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History
KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps

KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps

Nikolaus Wachsmann

$35.00

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ABBEY'S CHOICE APRIL 2015 ----- In March of 1933, a disused factory surrounded by barbed wire held 223 prisoners in the town of Dachau. By the end of 1945, the SS concentration camp system had become an overwhelming landscape of terror. Twenty-two large camps and over one thousand satellite camps throughout Germany and Europe were at the heart of the Nazi campaign of repression and intimidation. The importance of the camps in terms of Nazi history and our modern world cannot be questioned.

Dr Nikolaus Wachsmann is the first historian to write a complete history of the camps. Combining the political and the personal, Wachsmann will examine the organisation of such an immense genocidal machine, whilst drawing a vivid picture of life inside the camps for the individual prisoner. The book will give a voice to those typically forgotten in Nazi history: the 'social deviants', criminals and unwanted ethnicities that all faced the terror of the camps. Wachsmann will explore the practise of institutionalised murder and inmate collaboration with the SS selectively ignored by many historians. 

Pulling together a wealth of in-depth research, official documents, contemporary studies and the evidence of survivors themselves, KL will be a complete but accessible narrative.
Farewell Kabul: From Afghanistan to a More Dangerous World

Farewell Kabul: From Afghanistan to a More Dangerous World

Christina Lamb

$29.99

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From the award-winning co-author of 'I Am Malala', this book asks just how the might of NATO, with 48 countries and 140,000 troops on the ground, failed to defeat a group of religious students and farmers? How did it go so wrong? Twenty-seven years ago, Christina Lamb left Britain to become a journalist in Pakistan. She crossed the Hindu Kush into Afghanistan with mujaheddin fighting the Russians and fell unequivocally in love with this fierce country of pomegranates and war, a relationship which has dominated her adult life. Since 2001, Lamb has watched with incredulity as the West fought a war with its hands tied, committed too little too late, failed to understand local dynamics and turned a blind eye as their Taliban enemy was helped by their ally Pakistan. Farewell Kabul tells how success was turned into defeat in the longest war fought by the United States in its history and by Britain since the Hundred Years War. It has been a fiasco which has left Afghanistan still one of the poorest nations on earth, the Taliban undefeated, and nuclear armed Pakistan perhaps the most dangerous place on earth. With unparalleled access to all key decision-makers in Afghanistan, Pakistan, London and Washington, from heads of state and generals as well as soldiers on the ground, Farewell Kabul tells how this happened. In Afghanistan, Lamb has travelled far beyond Helmand - from the caves of Tora Bora in the south to the mountainous bad lands of Kunar in the east; from Herat, city of poets and minarets in the west, to the very poorest province of Samangan in the north. She went to Guantanamo, met Taliban in Quetta, visited jihadi camps in Pakistan and saw bin Laden's house just after he was killed. Saddest of all, she met women who had been made role models by the West and had then been shot, raped or forced to flee the country. This deeply personal book not only shows the human cost of political failure but explains how short-sighted encouragement of jihadis to fight the Russians, followed by prosecution of ill-thoughtout wars, has resulted in the spread of terrorism throughout the Islamic world.
The Silk Road: A New History

The Silk Road: A New History

Valerie Hansen

$26.95

The Silk Road is as iconic in world history as the Colossus of Rhodes or the Suez Canal. But what was it, exactly? It conjures up a hazy image of a caravan of camels laden with silk on a dusty desert track, reaching from China to Rome. The reality was different - and far more interesting - as revealed in this new history. 

In The Silk Road, Valerie Hansen describes the remarkable archeological finds that revolutionize our understanding of these trade routes. For centuries, key records remained hidden-sometimes deliberately buried by bureaucrats for safe keeping. But the sands of the Taklamakan Desert have revealed fascinating material, sometimes preserved by illiterate locals who recycled official documents to make insoles for shoes or garments for the dead. Hansen explores seven oases along the road, from Xi'an to Samarkand, where merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers mixed in cosmopolitan communities, tolerant of religions from Buddhism to Zoroastrianism. There was no single, continuous road, but a chain of markets that traded between east and west. China and the Roman Empire had very little direct trade. 

China's main partners were the peoples of modern-day Iran, whose tombs in China reveal much about their Zoroastrian beliefs. Silk was not the most important good on the road; paper, invented in China before Julius Caesar was born, had a bigger impact in Europe, while metals, spices, and glass were just as important as silk. Perhaps most significant of all was the road's transmission of ideas, technologies, and artistic motifs. 

The Silk Road is a fascinating story of archeological discovery, cultural transmission, and the intricate chains across Central Asia and China.
The Art of War (Illustrated Edition)

The Art of War (Illustrated Edition)

Sun Tzu ,  Roger T. Ames

$24.99

'The expert at battle seeks his victory from strategic advantage and does not demand it from his men'. The Art of War is the most widely read military classic in human history. Dating from the period of the warring states in early Chinese history, Sun Tzu's insights into strategy are today prized by leaders in all walks of life. This new gift edition combines the finest English translation with carefully chosen illustrations from the period Includes a new introduction setting the work in its context and exploring the main philosophical issues.
The Mighty Dead: Why Homer Matters

The Mighty Dead: Why Homer Matters

Adam Nicolson

$22.99

Where does Homer come from? And why does Homer matter? His epic poems of war and suffering can still speak to us of the role of destiny in life, of cruelty, of humanity and its frailty, but why they do is a mystery. How can we be so intimate with something so distant?

Longlisted for the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction In this passionate and deeply personal book, Adam Nicolson sets out to explain why these great ancient poems still have so much to say about what it is to be human, to love, lose, grow old and die. 'The Mighty Dead' is a journey of history and discovery, sewn together by the oldest stories we have - the Iliad and the Odyssey, which emerged from a time before the Greeks became Greek. As nomadic tribes of the northern steppe, they clashed with the sophisticated cities of the eastern Mediterranean. These poems tell us how we became who we are. We witness a disputatious dinner in 19th-century Paris and Keats finding in Chapman's Homer the inspiration to travel in the 'realms of gold'.  We go to Bosnia in the 1930s, with the god of Homer studies Milman Parry where oral poetry still thrived; to Spain to visit the possible site of Hades; to Troy, Ukraine, Syria and the islands of the Mediterranean; and to that most ancient of modern experiences, the open sea, in calm and storm.

