Japan's discourses of defeat. Hashimoto uncovers the key war memory narratives that are shaping Japan's choices - nationalism, pacifism, or reconciliation - for addressing the rising international tensions and finally overcoming its dark history.
After This: Survivors of the Holocaust Speak

After This: Survivors of the Holocaust Speak

Alice Nelson

$24.99

On 27 January 2015, the world commemorated the 70-year anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau. As the last living witnesses of that terrible time pass away, award-winning writer Alice Nelson presents a powerful collection of fourteen narratives by Australian Holocaust survivors told in their voices. Each individual's account of the war years - and of the life that followed - tells a deeply personal story that affirms the resilience of the human spirit.
The Holocaust

The Holocaust

Thomas Cussans

$59.95

The Holocaust was the systematic murder of Europe's Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during the Second World War. An understanding of the historical circumstances that fed the Holocaust remains the essential means of making sense of the inexplicable crimes that occurred. This commemorative volume describes Jewish life before the spread of Nazism in Europe and Nazi ideologies. The author discusses the mass murder, the death camps such as Auschwitz, the perpetrators, the witnesses, the escapees, the refugee havens and the 10,000 Kindertransport youngsters who were given safe haven in Britain. We are told stories of the resistance, acts of heroism, survivors and those who risked their lives to save the Jews. Finally, we learn about the liberation of the camps, the resettlement of the Jews and how the events are remembered now. The 15 removable documents included in this book have been carefully selected to take us beyond the horrifying statistics and remind us that each number was a person. They include: letter describing Kristallnacht and a diary extract about life in the ghetto; list of Jews to be transported, including place of departure and destination; and drawings by a child incarcerated at Theresienstadt concentration camp.
The War on Women in Israel

The War on Women in Israel

Elana Maryles Sztokman

$19.99

Across Israel, women are being harassed as a rising Orthodox Jewish faction seeks to suppress them. In this gripping expose, leading women's activist Elana Sztokman investigates the struggles of Israeli women against increasing religious and political intrusion, from segregation on public buses to being barred from public events to being erased from newspapers and advertising. This book weaves together interviews and investigative research in a cutting-edge look at this alarming reality, and proposes solutions for creating a different, more egalitarian vision for religious culture both in Israeli society and around the world.
A War within a War: Turkey's Struggle with the PKK Since 1984

A War within a War: Turkey's Struggle with the PKK Since 1984

Brian Miller

$36.95

Rising from the remains of the Ottoman Empire in 1923, Turkey inherited many ethnic and sociological problems from its predecessor. Of these the Kurdish question has been the most challenging one to the state itself. The young republic survived many revolts in its predominantly Kurdish-inhabited southeastern regions, but the PKK (Partiya Karkeren Kurdistan: Kurdistan Workers Party) has been the most crucial threat to the integrity of the country. During the 1960s Turkey was a battlefield for many right and left wing groups and organizations, resulting with the 1980 coup d'etat. This war which has been going on for around 30 years is yet to be concluded, but deserves special attention, not only because it affects a large region and but also because it provides a valuable comparison to many intertwined geopolitical conflicts.
In the Skin of a Jihadist: Inside Islamic State's Recruitment Networks

In the Skin of a Jihadist: Inside Islamic State's Recruitment Networks

Anna Erelle

$29.99

Twenty year-old Melodie , a recent convert to Islam, meets the leader of an ISIS brigade on Facebook. In 48 hours he has 'fallen in love' with her, calls her every hour, urges her to marry him, join him in Syria in a life of paradise - and join his jihad. She discovers how ISIS entraps ordinary people, like teenage girls from Bethnal Green. Anna Erelle is the undercover journalist behind Melodie . Created to investigate the powerful propaganda weapons of Islamic State, Melodie is soon sucked in by Bilel, right-hand man of the infamous Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. An Iraqi for whose capture the US government has promised $10 million, al-Baghdadi is described by Time Magazine as the most dangerous man in the world and by himself as the caliph of Islamic State. Bilel shows off his jeep, his guns, his expensive watch. He boasts about the people he has just killed. With Bilel impatient for his future wife, Melodie embarks on her highly dangerous mission, which - at its ultimate stage - will go very wrong... Enticed into this lethal online world like hundreds of other young people, including many young British girls and boys, Erelle's harrowing and gripping investigation helps us to understand the true face of terrorism.
Waterloo: A New History of the Battle and its Armies

