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History
Kokoda Air Strikes: Allied Air Forces in New Guinea, 1942

Kokoda Air Strikes: Allied Air Forces in New Guinea, 1942

Anthony Cooper

$39.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JULY 2014 ----- The author of the bestselling Darwin Spitfires casts a forensic eye over the role that Allied air forces played - or failed to play - in crucial World War II campaigns in New Guinea.

This is the story of the early battles of the South West Pacific theatre - the Coral Sea, Kokoda, Milne Bay, Guadalcanal - presented as a single air campaign that began with the Japanese conquest of Rabaul in January 1942. It is a story of both Australian and American airmen who flew and fought in the face of adversity - with incomplete training, inadequate aircraft, and from poorly set up and exposed airfields. And they persisted despite extreme exhaustion, sickness, poor morale and the near certainty of being murdered by their Japanese captors if they went down in enemy territory.
Menzies at War

Menzies at War

Anne Henderson

$34.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JULY 2014 ----- In the months following his resignation as PM in late August 1941, Menzies swayed between relief at his release from the burdens of office as PM and despair that his life at the top had come to so little. Many followers of Australian political history, including Liberal party supporters, forget that Robert Menzies had many years in the political wilderness not knowing he would end up being Australia's longest-serving prime minister.

This book focuses on the period between 1941, when Menzies lost the prime-ministership, to 1949, when he regained it. In the interim he travelled around the world, spending an extended time in Britain during World War II, set up the Liberal Party and, the author argues, developed the leadership qualities that made him so successful. Anne Henderson refers to this time as his real political blooding.

Menzies at War by Anne Henderson
The Lost Legions of Fromelles: The True Story of the Most Dramatic Battle in Australia's History

The Lost Legions of Fromelles: The True Story of the Most Dramatic Battle in Australia's History

Peter Barton

$32.99

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The story has always appeared simple, but in truth history did not unfold in the way we have for so long been led to believe. Controversial and groundbreaking, this is the most authoritative book ever written on the battle of Fromelles - the worst day in Australia's entire military history.

With the discovery of a mass grave at Fromelles and the disinterment of many diggers, it has been suggested that the battle of Fromelles should enter the Australian national consciousness in the same way as Gallipoli. Raging for 14 hours, this was the worst day in Australia's military history with our soldiers suffering 5,533 casualties during one horrendous night. The Australian toll at Fromelles was equivalent to the total Australian casualties in the Boer War, Korean War and Vietnam War put together - a staggering disaster.

It has also left many mysteries. At the time of the battle, and for many decades after, the bodies of the dead lay undiscovered. Indeed, it was only through efforts in the last few years that the final resting place of so many has finally been located and the dead provided with a formal burial.

With access to the German archives for the first time ever, Barton describes its long and surprising genesis and offers an unexpected account of the fighting; he investigates the interrogation of Anglo-Australian prisoners, and the results of shrewd German propaganda techniques. He explores the circumstances surrounding the 'missing' Pheasant Wood graves and also brings a new perspective to the writings of Charles Bean.

This compelling and illuminating history dispels many a myth surrounding one of the bloodiest battlefields of the Great War.

The Lost Legions of Fromelles: The True Story of the Most Dramatic Battle in Australia's History by Peter Barton at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
The Third Horseman: Climate Change and the Great Famine of the 14th Century

The Third Horseman: Climate Change and the Great Famine of the 14th Century

William Rosen

$32.99

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How a seven-year cycle of rain, cold, disease, and warfare created the worst famine in European history  In May 1315, it started to rain. It didn't stop anywhere in north Europe until August. Next came the four coldest winters in a millennium. Two separate animal epidemics killed nearly 80 percent of northern Europe's livestock. Wars between Scotland and England, France and Flanders, and two rival claimants to the Holy Roman Empire destroyed all remaining farmland. After seven years, the combination of lost harvests, warfare, and pestilence would claim six million lives--one eighth of Europe's total population.  

William Rosen draws on a wide array of disciplines, from military history to feudal law to agricultural economics and climatology, to trace the succession of traumas that caused the Great Famine. With dramatic appearances by Scotland's William Wallace, and the luckless Edward II and his treacherous Queen Isabella, history's best documented episode of catastrophic climate change comes alive, with powerful implications for future calamities.
How to Manage Your Slaves by Marcus Sidonius Falx

How to Manage Your Slaves by Marcus Sidonius Falx

Jerry Toner ,  Mary Beard

$29.99

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At last a clear manual for managing slaves the Roman way.

How to Manage your Slaves offers practical answers to every question you're likely to have and guidance on every problem you're likely to encounter. Marcus Sidonius Falx shows where and how to buy the slaves for the purposes you have in mind and how to get the best out of them once you've got them.

He explains how to tell a good slave from a bad, offers guidance on the punishment of miscreants, and reveals the secrets of command and authority. He covers the delicate subjects of when you should let your slaves have sex with each other and whether to engage in sex with them yourself - and considers when to set them free. Armed with this guide you will be master in your own home: your household will be a comfort to your family and its running the envy of your neighbours.

Up to now ancient slavery may have been difficult to fathom: this Roman's-eye view takes us to the heart of the matter and, based on a wealth of original sources, lets us understand just why slaves meant so much to the Romans.
Rome's Last Citizen: Life and Legacy of Cato, Mortal Enemy of Caesar

Rome's Last Citizen: Life and Legacy of Cato, Mortal Enemy of Caesar

Rob Goodman ,  Jimmy Soni

$19.99

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Marcus Porcius Cato: aristocrat who walked barefoot and slept on the ground with his troops, political heavyweight who cultivated the image of a Stoic philosopher, a hard-nosed defender of tradition who presented himself as a man out of the sacred Roman past - and the last man standing when Rome's Republic fell to tyranny. His blood feud with Caesar began in the chamber of the Senate, played out on the battlefields of a world war, and ended when he took his own life rather than live under a dictator. 

Centuries of thinkers, writers, and artists have drawn inspiration from Cato's Stoic courage. Saint Augustine and the early Christians were moved and challenged by his example. Dante, in his Divine Comedy, chose Cato to preside over the souls who arrive in Purgatory. George Washington so revered him that he staged a play on Cato's life to revive the spirit of his troops at Valley Forge.

Now, in Rome's Last Citizen, Rob Goodman and Jimmy Soni deliver the first modern biography of this stirring figure.
Australian History in 7 Questions

Australian History in 7 Questions

John Hirst

$24.99

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From the author of The Shortest History of Europe, acclaimed historian John Hirst, comes this fresh and stimulating approach to understanding Australia's past and present.

Hirst asks and answers questions that get to the heart of Australia's history: Why did Aborigines not take up farming? How did a penal colony change peacefully into a democratic society? Why was Australia so prosperous so early? Why did the colonies federate? What effect did convict origins have on national character? Why was the postwar migration programme such a success? Why is Australia not a republic? 

Engaging and enjoyable, and written for the novice and the expert alike, Australian History in Seven Questions explains how we became the nation we are today.
Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China

Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China

Jung Chang

$19.99

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From the bestselling author of Wild Swans and Mao: The Unknown Story.

In this groundbreaking biography, Jung Chang vividly describes how Empress Dowager Cixi - the most important woman in Chinese history - brought a medieval empire into the modern age. Under her, the ancient country attained virtually all the attributes of a modern state and it was she who abolished gruesome punishments like 'death by a thousand cuts' and put an end to foot-binding.

Jung Chang comprehensively overturns the conventional view of Cixi as a diehard conservative and cruel despot and also takes the reader into the depths of her splendid Summer Palace and the harem of Beijing's Forbidden City, where she lived surrounded by eunuchs - with one of whom she fell in love, with tragic consequences.

Packed with drama, fast-paced and gripping, it is both a panoramic depiction of the birth of modern China and an intimate portrait of a woman: as the concubine to a monarch, as the absolute ruler of a third of the world's population, and as a unique stateswoman. 
Empire's Crossroads: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to the Present

Empire's Crossroads: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to the Present

Carrie Gibson

$32.99

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This is a definitive history of the Caribbean by a brilliant young historian.

In October 1492, an Italian-born, Spanish-funded navigator discovered a new world, thousands of miles across the Atlantic Ocean. In Empire's Crossroads, Carrie Gibson, unfolds the story of the Caribbean from Columbus' first landing on the island he named San Salvador to today's islands - largely independent, but often still in thrall to Europe and America's insatiable desire for tropical luxuries.

From the early years of settlement to the age of sugar and slavery, during which vast riches were generated for Europeans through the enforced labour of millions of enslaved Africans, to the great slave rebellions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the long, slow progress towards independence in the modern era, Gibson offers a vivid, panoramic view of this complex and contradictory region.

From Cuba to Haiti, from Jamaica to Trinidad, the story of the Caribbean is not simply the story of slaves and masters - but of fortune-seekers, tourists, scientists and pirates. It is not only a story of imperial expansion - European and American - but also of life as it is lived in the islands, both in the past and today.
The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book

The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book

Peter Finn ,  Petra Couvee

$35.00

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1956. Boris Pasternak presses a manuscript into the hands of an Italian publishing scout with these words: 'This is Doctor Zhivago. May it make its way around the world.'

Pasternak knew his novel would never be published in the Soviet Union as the authorities regarded it as seditious, so, instead, he allowed it to be published in translation all over the world - a highly dangerous act. 1958. The life of this extraordinary book enters the realms of the spy novel. The CIA, recognising that the Cold War was primarily an ideological battle, published Doctor Zhivago in Russian and smuggled it into the Soviet Union. It was immediately snapped up on the black market. Pasternak was later forced to renounce the Nobel Prize in Literature, igniting worldwide political scandal.

With sole access to otherwise classified CIA files, The Zhivago Affair gives an irresistible portrait of Pasternak, and takes us deep into the Cold War, back to a time when literature had the power to shake the world.
The Luck of the Irish: How a Shipload of Convicts Survived the Wreck of the Hive to Make a New Life in Australia

The Luck of the Irish: How a Shipload of Convicts Survived the Wreck of the Hive to Make a New Life in Australia

Babette Smith

$32.99

The luck of the Irish was chronic bad luck, as their sad history attests. That's how it looked for 250 Irish convicts when their ship, the Hive, sank ignominiously off the NSW coast in 1835. Miraculously all survived, guided to safety by local Aboriginal people. They landed at a time when the so-called slave colony was at its height, ruled by the lash and the chain gang. Yet as Babette Smith tracked the lives of the people aboard the Hive, she discovered a very different story. Most were assigned to work on farms or in businesses, building a better life than they possibly could have experienced in Ireland. Surprisingly, in the workforce they found power, which gave rise to the characteristic Australian culture later described by DH Lawrence: 'Nobody felt better than anybody else, or higher.' The Luck of the Irish is a fascinating portrait of colonial life in the mid-19th century, which reveals how the Irish helped lay the foundations of the Australia we know today.
Anzac Girls: The Extraordinary Story of Our World War I Nurses

Anzac Girls: The Extraordinary Story of Our World War I Nurses

Peter Rees

$29.99

By the end of the Great War, forty-five Australian and New Zealand nurses had died on overseas service and over two hundred had been decorated. These were the women who left for war looking for adventure and romance but were soon confronted with challenges for which their civilian lives could never have prepared them. Their strength and dignity were remarkable. Using diaries and letters, Peter Rees takes us into the hospital camps and the wards, and the tent surgeries on the edge of some of the most horrific battlefronts of human history. But he also allows the friendships and loves of these courageous and compassionate women to shine through and enrich our experience. Profoundly moving, Anzac Girls is a story of extraordinary courage and humanity shown by a group of women whose contribution to the Anzac legend has barely been recognised in our history. Peter Rees has changed that understanding forever.
Tomorrow We Escape

Tomorrow We Escape

Tom Trumble

$29.99

A boy's own adventure that traverses some of the great battlefields of WWII - a story of breathtaking gallantry, resilience and friendship, but also of violence, hatred and cruelty. When 22-year-old sapper Ian Busst boarded the RMS Mauretania bound for Glasgow, it was the beginning of an extraordinary military adventure that took him through fighting in Tobruk and surviving horrific conditions in the prison camps of occupied Europe. Busst - known as 'Mad Bastard' because he would do anything to survive - became a great escape artist. Ian Busst was witness to several iconic moments of the Second World War - the Battle of Britain; fighting in the Western Desert; the Fall of Fascist Italy; the near annihilation of Munich. He is now 95, but the detail with which he could recount certain moments that took place 70 years earlier makes his life well worth documenting. He remembers the way a soldier held a cigarette before battle; the thrum of a transport ship making full speed in a storm; the smell after an air raid; the sound of a strafing Messerschmitt; the physical and mental anguish of enduring 28 days solitary confinement for failing to salute the prison commandant; the names and faces of the Italian partisans that aided his escape through the Apennine mountains; the glorious taste of tinned herrings in sauce; the expression on a wounded comrade's face moments before he took his last breath.
Too Bold to Die: The Making of Australian War Heroes