Reflecting on fathers and sons, men and women, on the necessity for love and the violence of warriors, on peace and war, youth and old-age, Homer is the deep voice of Europe, as dark as Mavrodaphne and as glowingly alive as anything that has ever been.
The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Themes, Sites, Methods and Skills

The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Themes, Sites, Methods and Skills

Jim Grant ,  Sam Gorin ,  Neil Fleming

$58.99

This fully updated and revised edition of the best-selling title The Archaeology Coursebook is a guide for students studying archaeology for the first time. Including new methods and case studies in this fourth edition, it provides pre-university students and teachers, as well as undergraduates and enthusiasts, with the skills and technical concepts necessary to grasp the subject. The Archaeology Coursebook: introduces the most commonly examined archaeological methods, concepts, and themes, and provides the necessary skills to understand them explains how to interpret the material students may meet in examinations and how to succeed with different types of assignments and exam questions supports study with case studies, key sites, key terms, tasks and skills development illustrates concepts and commentary with over 600 photos and drawings of excavation sites, methodology and processes, tools and equipment Reflecting changes in archaeological practice and with new case studies, methods, examples, boxes, photographs and diagrams; as well as updates on examination changes for pre-university students, this is definitely a book no archaeology student should be without.
The Woman Who Would be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt

The Woman Who Would be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt

Kara Cooney

$35.00

Hatshepsut, the daughter of a general who had usurped the throne of Egypt, was born into a privileged position within the royal household. Married off to her own brother, she was expected to bear sons who would legitimize the reign of her father's family. But she failed to produce a male heir. Such was the twist of fate that paved the way for her own scarcely believable rule: she ascended to the throne as a 'king'.

Over a spectacular twenty-two-year reign, Hatshepsut proved herself a master strategist, cloaking her political power plays with a veil of piety and sexual reinvention. Just as women today face obstacles from a society that equates authority with masculinity, Hatshepsut had to operate the levers of a patriarchal system to emerge as Egypt's second female pharaoh. Scholars have long speculated as to why her images were violently destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her rule. Constructing a rich narrative history using the sources that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power-and why she fell from public favour just as quickly. 

The Woman Who Would Be King traces the unconventional life of a female pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.
The Colossal Statue of Ramesses II: Objects in Focus

The Colossal Statue of Ramesses II: Objects in Focus

Anna Garnett

$12.99

One of the largest pieces of Egyptian sculpture in the British Museum, the upper part of the colossal statue of Ramesses II, also known as the Younger Memnon, was perhaps the first piece of Egyptian sculpture to be recognized as a work of art by connoisseurs, who traditionally judged things by the standards of ancient Greek art.

Weighing 7.25 tons, this fragment of his statue was cut from a single block of two - coloured granite , and shows Ramesses wearing the nemes head - dress surmounted by a cobra diadem. The statue was retrieved from the mortuary temple of Ramesses at Thebes (the 'Ramesseum') by Giovanni Belzoni in 1816. Belzoni wrote a fascinating account of his struggle to remove it, both literally, given its colossal size, and politically. After its arrival in England and its acquisition, the Colossal Statue of Ramesses was to become among the most famous objects in the British Museums Egyptian collection and is of significant historical interest. 

Beautifully illustrated with photographs of the statue and contextual images, and including archival material relating to the British Museums acquisition, this book tells the story of this magnificent artefact, discussing alongside the draw of colossal Egyptian sculpture, the history of the reign of Ramesses II and the nature of the statues acquisition.
Magna Carta: The True Story Behind the Charter

Magna Carta: The True Story Behind the Charter

David Starkey

$39.99

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2015 is the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta, which took place in 1215.

In this new book published in celebration of that event, eminent historian David Starkey explores the many aspects of Magna Carta and its relevance today. Starkey reveals the historical background of Magna Carta; how it created the modern British constitution; its importance for Britain today; and, the international impact of Magna Carta.

An exciting new project from David Starkey, this book invites readers to see this historical text in a fresh new context.
Illuminated Manuscripts: Masterpieces of Art

Illuminated Manuscripts: Masterpieces of Art

James Peacock ,  Michael Kerrigan

$34.99

Prior to the invention of the printing press, all books had to be written by hand. Manuscripts are the beautiful manifestation of this craft, and the most precious and expensive of such manuscripts were 'illuminated' through the use of brightly coloured pigments and gold embellishments. Beginning with a fresh and thoughtful introduction to illuminated manuscripts, Illuminated Manuscripts Masterpieces of Art goes on to showcase key works in this stunning artistic genre.
Armies of Castile and Aragon 1370-1516

Armies of Castile and Aragon 1370-1516

John Pohl ,  Gerry Embleton

$24.99

Most studies of medieval warfare in the late 14th and 15th centuries concentrate on the Hundred Years' War between England and France and the Wars of the Roses. But meanwhile, on the Iberian peninsula, the foundations of Spain's military 'Golden Age' were being laid as the kingdoms of Castile and Aragon under the Trastamara dynasty grew in power, ambition and success. Featuring spectacular full-colour artwork, and rare manuscript illustrations, this book depicts the fighting men whose skill and tactical flexibility made Spain into a world power at the close of the Middle Ages, carving out empires from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean.
Xerxes, King of King's: The True Story

Xerxes, King of King's: The True Story

Ian Macgregor Morris

$59.99

Xsaya-rsa (Khshayarsha) to the Persians, Ahasuerus to the Jews, Xerxes to the Greeks. So great was his power, that he was hailed by the Persians as 'King of Kings', and by the Greeks as simply  The King.

Famed for his beauty and magnificence, he ruled over the greatest empire the world had known, and built cities the like of which the world had never seen. He was the king who re-conquered Egypt and subdued the rebels of Babylon; he was the king who captured Athens and burnt the temples of the Acropolis; and he was the king who defeated Leonidas, the greatest of the Warrior-Kings of Sparta. Some claim that he was the king who saved the Jews. The life of Xerxes, however, has never been told - until now.

Ian Macgregor Morris brings together a variety of evidence, literary and archaeological, to create a nuanced account that fully takes into account the context of fifth-century Persia. Macgregor Morris reviews the background of Xerxes' upbringing and his early taste of power, the problems of the succession, and the challenges he faced as a new king. 