Waterloo: A New History of the Battle and its Armies

Gordon Corrigan

$24.99

Fought on Sunday, 18 June 1815, by some 220,000 men over rain-sodden ground in what is now Belgium, the Battle of Waterloo brought an end to twenty-three years of almost continual war between revolutionary and later imperial France and her enemies. A decisive defeat for Napoleon and a hard-won victory for the Allied armies of the Duke of Wellington and the Prussians led by the stalwart Blucher, it brought about the French emperor's final exile to St Helena and cleared the way for Britain to become the dominant world power. A former soldier, Gordon Corrigan is the author of an acclaimed military biography of Wellington and has walked the battlefields of the Napoleonic era many times. He is perfectly placed to offer a robust, clear and gripping account of the campaign that surveys the wider military scene before moving on to the actions at Quatre Bras and Ligny and then the final, set-piece confrontation at Waterloo itself. He is also well qualified to explore, often in fascinating detail, the relative strengths and frailties of the very different armies involved - French, British, Dutch, Prussian and German - of their various arms - infantry, artillery and cavalry - and of their men, officers and, above all, their commanders. Wellington remarked that Waterloo was 'a damned nice thing', 'nice' meaning uncertain or finely balanced. He was right. For his part, Napoleon reckoned 'the English are bad troops and this affair is nothing more than eating breakfast'. He was wrong, and this splendid book proves just how wrong.
The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, 1453 to 1774: The Ottoman Empire

The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, 1453 to 1774: The Ottoman Empire

Molly Greene

$71.99

Provides a nuanced picture of the Greek experience in the Ottoman empire. The period of Ottoman rule in Greek history has undergone a dramatic reassessment in recent years. Long reviled as four hundred years of unrelieved slavery and barbarity ('the Turkish yoke'), a new generation of scholars, based mainly but not exclusively in Greece, is rejecting this view in favor of a more nuanced picture of the Greek experience in the Ottoman Empire. This volume considers this new scholarship, most of it in Greek, and makes it accessible for the first time to a wider audience. Molly Greene also discusses the changing views of the Ottoman Empire more generally and assesses what this changing historiography can tell us about this period in Greek history. The book begins with the conventional date of 1453, the fall of Constantinople, and includes debates over the extent to which 1453 represented a real break with the past. The volume ends with the Russo Ottoman War of 1768 - 1774, which brought to an end the relative peace and stability of the Ottoman eighteenth century and helped to usher in the nationalist movements in the region. It covers the period from the fall of Constantinople to the Russo Ottoman War; It assesses new scholarship on the period and synthesises this for the reader; the fate of the 1,000 year Byzantine heritage; the millet system and Ottoman society; the connections between the Greek population and other members of Ottoman society and the Greeks in a European context.
The China Mirage: The Hidden History of American Disaster in Asia

The China Mirage: The Hidden History of American Disaster in Asia

James Bradley

$350.00

In each of his books, James Bradley has exposed the hidden truths behind America's engagement in Asia. Now comes his most engossing work yet. Beginning in the 1850s, Bradley introduces us to the prominent Americans who made their fortunes in the China opium trade. As they - good Christians all - profitably addicted millions, American missionaries arrived, promising salvation for those who adopted Western ways. And that was just the beginning. From drug dealer Warren Delano to his grandson Franklin Delano Roosevelt, from the port of Hong Kong to the towers of Princeton University, from the era of Appomattox to the age of the A-Bomb, this book explores a difficult century that defines U.S - Chinese relations to this day.
Sons of Wichita: How the Koch Brothers Became America's Most Powerful and Private Dynasty

Sons of Wichita: How the Koch Brothers Became America's Most Powerful and Private Dynasty

Daniel Schulman

$32.99

Like the Rockefellers and the Kennedys, the Kochs are one of the most influential dynasties of the modern age, but they have never been the subject of a major biography... until now. Not long after the death of his father, Charles Koch, then in his early 30s, discovered a letter the family patriarch had written to his sons.  You will receive what now seems to be a large sum of money,  Fred Koch cautioned.  It may either be a blessing or a curse. 