Too Bold to Die: The Making of Australian War Heroes

Ian McPhedran

$24.99

An unputdownable account of the courage and bravery under fire of our Australian soldiers on the frontline - from WWII to Afghanistan. From Gallipoli to Afghanistan, many Australians have been awarded military honours for acts of selfless courage. Others have missed out. Bestselling author Ian McPhedran uncovers new stories of extreme bravery in action from WWII to today, and hears from those on the front line about what courage really means. Some of these stories, including Medals for Gallantry awarded in the face of the enemy in East Timor and Afghanistan, are quite extraordinary. This book also explores why some become national heroes and others are overlooked.
The True Story of Ned Kelly's Last Stand

The True Story of Ned Kelly's Last Stand

Paul Terry

$29.99

When Ned Kelly fought his Last Stand at Glenrowan, he made his suit of armour and a tiny bush pub part of Australian folklore. But what really happened at the Glenrowan Inn when the Kelly Gang took up arms against the government? Who was there when the bullets began to fly and how did their actions help to set the course of history? Almost 130 years after the gunfight, a team of archaeologists peeled back the layers of history at Glenrowan to reveal new information about how the battle played out, uncovering the stories of the people caught up in a violent confrontation that helped to define what it means to be Australian. The True Story of Ned Kelly's Last Stand uses science, history and family lore to literally unearth a new understanding of how a legend was made. It examines the actions of a woman who took a chance and lost. It delves into the lives and deaths of the people who helped to create the legend. And, perhaps most importantly, as the inn reveals its lost secrets, it creates an opportunity to shed new light on Ned Kelly, a man who still polarises a nation as either a romantic hero or a convicted killer.
Australian Doctors on the Western Front: The Australian Doctors at War

Australian Doctors on the Western Front: The Australian Doctors at War

Robert Likeman

$65.00

This book covers the carnage on the Western Front from 1916-1918. Likeman provides mini-biographies of each of the more than 600 Australian doctors, and the Australian Army Medical Corps units and hospitals, which served on the Western Front and in the training establishments in the UK. Each officers medical qualifications are listed, along with any honours and awards, as well as numerous photographs. There are also introductory essays about the campaigns in which the Australians served, and accompanying maps.
Visions of Colonial Grandeur: John Twycross at the Melbourne International Exhibitions

Visions of Colonial Grandeur: John Twycross at the Melbourne International Exhibitions

Charlotte Smith

$39.95

Visions of Colonial Grandeur explores Melbourne's international exhibitions through the art collection of 19th-century businessman John Twycross. John Twycross, also known as Top Hat, was a merchant and art collector who lived and worked in 'Marvellous Melbourne'. In this boom period of the 1880s, a confident Melbourne hosted two international exhibitions and the best and latest in trade and culture was seen by millions in the newly-built (Royal) Exhibition Building. Twycross was an enthusiastic participant in the growing Melbourne art market and, during his frequent visits to the international exhibitions, purchased hundreds of exquisite fine art objects and paintings, building a collection that was treasured by four generations of the Twycross family and is now part of the Museum Victoria collection. This unique book features both archival photographs and colour images of some of the beautiful and significant art works in the Twycross collection. It is also an insightful study of the development of a collection, exploring the world of the international exhibitions and the thriving art trade in 19th-century Melbourne.
The Paper Trail: An Unexpected History of the World's Greatest Invention

The Paper Trail: An Unexpected History of the World's Greatest Invention

Alexander Monro

$39.99

This is the story of how paper, a simple Chinese invention, has wrapped itself around our world, with history's most momentous ideas etched upon its surface. The emergence of paper in the imperial court of Han China brought about a revolution in the transmission of knowledge and of ideas. For over two millennia, it has allowed ideas, religions, philosophies and propaganda to spread around the world with ever greater ease. Paper was the first writing surface sufficiently cheap, portable and printable for books, pamphlets, prints and journals to be mass-produced and to travel widely. It enabled an ongoing dialogue between communities of scholars who could now engage with each others' ideas across continents and years. The Paper Trail traces the westward voyage of this ground-breaking invention; beginning with the Buddhist translators responsible for the spread of paper across China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. It describes the theologians, scientists and artists who used paper to create the intellectual world of the Abbasid Caliphate, and journeys with the missionaries and merchants who carried it along the Silk Road. Paper finally reached Europe in 1276 and was indispensable to the scholars and translators who manufactured the Renaissance and Reformation from their desks. Paper created a world in which free thinking could flourish, and brought disciplines from science to music into a new age: the paper age. Paper still surrounds us in our everyday lives - on our desks, wrapping our food, in our wallets. It has become universal, and also supremely disposable. But is the age of paper coming to an end?
The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

Thomas Goetz

$29.99

The riveting history of tuberculosis, the world's most lethal disease, the two men whose lives it tragically intertwined, and the birth of medical science. In 1875, tuberculosis was the deadliest disease in the world, accountable for a third of all deaths. A diagnosis of TB--often called consumption--was a death sentence. Then, in a triumph of medical science, a German doctor named Robert Koch deployed an unprecedented scientific rigor to discover the bacteria that caused TB. Koch soon embarked on a remedy--a remedy that would be his undoing. When Koch announced his cure for consumption, Arthur Conan Doyle, then a small-town doctor in England and sometime writer, went to Berlin to cover the event. Touring the ward of reportedly cured patients, he was horrified. Koch's remedy was either sloppy science or outright fraud. But to a world desperate for relief, Koch's remedy wasn't so easily dismissed. As Europe's consumptives descended upon Berlin, Koch urgently tried to prove his case. Conan Doyle, meanwhile, returned to England determined to abandon medicine in favor of writing. In particular, he turned to a character inspired by the very scientific methods that Koch had formulated: Sherlock Holmes. Capturing the moment when mystery and magic began to yield to science, The Remedy chronicles the stunning story of how the germ theory of disease became a true fact, how two men of ambition were emboldened to reach for something more, and how scientific discoveries evolve into social truths.
Russian Roulette: How British Spies Defeated Lenin

Russian Roulette: How British Spies Defeated Lenin

Giles Milton

$22.99

In 1917, an eccentric band of British spies is smuggled into newly-Soviet Russia. Their goal? To defeat Lenin's plan to destroy British India and bring down the democracies of the West. These extraordinary spies, led by Mansfield Cumming, proved brilliantly successful. They found a wholly new way to deal with enemies, one that relied on espionage and dirty tricks rather than warfare. They were the unsung founders of today's modern, highly professional secret services. They were also the inspiration for fictional heroes to follow, from James Bond to Jason Bourne.
The War that Ended Peace: How Europe Abandoned Peace for the First World War

The War that Ended Peace: How Europe Abandoned Peace for the First World War

Margaret MacMillan

$24.99

WINNER of the International Affairs Book of the Year at the Political Book Awards 2014 Longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2013 The First World War followed a period of sustained peace in Europe during which people talked with confidence of prosperity, progress and hope. But in 1914, Europe walked into a catastrophic conflict which killed millions of its men, bled its economies dry, shook empires and societies to pieces, and fatally undermined Europe's dominance of the world. It was a war which could have been avoided up to the last moment - so why did it happen? Beginning in the early nineteenth century, and ending with the assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand, award-winning historian Margaret MacMillan uncovers the huge political and technological changes, national decisions and - just as important - the small moments of human muddle and weakness that led Europe from peace to disaster. This masterful exploration of how Europe chose its path towards war will change and enrich how we see this defining moment in our history.
Empires of the Dead: How One Man's Vision Led to the Creation of WWI's War Graves

Empires of the Dead: How One Man's Vision Led to the Creation of WWI's War Graves

David Crane

$19.99

Shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction; the extraordinary and forgotten story behind the building of the First World War cemeteries. In the wake of the First World War, Britain and her Empire faced the enormous question of how to bury the dead. Critically-acclaimed author David Crane describes how the horror of the slaughter motivated an ambulance commander named Fabian Ware to establish the Commonwealth war cemeteries. Behind these famous monuments - the Cenotaph, Tyne Cot, Menin Gate, Etaples amongst them - lies a deeply moving story; 'Empires of the Dead' chronicles a generation coming to terms with grief on a colossal scale.
A Broken World: Letters, Diaries and Memories of the Great War

A Broken World: Letters, Diaries and Memories of the Great War

Sebastian Faulks ,  Hope Wolf

$55.00

Edited by the bestselling author of Birdsong and Dr Hope Wolf, this is an original and illuminating non-fiction anthology of writing on the First World War. A lieutenant writes of digging through bodies that have the consistency of Camembert cheese; a mother sends flower seeds to her son at the Front, hoping that one day someone may see them grow; a nurse tends a man back to health knowing he will be court-martialled and shot as soon as he is fit. In this extraordinarily powerful and diverse selection of diaries, letters and memories - many of which have never been published before - privates and officers, seamen and airmen, munitions workers and mothers, nurses and pacifists, prisoners-of-war and conscientious objectors appear alongside each other. The war involved people from so many different backgrounds and countries and included here are, among others, British, German, Russian and Indian voices. Alongside testament from the many ordinary people whose lives were transformed by the events of 1914-18, there are extracts from names that have become synonymous with the war, such as Siegfried Sassoon and T.E. Lawrence. What unites them is a desire to express something of the horror, the loss, the confusion and the desire to help - or to protest. A Broken World is an original collection of personal and defining moments that offer an unprecedented insight into the Great War as it was experienced and as it was remembered.
The Blood Telegram

The Blood Telegram

Gary Jonathan Bass

$29.95

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction Winner of the Lionel Gelber Prize for Best Foreign Affairs Book One of the Best Books of the Year at * The Economist * Financial Times * The New Republic * The Washington Post * Kirkus Reviews *A New York Times Notable Book This magnificent history provides the first full account of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger's secret support for Pakistan in 1971 as it committed shocking atrocities in Bangladesh--which led to war between India and Pakistan, shaped the fate of Asia, and left major strategic consequences for the world today. Drawing on previously unheard White House tapes, recently declassified documents, and his own extensive investigative reporting, Gary Bass uncovers an astonishing unknown story of superpower brinkmanship, war, scandal, and conscience. Revelatory, authoritative, and compulsively readable, The Blood Telegram is a thrilling chronicle of a pivotal chapter in American foreign policy.
First World War at Sea: 5 Minute History

First World War at Sea: 5 Minute History

David Wragg

$12.99

How much can you really find out about the War at Sea during the First World War in five minutes? This handy little history book will surpass all your expectations and leave you well versed on all you wish to know, and maybe even a little bit more...* Which was stronger, the German or British navy? * What was the biggest battle? * Who were the heroes? * Who led the navies? * And how successful were they? Jam-packed with facts, stats and first-hand accounts of the action, all woven together in an accessible way by an expert in the field, this 5 Minute History is a valuable addition to anyone's bookshelf, ready to be delved into at a moment's notice.
First World War in the Air: 5 Minute History

First World War in the Air: 5 Minute History

Norman Ferguson

$12.99

How much can you really find out about the War in the Air during the First World War in five minutes? This handy little history book will surpass all your expectations and leave you well versed on all you wish to know, and maybe even a little bit more...* Who was the highest-scoring ace? * Which plane looked like a dog begging? * What was the Black Flight? * How many died in the first Blitz? * What was the Fokker Scourge? Jam-packed with facts, stats and first-hand accounts of the action, all woven together in an accessible way by an expert in the field, this 5 Minute History is a valuable addition to anyone's bookshelf, ready to be delved into at a moment's notice.
First World War Leaders and Commanders: 5 Minute History

First World War Leaders and Commanders: 5 Minute History

Peter Doyle

$12.99

How much can you really find out about the Leaders and Commanders of the First World War in five minutes? This handy little history book will surpass all your expectations and leave you well versed on all you wish to know, and maybe even a little bit more...* Who were the leaders? * Who commanded the British Army on the Somme? * Which general committed suicide in shame? * Who stopped the German offensive at Verdun? * Who invented stormtroopers? Jam-packed with facts and first-hand accounts of the action, all woven together in an accessible way by an expert in the field, this 5 Minute History is a valuable addition to anyone's bookshelf, ready to be delved into at a moment's notice.
First World War Trenches: 5 Minute History