The Greek expedition will be considered from a Persian perspective, while the effect of its failure on Persian policy in general, and on Xerxes in particular, forms a major theme of the later chapters. The character of Xerxes, so often depicted as hubristic, will be re-examined in terms of notions of Persian kingship, while his domestic policies on issues such as religious tolerance and the ambitious building programmes will be seen in light of the political events of the period.
Ancient Assyria: A Very Short Introduction

Ancient Assyria: A Very Short Introduction

Karen Radner

$15.95

Assyria was one of the most influential kingdoms of the Ancient Near East. In this Very Short Introduction, Karen Radner sketches the history of Assyria from city state to empire, from the early 2nd millennium BC to the end of the 7th century BC. Since the archaeological rediscovery of Assyria in the mid-19th century, its cities have been excavated extensively in Iraq, Syria, Turkey and Israel, with further sites in Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan providing important information. The Assyrian Empire was one of the most geographically vast, socially diverse, multicultural, and multi-ethnic states of the early first millennium BC.Using archaeological records, Radner provides insights into the lives of the inhabitants of the kingdom, highlighting the diversity of human experiences in the Assyrian Empire. 

ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
The Standard of Ur: Objects in Focus

The Standard of Ur: Objects in Focus

Sarah Collins

$12.99

Ur, one of the world's first cities, was highly important politically and economically around 2600 2500 BC when the Sumerian rulers of the city were buried in tombs filled with ornate, valuable objects and with evidence of elaborate rituals and human sacrifice. Without the artefacts from the tombs of Ur it would be very difficult for us today to visualise Sumerian history and know anything about Sumerian art.

Of all the objects found in the royal tombs of Ur, the Standard is the most informative yet also the most enigmatic. The Standard was given its name because it lay in a tomb near the shoulder of a man as if it had been carried like a battle standard. However, its real function and purpose within the tomb is still unknown. It was originally hollow, like a box, and is decorated on four sides with mosaic images created with inlays of shell, lapis lazuli and red limestone that were set into bitumen on a wooden frame. The two main, rectangular sides sometimes referred to as war and peace, show scenes of a battle and of a banquet. 

Both of these themes, commonly depicted in Mesopotamian art, are shown on the Standard using a narrative technique that was to be used in Mesopotamia for almost two thousand years and can still be appreciated today. Viewed as a remarkable work of ancient art the Standard testifies to sophisticated Sumerian craftsmanship and the wide trade networks and wealth of the city of Ur. More importantly for us today, it is also a realistic and lively representation of aspects of the life and concerns of people who lived in one of the world's great ancient civilisations during the third millennium BC.

This beautifully illustrated short introduction tells the story of discovery and significance of this splendid object.
Ur: The City of the Moon God

Ur: The City of the Moon God

Harriet E. W. Crawford

$39.99

The ancient Mesoptamian city of Ur was a Sumerian city state which flourished as a centre of trade and civilisation between 2800-2000 BCE. However, in the recent past it suffered from the disastrous Gulf war and from neglect. It still remains a potent symbol for people of all faiths and will have an important role to play in the future.

This account of Ur's past looks at both the ancient city and its evolution over centuries, and its archaeological interpretation in more recent times. From the 19th century explorers and their identification of the site of Mukayyar as the Biblical city of Ur, the study proceeds to look in detail at the archaeologist Leonard Woolley and his key discoveries during the 1920s and 30s. Using the findings as a framework and utilising the latest evidence from environmental, historical and archaeological studies, the volume explores the site's past in chronological order from the Ubaid period in the 5th millennium to the death of Alexander. It looks in detail at the architectural remains: the sacred buildings, royal graves and also the private housing which provides a unique record of life 4000 years ago. 

The volume also describes the part played by Ur in the Gulf war and discusses the problems raised for archaeologists in the war's aftermath.
Augustus: The Biography

Augustus: The Biography

Jochen Bleicken ,  Anthea Bell

$49.99

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Born to a plebeian family in 63 BC, Octavian was a young solder training abroad when he heard news of Julius Caesar's brutal assassination - and discovered that he was the dictator's sole political heir.

With the opportunism and instinct for propaganda that were to characterize his rule, Octavian rallied huge financial, military and political backing to eliminate his opponents, end the bloody turmoil that had so long wracked Rome and, finally, take autocratic control of a state devoted to republicanism. He became Augustus - Rome's first Emperor, and the founder of the greatest empire the world had ever seen.

In this monumental biography, translated into English for the first time by Anthea Bell, Jochen Bleicken tells the story of a man who found himself a demi-god in his own lifetime and paints a portrait of one of the most dramatic periods of Roman history.
Coming Out Christian in the Roman World: How the Followers of Jesus Made a Place in Caesar S Empire

Coming Out Christian in the Roman World: How the Followers of Jesus Made a Place in Caesar S Empire

Douglas Ryan Boin

$39.99

The supposed collapse of Roman civilization is still lamented more than 1,500 years later - and intertwined with this idea is the notion that a fledgling religion, Christianity, went from a persecuted fringe movement to an irresistible force that toppled the empire.

The  intolerant zeal  of Christians, wrote Edward Gibbon, swept Rome's old gods away, and with them the structures that sustained Roman society. Not so, argues Douglas Boin. Such tales are simply untrue to history, and ignore the most important fact of all: life in Rome never came to a dramatic stop. Instead, as Boin shows, a small minority movement rose to transform society - politically, religiously, and culturally - but it was a gradual process, one that happened in fits and starts over centuries.

Drawing upon a decade of recent studies in history and archaeology, and on his own research, Boin opens up a wholly new window onto a period we thought we knew. His work is the first to describe how Christians navigated the complex world of social identity in terms of  passing  and  coming out.  Many Christians lived in a dynamic middle ground. Their quiet success, as much as the clamor of martyrdom, was a powerful agent for change.