Fred's legacy would become a blessing  and  a curse to his four sons-Frederick, Charles, and fraternal twins David and Bill-who in the ensuing decades fought bitterly over their birthright, the oil and cattle-ranching empire their father left behind in 1967. Against a backdrop of scorched-earth legal skirmishes, Charles and David built Koch Industries into one of the largest private corporations in the world-bigger than Boeing and Disney-and they rose to become two of the wealthiest men on the planet.

Influenced by the sentiments of their father, who was present at the birth of the John Birch Society, Charles and David have spent decades trying to remake the American political landscape and mainline their libertarian views into the national bloodstream. They now control a machine that is a center of gravity within the Republican Party. To their supporters, they are liberating America from the scourge of Big Government. To their detractors, they are political  contract killers,  as David Axelrod, President Barack Obama's chief strategist, put it during the 2012 campaign.

Bill, meanwhile, built a multi-billion dollar energy empire all his own, and earned notoriety as an America's Cup-winning yachtsman, a flamboyant playboy, and as a litigious collector of fine wine and Western memorabilia. Frederick lived an intensely private life as an arts patron, refurbishing a series of historic homes and estates.

This book traces the complicated lives and legacies of these four tycoons, as well as their business, social, and political ambitions. No matter where you fall on the ideological spectrum, the Kochs are one of the most influential dynasties of our era, but so little is publicly known about this family, their origins, how they make their money, and how they live their lives.
Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies: The Real West

Bill O'Reilly's Legends and Lies: The Real West

Bill O'Reilly ,  David Fisher

$39.99

The must-have companion to Bill O'Reilly's historic series  Legends and Lies: The Real West,  a fascinating, eye-opening look at the truth behind the western legends we all think we know.

How did Davy Crockett save President Jackson's life only to end up dying at the Alamo? Was the Lone Ranger based on a real lawman-and was he an African American? What amazing detective work led to the capture of Black Bart, the  gentleman bandit  and one of the west's most famous stagecoach robbers? Did Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid really die in a hail of bullets in South America? Generations of Americans have grown up on TV shows, movies and books about these western icons. But what really happened in the Wild West? All the stories you think you know, and others that will astonish you, are here - some heroic, some brutal and bloody, all riveting.

Included are the legends featured in Bill O'Reilly's ten week run of historic episodic specials - from Kit Carson to Jesse James, Wild Bill Hickok to Doc Holliday - accompanied by two bonus chapters on Daniel Boone and Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley.

Frontier America was a place where instinct mattered more than education, and courage was necessary for survival. It was a place where luck made a difference and legends were made. Heavily illustrated with spectacular artwork that further brings this history to life, and told in fast-paced, immersive narrative,  Legends and Lies  is an irresistible, adventure-packed ride back into one of the most storied era of our nation's rich history.
The Religion of Democracy: Seven Liberals and the American Moral Tradition

The Religion of Democracy: Seven Liberals and the American Moral Tradition

Amy Kittelstrom

$49.99

Today we associate liberal politics with secularism. However, the role of religion in American politics has always been more complex than that: America has never had a president, democrat or republican, who has not openly stated that they are a Christian, for a start! The Religion of Democracy is a lively narrative of quintessentially American ideas as they were forged, debated and remade across history. Kittlestrom shows that the principles of liberty and equality did not emerge in opposition to religion but were actually forged by religion.
The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act