First World War Trenches: 5 Minute History

Andrew Robertshaw

$12.99

How much can you really find out about the Trenches of the First World War in five minutes? This handy little history book will surpass all your expectations and leave you well versed on all you wish to know, and maybe even a little bit more...* Was it always muddy? * Was every minute spent under fire? * How did they get around? * What food was eaten? * And how did they build them anyway? Jam-packed with facts, stats and first-hand accounts of the action, all woven together in an accessible way by an expert in the field, this 5 Minute History is a valuable addition to anyone's bookshelf, ready to be delved into at a moment's notice.
Prelude to the First World War: The Balkan  Wars 1912-1913

Prelude to the First World War: The Balkan Wars 1912-1913

E. R. Hooton

$44.99

The fuse to the First World War was lit in the Balkans where simmering hatreds exploded into violence. Like a string of firecrackers, these hatreds had been fuelled by attacks on the Turkish Ottoman Empire in the previous few years. From 1911-1912, Italy seized Libya. In 1912, the Balkan states united to drive Turkey out of Europe in the First Balkans War, and in the following year in the Second Balkans War, turned on each other in a division of the spoils which allowed Turkey to retain a foothold in Europe. This was a war of land campaigns, sea battles and amphibious operations in which the new military technology was first used. Submarine and aircraft attacked ships, aircraft made reconnaissance flights and bombed troops while even electronic warfare was used. It also saw mirror images of the events in the First World War; Bulgarians driven from Salonika where an Allied army would later be contained and Turkish troops held back in the Dardanelles, their guns driving off a naval task force. These now forgotten wars were the overture to the First World War and yet they have overtones a century later. The First World War saw echoes of these campaigns in Salonika and especially in the Dardanelles, while the ethnic tensions would erupt into further bloodshed after the Cold War ended as Yugoslavia collapsed during the 1990s.
The Silent Day: A Landmark Oral History of D-Day on the Home Front

The Silent Day: A Landmark Oral History of D-Day on the Home Front

Max Arthur

$32.99

On 6 June 1944 Britain woke up to a profound silence. Overnight, 160,000 Allied troops had vanished and an eerie emptiness settled over the country. The majority of those men would never return. This is the story of that extraordinary 24 hours. Using a wealth of first person testimonies, renowned historian Max Arthur recounts a remarkable new oral history of D-Day, beginning with the two years leading up to the silent day which saw the UK transformed by the arrival of thousands of American and Canadian troops. We also hear the views of the American troops, who quickly formed strong views of both the British military and civilian populations. Then, on that June morning, many Britain people woke up to discover that vast areas of the country, which had throbbed with life only the day before, were now empty and silent. Civilian workers found coffee pots still warm on the stove but not a soul to greet them. Many women - and children - felt bewildered and betrayed. Then, throughout that day and the days that followed, the whole population gathered around wireless sets, waiting for news. There are powerful testimonies from families of who lost loved ones on the beaches of Normandy, and dramatic personal accounts from young widows who had never had the chance to say goodbye. THE SILENT DAY is an original and evocative portrait of a key event in world history, and a poignant reminder of the human cost of D-Day.
The Great War Explained

The Great War Explained

Philip Stevens

$39.99

This is much more than just another book to add to the thousands on The Great War. It sets out to fill a gap. Written for the layman by a layman (who is also an articulate and experienced battlefield guide) it summarises the key events and contributions of key individuals, some well, others unknown but with a story to tell. To get a true picture of this monumental event in history, it is necessary to grasp the fundamentals, be they military, political, social or simply human. The slaughters at Verdun, Somme and Passchendaele are no more than statistics without the stories of those that fought, drowned and died there. It is designed to capture the imagination and feed the mind of those ever increasing number of people who seek a better understanding of The Great War.
1918: The Last Act

1918: The Last Act

Barrie Pitt

$49.99

By 1918, after three years of war, Europe was weary of the stalemate and the terrible slaughter on the Western Front. The Russian Front had collapsed but the United States had abandoned her neutral stance and joined the Allies. So the stage was set for what would be the last year of the Great War. Acclaimed military historian Barrie Pitt describes the savage battles that raged unceasingly along the Western front, and analyses the policies of the warring powers and studies the men who led them. From the German onslaught of 21st March 1918 - the Kaiser's Battle designed to force a resolution before America's armies could tip the balance - through the struggles in Champagne and the Second Battle of the Marne to the turning point in August and final victory, the author gathers together scattered material to make an enthralling book.
The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union

The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union

Luuk van Middelaar

$39.95

This essential book explains the origins of the European Union, the forces binding it together and driving it forward, and how political leaders will surmount the current economic turmoil. Drawing on long experience working behind the scenes, Luuk van Middelaar captures the day-to-day dynamics and illuminates the political and philosophical issues that shaped the EU's development, providing a gripping account of the realities of power politics and shedding fresh light on the present and future of European unification.
Tommy's War: The Western Front in Soldiers' Words and Photographs

Tommy's War: The Western Front in Soldiers' Words and Photographs

Richard Van Emden

$49.99

Conventional histories of the Great War have tended to focus on the terrible attritional battles of Ypres, of Arras and of the Somme. What they do not tell us is what life was like for the ordinary soldier, what mattered to him, and how he survived, both physically and mentally. Now for the first time, one of Britain's leading military historians, Richard van Emden tells the story of the Great War exclusively through the words and images of soldiers on the ground. In Tommy's War, he gathers some of the very best first-hand material written about the War, some of it published at the time and forgotten, some of it previously unpublished, but all of it wonderfully descriptive and immediate, and often wickedly funny. Tommy humour, frequently very dark, played a vital part in men's mental survival, particularly in times of great stress. Until now its critical role in victory has been overlooked. Richard van Emden restores the balance, giving weight to the soldiers' natural inclination to laugh during their darkest moments. Illustrating these eyewitness accounts with soldiers' own photographs taken on privately owned cameras, often tiny Vest Pocket Kodaks - the smart phones of their day - van Emden has created an entirely new and fresh history of the Great War, giving us a glimpse of 'Tommy Atkins' as he has never been seen before.
Walking the Retreat: The March to the Marne: 1914 Revisited

Walking the Retreat: The March to the Marne: 1914 Revisited

Terry Cudbird

$29.99

The opening month of the Great War ending in the Battle of the Marne (6-9 September 1914) was a turning point in modern history. The French and British armies were forced into a long retreat from Belgium but subsequently regrouped to mount a successful counter-attack. However, the miracle of the Marne, as it was later called, ended in the stalemate of the trenches. The failure of the Imperial German Army to achieve a decisive victory led to thirty years of hostility, warfare and destruction, which cost millions of lives. During the retreat to the Marne over a million soldiers marched 20 miles a day carrying 60-lb packs in temperatures above 30 degrees. They were often short of food and only managed short snatches of rest. They fought a series of engagements over two weeks which ended in a battle from the plains of Lorraine to the gates of Paris. This march tested them to the limits of endurance and beyond. In this book Terry Cudbird recreates the experience of the infantry during their gruelling journey. He describes his own August walk from southern Belgium to the battlefield, which followed the exact route taken by a French Lieutenant in the Fifth Army. He draws on a wide range of personal reminiscences, not only French but also British and German. He takes us back to the landscapes of Northern France in 1914 and explains how they have changed since that August one hundred years ago. He also reflects on the soldiers' origins and training, and their morale as they set out. This is not another military history but a unique evocation of the powers of endurance of ordinary soldiers. It will appeal to those interested in the history of the Great War, including readers who want to explore the route of the retreat for themselves.
The Spanish Armada

The Spanish Armada

Robert Hutchinson

$19.99

After the accession of Elizabeth I in 1558, Protestant England was beset by the hostile Catholic powers of Europe - not least Spain. In October 1585 King Philip II of Spain declared his intention to destroy Protestant England and began preparing invasion plans, leading to an intense intelligence war between the two countries, culminating in the dramatic sea battles of 1588. Robert Hutchinson's tautly written book is the first to examine this battle for intelligence, and uses everything from contemporary eye-witness accounts to papers held by the national archives in Spain and the UK to recount the dramatic battle that raged up the English Channel. Contrary to popular theory, the Armada was not defeated by superior English forces - in fact, Elizabeth I's parsimony meant that her ships had no munitions left by the time the Armada had fought its way up to the south coast of England. In reality it was a combination of inclement weather and bad luck that landed the killer blow on the Spanish forces, and of the 125 Spanish ships that set sail against England, only 60 limped home - the rest sunk or wrecked with barely a shot fired.
My Fellow Prisoners

My Fellow Prisoners

Mikhail Khodorkovsky

$12.99

There is the guard who delivers blows with no visible traces. The fraudster stitched up by the police for murder. The man who refuses to lie for a packet of cigarettes. The abandoned teenager, the down-and-out, the grass...He describes a hidden world of brutality and corruption, yet one where moments of humanity still manage to shine through. One in ten Russian men pass through prison at some point in their lives. This book is a denunciation of an entire system of bureaucratic criminality, and a passionate call to recognise a human tragedy.
Revolutionary Russia, 1891-1991: A Pelican Introduction

Revolutionary Russia, 1891-1991: A Pelican Introduction

Orlando Figes

$14.99

What caused the Russian Revolution? Did it succeed or fail? Do we still live with its consequences? Orlando Figes teaches history at Birkbeck, University of London and is the author of many acclaimed books on Russian history, including A People's Tragedy, which The Times Literary Supplement named as one of the '100 most influential books since the war', Natasha's Dance, The Whisperers, Crimea and Just Send Me Word. The Financial Times called him 'the greatest storyteller of modern Russian historians.'
Secret Lives of the Tsars: Three Centuries of Autocracy, Debauchery, Betrayal, Murder, and Madness from Romanov Russia

Secret Lives of the Tsars: Three Centuries of Autocracy, Debauchery, Betrayal, Murder, and Madness from Romanov Russia

Michael Farquhar

$32.99

Michael Farquhar doesn't write about history the way, say, Doris Kearns Goodwin does. He writes about history the way Doris Kearns Goodwin's smart-ass, reprobate kid brother might. I, for one, prefer it. --Gene Weingarten, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and Washington Post columnist Scandal! Intrigue! Cossacks! Here the world's most engaging royal historian chronicles the world's most fascinating imperial dynasty: the Romanovs, whose three-hundred-year reign was remarkable for its shocking violence, spectacular excess, and unimaginable venality. In this incredibly entertaining history, Michael Farquhar collects the best, most captivating true tales of Romanov iniquity. We meet Catherine the Great, with her endless parade of virile young lovers (none of them of the equine variety); her unhinged son, Paul I, who ordered the bones of one of his mother's paramours dug out of its grave and tossed into a gorge; and Grigori Rasputin, the Mad Monk, whose mesmeric domination of the last of the Romanov tsars helped lead to the monarchy's undoing. From Peter the Great's penchant for personally beheading his recalcitrant subjects (he kept the severed head of one of his mistresses pickled in alcohol) to Nicholas and Alexandra's brutal demise at the hands of the Bolsheviks, Secret Lives of the Tsars captures all the splendor and infamy that was Imperial Russia. Praise for Michael Farquhar's Behind the Palace Doors [A] rollicking account of kings and queens gone wild. -- People Farquhar's style is a breezy pleasure throughout. -- Publishers Weekly A terrifically accessible history. -- Kirkus Reviews
The Wrath of Cochise

The Wrath of Cochise

Terry Mort

$19.99

In February 1861, the twelve-year-old son of Arizona rancher John Ward was kidnapped by Apaches. Ward followed their trail and reported the incident to patrols at Fort Buchanan, blaming a band of Chiricahuas led by the infamous warrior Cochise. Though Ward had no proof that Cochise had kidnapped his son, Lt. George Bascom organized a patrol and met with the Apache leader, who, not suspecting anything was amiss, had brought along his wife, his brother, and two sons. Despite Cochise's assertions that he had not taken the boy and his offer to help in the search, Bascom immediately took Cochise's family hostage and demanded the return of the boy. An incensed Cochise escaped the meeting tent amidst flying bullets and vowed revenge.What followed that precipitous encounter would ignite a Southwestern frontier war between the Chiricahuas and the US Army that would last twenty-five years. In the days following the initial melee, innocent passersby-Apache, white, and Mexican - would be taken as hostages on both sides, and almost all of them would be brutally slaughtered. Cochise would lead his people valiantly for ten years of the decades-long war. Thousands of lives would be lost, the economies of Arizona and New Mexico would be devastated, and in the end, the Chiricahua way of life would essentially cease to exist. In a gripping narrative that often reads like an old-fashioned Western novel, Terry Mort explores the collision of these two radically different cultures in a masterful account of one of the bloodiest conflicts in American frontier history.
The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson

The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson

Chris Mackowski ,  Kristopher D White

$29.99

May 1863. The Civil War was in its third spring, and Confederate Lt. Gen. Thomas Jonathan Jackson stood at the peak of his fame. He had arisen from obscurity to become Old Stonewall, adored across the South and feared and respected throughout the North. On the night of May 2, however, just hours after Jackson executed the most audacious maneuver of his career and delivered a crushing blow against an unsuspecting Union army at Chancellorsville, disaster struck.The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson recounts the events of that fateful night considered one of the most pivotal moments of the war and the tense vigil that ensued as Jackson struggled with a foe even he could not defeat. From Guinea Station, where Jackson crosses the river to rest under the shade of the trees, the story follows Jackson s funeral and burial, the strange story of his amputated arm, and the creation and restoration of the building where he died (now known as the Stonewall Jackson Shrine). This newly revised and expanded second edition features more than 50 pages of fresh material, including almost 200 illustrations, maps, and eye-catching photos.New appendices allow readers to walk in Jackson s prewar footsteps through his adopted hometown of Lexington, Virginia; consider the ways Jackson s memory has been preserved through monuments, memorials, and myths; and explore the misconceptions behind the Civil War s great What-If: What if Stonewall had survived his wounds? With the engaging prose of master storytellers, Chris Mackowski and Kristopher White make The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson a must-read for Civil War novices and buffs alike.
Clinton, Inc: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine

Clinton, Inc: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine

Daniel Halper

$39.99

How did Bill and Hillary Clinton plot a comeback from the depths of disgrace to the pinnacle of American politics and the ranks of the global elite?Thirteen years ago, Bill and Hillary Clinton left the White House under a cloud, dogged by sordid sexual scandals, a series of highly compromising investigations, and last-minute pardons that won widespread bipartisan condemnation. Even many Democrats were glad to see them go. Yet within just a few years Bill had secured a new reputation as a global humanitarian and Democratic Party elder statesman, and Hillary was running for president. Despite her 2008 loss to Barack Obama, Hillary bounced back to become one of the most powerful and respected figures in his cabinet. Along the way, she and Bill have gone from being virtually penniless to millionaires many times over.Today the Clintons are among the most popular politicians in America--respected and feared by Republicans and Democrats alike. Their transformation has been so complete that it takes an effort to recall just how low their fortunes were a decade ago. Hillary is already the presumptive frontrunner for 2016, while Bill jets around the world dispensing advice, making deals and collecting huge fees. Meanwhile, Chelsea Clinton has emerged as a formidable public figure in her own right.None of this happened by accident. Behind the Clintons' remarkable comeback is an untold story of strategic calculation, backroom deals, reckless gambles, and an unquenchable thirst for wealth and power. In Clinton, Inc., Weekly Standard reporter Daniel Halper compiles a wealth of research, exclusive documents, and candid interviews with former Clinton administration officials, senators, congressmen, friends, allies, and former enemies of the Clintons to reveal how they rebuilt their reputations, reconstructed their political machine, and positioned themselves for even greater success. Clinton, Inc. describes in intimate detail how the Bill and Hillary partnership works: they are, in effect, dual CEOs of a single enterprise, often playing both sides of the street, sometimes at odds with each other, but always focused on the ultimate goal of reclaiming political power. Halper provides new insights into their deals with Barack Obama and the inner workings of their surprising friendship with the Bush family; how the Clintons managed to pacify their once most bitter enemies; how Bill and Hillary are laying the groundwork for Hillary's upcoming presidential campaign; and how Vice President Biden and other Democrats are trying to maneuver around her. He reveals the Clintons' plans for Chelsea's future and the lengths to which they will go to protect her carefully cultivated image. Halper also reveals the secrets of the Clintons' skillful media management, the survival of the Clintons' marriage, as well as the Clintons' financial backers and hidden corporate enterprises. The book also discusses a comprehensive Republican effort to bring their ambitions to a halt. Compulsively readable and filled with juicy scoops and inside information, Clinton, Inc. is the key to understanding America's most powerful political couple.
The Men Who United the States: The Amazing Stories of the Explorers, Inventors and Mavericks Who Made America

The Men Who United the States: The Amazing Stories of the Explorers, Inventors and Mavericks Who Made America

Simon Winchester

$24.99

From bestselling author Simon Winchester, the extraordinary story of how America was united into a single nation. For more than two centuries, E pluribus unum - out of many, one - has been featured on America's official government seals and stamped on its currency. But how did America become 'one nation, indivisible'? In this monumental history, Simon Winchester addresses this question, introducing the fearless trailblazers whose achievements forged and unified America. Winchester follows in the footsteps of America's most essential explorers, thinkers, and innovators. He treks vast swaths of territory, introducing these fascinating pioneers - some, such as Washington and Jefferson, Lewis and Clark being familiar, some forgotten, some hardly known - who played a pivotal role in creating today's United States. Throughout, he ponders whether the historic work of uniting the States has succeeded, and to what degree. 'The Men Who United the States' is a fresh, lively, and erudite look at the way in which the most powerful nation on earth came together, from one of our most entertaining, probing, and insightful observers.
Across the Pond: An Englishman's View of America

Across the Pond: An Englishman's View of America

Terry Eagleton

$18.95

Americans have long been fascinated with the oddness of the British but we, says literary critic Terry Eagleton, find our transatlantic neighbours just as strange. Only an alien race would admiringly refer to a colleague as aggressive , use superlatives to describe everything from one's pet dog to one's record collection or speak frequently of being empowered . And why must they remain so irritatingly optimistic, even when all signs point to failure? On his quirky journey through the language, geography and national character of the United States, Eagleton proves to be an informal and utterly idiosyncratic guide. He answers the questions we (being British) dare not ask, like why Americans willingly rise at the crack of dawn, even on Sundays or why they publicly chastise cigarette smokers as if they're all spokespeople for the surgeon general. In this pithy, warm-hearted and very funny book, Eagleton melds a good old-fashioned roast with genuine admiration for his neighbours across the pond .
This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!--In America's Gilded Capital

This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!--In America's Gilded Capital

Mark Leibovich

$19.99

Hailed as vastly entertaining and deeply troubling ( The New York Times Book Review ), as insidery as Game Change ( The Washington Post ), and a hysterically funny portrait of the capital's vanities and ambitions ( The New Yorker ), This Town captured America's attention as the political book of 2013. With a new Afterword by author Mark Leibovich, the book that is changing the national conversation about Washington is available in a stunning new edition. Washington, D.C., might be loathed from every corner of the nation, yet these are fun and busy days at this nexus of big politics, big money, big media, and big vanity. There are no Democrats and Republicans anymore in the nation's capital, just millionaires. In This Town, Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, presents a blistering, stunning--and often hysterically funny-- examination of our ruling class's incestuous media industrial complex. Through his eyes, we discover how the funeral for a beloved newsman becomes the social event of the year. How political reporters are fetishized for their ability to get their names into the predawn e-mail sent out by the city's most powerful and puzzled-over journalist. How a disgraced Hill aide can overcome ignominy and maybe emerge with a more potent brand than many elected members of Congress. And how an administration bent on changing Washington can be sucked into the ways of This Town with the same ease with which Tea Party insurgents can, once elected, settle into it like a warm bath. Outrageous, fascinating, and very necessary, This Town is a must-read, whether you're inside the Beltway--or just trying to get there.
James Madison: A Life Reconsidered

James Madison: A Life Reconsidered

Lynne Cheney

$39.99

This majestic new biography of James Madison explores the astonishing story of a man of vaunted modesty who audaciously changed the world. Among the Founding Fathers, Madison was a true genius of the early republic. Outwardly reserved, Madison was the intellectual driving force behind the Constitution and crucial to its ratification. His visionary political philosophy and rationale for the union of states-so eloquently presented in The Federalist papers-helped shape the country Americans live in today.
When Britain Burned the White House: The 1814 Invasion of Washington

When Britain Burned the White House: The 1814 Invasion of Washington

Peter Snow

$22.99

As heard on BBC Radio 4's Book of the Week. Shortlisted for the Paddy Power Political History Book of the Year Award 2014. In August 1814 the United States' army is defeated in battle by an invading force just outside Washington DC. The US president and his wife have just enough time to pack their belongings and escape from the White House before the enemy enters. The invaders tuck into the dinner they find still sitting on the dining-room table and then set fire to the place. 9/11 was not the first time the heartland of the United States was struck a devastating blow by outsiders. Two centuries earlier, Britain - now America's close friend, then its bitterest enemy - set Washington ablaze before turning its sights to Baltimore. In his compelling narrative style, Peter Snow recounts the fast-changing fortunes of both sides of this extraordinary confrontation, the outcome of which inspired the writing of the 'Star-Spangled Banner', America's national anthem. Using a wealth of material including eyewitness accounts, he also describes the colourful personalities on both sides of these spectacular events: Britain's fiery Admiral Cockburn, the cautious but immensely popular army commander Robert Ross, and sharp-eyed diarists James Scott and George Gleig. On the American side: beleaguered President James Madison, whose young nation is fighting the world's foremost military power, his wife Dolley, a model of courage and determination, military heroes such as Joshua Barney and Sam Smith, and flawed incompetents like Army Chief William Winder and War Secretary John Armstrong. When Britain Burned the White House highlights this unparalleled moment in American history, its far-reaching consequences for both sides and Britain's and America's decision never again to fight each other.
American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love and Politics

American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love and Politics

Dan Savage

$19.99

In American Savage, Dan Savage addresses a broad range of controversial topics with his signature honesty and irreverent humor, including: why Obamacare, as good as it is, is 'still kinda evil'; why straight people should have straight 'pride' parades too; why public school sex-ed is more like 'sex dread' and why the Bible is 'only as good and decent as the person reading it'. This widely acclaimed book cements Savage's place as an important voice in popular culture.
American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction

American Slavery: A Very Short Introduction

Heather Andrea Williams

$14.95

Europeans, Africans, and American Indians practiced slavery long before the first purchase of a captive African by a white land-owner in the American colonies; that, however, is the image of slavery most prevalent in the minds of Americans today. This Very Short Introduction begins with the Portuguese capture of Africans in the 1400s and traces the development of American slavery until its abolition following the Civil War. Historian Heather Andrea Williams draws upon the rich recent scholarship of numerous highly-regarded academics as well as an analysis of primary documents to explore the history of slavery and its effects on the American colonies and later the United States of America. Williams examines legislation that differentiated American Indians and Africans from Europeans as the ideology of white supremacy flourished and became an ingrained feature of the society. These laws reflected the contradiction of America's moral and philosophical ideology that valorized freedom on one hand and justified the enslavement of a population deemed inferior on another. She explores the tense and often violent relationships between the enslaved and the enslavers, and between abolitionists and pro-slavery advocates as those who benefited from the institution fought to maintain and exert their power. Williams is attentive to the daily labors that enslaved people performed, reminding readers that slavery was a system of forced labor with economic benefits that produced wealth for a new nation, all the while leaving an indelible mark on its history.
Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality

Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality

Jo Becker

$29.99

[A] riveting legal drama, a snapshot in time, when the gay rights movement altered course and public opinion shifted with the speed of a bullet train... Becker's most remarkable accomplishment is to weave a spellbinder of a tale that, despite a finale reported around the world, manages to keep readers gripped until the very end. -- The Washington Post A tour de force of groundbreaking reportage by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jo Becker, Forcing the Spring is the definitive account of five remarkable years in American civil rights history: when the United States experienced a tectonic shift on the issue of marriage equality. Beginning with the historical legal challenge of California's ban on same-sex marriage, Becker expands the scope to encompass all aspects of this momentous struggle, offering a gripping behind-the-scenes narrative told with the lightning pace of the greatest legal thrillers. For nearly five years, Becker was given free rein in the legal and political war rooms where the strategy of marriage equality was plotted. She takes us inside the remarkable campaign that rebranded a movement; into the Oval Office where the president and his advisors debated how to respond to a fast-changing political landscape; into the chambers of the federal judges who decided that today's bans on same-sex marriage were no more constitutional than the previous century's bans on interracial marriage; and into the mindsets of the Supreme Court judges who decided the California case and will likely soon decide the issue for the country at large. From the state-by state efforts to win marriage equality at the ballot box to the landmark Supreme Court case that struck down a law that banned legally married gay and lesbian couples from receiving federal benefits, Becker weaves together the political and legal forces that reshaped a nation. Forcing the Spring begins with California's controversial ballot initiative Proposition 8, which banned gay men and lesbians from marrying the person they loved. This electoral defeat galvanized an improbable alliance of opponents to the ban, with political operatives and Hollywood royalty enlisting attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies--the opposing counsels in the Supreme Court's Bush v. Gore case--to join together in a unique bipartisan challenge to the political status quo. Despite stiff initial opposition from the gay rights establishment, the case against Proposition 8 would ultimately force the issue of marriage equality all the way to the Supreme Court, transforming same-sex marriage from a partisan issue into a modern crisis of civil rights. Based on singular access to the internal workings of this momentous trial--and enlivened by original interviews with the participants on both sides of the case, many speaking for the first time-- Forcing the Spring is at once an emotion-packed tale of love and determination as well as an eye-opening examination of an evidentiary record that federal courts across the nation are now relying on to strike down bans similar to California's. Shuttling between the twin American power centers of Hollywood and Washington--and based on access to all the key players in the Justice Department and the White House--Becker offers insider coverage on the true story of how President Obama evolved to embrace marriage equality, his surprising role in the Supreme Court battle, and the unexpected way the controversial issue played in the 2012 elections. What starts out as a tale of an epic legal battle grows into the story of the evolution of a country, a testament and old-fashioned storytelling to move public opinion. Becker shows how the country reexamined its opinions on same-sex marriage, an issue that raced along with a snowballing velocity which astounded veteran political operatives, as public opinion on same-sex marriage flipped and elected officials repositioned themselves to adjust to a dramatically changed environment. Forcing the Spring is the ringside account of this unprecedented change, the fastest shift in public opinion ever seen in modern American politics. Clear-eyed and even-handed, Forcing the Spring is political and legal journalism at its finest, offering an unvarnished perspective on the extraordinary transformation of America and an inside look into the fight to win the rights of marriage and full citizenship for all. The New York Times Book Review A stunningly intimate story... Maybe because she's such a versatile reporter, Becker saw the big picture. The fight for marriage equality did not end in a total victory on the Supreme Court steps but triumphed in a higher court, the court of public opinion. It may not be the story she set out to tell, but it's a great one nonetheless. Publishers Weekly (STARRED) An engaging narrative... a thorough, perceptive read... the book stands testament to good political writing and a wealth of information made alive through prose. *** Forcing the Spring offers a thrilling perspective on the landmark Supreme Court case Hollingsworth v. Perry depicted in the HBO film The Case Against 8 and David Boies and Theodore B. Olson's Redeeming the Dream ***
The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps

The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps

Michael Blanding

$32.99

Once considered a respectable rare-map dealer, E. Forbes Smiley made millions and was highly esteemed for his knowledge; until he was arrested for slipping maps out of books in the Yale University library. Though pieces of the story have been told before, Blanding is the first reporter to gain access to Smiley himself after he'd gone silent. Although Smiley swears he has admitted to all of the maps he stole, libraries claim he stole hundreds more, and offer evidence to prove it. Now, through a series of exclusive interviews, Blanding teases out the whole story.
The Scorpion's Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War

The Scorpion's Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War

James Oakes

$30.95

An award-winning historian lays the foundation fora fresh account of slavery, abolition, and the Civil War.
Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York

Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York

Professor of History and Law Ted Steinberg (Case Western Reserve University) ,  Professor of History and Law Ted Steinberg (Case Western Reserve University)

$38.99

This is the story of the monumental struggle between New York and the natural world. From Henry Hudson's discovery of Mannahatta to Hurricane Sandy, Gotham Unbound is Ted Steinberg's sweeping ecological history of one of the most man-made spots on earth. Here is a tale of the world with us --lots of us--a groundbreaking book that recounts the four-century history of how hundreds of square miles of open marshlands became home to six percent of the nation's population. Steinberg vividly brings a vanished New York back to life. You will see the metropolitan area anew, not just as a dense urban goliath but as an estuary once home to miles of oyster reefs, wolves, whales, and blueberry bog thickets. That world gave way to an onslaught managed by thousands, from Governor John Montgomerie, who turned water into land, and John Randel, who imposed a grid on Manhattan, to Robert Moses, Charles Urstadt, Donald Trump, and Michael Bloomberg. This book is a powerful account of the relentless development that New Yorkers wrought as they plunged headfirst into the floodplain and transformed untold amounts of salt marsh and shellfish beds into a land jam-packed with people, asphalt and steel, and the reeds and gulls that thrive among them. With metropolitan areas across the globe on a collision course with rising seas, Gotham Unbound is a penetrating history that helps explain how one of the most important cities in the world wound up in such a perilous situation.
Waterloo: A New History of the Battle and its Armies

Waterloo: A New History of the Battle and its Armies

Gordon Corrigan

$59.99

Fought on Sunday 18 June 1815 by some 220,000 men over rain-sodden ground in what is now Belgium, the Battle of Waterloo brought an end to twenty-three years of almost continual war between revolutionary and later imperial France and her enemies. A decisive defeat for Napoleon and a hard-won victory for the Allied armies of the Duke of Wellington and the Prussians led by the stalwart Blucher, it brought about the French emperor's final exile to St Helena and cleared the way for Britain to become the dominant world power. A former soldier, Gordon Corrigan is the author of an acclaimed military biography of Wellington and has walked the battlefields of the Napoleonic era many times. He is perfectly placed to offer a robust, clear and gripping account of the campaign that surveys the wider military scene before moving on to the actions at Quatre Bras and Ligny and then the final, set-piece confrontation at Waterloo itself. He is also well qualified to explore, often in fascinating detail, the relative strengths and frailties of the very different armies involved - French, British, Dutch, Prussian and German - of their various arms - infantry, artillery and cavalry - and of their men, officers and, above all, their commanders. Wellington remarked that the Waterloo was 'a damned nice thing', 'nice' meaning uncertain or finely balanced. He was right. For his part, Napoleon reckoned 'the English are bad troops and this affair is nothing more than eating breakfast'. He was wrong, and this splendid book proves just how wrong.
Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London and the Birth of the Modern City

Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London and the Birth of the Modern City

Jonathan Conlin

$22.99

Paris and London have long held a mutual fascination, and never more so than in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when they both vied to be the world's greatest city. Each city has been the focus of many books, yet here Jonathan Conlin uncovers the intriguing relationship between them for the first time. It is a history of surprises: Sherlock Holmes was actually French, the can-can was English and the first restaurant served English food in Paris. Tales of Two Cities examines and compares six urban spaces - the street, the cemetery, the apartment, the restaurant, the music hall and the nocturnal underworld. The citizens of Paris and London were the first to create these landmarks of the modern cityscape. By borrowing, imitating and learning from each other they invented the modern metropolis and so defined urban living for us all.
Rivers of Gold, Lives of Bondage: Governing Through Slavery in Colonial Quito

Rivers of Gold, Lives of Bondage: Governing Through Slavery in Colonial Quito

Sherwin K Bryant

$78.55  $70.70

In this pioneering study of slavery in colonial Ecuador and southern Colombia--Spain's Kingdom of Quito--Sherwin K. Bryant argues that the most fundamental dimension of slavery was governance and the extension of imperial power. Bryant shows that enslaved black captives were foundational to sixteenth-century royal claims on the Americas and elemental to the process of Spanish colonization. Following enslaved Africans from their arrival at the Caribbean port of Cartagena through their journey to Quito, Bryant explores how they lived during their captivity, formed kinships and communal affinities, and pressed for justice within a slave-based Catholic sovereign community.In Cartagena, officials branded African captives with the royal insignia and gave them a Catholic baptism, marking slaves as projections of royal authority and majesty. By licensing and governing Quito's slave trade, the Crown claimed sovereignty over slavery, new territories, natural resources, and markets. By adjudicating slavery, royal authorities claimed to govern not only slaves but other colonial subjects as well. Expanding the diaspora paradigm beyond the Atlantic, Bryant's history of the Afro-Andes in the early modern world suggests new answers to the question, what is a slave?
Netsuke: 100 Miniature Masterpieces from Japan

Netsuke: 100 Miniature Masterpieces from Japan

Noriko Tsuchiya

$29.99

Netsuke have once again come to the fore in the popular imagination of the public. In part this is due to the phenomenal success of Edmund De Waals 2010 book, Hare with the Amber Eyes, which highlights a treasured netsuke collection that was challenged by war and the vicissitudes of time. Intricately carved from various materials including ivory, wood and metal, these small toggles served a practical purpose in Japan: a netsuke was used to fasten a mans sash, an integral part of Japanese costume. Up until the seventeenth century netsuke were relatively insignificant objects that were rarely of artistic interest, but as time passed they evolved in terms of both materials and workmanship, and were then used by men to flaunt their wealth or as an expression of status. Today netsuke are considered an art form in their own right and are prized by collectors around the world. They are found in a variety of forms and depict a wide range of subjects including figures of human and legendary form, ghosts, animals, botanical subjects and masks. Skilfully worked, these miniature carvings are of great artistic value, but they also provide a window into Japanese culture and society. This book brings together one hundred of the most beautiful and interesting netsuke from the extensive collection of the British Museum, each of which has its own special charm and story to tell. Uncovering the stories behind these netsuke and coupling them with stunning new photography, this book reveals why these tiny objects have captivated so many, the meaning they have held for those who wore them, and what they can tell us about Japanese everyday life.
Bannockburn: Scotland's Greatest Victory

Bannockburn: Scotland's Greatest Victory

Peter Reese

$22.99

1314. On a marsh-fringed plain south of Stirling Castle, King Robert the Bruce led the Scottish army in a singularly devastating victory over the English. Bannockburn was Scotland's greatest battlefield triumph, achieved against the odds by a combination of brilliant tactical leadership and the fatal overconfidence of the English King, Edward II. On the 700th anniversary of the battle, Peter Reese's definitive history shines a spotlight on this pivotal moment in Scottish History and considers the wider implications of this momentous victory.
A People's History of Scotland

A People's History of Scotland

Chris Bambery

$32.99

A People's History of Scotland looks beyond the kings and queens, the battles and bloody defeats of the past. It captures the history that matters today, stories of freedom fighters, suffragettes, the workers of Red Clydeside, and the hardship and protest of the treacherous Thatcher era. With riveting storytelling, Chris Bambery recounts the struggles for nationhood. He charts the lives of Scots who changed the world, as well as those who fought for the cause of ordinary people at home, from the poets Robbie Burns and Hugh MacDiarmid to campaigners such as John Maclean and Helen Crawfurd. This is a passionate cry for more than just independence but also for a nation based on social justice.
Robert the Bruce: King of Scots

Robert the Bruce: King of Scots

Ronald McNair Scott ,  Peter Reese

$22.99

Robert the Bruce had himself crowned King of Scots at Scone on a frozen March morning in 1306. After years of struggle, Scotland had been reduced to a vassal state by Edward I of England and its people lived in poverty. On the day he seized the crown Bruce renewed the fight for Scotland's freedom, and let forth a battle cry that would echo through the centuries. Using contemporary accounts, Ronald McNair Scott tells the story of Scotland's legendary leader, and one of Europe's most remarkable medieval kings. It is a story with episodes as romantic as those of King Arthur, but also one which belongs in the annals of Scottish History, and has shaped a nation.
Pink Sari Revolution: A Tale of Women and Power in the Badlands of India

Pink Sari Revolution: A Tale of Women and Power in the Badlands of India

Amana Fontanella-Khan

$19.99

Sampat Pal was married at twelve, essentially illiterate. Today she leads a vigilante group fighting for women's rights: the Pink Gang. When Sheelu was arrested for stealing from a powerful politician, she was sure that she would be forced to accept a prison sentence, not least because she alleged that she had been abused b y a man in the politician's household. But then Sampat Pal heard word of the charges, and the formidable commander of the pink-sari-wearing, pink-baton-wielding, 20,000-strong 'Pink Gang' decided to shake things up. In the story of Sampat Pal and the Pink Gang's fight for Sheelu, as well as others facing injustice and oppression, Amana Fontanella-Khan delivers a riveting portrait of women grabbing fate with their own hands - and winning back their lives.
Edward Gibbon and the Shape of History