With this insightful approach to the story of Christians in the Roman world, Douglas Boin rewrites, and rediscovers, the fascinating early history of a world faith.
The Complete Roman Legions

The Complete Roman Legions

Nigel Pollard ,  Joanne Berry

$35.00

The legions of Rome were among the greatest fighting forces in history. For almost half a millennium they secured the known world under the power of the Caesars. This pioneering account gathers together the stories of each and every imperial legion, telling the tales of their triumphs and defeats as they policed the empire and enlarged its borders. Focusing on the legions as the core of the Roman army, and chronicling their individual histories in detail, this volume builds on the thematic account of the Roman military force given by its companion The Complete Roman Army , and is vital reading for anyone who has enjoyed that book.
Roman Legionary AD 284-337: The Age of Diocletian and Constantine the Great

Roman Legionary AD 284-337: The Age of Diocletian and Constantine the Great

Ross Cowan ,  Sean O'Brogain

$29.99

Diocletian and Constantine were the greatest of the Late Roman emperors, and their era marks the climax of the legionary system. Under Constantine's successors the legions were reduced in size and increasingly sidelined in favour of new units of elite auxilia, but between AD 284 and 337 the legions reigned supreme. The legionaries defeated all-comers and spearheaded a stunning Roman revival that humbled the Persian Empire and reduced the mighty Goths and Sarmatians to the status of vassals. This title details the equipment, background, training and combat experience of the men from all parts of the empire who made up the backbone of Rome's legions in this pivotal period.
Born on ANZAC Day

Born on ANZAC Day

Ric Teague

$29.95

The story of Vietnam veteran Allan 'Aldy' Aldenhoven, born in Darwin, his mother was of  The Stolen Generation  and his father a descendant of German settlers. Grew up in Adelaide, and was conscripted to fight in the Vietnam War.  He was with the 7 RAR where his fighting spirit was legendary. 

Upon his return Aldy became a professional boxer, a star in TV  Ringside  and the Australian Welterweight Boxing Champion.  He was a friend of Aussie rock and music stars Bon Scott, Ruusell Morris, Jim Keays, Broderick Smith and Evan Jones. He was a  larrikin, loving his fame and notoriety.  The treatment meted out to Vietnam veterans angered him and he struggled with his war demons and the psychological scars they inflicted. 

He became involved in a world of drug dealers, gangsters and crooked cops.  He was part of Adelaide's underworld and was involved in the kidnapping of a heroin dealer in a plan hatched by rogue South Australian police.  Shortly after he died under mysterious circumstances.  He was 30. 

A short, eventful life, with bursts of glory and a squalid ending,  one of the many Vietnam veterans who found civilian life,  the denigration of their service,  and their memories hard to manage.
Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation

Indigenous Australia: Enduring Civilisation

Gaye Sculthorpe ,  Lissant Bolton ,  John Carty

$60.00

This extraordinary selection of objects showcases the beauty and knowledge embodied in works of art and everyday life from Indigenous Australia. Published to accompany the first major UK exhibition on Indigenous Australia, this ground breaking new publication explores the profound impact and legacy of colonialism, the nature of collecting and the changing meaning of objects now in the collection of the British Museum. The encounters between Indigenous peoples and colonists were complex and nuanced, and contemporary Australian society is still dealing with this legacy, trying to transform or reconcile different worldviews.
Gallipoli: The Dardanelles Disaster in Soldiers' Words and Photographs

Gallipoli: The Dardanelles Disaster in Soldiers' Words and Photographs

Stephen Chambers, RA ,  Richard Van Emden

$49.99

Presenting more than 150 never-before-published photographs of the campaign, many taken by the soldiers themselves, together with unpublished written material from British, Anzac, French and Turkish, including eyewitness accounts of the landings, this is an unrivalled account of what really happened at Gallipoli. Van Emden's gripping narrative and lucid analysis of Churchill's infamous operation, compliments Chambers's evocative images, showing how the rapid spread of diseases like dissentry, the lack of clean water and food, the tremendous losses on both sides affected morale, until finally in January 1916, in what were the best-laid plans of the entire disastrous campaign, the Allies successfully fooled the Turkish forces and evacuated their troops from the peninsula with no additional casualties. Leading First World War historian Richard van Emden and Gallipoli expert Stephen Chambers have produced an entirely fresh, personal and illuminating study of one of the Great War's most catastrophic events.
The Ottoman Defence Against the Anzac Landing, 25 April 1915

The Ottoman Defence Against the Anzac Landing, 25 April 1915

Mesut Uyar

$19.99

The landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915 represents a defining moment, not only for Australia and New Zealand, but also for Turkey. However a detailed account of the landing from the Turkish perspective has yet to be published in English despite the 100 years that has elapsed since the first ANZACs scrambled ashore.

Descriptions of the Ottoman forces such as the composition of units, the men who commanded them, their weapons, capabilities and reactions to the ANZAC invasion have generally remained undocumented or described in piecemeal fashion based on secondary sources. The lack of a Turkish perspective has made it almost impossible to construct a balanced account of the events of that fateful April day. The Ottoman Defence against the Anzac Landing, 25 April 1915 seeks to redress this imbalance, portraying the Ottoman experience based on previously unpublished Ottoman and Turkish sources. This meticulously researched volume describes the Ottoman Army in fascinating detail from its order of battle, unit structure and composition, training and doctrine to the weapons used against the ANZACs. 

Using Ottoman military documents, regimental war diaries, personal accounts and memoirs, author Mesut Uyar describes the unfolding campaign, unravelling its complexity and resolving many of the questions that have dogged accounts for a century. This valuable chronicle will enhance readers' understanding of the Ottoman war machine, its strengths and weaknesses and why it proved so successful in containing the Allied invasion. Detailed maps and photographs published for the first time add clarity and portray many of the men the ANZACs referred to with grudging respect as 'Johnny Turk'.
The Landing at ANZAC, 1915

The Landing at ANZAC, 1915

Chris Roberts

$19.99

The Landing at ANZAC, 1915 challenges many of the cherished myths of the most celebrated battle in Australian and New Zealand history - myths that have endured for almost a century. Told from both the ANZAC and Turkish perspectives, this meticulously researched account questions several of the claims of Charles Bean's magisterial and much-quoted Australian official history and presents a fresh examination of the evidence from a range of participants. The Landing at ANZAC, 1915 reaches a carefully argued conclusion in which Roberts draws together the threads of his analysis delivering some startling findings. But the author's interest extends beyond the simple debunking of hallowed myths, and he produces a number of lessons from the armies of today. This is a book that pulls the Gallipoli campaign into the modern era and provides a compelling argument for its continuing relevance. In short, today's armies must never forget the lessons of Gallipoli.
Memoirs of an Anzac: A First-Hand Account by an AIF Officer in the First World War

Memoirs of an Anzac: A First-Hand Account by an AIF Officer in the First World War

John Charles Barrie ,  Ross McMullin

$32.99

Against his mother's wishes, John Charles Barrie joined the Australian army in 1909. Five years later, he was on his way to Egypt as an officer with the Australian Imperial Force. He survived the war to write his memoirs, which were kept by his family for 80 years. Made public for the first time, this book gives first-hand accounts of Barrie's wounding at Gallipoli on that fateful first Anzac Day, his recuperation in England, and the friendships he made there. It chronicles his escape from rehab so that he could return to the war in France, and his fighting for days on end, waist-deep in mud in the trenches. Memoirs of an Anzac tells of the horrors of war, but it is also lightened with the good humour that resulted from thousands of young Australian men being thrown together in dire circumstances. This is not a history textbook, nor is it a series of diary notes and letters - it is a gut-wrenching, heart-warming true story that will move you.
Over the Top: A Cartoon History of Australia at War

Over the Top: A Cartoon History of Australia at War

Tim S Benson

$49.99

To commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the Gallipoli landings, this groundbreaking book is a history of Australia at war as seen through the published work of Australia's finest cartoonists.  Australia has had, over the years, a political-cartoon heritage second to none.