The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act

Clay Risen

$19.99

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was the single most important piece of legislation passed by Congress in American history. This one law so dramatically altered American society that, looking back, it seems preordained--as Everett Dirksen, the GOP leader in the Senate and a key supporter of the bill, said, No force is more powerful than an idea whose time has come. But there was nothing predestined about the victory: a phalanx of powerful senators, pledging to fight to the death for segregation, launched the longest filibuster in American history to defeat it. The bill's passage has often been credited to the political leadership of President Lyndon B. Johnson, or the moral force of Martin Luther King Jr. Yet as Clay Risen shows, the battle for the Civil Rights Act was a story much bigger than those two men. It was a broad, epic struggle, a sweeping tale of unceasing grassroots activism, ringing speeches, backroom deal-making, and, finally, hand-to-hand legislative combat. In The Bill of the Century, Clay Risen delivers the full story, in all its complexity and drama.
Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery

Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery

Margaret Ellen Newell

$79.00

In Brethren by Nature, Margaret Ellen Newell reveals a little-known aspect of American history: English colonists in New England enslaved thousands of Indians. Massachusetts became the first English colony to legalize slavery in 1641, and the colonists' desire for slaves shaped the major New England Indian wars, including the Pequot War of 1637, King Philip's War of 1675-76, and the northeastern Wabanaki conflicts of 1676-1749. When the wartime conquest of Indians ceased, New Englanders turned to the courts to get control of their labor, or imported Indians from Florida and the Carolinas, or simply claimed free Indians as slaves. 

Drawing on letters, diaries, newspapers, and court records, Newell recovers the slaves' own stories and shows how they influenced New England society in crucial ways. Indians lived in English homes, raised English children, and manned colonial armies, farms, and fleets, exposing their captors to Native religion, foods, and technology. Some achieved freedom and power in this new colonial culture, but others experienced violence, surveillance, and family separations. Newell also explains how slavery linked the fate of Africans and Indians. 

The trade in Indian captives connected New England to Caribbean and Atlantic slave economies. Indians labored on sugar plantations in Jamaica, tended fields in the Azores, and rowed English naval galleys in Tangier. Indian slaves outnumbered Africans within New England before 1700, but the balance soon shifted. Fearful of the growing African population, local governments stripped Indian and African servants and slaves of legal rights and personal freedoms.

Nevertheless, because Indians remained a significant part of the slave population, the New England colonies did not adopt all of the rigid racial laws typical of slave societies in Virginia and Barbados. Newell finds that second- and third-generation Indian slaves fought their enslavement and claimed citizenship in cases that had implications for all enslaved peoples in eighteenth-century America.
The Cambridge Companion to John F. Kennedy

The Cambridge Companion to John F. Kennedy

Andrew Hoberek

$35.95

John F. Kennedy remains central to both the American and the global imagination. Featuring essays by leading literary critics, historians, and film scholars, The Cambridge Companion to John F. Kennedy addresses such topics as Kennedy's youth in Boston and his time at Harvard, his foreign policy and his role in reshaping the US welfare state, his relationship to the civil rights and conservative movements, and the ongoing reverberations of his life and death in literature and film. Going beyond historical or biographical studies, these chapters explore the creation and afterlife of an icon, a figure who still embodies - and sparks debate about - what it means to be American.
Is the American Century Over?

Is the American Century Over?

Joseph S. Nye

$20.95

For more than a century, the United States has been the world's economic powerhouse. Now analysts predict that China will soon take its place. Are we now living in a post-American world? Will China's rapid rise spark a new Cold War between the two titans? In this compelling essay, world renowned foreign policy analyst, Joseph Nye, explains why the American century is far from over and what the US must do to retain its lead in an era of increasingly diffuse power politics. America's superpower status may well be tempered by its own domestic problems and China's economic boom, he argues, but its military, economic and soft power capabilities will continue to outstrip those of its closest rivals for decades to come.
The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution

Edward G. Gray ,  Jane Kamensky

$39.95

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution draws on a wealth of new scholarship to create a vibrant dialogue among varied approaches to the revolution that made the United States. In thirty-three essays written by authorities on the period, the Handbook brings to life the diverse multitudes of colonial North America and their extraordinary struggles before, during, and after the eight-year-long civil war that secured the independence of thirteen rebel colonies from their erstwhile colonial parent. The chapters explore battles and diplomacy, economics and finance, law and culture, politics and society, gender, race, and religion. Its diverse cast of characters includes ordinary farmers and artisans, free and enslaved African Americans, Indians, and British and American statesmen and military leaders. In addition to expanding the Revolution's who, the Handbook broadens its where, portraying an event that far transcended the boundaries of what was to become the United States. It offers readers an American Revolution whose impact ranged far beyond the thirteen colonies. The Handbook's range of interpretive and methodological approaches captures the full scope of current revolutionary-era scholarship. Its authors, British and American scholars spanning several generations, include social, cultural, military, and imperial historians, as well as those who study politics, diplomacy, literature, gender, and sexuality. Together and separately, these essays demonstrate that the American Revolution remains a vibrant and inviting a subject of inquiry. Nothing comparable has been published in decades.
Stalingrad: The City That Defeated the Third Reich

Stalingrad: The City That Defeated the Third Reich

Jochen Hellbeck ,  Christopher Tauchen

$39.99

The turning point of World War II came at Stalingrad. Hitler's soldiers stormed the city in September 1942 in a bid to complete the conquest of Europe. Yet Stalingrad never fell. After months of bitter fighting, 100,000 surviving Germans, huddled in the ruined city, surrendered to Soviet troops. 

During the battle and shortly after its conclusion, scores of Red Army commanders and soldiers, party officials and workers spoke with a team of historians who visited from Moscow to record their conversations. The tapestry of their voices provides groundbreaking insights into the thoughts and feelings of Soviet citizens during wartime.

These testimonials were so harrowing and candid that the Kremlin forbade their publication, and they were forgotten by modern history - until now. Revealed here in English for the first time, they humanize the Soviet defenders and allow Jochen Hellbeck, in Stalingrad, to present a definitive new portrait of the most fateful battle of World War II.
Russian Revolutionary Posters

Russian Revolutionary Posters

David King

$29.99

Russian Revolutionary Posters tells the story of the development of the Soviet poster, from the revolutionary period through to the death of Stalin, revealing the way in which tumultuous events within the Soviet Union were matched by equally dramatic shifts in graphic art and design.

Written and designed by David King, one of the world's foremost experts on Soviet art and himself an internationally acclaimed graphic designer, the publication features posters drawn from his unparalleled collection, well known to visitors to Tate Modern in London. The book is arranged chronologically. Captions accompany each poster, explaining the historical and artistic context in which it was produced. Constructivist posters, socialist advertising, film posters of the 1920s, classic photomontage, the heroic posters of the Great Patriotic War, biting political satire and the cult of personality of the Stalin years are all here. The great names of Soviet poster design, including Alexander Rodchenko, El Lissitsky, Gustav Klutsis, Dimitri Moor, Viktor Demi and Nina Vatolina, all feature. 

However, some of the most arresting posters reproduced were created anonymously or by scarcely known artists whose work will be a revelation to many. King takes us behind the scenes, explaining the process involved in the commissioning of the posters and the key figures who coordinated poster campaigns, providing personal histories of the art directors and creative directors whose vision played such a vital role in soviet poster design.