Edward Gibbon and the Shape of History

Charlotte Roberts

$96.95

Edward Gibbon's presentation of character in both the History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and in his posthumously published Memoirs demonstrates a prevailing interest in the values of transcendent heroism and individual liberty, but also an insistent awareness of the dangers these values pose to coherence and narrative order. In this study, Charlotte Roberts demonstrates how these dynamics also inform the 'character' of the Decline and Fall: in which ironic difference confronts enervating uniformity; oddity counters specious lucidity; and revision combats repetition. Edward Gibbon and the Shape of History explores the Decline and Fall as a work of scholarship and of literature, tracing both its expansive outline and its expressive details. A close examination of each of the three instalments of Gibbon's history reveals an intimate relationship between the style of Gibbon's narrative and the overall shape of his historiographical composition. The constant interplay between style and substance, or between the particular details of composition and the larger patterns of argument and narrative, informs every aspect of Gibbon's work: from his reception of established and innovative historiographical conventions to the expression of his narrative voice. Through a combination of close reading and larger literary and scholarly analysis, Charlotte Roberts conveys a sense of the Decline and Fall as a work more complex and conflicted, in its tone and structure, than has been appreciated by previous scholars, without losing sight of the grand contours of Gibbon's superlative achievement.
Hess, Hitler and Churchill: The Real Turning Point of the Second World War - A Secret History

Hess, Hitler and Churchill: The Real Turning Point of the Second World War - A Secret History

Peter Padfield

$22.99

When Hitler's deputy Rudolf Hess set off for Britain on a peace mission in May 1941, he launched one of the great mysteries of the Second World War. Had he really acted alone, without Hitler's knowledge? Who were the British he had come to see? Was British intelligence involved? Award-winning historian Peter Padfield presents striking new evidence that demands the wholesale reappraisal of the episode. For, allied to a powerful argument that Hess must have had both Hitler's backing and considerable encouragement from Britain, Padfield demonstrates that he also brought with him a draft peace treaty committing Hitler to the evacuation of occupied European countries. Made public, this would have destroyed Churchill's campaign to bring the United States into the war. Expertly woven into a compelling narrative that touches on Lord (Victor) Rothschild and the Cambridge spy ring, possible British foreknowledge of Operation Barbarossa and the 'final solution', MI6's use of Hess to prevent the bombing of London and the mysterious circumstances of his death in Spandau prison - including the previously unseen witness accounts from that day - Hess, Hitler and Churchill is among the most important history books of recent years.
Guarding the Fuhrer: Sepp Dietrich, Johann Rattenhuber, and the Protection of Adolf Hitler

Guarding the Fuhrer: Sepp Dietrich, Johann Rattenhuber, and the Protection of Adolf Hitler

Blaine Taylor

$39.99

German leader Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) was one of the most controversial politicians and military commanders in all recorded history. As such, his life was conspired against by all manner of enemies, both foreign and domestic: German and Russian Communists, political and military opponents, rival Nazi leaders, and the intelligence services of the Allied powers, among them the British SOE. Dozens of attempts were made on his life over the course of two decades, including a bomb explosion in his own headquarters- and yet, he survived them all. This is the story of how he did so, as told via the exciting sagas of Sepp Dietrich and his SS, as well as of German government security leader Johann Rattenhuber and his Reich Security Service, the RSD. Here we see the measures used to protect Hitler in public, his cars, planes, trains, homes, military headquarters scattered across conquered Europe, and during personal appearances. Ironically, of course, in the end Hitler decided to take his own life in the infamous Berlin bunker, but this is the story of how a man that so many people wanted dead managed to stay alive for so long in volatile circumstances.
When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-44

When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-44

Ronald Rosbottom

$32.99

In May and June 1940 almost four million people fled Paris and its suburbs in anticipation of a German invasion. On June 14, the German Army tentatively entered the silent and eerily empty French capital. Without one shot being fired in its defence, the Occupation of Paris had begun. When Paris Went Dark tells the extraordinary story of Germany's capture and Occupation of Paris, Hitler's relationship with the City of Light, and its citizens' attempts at living in an environment that was almost untouched by war, but which had become uncanny overnight. Beginning with the Phoney War and Hitler's first visit to the city, acclaimed literary historian and critic Ronald Rosbottom takes us through the German Army's almost unopposed seizure of Paris, its bureaucratic re-organization of that city, with the aid of collaborationist Frenchmen, and the daily adjustments Parisians had to make to this new oppressive presence. Using memoirs, interviews and published eye-witness accounts, Rosbottom expertly weaves a narrative of daily life for both the Occupier and the Occupied. He shows its effects on the Parisian celebrity circles of Pablo Picasso, Simone de Beauvoir, Colette, Jean Cocteau, and Jean-Paul Sartre, and on the ordinary citizens of its twenty arrondissements. But Paris is the protagonist of this story, and Rosbottom provides us with a template for seeing the City of Light as more than a place of pleasure and beauty.
Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth and Faith in the New China

Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth and Faith in the New China

Evan Osnos

$34.99

A young army captain who risked execution to swim from free-market Taiwan to Communist China. A barber who made $150 million in the gambling dens of Macau. The richest woman in China, a recycling tycoon known as the 'Wastepaper Queen'. Age of Ambition describes some of the billion individual lives that make up China's story - one that unfolds on remote farms, in glittering mansions, and in the halls of power of the world's largest authoritarian regime. Together they describe the defining clash taking place today: between the individual and the Communist Party's struggle to retain control. Here is a China infused with a sense of boundless possibility and teeming romance. Yet it is also riven by contradictions. It is the world's largest buyer of Rolls Royces and Ferraris yet the word 'luxury' is banned from billboards. It has more Christians than members of the Communist Party. And why does a government that has lifted more people from poverty than any other so strictly restrain freedom of expression? Based on years of research, Age of Ambition is a stunning narrative that reveals China as we have never understood it before.
The Emergence of Modern Afghanistan: Politics of Reform and Modernization

The Emergence of Modern Afghanistan: Politics of Reform and Modernization

Vartan Gregorian

$78.40  $70.55

Long heralded as a seminal work on the history of Afghanistan, this book traces the evolution of the modern Afghan state by studying the politics of reform and modernization that started in 1880 through World War II. In this reissue, Vartan Gregorian offers a new introduction that places the key themes of the book in the context of contemporary events, addressing questions of tribalism, nationalism, Islam, and modernization, as well as the legacies of the Cold War and the various exit strategies of occupying powers. The book remains as distinctive today as when it was first published. It is the only broad work on Afghan history that considers ethnicity as the defining influence over the course of the country's history, rather than religion. In light of today's ongoing struggle to develop a coherent national identity, the question of Afghan nationalism remains a particularly significant issue.
English History: Strange But True

English History: Strange But True

Richard Smyth

$17.99

This book is a treasure trove of English oddities, crammed with the most curious stories, remarkable facts and unexpected goings-on from the country's long and convoluted history. From frogs' legs at Stonehenge to knicker elastic in the Blitz, this is England - the unauthorised biography.
Crown of Thistles: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary Queen of Scots

Crown of Thistles: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary Queen of Scots

Linda Porter

$19.99

The struggle between the fecund Stewarts and the barren Tudors is generally seen only in terms of the relationship between Elizabeth I and her cousin, Mary Queen of Scots. But very little has been said about the background to their intense rivalry. Here, Linda Porter examines the ancient and intractable power struggle between England and Scotland, a struggle intensified during the reigns of Elizabeth and Mary's grandfathers. Henry VII aimed to provide stability when he married his daughter, Margaret, to James IV of Scotland in 1503. But he must also have known that Margaret's descendants might seek to rule the entire island. Crown of Thistles is the story of a divided family, of flamboyant kings and queens, cultured courts and tribal hatreds, blood feuds, rape and sexual licence on a breath-taking scale, and violent deaths. It also brings alive a neglected aspect of British history - the blood-spattered steps of two small countries on the fringes of Europe towards an awkward unity that would ultimately forge a great nation. Beginning with the unlikely and dramatic victories of two usurping kings, one a rank outsider and the other a fourteen-year-old boy who rebelled against his own father, the book sheds new light on Henry VIII, his daughter, Elizabeth, and on his great-niece, Mary Queen of Scots, still seductive more than 400 years after her death.
The Perilous Question: The Drama of the Great Reform Bill 1832

The Perilous Question: The Drama of the Great Reform Bill 1832

Antonia Fraser

$19.99

Internationally bestselling historian Antonia Fraser's new book brilliantly evokes one year of pre-Victorian political and social history - the passing of the Great Reform Bill of 1832. For our inconclusive times, there is an attractive resonance with 1832, with its 'rotten boroughs' of Old Sarum and the disappearing village of Dunwich, and its lines of most resistance to reform. This book is character-driven - on the one hand, the reforming heroes are the Whig aristocrats Lord Grey, Lord Althorp and Lord John Russell, and the Irish orator Daniel O'Connell. They included members of the richest and most landed Cabinet in history, yet they were determined to bring liberty, which whittled away their own power, to the country. The all-too-conservative opposition comprised Lord Londonderry, the Duke of Wellington, the intransigent Duchess of Kent and the consort of the Tory King William IV, Queen Adelaide. Finally, there were 'revolutionaries' and reformers, like William Cobbett, the author of RURAL RIDES. This is a book that features one eventful year, much of it violent. There were riots in Bristol, Manchester and Nottingham, and wider themes of Irish and 'negro emancipation' underscore the narrative. The time-span of the book is from Wellington's intractable declaration in November 1830 that 'The beginning of reform is the beginning of revolution', to 7th June 1832, the date of the extremely reluctant royal assent by William IV to the Great Reform Bill, under the double threat of the creation of 60 new peers in the House of Lords and the threat of revolution throughout the country. These events led to a total change in the way Britain was governed, a two-year revolution that Antonia Fraser brings to vivid dramatic life.
Henry VIII and His Six Wives: A Guide to Historic Tudor Sites

Henry VIII and His Six Wives: A Guide to Historic Tudor Sites

Peter Bramley

$34.99

A greatly romanticised era of history, the Tudor period kick-started one of the most significant shifts in British culture ever to occur. When the notorious Henry VIII began his hunt for a male heir it led to momentous changes: the British Crown breaking with Rome, the Reformation and the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Of the six wives Henry wed successively, two were executed - a chilling first in English history. From these tumultuous events an incredible number of historic sites linked to the Tudors survive, accessible now through this beautifully illustrated book. Here Peter Bramley has arranged the surviving sites by region, covering England and some of Europe. With directions to each site, along with full details of the Tudor events and personalities linked to them, this guidebook will bring life and colour to the study of history.
Queen Victoria: A Life of Contradictions

Queen Victoria: A Life of Contradictions

Matthew Dennison

$19.99

A fresh, witty, accessible life of Queen Victoria. Not since Lytton Strachey has the irony, contradictions and influence of this Queen been treated with such flourish or biographical insight. Reigning over a lifetime, Queen Victoria embodied the spirit of the contradictory era to which she lent her name. She championed modern art and photography but resisted education for the working classes and woman's suffrage; she advocated cultural imperialism, tempered by imperial compassion; in her deference to her husband Prince Albert and her protracted mourning of his death, she combined wifely submission with regal obstinacy. Original and accessible, 'Queen Victoria' is a compelling assessment of the ruler's mercurial character, her key relationships and her impact on her own age and beyond.
The Warship Mary Rose: The Life & Times of King Henry VIII's Flagship

The Warship Mary Rose: The Life & Times of King Henry VIII's Flagship

David Childs

$49.99

This new paperback edition brings the history of Henry VIII's famous warship right up to date with new chapters on the stunning presentation of the hull and the 19,000 salvaged artefacts in the new museum in Portsmouth. Mary Rose has, along with HMS Victory, become an instantly recognisable symbol of Britain's maritime past, while the extraordinary richness of the massive collection of artefacts gleaned from the wreck has meant that the ship has acquired the status of some sort of 'time capsule', as if it were a Tudor burial site. But she is much more than an archaeological relic; she was a warship, and a revolutionary one, that served in the King's navy for thirty-four years, almost the entire length of his reign. This book tells the story of her eventful career, placing it firmly within the colourful context of Tudor politics, court life and the developing administration of a permanent navy. And though the author also brings the story right down to the present day, with chapters on the recovery, the fresh ideas and information thrown up by the massive programme of archaeological work since undertaken, and the new display just recently opened at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, it is at heart a vivid retelling of her career and, at the end, her dramatic sinking. With this fine narrative and the beautiful illustrations the book will appeal to the historian and enthusiast, and also to the general reader and museum visitor.
Great War Britain: The First World War at Home