From Livingstone Hopkins, Norman Lindsay, Sir David Low, Mick Armstrong, Alex Gurney, William Pigeon, and Paul Rigby, to name but a few, through to the likes of today's cartoonists such as Alan Moir, Mark Knight, Bruce Petty, and David Rowe, you can now enjoy the acerbic wit and brilliant draughtsmanship of works that have not been seen since the day they were first published.  This book visually chronicles the fortunes and misfortunes of the Australian military, as well as the civilian population at home, from the Boer War, the two World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq, through to the present conflict in Afghanistan.

With commentary throughout, with insights provided by the cartoonists themselves, each cartoon is put into historical perspective, in order for the reader to enjoy and appreciate the context within the cartoon.  All the cartoons featured in this book were originally published either in Australian magazines or newspapers.
From the Trenches: The Best ANZAC Writing of World War One

From the Trenches: The Best ANZAC Writing of World War One

Mark Dapin

$22.99

In the centenary of World War One, here are the Anzacs in their own words. From the Trenches is a collection of  gripping, awe-inspiring and sometimes terrifying accounts of life at the  front, recorded by those who lived through the fighting.

Drawn  from diaries, memoirs and letters, as well as poetry, reportage and  prose, this collection reminds us that the Anzac legend is rooted in  real and tragic circumstances on a heartbreakingly human scale. Belying  the common perception of the laconic digger, these compelling voices  convey the range of wartime experience, from the desolation and horror  to the unbridled excitement and camaraderie. Through it all runs the  bleak toll on young lives.

Author and journalist Mark Dapin has  selected writing from those on the frontlines as well as behind the  scenes, from officers and soldiers to nurses, engineers and reporters,  to create a volume that will be regarded as the definitive record of the  personal experiences that forged the emerging national identities of  Australia and New Zealand.
Australians at the Great War: 1914-1918

Australians at the Great War: 1914-1918

Australian War Memorial ,  Peter Burness

$29.99

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Australia's contribution to the Great War has become part of the core of its national identity, and this work from the Australian War Memorial's Peter Burness offers a compact, thoroughly illustrated and authoritative survey of the founding of the ANZAC tradition.

From the shores of Gallipoli, through the trenches of France and Belgium, to the Light Horse in the Middle East, Australians at the Great War: 1914-1918 showcases photographs, artworks, posters, maps and artefacts from the War Memorial's comprehensive archive, along with detailed historical and anecdotal passages.

Both as a testament to the courage of Australians at war, and as a guide to Australia's cultural legacy, Australians at the Great War: 1914-1918 is the perfect introduction.
Watson's Pier

Watson's Pier

Joshua Funder

$32.99

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Stan Watson was among the first ashore at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, and survived battle, fear and disease to build the pier at Anzac Cove from which so many men later escaped. He faced what seemed like an impossible mission: to get every man out alive. Watson never claimed to be the last man to leave Gallipoli, but through to the very end he played his part and became a hero. 

Sixty-two years to the day after he stepped away from that fatal shore, Watson took a slow train to visit his family for Christmas and decided to finally tell his life story.  A beautifully told mixture of fact and fiction, Watson's Pier traces not just one man's journey, but the history of a nation. It also challenges the historical record of what happened in the final moments at Anzac Cove. In doing so, it offers a new perspective on the meaning of Gallipoli.

Watson's Pier by Joshua Funder at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
Operation Rimau: Australia's Heroic and Daring Commando Raid on Singapore

Operation Rimau: Australia's Heroic and Daring Commando Raid on Singapore

Peter Thompson ,  Robert Macklin

$29.99

In the last months of 1944, a group of elite Australian and British commandos was selected for the biggest Allied behind-the-scenes operation of the Pacific War.

Their mission: to devastate the enemy's shipping by destroying the Japanese ships at anchor in Singapore Harbour. Operation Rimau, Britain's last throw of the colonial dice in South-East Asia, was intended as a body blow to the Japanese and a signal to the world that she would reclaim her Eastern Empire. Britain was trying to reclaim past glory - while Australia's wartime prime minister, John Curtin, had turned to America. In this atmosphere, Operation Rimau was planned...

Operation Rimau takes us inside the fierce conflict, and tells what really happened to these brave commandos - from the very beginnings of the operation through to their intense and courageous fighting in the South China Seas, and its aftermath. It exposes the sloppy planning behind the raid, and names the officers who betrayed and abandoned them in their hour of need, and details the political double-dealing which for so many years hid the real story behind red tape and bureaucratic lies.
Fractured Families: Life on the Margins in Colonial New South Wales

Fractured Families: Life on the Margins in Colonial New South Wales

Tanya Evans

$39.99

The poorest men and women in colonial NSW are no longer marginalised, but front and centre in a book that reveals what life was like for them. Most convicts arriving in New South Wales didnAEt expect to make their fortunes. Some went on to great success,but countless convicts and free migrants struggled with limited prospects, discrimination and misfortune. Many desperate people turned to The Benevolent Society, AustraliaAEs first charity founded in 1813, for assistance and sustenance. In this rich and revealing book, Tanya Evans collaborates with family historians u many writing about their own ancestors u to present the everyday lives of these people. The detailed and extensive archives of The Benevolent Society allow us to reclaim these unknown lives and understand our own history better, not to mention the often random nature of betterment and progress.
Radical Newcastle

Radical Newcastle

James Bennett ,  Nancy Cushing ,  Erik Eklund

$39.99

The Star Hotel in Newcastle has become a site of defiance for the marginalized young and dispossessed working class. To understand the whole story of the Star Hotel riot, it should be seen in the context of other moments of resistance such as the 1890 Maritime Strike, Rothbury miners' lockout in 1929 and the recent battle for the Laman Street fig trees. As Australia's first industrial city, Newcastle is also a natural home of radicalism but until now, the stories which reveal its breadth and impact have remained untold. Radical Newcastle brings together short illustrated essays from leading scholars, local historians and present day radicals to document both the iconic events of the region's radical past, and less well known actions seeking social justice for workers, women, Aboriginal people and the environment.
The Ghan: Australia's Grand Rail Journey

The Ghan: Australia's Grand Rail Journey

Ian Grady ,  Don Fuchs

$35.00

Welcome aboard one of the great train journeys of the world.