With an insightful introduction and over 165 images, some of which have never been seen before, this beautifully produced book will be the definitive survey of the subject for many years to come
Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe Airport, the Most Audacious Hostage Rescue Mission in History

Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe Airport, the Most Audacious Hostage Rescue Mission in History

Saul David

$32.99

At 15.40 hours on 3 July 1976, four Hercules C-130 transport planes carrying a secret Israeli special forces unit take off from an air force base in the Sinai Desert and fly south down the Red Sea. Codenamed Thunderbolt, the operation carries huge risks. The flight is a challenge: 2,000 miles with total radio silence over hostile territory to land in darkness at Entebbe Airport in Idi Amin's Uganda. On the ground, the Israeli commandos have just three minutes to carry out their mission. They must evade a cordon of elite Ugandan paratroopers, storm the terminal and free more than a hundred Israeli, French and US hostages held by German and Palestinian terrorists. So much can go wrong: the death of the hostages if the terrorists get wind of the assault; or the capture of Israel's finest soldiers if their Hercules planes cannot take off. Both would be a human and a PR catastrophe.  Now, with the mission largely forgotten or even unknown to many, Saul David gives the first comprehensive account of Operation Thunderbolt using classified documents from archives in four countries and interviews with key participants, including Israeli soldiers and politicians, hostages, a member of the Kenyan government and a former terrorist.
The Dead and Those About to Die: D-Day: the Big Red One at Omaha Beach

The Dead and Those About to Die: D-Day: the Big Red One at Omaha Beach

John C. McManus

$26.99

Nicknamed the Big Red One, 1st Division had fought from North Africa to Sicily, earning a reputation as stalwart warriors. Yet on D-Day, these veterans melded with fresh-faced replacements to accomplish one of the most challenging and deadly missions ever. As the men hit the beach their equipment was destroyed or washed away. Soldiers were cut down by the dozens. In this indepth study of that mission, McManus explores the heroes that survived as well as the Gap Assault Team engineers who dealt with the extensive mines and obstacles, suffering nearly a fifty percent casualty rate.
The Fall of Burma 1941-1943

The Fall of Burma 1941-1943

John Grehan ,  Martin Mace

$59.99

Despatches in this volume include that on operations in Burma between 15 December 1941 and 20 May 1942 by General Wavell; Operations in Eastern Theatre, based on India, March 1942 to 31 December 1942 by Field-Marshall Wavell; Operations in the Indo-Burma Theatre 21 June to 15 November 1942 by Field-Marshall Auchinleck; and Operations in the India Command 1 January to 20 June 1943 by Field-Marshall Wavell. This unique collection of original documents will prove to be an invaluable resource for historians, students and all those interested in what was one of the most significant periods in British military history.
A Mad Catastrophe: The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire

A Mad Catastrophe: The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire

Geoffrey Wawro

$22.99

The Austro-Hungarian army that marched east and south to confront the Russians and Serbs in the opening campaigns of World War I had a glorious past but a pitiful present. Speaking a mystifying array of languages and lugging outdated weapons, the Austrian troops were hopelessly unprepared for the industrialized warfare that would shortly consume Europe.

As prizewinning historian Geoffrey Wawro explains in  A Mad Catastrophe,  the doomed Austrian conscripts were an unfortunate microcosm of the Austro-Hungarian Empire itself - both equally ripe for destruction. After the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in June 1914, Germany goaded the Empire into a war with Russia and Serbia. With the Germans massing their forces in the west to engage the French and the British, everything - the course of the war and the fate of empires and alliances from Constantinople to London - hinged on the Habsburgs' ability to crush Serbia and keep the Russians at bay.

However, Austria-Hungary had been rotting from within for years, hollowed out by repression, cynicism, and corruption at the highest levels. Commanded by a dying emperor, Franz Joseph I, and a querulous celebrity general, Conrad von Hotzendorf, the Austro-Hungarians managed to bungle everything: their ultimatum to the Serbs, their declarations of war, their mobilization, and the pivotal battles in Galicia and Serbia. By the end of 1914, the Habsburg army lay in ruins and the outcome of the war seemed all but decided.