Great War Britain: The First World War at Home

Lucinda Gosling

$59.99

The declaration of war in August 1914 was to change Britain and British society irrevocably as conflict came to dominate almost every aspect of civilian life for the next four years. Popular weekly magazines such as The Tatler, The Sketch and The Queen, recorded the national preoccupations of the time and in particular, the upper-class experience of war. Targeted at a well-heeled, largely female audience, these magazines were veteran reporters of aristocratic balls, the latest Parisian fashions and society engagements, but quickly adapted to war-like conditions without ever quite losing their gossipy essence. Fashion soon found itself jostling for position with items on patriotic fundraising, and Court presentations were replaced by notes on nursing convalescent soldiers. The result is a fascinating, at times amusing and uniquely feminine perspective of life on the home front during the First World War.
Queen Anne: Patroness of Arts

Queen Anne: Patroness of Arts

James Anderson Winn

$47.95

As the last Stuart monarch, Queen Anne (1665-1714) received the education thought proper for a princess, reading plays and poetry in English and French while learning dancing, singing, acting, drawing, and instrumental music. As an adult, she played the guitar and the harpsichord, danced regularly, and took a connoisseur's interest in all the arts. In this comprehensive interdisciplinary biography, James Winn tells the story of Anne's life in new breadth and detail, and in unprecedented cultural context. Winn shows how poets, painters, and musicians used the works they made for Anne to send overt and covert political messages to the queen, the court, the church, and Parliament. Their works also illustrates the pathos of Anne's personal life: the loss of her mother when she was six, her troubled relations with her father and her sister, James II and Mary II, and her own doomed efforts to produce an heir. Her eighteen pregnancies produced only one child who lived past infancy; his death at the age of eleven, mourned by poets, was a blow from which Anne never fully recovered. Her close friendship with Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, a topic of scabrous ballads and fictions, ended in bitter discord; the death of her husband in 1708 left her emotionally isolated; and the wrangling among her chief ministers hastened her death. Richly illustrated with visual and musical examples, Queen Anne draws on works by a wide array of artists - among them composer George Frideric Handel, the poet Alexander Pope, the painter Godfrey Kneller, and the architect Christopher Wren - to shed new light on Anne's life and reign. This is the definitive biography of Queen Anne.
Crime and Punishment in Victorian London: A Street-Level View of  the City's Underworld

Crime and Punishment in Victorian London: A Street-Level View of the City's Underworld

Ross Gilfillan

$59.99

'Crime loomed large in the minds of Victorian Londoners. All over the city, watches, purses and handkerchiefs disappear from pockets, goods migrate from warehouses, off docks and out of shop windows. Burglaries are rife, shoplifting is carried on in West End stores and people fall victim to all kinds of ingenious swindles. 'Pornographers proliferate and an estimated 80,000 prostitutes operate on London's streets. The vulnerable are robbed in dark alleys or garroted, a new kind of mugging in which the victim is half-strangled from behind while being stripped of his possessions...' Discover Victorian London's grimy rookeries, home to thousands of the city's poorest and most desperate residents. Explore the crime-ridden slums, flash houses and gin palaces from a unique street-level view and meet the people who inhabited them. Ross Gilfillan uncovers London's lost criminal past in this fascinating account of nineteenth century low-life. Come face to face with pickpockets snatching pocket watches; pornographers peddling guides to lewd London; swindlers deluding the unwary and murderers whose deeds made the headlines and shocked their readers; right through to the consequences of their crimes - prison, transportation, or the gallows!
Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific

Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific

Robert D. Kaplan

$32.99

From Robert D. Kaplan, named one of the world's Top 100 Global Thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine, comes a penetrating look at the volatile region that will dominate the future of geopolitical conflict.
Ufos: God's Chariots?: Spirituality, Ancient Aliens, and Religious Yearnings in the Age of Extraterrestrials

Ufos: God's Chariots?: Spirituality, Ancient Aliens, and Religious Yearnings in the Age of Extraterrestrials

Ted Peters

$25.99

Are UFOs celestial saviours, coming to save Earth from self-destruction? Are UFOnauts advancing human evolution by birthing hybrid children? Is it time for a new astrotheology that enshrines the UFO phenomenon at the same level as the space sciences at NASA and SETI? UFOS: GOD'S CHARIOTS? uncovers and exposes the clandestine spiritual dimensions within the UFO phenomenon. UFOs vibrate with transcendence, omniscience, perfection and redemption. UFOS: GOD'S CHARIOTS? delves deeply into government conspiracies, analyses the newest models of close encounter interpretation and reveals the results of The Peters ETI Religious Crisis Survey, in which self-identified believers were asked if making contact with an intelligent extraterrestrial civilisation would undermine our historic religious traditions. They said no. Does this mean we're ready to share our pews with aliens?
South Africa

South Africa

Alexander Johnston

$39.99

This book is an exploration of nation-building in post-apartheid South Africa. Sandy Johnston tracks the rise of the ANC and the idea of nationalism to the 'critical moment' of 1990-1994 when the end of communism and the cold war triggered an ethno-nationalist resurgence. He then explores the place nationalism inhabits in the 'new' South Africa, asking whether there is such a thing as the South African nation at all. In doing so, he investigates both the political framework of constitution and competing agendas and the cultural context of language, memory and identity.
Forty-Four: A Tale of Survival

Forty-Four: A Tale of Survival

Graham Rundle

$32.95

At age seven, Graham Rundle was taken by his father for a 'holiday' to Eden Park, a Salvation Army boys' home outside Adelaide. As soon as his father left, Graham was given old clothes to wear and told from now on he was known as '44'. The book vividly portrays what happened to Graham over the following eight years, from 1959 until 1968, living in fear of sexual abuse by the people who were supposed to care for him.This extraordinary book contrasts the dark moments of unbelievable depravity with some of the sweetest and most innocent acts of kindness. As well as portraying life in the home, Graham writes of his taste of freedom at high school and at Indigenous camps at the Koorong, and of his time spent with his beloved, lifesaving Nana.
30-second Ancient Rome: The 50 Most Important Achievements of a Timeless Civilisation Each Explained in Half a Minute

30-second Ancient Rome: The 50 Most Important Achievements of a Timeless Civilisation Each Explained in Half a Minute

Luke Houghton ,  Ailsa Hunt ,  Peter Kruschwitz ,  Matthew Nicholls

$29.99

You know that Rome wasn't built in a day, but just how did a cluster of small hilltop villages expand to become one of the greatest empires in history? Why did Romulus kill his brother Remus? How was a legion organized? Did people really speak Latin? What entertainment could you see at the Colosseum? And what was daily life like for a Roman citizen? This book takes a novel approach to answering all these questions and more. 30-Second Ancient Rome presents a unique insight into one of the most brilliantly governed societies, where military might and expansive empire paved the way for technological advances that helped shape our modern existence. From aqueducts to sewers, from mosaics to medical diagnoses, this is the straightest road toward understanding the 50 key innovations and ideas that developed and defined one of the worlds great civilizations.
The Beau Street Hoard

The Beau Street Hoard

Eleanor Ghey

$9.99

In 2007 during an archaeological excavation in advance of a hotel development situated 150 metres from the Roman Baths in Bath, a Roman silver coin hoard was unearthed. This hoard was an exceptional find, not only because of its size 17,500 coins in total but also because of a number of unusual characteristics. Unlike other similar Roman hoards, the coins were discovered in a series of eight money bags almost eight mini hoards in one that are likely to have been deposited gradually over time. This small and beautifully illustrated book tells the story of this remarkable find, focusing on the discovery, scientific investigation, interpretation of the hoard, and the parallels and context in the Roman world.
The Lacock Cup

The Lacock Cup

Naomi Speakman ,  Lloyd DeBeer

$9.99  $9.90

The Lacock Cup is a rare object with a unique English history. Made in the 1430s, it is one of a handful of pieces of secular silver from the Middle Ages, which both survived the changing culture of Tudor fashion and the turmoil of the Reformation. Originally created as a drinking cup for feasting in the fifteenth century, the Cup later became a sacred chalice for the community of Lacock in Wiltshire at the parish church of Saint Cyriac. With an unbroken local heritage of over 400 years, this piece was a central feature of religious ceremony until the late twentieth century. The remarkable story of this special cup is brought to life in this short and accessible book. Its history, from drinking vessel to holy chalice, opens a window into the culture of late medieval England and having survived the centuries in near perfect condition, it acts as a witness to these times of great change. Charting the journey of the Cup, from fifteenth century medieval society, through the Reformation and later Civil War to the present day, this book will also explore the Cups role as a communion vessel in its local setting of Lacock, and its treatment at the British Museum where it has been on loan since 1962. The Cup remained in irregular use by the parish until the 1980s, and this story of over 500 years of outstanding care and use provides a fitting conclusion to one of Englands most important silver objects.
Greece: History and Treasures of an Ancient Civilization

Greece: History and Treasures of an Ancient Civilization

Stefano Maggi

$54.99

This lavishly illustrated volume invites readers to delve into the source of the oldest and most authentic roots of Western civilization, and to immerse themselves in the world of the ancient Greeks-their historical development, cultural horizons, art, and architecture. Hundreds of photographs, aerial views, three-dimensional reconstructions, and details of artifacts reveal the groundbreaking genius of this remarkable civilization. From Minos to the Roman conquest, historical milestones in Greek civilization are examined in an authoritative yet accessible text that presents the most up-to-date findings on the development of Greek art, architecture, and religion. Encompassing its artistic and architectural legacy, military victories, aspects of everyday life, and its inevitable decline, this volume is at once meticulously researched and highly engaging, presenting a well-rounded perspective on the breadth of Greek culture. Chapters include: The Origins of Ancient Greece, The Rise of Greece, Greek Dark Ages: Social and Political Conflicts, The Dominance of Athens, The Rise of Macedon, The Conquest of Alexander, and Greek Society.
The Spartan Supremacy 412-371 BC

The Spartan Supremacy 412-371 BC

Mike Roberts ,  Bob Bennett

$75.00

Sparta was a small city which consistently punched above its weight in the affairs of classical Greece, happily meddling in the affairs of the other cities. For two centuries her warriors were acknowledged as second to none. Yet at only one period in its long history, in the late fourth and early third century BC, did the home of these grim warriors seem set to entrench itself as the dominant power in the Greek world. This period includes the latter stages of the Peloponnesian War from 412 BC to the Spartan victory in 402, and then down to the Spartan defeat by the Thebans at Leuctra in 371 BC, where it all began to unravel for the Spartan Empire Surprisingly few previous books have covered the tumultuous first decades of the fourth century BC, particularly when compared to the ample coverage of the Peloponnesian War. As the authors explain, although the earlier period has the benefit of Thucydides' magisterial history, the period covered here is actually well served by sources and well worthy of study. There are many interesting characters here, including Alcibiades, Lysander, Agesilaus, Pelopidas and Epaminondas, to name but a few. In addition there are several campaigns and battles that are reported in enough detail to make them interesting and comprehensible to the reader. Bob Bennett and Mike Roberts untangle the complexities of this important but unduly neglected period for the modern reader.
The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt

The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt

Steven Snape

$49.99

Ancient Egyptian cities and towns have until recently been one of the least- studied and least-published aspects of this great ancient civilization. Now new research and excavation are transforming our knowledge. The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt is the first book to bring these latest discoveries to a wide general and scholarly audience, and to provide a comprehensive overview of what we know about ancient settlement during the dynastic period. Divided in two halves, the book opens with an account of the development of urban settlement in Egypt, describing the pattern of urban life, from food production, government, crime and health to schooling, leisure, ancient tourism, and the interaction of the living community with the dead. The second half of the book takes the reader on a trip down the Nile from Aswan to the Delta, giving a comprehensive account of all cities and towns with details for each of their discovery, excavation and important finds, supported by maps and plans as well as recent photographs. This book is sure to appeal to all those concerned with urban design and history, as well as tourists, students and Egyptophiles.
Unwrapping Ancient Egypt

Unwrapping Ancient Egypt

Christina Riggs

$49.99

In ancient Egypt, wrapping sacred objects, including mummified bodies, in layers of cloth was a ritual that lay at the core of Egyptian society. Yet in the modern world, attention has focused instead on unwrapping all the careful arrangements of linen textiles the Egyptians had put in place. This book breaks new ground by looking at the significance of textile wrappings in ancient Egypt, and at the way their unwrapping has shaped the way we think about the Egyptian past. Wrapping mummified bodies and divine statues in linen reflected the cultural values attached to this textile, with implications for understanding gender, materiality and hierarchy in Egyptian society. Unwrapping mummies and statues similarly reflects the values attached to Egyptian antiquities in the West, where the colonial legacies of archaeology, Egyptology and racial science still influence how Egypt appears in museums and the press. From the tomb of Tutankhamun to the Arab Spring, Unwrapping Ancient Egypt raises critical questions about the deep-seated fascination with this culture - and what that fascination says about our own.
30-second Ancient Egypt: The 50 Most Important Achievements of a Timeless Civilisation Each Explained in Half a Minute