About the Authors: Ian Grady is a creative writing teacher, freelance writer and tour guide in Sydney. His previous publications include walking guides to the Greek Isles and various articles in the Guardian and Sydney Morning Herald. Don Fuchs is a freelance photojournalist with experience in books and magazines ranging from modelling shoots to travel features. Don has published several books on various travel destinations of the world including California and Australia.
The Battle of Cuito Cuanavale: Cold War Angolan Finale, 1987-1988

The Battle of Cuito Cuanavale: Cold War Angolan Finale, 1987-1988

Andrew Hudson

$42.00

The battle for the town of Cuito Cuanavale is a myth. The conduct of Operations Modular, Hooper, Packer and Displace by South African and UNITA forces in the 6th Military Region of southeastern Angola initially prevented FAPLA and its allies from occupying the UNITA town of Mavinga. The success achieved in this endeavor then led to the conduct of offensive military operations to force FAPLA and its allies to relinquish their bridgehead over the Cuito River and to redeploy to the western bank at Cuito Cuanavale. The FAPLA deployment and occupation of Cuito Cuanavale, on the western bank of the Cuito River, was never contested militarily by opposing forces during 1987 and 1988.

Drawing on his personal experience on the Cuito battlefield and elsewhere during this period, personal interviews with South African commanders who were on the ground, declassified documents and other sources, the author dispassionately relates the sequence of events that has widely become known as the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale. Opening with an overview of the military situation in southern Angola prior to the 1987 offensive by the FAPLA force and its allies to take Mavinga, this compelling narrative goes on to describe the subsequent FAPLA advance on Mavinga, the South African and UNITA forces' defensive battle on the Lomba River, the counter-offensive and pursuit by South African and UNITA forces and the attacks by South African armored forces on the FAPLA deployments east of Cuito River. The strategic encounter battle across the breadth of the 5th and 6th military regions of southern Angola which then ensued between South African forces on the one hand, and Cuban and FAPLA forces on the other, draws this period of conflict to a close.

This contribution towards an improved understanding of the South African military operations during the campaign leaves the reader with two abiding impressions: a clear, concise narrative of the clash between the opposing forces and the author's profound respect for and appreciation of his fellow South African soldier.
Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot: The True Story of the Tyrant Who Created North Korea and the Young Lieutenant Who Stole His Way to Freedom

Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot: The True Story of the Tyrant Who Created North Korea and the Young Lieutenant Who Stole His Way to Freedom

Blaine Harden

$29.99

An ambitious and gripping exploration of the world's most secretive state through the intertwined lives of two North Koreans, one infamous, one obscure: Kim Il Sung, the former North Korean leader and No Kum Sok, once the state's youngest jet fighter pilot. Shortly before the Korean War ended, their paths crossed. Kim Il Sung congratulated No Kum Sok on his flying skill and courage, but just a few months later, No Kum Sok stole a Soviet-made MiG-15 and escaped to a US airfield in South Korea. 

This non-fiction thriller digs deeply into the character of the Kim family dictatorship. Both an irresistible adventure story and an authoritative guide to the notorious state, The Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot explains why North Korea remains so isolated, why it created and maintains its concentration camps, and why it is still so angry at the western world.
Without You, There is No Us: My Secret Life Teaching the Sons of North Korea's Elite

Without You, There is No Us: My Secret Life Teaching the Sons of North Korea's Elite

Suki Kim

$19.99

It is 2011, and all universities in North Korea have been shut down for an entire year, except for the all-male Pyongyang University of Science and Technology. This is where Suki Kim has accepted a job teaching English. Over the next six months she will eat three meals a day with her young charges and struggle to teach them to write, all under the watchful eye of the regime. Life at the university is lonely and claustrophobic. Her letters are read by censors and she must hide her notes and photographs not only from her minders but also from her colleagues, evangelical Christian missionaries, whose faith she does not share. As the weeks pass she discovers how easily her students lie, and how total is their obedience to Kim Jong-il. She also, bravely, hints at the existence of a world beyond their own: the internet, free travel, democracy, and other ideas forbidden in a country where torture and execution are commonplace. Yet her pupils are also full of boyish enthusiasm, with flashes of curiosity not yet extinguished. Without You, There Is No Us offers a moving and incalculably rare glimpse of life inside the world's most inscrutable country.
William Simpson's Afghanistan: Travels of a Special Artist and Antiquariann During the Second Afghan War, 1878-1879

William Simpson's Afghanistan: Travels of a Special Artist and Antiquariann During the Second Afghan War, 1878-1879

Peter Harrington

$75.00

Left London, on a journey with Kabool as my objective via Brindisi and Bombay'. With these words written on Tuesday October 15, 1878, the Scottish artist William Simpson (1823-1899), commenced a daily journal which he later entitled Diary of a Journey to Afghanistan during the Campaign of 1878-79.

Simpson was no stranger to the life of a 'special' having previously covered military campaigns in Abyssinia, France, and California on behalf of his employer, the Illustrated London News. Earlier, his efforts in the Crimean War had already established his reputation for accuracy and an eye for detail. As an 'embedded' artist with the Peshawar Valley Field Force, Simpson recorded the events leading up to the signing of the Treaty of Gandamak in May 1879 which brought the first phase of the Second Afghan War to a close. During his six months in Afghanistan, he sent back numerous sketches, drawings and watercolours accompanied by detailed captions to his newspaper in London. This period could be described as a 'phony war' as the British waited for the various tribal leaders to come into camp in Jalalabad and swear their allegiance to the British Government. 