Drawing on deep archival research, Wawro charts the decline of the Empire before the war and reconstructs the great battles in the east and the Balkans in thrilling and tragic detail.  A Mad Catastrophe  is a riveting account of a neglected face of World War I, revealing how a once-mighty empire collapsed in the trenches of Serbia and the Eastern Front, changing the course of European history.
Ottoman Navy Warships 1914-18

Ottoman Navy Warships 1914-18

Ryan K. Noppen ,  Paul Wright

$24.99

At the start of the 20th century the Ottoman Navy was a shadow of its former might, a reflection of the empire as a whole - the Sick Man of Europe . Years of defeat, nepotism, and neglect had left the Ottoman Navy with a mix of obsolete vessels, whilst the list of prospective enemies was ever-growing. An increasing Russian naval presence in the Black Sea and the alarming emergence of Italy and Greece as regional Naval powers proved beyond all doubt that intensive modernization was essential, indeed, the fate of the Empire as a naval power depended on it. So the Ottoman Navy looked to the ultimate naval weapon of the age, the dreadnought, two of which were ordered from the British. But politics intervened, and a succession of events culminated in the Ottoman Navy fielding a modern German battle cruiser and state-of-the-art light cruiser instead - with dramatic consequences. In this meticulous study, Ryan Noppen presents a fresh appraisal of the technical aspects and operations of the warships of the Ottoman Navy in World War I. It is the first work of its kind in the English language - produced with a wealth of rare material with the co-operation of the Turkish Consulate and Navy. Packed with precise technical specifications, revealing illustrations and exhaustive research, this is an essential guide to a crucial chapter in the Aegean arms race.
Voices of the Battle of Britain

Voices of the Battle of Britain

Colin Higgs ,  Bruce Vigar

$89.99

A limited edition hardcover book along with two DVDs packed with rare archival footage and interviews with 18 survivors. It was a crucial moment of World War II.1940. The Royal Air Force, virtually alone, defended the skies of Britain against massed formations of German bombers. They put up such a ferocious defense that Hitler gave up ideas of invading Britain and turned his attention to an assault on the Soviet Union. Of those pilots who courageously flew their Spitfires and Hurricanes against the Luftwaffe barely a handful remain. The authors have interviewed 18 survivors and it is their memories and anecdotes that make this book unique. Highly illustrated throughout with rarely seen images, this bookis packed with great stories of aerial combat and being shot down, of the classic fighters that they flew and fought in and against, of making and losing friends and colleagues, of a strained social life in the midst of battle, and, most of all, of standing steadfast in the face of overwhelming odds. It is coupled with an authoritative and lively narrative.
Westland Sea King: 1988 Onwards (HU Mk5 SAR Model) - Owners' Workshop Manual

Westland Sea King: 1988 Onwards (HU Mk5 SAR Model) - Owners' Workshop Manual

Lee Howard

$59.99

An insight into the design, construction and operation of the Royal Navy's classic search and rescue helicopter. For more than 25 years the Agusta Westland Sea King has been that most welcome of sights around the English coast, providing essential Search and Rescue (SAR) capabilities for those in peril both on land and at sea. The Royal Navy variant - the Sea King HU Mk 5, which is the main focus of this book - is estimated to have saved literally hundreds of lives. Author and photographer Lee Howard has been given privileged official access to the Navy's SAR air and ground crews to offer fascinating insights into operating, flying and maintaining the Sea King.
The Handy Military History Answer Book

The Handy Military History Answer Book

Samuel Willard Crompton

$28.99

Brutality and fear. Heroism and sacrifice. Military history is a fascinating, complex and often contradictory subject. War and fighting between tribes, clans, groups and countries has been with us forever. Great leaders, great villains, pivotal moments and events become transformative, causing political, social and technological upheavals, which were often built on the foundation of war. The Handy Military History Answer Book is a captivating, concise and convenient look at how the world, the United States and modern society think about conflict.
Mad, Bad and Dangerous: The Eccentricity of Tyrants

Mad, Bad and Dangerous: The Eccentricity of Tyrants

Tom Ambrose

$29.99

A penetrating and incisive study of the fanaticism and foibles of some of history's most illustrious names. From Assad to Nero, Gaddafi to Ivan the Terrible, this volume investigates the minds of some of the most powerful people in history. While leaving some room to describe the amusing incidents and eccentricities associated with a host of men and women in power, it also reaches into the terrifying depths and depravities of minds that shaped the destinies of peoples and nations. Using a unique combination of history, politics and psychology, the book explores how power not only corrupts but deranges.
Terrorists at the Table: Why Negotiating Is the Only Way to Peace