30-second Ancient Egypt: The 50 Most Important Achievements of a Timeless Civilisation Each Explained in Half a Minute

Rachel Aronin ,  Marianne Eaton-Krauss ,  Ronald J. Leprohon ,  Peter Der Manuelian

$29.99

We've all heard of pyramids, hieroglyphs and Cleopatra, but how much do you really know about ancient Egypt? Why was the Nile integral to the unification of Egypt? What is the mystery surrounding Queen Hetephere's tomb? What did the Amarna Letters reveal? What did the ancient Egyptians eat and drink? 30-Second Ancient Egypt presents a unique insight into one of the most brilliant and beguiling civilizations, where technological innovations and architectural wonders emerge among mysterious gods and burial rites. Each entry is summarized in just 30 seconds using nothing more than two pages, 300 words and a single picture. From royal dynasties and Tutankhamun's tomb, to hieroglyphs and mummification, interspersed with biographies of Egypt's most intriguing rulers, this is the quickest path to understanding the 50 key ideas and innovations that developed and defined one of the worlds great civilizations.
Bright Lights in the Dark Ages: The Thaw Collection of Early Medieval Ornament

Bright Lights in the Dark Ages: The Thaw Collection of Early Medieval Ornament

Noel Adams

$130.00

Bright Lights in the Dark Ages is a major new volume focused on Early Medieval personal ornament. It features over one hundred magnificent objects, many crafted in gold and silver and inlaid with sparkling garnet stones. These splendid brooches, buckles, and pendants, created to advertise power and wealth in the barbarian kingdoms, were later interred with their owners to be used in the afterlife. The exceptionally broad scope of the Thaw collection, spanning over a millennium, illustrates the continuity and evolution of fine metalworking traditions. It also reveals the profound influence of the classical world on the new political alliances formed during the Early Medieval period that united people from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Highlights of this volume, replete with sumptuous images, include stunning Sarmatian-period jewellery, rare examples of Hunnic and Gothic garnet cloisonne, and exceptional brooches from the Merovingian period as well as superb Early Byzantine gold belt fittings.
The Staffordshire Hoard

The Staffordshire Hoard

Kevin Leahy ,  Roger Bland

$11.95

On 5 July 2009 a metal-detectorist started to unearth gold objects in a Staffordshire field. Thus began the discovery of the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon treasure ever found. Consisting of over 1600 items including fittings from the hilts of swords, fragments from helmets, Christian crosses and magnificent pieces of garnet work the Staffordshire Hoard has begun to rewrite history. This new and extended edition of the successful title by Kevin Leahy and Roger Bland delves deeper into the story behind the hoard, using the latest research to fill previous gaps in knowledge and turn some of the original ideas about the discovery on their head. Complete with new photography of the cleaned and conserved objects, showing off the stunning and intricate decoration, this book provides a fascinating account of the history and the discovery of this remarkable hoard.
'Why is Your Axe Bloody?': A Reading of Njals Saga

'Why is Your Axe Bloody?': A Reading of Njals Saga

William Ian Miller

$105.95

Njals saga, the greatest of the sagas of the Icelanders, was written around 1280. It tells the story of a complex feud, that starts innocently enough in a tiff over seating arrangement at a local feast, and expands over the course of 20 years to engulf half the country, in which both sides are effectively exterminated, Njal and his family burned to death in their farmhouse, the other faction picked off over the entire course of the feud. Law and feud feature centrally in the saga, Njal, its hero, being the greatest lawyer of his generation. No reading of the saga can do it justice unless it takes its law, its feuding strategies, as well as the author's stunning manipulation and saga conventions. In 'Why is your axe bloody' W.I. Miller offers a lively, entertaining, and completely original personal reading of this lengthy saga.
The Barbarians of Ancient Europe: Realities and Interactions

The Barbarians of Ancient Europe: Realities and Interactions

Larissa Bonfante

$47.95

The Barbarians of Ancient Europe deals with the reality of the indigenous peoples of Europe, in contrast to many publications that explore these peoples in the context of the Greek idea of 'barbarians' as the 'Other'. These varied groups - Thracians, Scythians, Celts, Germans, Etruscans, and other peoples of Italy, the Alps, and beyond - had contact with one another and with Greek culture during its flowering. Images on the spectacular gold and silver objects buried in royal tombs show how the horse-riding nomads and the barbarian women warriors known in antiquity as Amazons saw themselves. Archaeological discoveries show how they dressed, what they ate and drank, where they lived, and how they honored their dead kings with barbaric splendor and human sacrifices, allowing us to change, correct, or confirm the picture given in Greek and Roman literature.
Greek and Roman Political Ideas: A Pelican Introduction

Greek and Roman Political Ideas: A Pelican Introduction

Melissa Lane

$14.99

Where do our ideas about politics come from? What can we learn from the Greeks and Romans? How should we exercise power? Melissa Lane teaches politics at Princeton University, and previously taught political thought at the University of Cambridge, where she was a Fellow of King's College. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship in the field of classics, and the historian Richard Tuck called her book Eco-Republic 'a virtuoso performance by one of our best scholars of ancient philosophy.'
The Etruscans: A Very Short Introduction

The Etruscans: A Very Short Introduction

Christopher John Smith

$14.95

From around 900 to 400 BC, the Etruscans were the most innovative, powerful, wealthy, and creative people in Italy. Their archaeological record is both substantial and fascinating, including tomb paintings, sculpture, jewellery, and art. In this Very Short Introduction, Christopher Smith explores Etruscan history, culture, language, and customs. Examining the controversial debates about their origins, he explores how they once lived, placing this within the geographical, economic, and political context of the time. Smith concludes by demonstrating how the Etruscans have been studied and perceived throughout the ages, and the impact this has had on our understanding of their place in history. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Warfare in Northern Europe Before the Romans: Evidence from Archaeology

Warfare in Northern Europe Before the Romans: Evidence from Archaeology

Julie Rosemary Wileman

$59.99

Julie Wileman challenges the traditional view of the barbaric fighting which went on prior to the Roman occupation of Northern Europe as she uncovers the true nature of warfare before the Romans. Aspects investigated include what war meant in a pre-state society, the many levels of battle and warfare, the reasons why prehistoric people fought, evidence of early attacks and massacres, ways in which prehistoric war can be identified, heroic warfare, and the rise of war in the Iron Age. Wileman also looks at the Roman evidence for the portrayal of the drunken, savage and barbaric fighting as well as the tactics they employed against one another, why certain battles were won and lost, and which aspects went on to influence Roman warfare in later centuries. Warfare in Northern Europe Before the Romans provides an exciting read for both archaeologists and military historians interested in how warfare developed outside of classical Europe as well as being one of the only books in the area accessible to the non-academic reader.
Food and Drink in Antiquity: Readings from the Greco-Roman World, a Sourcebook

Food and Drink in Antiquity: Readings from the Greco-Roman World, a Sourcebook

John Donahue

$45.99

Amid growing interest in food and drink as an academic discipline in recent years, Food and Drink in Antiquity emerges as the only source to provide insight into eating and drinking by focusing on what the ancients themselves actually had to say about this important topic. This thorough and varied sourcebook offers a thematic approach to eating and drinking in antiquity and is a unique asset to any course on food and foodways. The chronological scope of the material extends from Greece of the Eighth Century BCE to the Late Roman Empire of the Fourth Century CE. Each thematic chapter consists of an introduction along with a concluding bibliography of suggested readings. The excerpts themselves, rendered in clear and readable English that remains faithful to the original Latin or Greek, are set in their proper social and historical context, with the author of each passage fully identified. This volume provides a compilation of essential source material for classics courses focusing on ancient social history, for introductory courses on the history of food and drink, as well as for those offerings with a strong sociological or anthropological approach. A wide range of evidence, drawing upon literary, inscriptional, legal and religious testimony, makes Food and Drink in Antiquity an essential source and one that is particularly well suited to the interdisciplinary focus of modern food studies. The chronological scope of the excerpts extends from Homer in the Eighth Century BCE to the Roman emperor Constantine in the Fourth Century CE. Each thematic chapter consists of an introduction along with a bibliography of suggested readings. Translated excerpts are then presented accompanied by an explanatory background paragraph identifying the author and context of each passage. A wide range of evidence is included, the majority is literary, but also includes inscriptional, legal and religious, making this volume the essential source for the relevant food and classics courses.
China: History and Treasures of an Ancient Civilization

China: History and Treasures of an Ancient Civilization

Stefania Stafutti ,  Federica Romagnoli

$54.99

This volume, intended for the general public, outlines the history of ancient China, from its origins to the 18th century. It describes the unique aspects of China's evolution, as seen through the perspective of its social history, that is, its culture, customs, political and social concepts, state organization, economy, and generally how its people lived. The key aspects of this narrative, which begins with China's pre-dynastic eras and the onset of the Han dynasty, are the enigmatic but consistent traces of what was a refined and extremely ritualized civilization.In our description of the development of ancient China from its origins to the moment of the Mongol conquest and the resulting Yuan dynasty, we sought to provide a historical framework within which we could establish the salient features of the country's artistic developments as well as a standpoint for observing the transformations and changes in the social, political, philosophical, and economic arenas.This fabulous and fascinating civilization - with its vast burial complexes and their sumptuous grave goods, superb artistic tradition, and striking skills in metalworking and ceramics - is brought to life by the lovely and spellbinding images included here.
Confucianism: A Very Short Introduction

Confucianism: A Very Short Introduction

Daniel K. Gardner

$14.95

To understand China, it is essential to understand Confucianism. First formulated in the sixth century BCE, the teachings of Confucius would come to dominate Chinese society, politics, economics, and ethics. In this Very Short Introduction, Daniel K. Gardner explores the major philosophical ideas of the Confucian tradition, showing their profound impact on state ideology and imperial government, the civil service examination system, domestic life, and social relations over the course of twenty-six centuries. Gardner focuses on two of the Sage's most crucial philosophical problems-what makes for a good person, and what constitutes good government-and demonstrates the enduring significance of these questions today. This volume shows the influence of the Sage's teachings over the course of Chinese history-on state ideology, the civil service examination system, imperial government, the family, and social relations-and the fate of Confucianism in China in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as China developed alongside a modernizing West and Japan. Some Chinese intellectuals attempted to reform the Confucian tradition to address new needs; others argued for jettisoning it altogether in favor of Western ideas and technology; still others condemned it angrily, arguing that Confucius and his legacy were responsible for China's feudal, backward conditions in the twentieth century and launching campaigns to eradicate its influences. Yet Chinese continue to turn to the teachings of Confucianism for guidance in their daily lives. In addition to a survey of the philosophy and history of Confucianism, Gardner offers an examination of the resurgence of Confucianism in China today, and explores what such a revival means for the Chinese government and the Chinese people.
Early Mainland Southeast Asia: From First Humans to Angkor

Early Mainland Southeast Asia: From First Humans to Angkor

Charles Higham

$64.99

This synthesis of the latest archaeological discoveries in Southeast Asia begins with the early hunter gatherers and concludes with the early states, with particular reference to Angkor. There has been a proliferation of new ideas and interpretations with the progressive archaeology and excavation of these sites. Rice farming is now documented in the Yangzi Valley, before it spread south; copper and bronze casting is seen as an extension via China, of a process that began in the Near East. In conjunction with his own excavations in Northeast Thailand, Charles Higham reviews the important culture of the Iron Age that gave rise to these early civilisations. This book is the only up-to-date account of the ancient cultures of a diverse and geographically expansive area and is a unique compendium, essential for all those interested in this region.
Maya Art and Architecture

Maya Art and Architecture

Mary Ellen Miller ,  Megan Eileen O'Neil

$24.95

Rewritten from cover to cover and updated to include the discoveries and new theories from the past decade and a half, this classic guide to the art of the ancient Maya is now illustrated in full colour throughout. World expert Mary Miller and her co-author Megan ONeil take the reader through the visual world of the Maya, explaining how and why they created the paintings, sculpture and monuments that intrigue and compel people the world over. With an array of new material, from recent finds including the La Corona panels, to new studies of the monuments at Palenque, Zotz and elsewhere, to the beautiful wall paintings discovered in recent years, this new edition will be essential reading for students and scholars and for travellers to the cities of this mysterious civilization.
           
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