The inactivity of the army with only the occasional punitive expedition to alleviate the boredom allowed Simpson to pursue his antiquarian interests by exploring caves and excavating several ancient Buddhist burial monuments known as stupas. In addition to the finely detailed and exquisite pictures, Simpson's diary contains accounts of his studies of these ancient sites as well as commentaries on the people and places he observed.

Upon his return to England, he collected all his original sketches, drawings and watercolors sent to 'News and mounted them in two large albums, one dealing with the war, the people and the country, the other containing all his archaeological pictures. The dairy paints a rare picture of the life of a 19th century 'special' artist in a war zone and the mechanics and editorial decisions that went into the pictorial coverage of a colonial war. It also offers a unique insight into early colonial archaeology undertaken by Simpson and a number of British officers while on campaign continuing the tradition of oriental scholarship among army officials. 

While much of this revolved around 'treasure hunting' Simpson went beyond this to understand the Buddhist culture that created the many monuments surrounding the Jalalabad Valley. This edition of the diary benefits from an extensive introduction and appendices.
A Visitor's Companion to Tudor England

A Visitor's Companion to Tudor England

Suzannah Lipscomb

$19.99

Join historian Suzannah Lipscomb as she reveals the hidden secrets of palaces, castles, theatres and abbeys to uncover the stories of Tudor England. From the famous palace at Hampton Court where dangerous court intrigue was rife, to less well-known houses, such as Anne Boleyn's childhood home at Hever Castle or Tutbury Castle where Mary Queen of Scots was imprisoned, follow in the footsteps of the Tudors in the places that they knew. In the corridors of power and the courtyards of country houses we meet the passionate but tragic Kateryn Parr, Henry VIII's last wife, Lady Jane Grey the nine-day queen, and hear how Sir Walter Raleigh planned his trip to the New World. This lively and engaging book reveals the rich history of the Tudors and paints a vivid and captivating picture of what it would have been like to live in Tudor England.
The Darkest Days: The Truth Behind Britain's Rush to War, 1914

The Darkest Days: The Truth Behind Britain's Rush to War, 1914

Douglas Newton

$19.99

The Darkest Days shows how the war-hungry leaders and the right-wing press hustled the nation into war, making only the barest efforts to save the peace. As a result the declaration was the result of political negotiation, dishonesty and willful belligerence that split the cabinet and kept the opposition and the nation itself in the dark until it was too late. Through a forensic study of the personal papers of many of the key figures on both sides of the debate, historian Douglas Newton pieces together what really went on in the frenetic weeks between the assassination in Sarajevo and Britain's declaration of war upon Germany on Tuesday 4 August 1914. Many recently published histories of Britain's Great War embrace the conflict as a good war - irresistible, righteous - and popular. It has become almost heretical to offer criticism of Britain's intervention. This book presents a new critical examination of the government's choice for war, and weaves into the story an account of those radicals and other activists who urged neutral diplomacy in 1914.
Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London

Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London

Catharine Arnold

$34.99

The life of William Shakespeare, Britain's greatest dramatist, was inextricably linked with the history of London. Together, the great writer and the great city came of age and confronted triumph and tragedy.

Triumph came when Shakespeare's company, the Chamberlain's Men, opened the Globe playhouse on Bankside in 1599, under the patronage of Queen Elizabeth I. Tragedy touched the lives of many of his contemporaries, from fellow playwright Christopher Marlowe to the disgraced Earl of Essex, while London struggled against the ever-present threat of riots, rebellions and outbreaks of plague.

Globe takes its readers on a tour of London through Shakespeare's life and work, as, in fascinating detail, Catharine Arnold tells how acting came of age. We learn about James Burbage, founder of the original Theatre in Shoreditch, who carried timbers across the Thames to build the Globe among the bear-gardens and brothels of Bankside, and of the terrible night in 1613 when the theatre caught fire during a performance of King Henry VIII. Rebuilt, the Globe continued to stand as a monument to Shakespeare's genius until 1642 when it was destroyed on the orders of Oliver Cromwell. 

And finally we learn how 300 years later, Shakespeare's Globe opened once more upon the Bankside, to great acclaim, rising like a phoenix from the flames Arnold creates a vivid portrait of Shakespeare and his London from the bard's own plays and contemporary sources, combining a novelist's eye for detail with a historian's grasp of his unique contribution to the development of the English theatre.

This is a portrait of Shakespeare, London, the man and the myth.
Dirty Bertie: An English King Made in France

Dirty Bertie: An English King Made in France

Stephen Clarke

$22.99

This is the entertaining biography of Edward VII and his playboy lifestyle, by Stephen Clarke, author of 1000 Years of Annoying the French and A Year in the Merde. Despite fierce opposition from his mother, Queen Victoria, Edward VII was always passionately in love with France. He had affairs with the most famous Parisian actresses, courtesans and can-can dancers. He spoke French more elegantly than English. He was the first ever guest to climb the Eiffel Tower with Gustave Eiffel, in defiance of an official English ban on his visit. He turned his French seduction skills into the diplomatic prowess that sealed the Entente Cordiale. A quintessentially English king? Pas du tout! Stephen Clarke argues that as 'Dirty Bertie', Edward learned all the essentials in life from the French.
Great Houses of the National Trust

Great Houses of the National Trust

Lydia Greeves

$29.99

This absorbing book covers both great mansions, such as Petworth House in Sussex, and less grand but nevertheless unique buildings in the care of the National Trust. It travels the length and breadth of the British Isles, presenting buildings ranging from stunning Cragside, rooted in the rugged Northumbrian landscape, to the rather more austere surroundings of the Workhouse in Southwell, Nottinghamshire, and beyond. Between them, these buildings have borne witness to a thousand years of history, from the time of William the Conqueror to the present day.
Meadowland: The Private Life of an English Field

Meadowland: The Private Life of an English Field

John Lewis-Stempel

$19.99

What really goes on in the long grass? Meadowland gives an unique and intimate account of an English meadow's life from January to December, together with its biography. In exquisite prose, John Lewis-Stempel records the passage of the seasons from cowslips in spring to the hay-cutting of summer and grazing in autumn, and includes the biographies of the animals that inhabit the grass and the soil beneath: the badger clan, the fox family, the rabbit warren,the skylark brood and the curlew pair, among others. Their births, lives, and deaths are stories that thread through the book from first page to last.
Bath