Terrorists at the Table: Why Negotiating Is the Only Way to Peace

Jonathan Powell

$39.99

Should governments talk to terrorists? Do they have any choice? Without doing so, argues author Jonathan Powell, we will never end armed conflict. As violent insurgencies continue to erupt across the globe, we need people who will brave the depths of the Sri Lankan jungle and scale the heights of the Colombian mountains, painstakingly tracking down the heavily armed and dangerous leaders of these terrorist groups in order to open negotiations with them. Powell draws on his own experiences negotiating peace in Northern Ireland and talks to all the major players from the last thirty years-terrorists, Presidents, secret agents and intermediaries-exposing the subterranean world of secret exchanges between governments and armed groups to give us the inside account of negotiations on the front line. These past negotiations shed light on how today's negotiators can tackle the Taliban, Hammas and al-Qaeda. And history tells us that it may be necessary to fight and talk at the same time. Ultimately, Powell brings us a message of hope: there is no armed conflict anywhere in the world that cannot be resolved if we are prepared to learn from the lessons of the past.
Papyrus: The Plant That Changed the World - From Ancient Egypt to Today's Water Wars

Papyrus: The Plant That Changed the World - From Ancient Egypt to Today's Water Wars

John Gaudet

$19.95

From ancient Pharaohs to twenty-first century water wars, papyrus is a unique plant that is still one of the fastest growing plant species on earth. It produces its own soil - a peaty, matrix that floats on water-and its stems inspired the fluted columns of the ancient Greeks. In ancient Egypt, the papyrus bounty from the Nile delta provided not just paper for record keeping-instrumental to the development of civilization-but food, fuel and boats. Disastrous weather in the sixth century caused famines and plagues that almost wiped out civilization in the west, but it was papyrus paper in scrolls and codices that kept the record of our early days and allowed the thread of history to remain unbroken. The sworn enemy of oblivion and the guardian of our immortality, it came to our rescue then and will again. Today, it is not just a curious relic of our ancient past, but a rescuing force for modern ecological and societal blight.
Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf That Conquered the World

Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf That Conquered the World

Markman Ellis ,  Matthew Mauger ,  Richard Coulton

$59.99

Tea has a rich and well-documented past. The beverage originated in Asia long before making its way to seventeenth-century London, where it became an exotic, highly sought after commodity. Over the subsequent two centuries, tea's powerful psychoactive properties seduced British society, becoming popular across the nation from castle to cottage. Now the world's most popular drink, tea was one of the first truly global products to find a mass market, with tea drinking now stereotypically associated with British identity.

Imported by the East India Company in increasing quantities across the eighteenth century, tea inaugurated the first regular exchange between China and Britain, both commercial and cultural. While European scientists struggled to make sense of its natural history and medicinal properties, the delicate flavour profile and hot preparation of tea inspired poets, artists and satirists. Becoming central to everyday life, tea was embroiled in controversy, from the gossip of the domestic tea table to the civil disorder occasioned by smuggling, and the political scandal of theBoston Tea Party to the violent conflict of the Anglo-Chinese Opium War.

Such stories shaped the contexts for the imperial teaindustry that later developed across India and Sri Lanka. Empire of Tea is based on extensive original research, providing a rich cultural history that explores how the British 'way of tea' became the norm across the Anglophone world.
Not Your Usual Bushrangers

Not Your Usual Bushrangers

Peter Macinnis

$34.95

Take a journey with one of Australia's most accessible history and science writers into an early Australia that extends beyond the Wild Colonial Boy and the Kelly Gang. Discover the endearing Moondyne Joe and Diver Fitzgerald, scallywags rather than villains, as well as some who affected a gentlemanly front, a sort of false gallantry that did not sit well with their thieving ways, plus the thugs with no saving graces.
           
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