Bath

Kirsten Elliott ,  Neill Menneer

$55.00

Throughout recorded history, Bath has been famed for its hot springs. The Romans bathed there; Elizabeth I promoted the spa town; Hanoverians visited it for their health. By the eighteenth century Bath was the fashionable venue for high society. Entrepreneurs of all types seized the opportunity. 'Beau' Nash instituted a strictly regulated social life; eager young architects including John Wood the Elder and his son Wood the Younger transformed the cityscape. In this text, Kirsten Elliott tells Bath's story through the centuries and brings it up to date, celebrating the modern city as a vibrant place attracting visitors from all over the world. Illustrated with over 200 stunning colour photographs by renowned location photographer Neill Menneer, text and pictures come together to make a book which is a joy to anyone who loves Bath, a must for any visitor.
Elizabeth I and Her Circle

Elizabeth I and Her Circle

Susan Doran

$50.95

This is the story of Elizabeth I's inner circle and the crucial human relationships which lay at the heart of her personal and political life. Using a wide range of original sources - including private letters, portraits, verse, drama, and state papers - Susan Doran provides a vivid and often dramatic account of political life in Elizabethan England and the queen at its centre, offering a deeper insight into Elizabeth's emotional and political conduct - and challenging many of the popular myths that have grown up around her. It is a story replete with fascinating questions.

What was the true nature of Elizabeth's relationship with her father, Henry VIII, especially after his execution of her mother? How close was she to her half-brother Edward VI - and were relations with her half-sister Mary really as poisonous as is popularly assumed? And what of her relationship with her Stewart cousins, most famously with Mary Queen of Scots, executed on Elizabeth's orders in 1587, but also with Mary's son James VI of Scotland, later to succeed Elizabeth as her chosen successor?  Elizabeth's relations with her family were crucial, but just as crucial were her relations with her courtiers and her councillors.

Here again, the story raises a host of fascinating questions. Was the queen really sexually jealous of her maids of honour? Did physically attractive male favourties dominate her court?  What does her long and intimate relationship with the Earl of Leicester reveal about her character, personality, and attitude to marriage? What can the fall of Essex tell us about Elizabeth's political management in the final years of her reign? And what was the true nature of her personal and political relationship with influential and long-serving councillors such as the Cecils and Sir Francis Walsingham? And how did courtiers and councillors deal with their demanding royal mistress?
Magna Carta: The Foundation of Freedom 1215-2015

Magna Carta: The Foundation of Freedom 1215-2015

Nicholas Vincent ,  Anthony Musson ,  Justin Champion ,  Joyce Lee Malcolm

$63.00

Eight hundred years ago King John of England was forced to seal a document of historic importance. As the first charter to grant individual liberties under the rule of law, protecting the people against tyranny, Magna Carta is the most influential and far-reaching legal text the world has ever known. For this book, published with the official support of the UK Magna Carta Trust and marking the eight hundredth anniversary of the charter's first issue, Professor Nicholas Vincent is joined by a range of experts on Magna Carta from across the world to reflect on the circumstances of its genesis and its enduring significance. Magna Carta was serially reinterpreted by later generations, becoming a totem in fierce political debates on the liberties of the people - it became a sacred text for English puritans of the Civil War, for the American patriots of the War of Independence, and for all those in the English-speaking world who have striven to build democratic rights and freedoms in the post-colonial age.
Counting Sheep: A Celebration of the Pastoral Heritage of Britain

Counting Sheep: A Celebration of the Pastoral Heritage of Britain

Philip Walling

$22.99

Sheep are the thread that runs through the history of the English countryside. Our fortunes were once founded on sheep, and this book tells a story of wool and money and history, of merchants and farmers and shepherds, of English yeomen and how they got their freedom, and above all, of the soil. Sheep have helped define our culture and topography, impacting on everything from accent and idiom, architecture, roads and waterways, to social progression and wealth. With his eye for the idiosyncratic, Philip meets the native breeds that thrive in this country; he tells stories about each breed, meets their shepherds and owners, learns about their past - and confronts the present realities of sheep farming. Along the way, Philip meets the people of the countryside and their many professions: the mole-catchers, the stick-makers, the tobacco-twisters and clog-wrights. He explores this artisan heritage as he re-discovers the countryside, and finds a lifestyle parallel to modern existence, struggling to remain unchanged - and at its heart, always sheep.
The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, 1768 to 1913: The Long Nineteenth Century

The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, 1768 to 1913: The Long Nineteenth Century

Thomas W. Gallant

$69.99

Traces the rich social, cultural, economic and political history of the Greeks. Often referred to as the 'Long Nineteenth Century', this period in Greek history conventionally begins with the war of independence in 1821. However, this book adopts a broader geographical scope, encompassing the Greeks of Russia and of the Ottoman Empire. The story therefore begins earlier than the war of independence and extends later into the 20th century. This period witnessed the establishment of a Greek nation state which had a profound impact on the Greeks of the Diaspora. As well as looking at identity and migration, this volume examines some key themes that were especially important in shaping the development of Greek culture during the 19th century, including the impact of the formation of the nation state, the formation of multi tiered, multinational social structure, and the development of a transnational Greek culture. It is an interdisciplinary approach that bridges history, anthropology and archaeology. It emphasises social history, including an in depth discussion of Greek rural society and economy. It brings Greek history and Ottoman history into dialogue in a way that hasn't been done before. It includes over 70 figures - maps, illustrations, tables and line drawings - which illustrate the key aspects of Greek social life.
The Tears of the Rajas: Mutiny, Money and Marriage in India 1805-1905

The Tears of the Rajas: Mutiny, Money and Marriage in India 1805-1905

Ferdinand Mount

$39.99

The Tears of the Rajas is a sweeping history of the British in India, seen through the experiences of a single Scottish family. For a century the Lows of Clatto survived mutiny, siege, debt and disease, everywhere from the heat of Madras to the Afghan snows. They lived through the most appalling atrocities and retaliated with some of their own. Each of their lives,  remarkable in itself, contributes to the story of the whole fragile and imperilled, often shockingly oppressive and devious but now and then heroic and poignant enterprise.

On the surface, John and Augusta Low and their relations may seem imperturbable, but in their letters and diaries they often reveal their loneliness and desperation and their doubts about what they are doing in India. The Lows are the family of the author's grandmother, and a recurring theme of the book is his own discovery of them and of those parts of the history of the British in India which posterity has preferred to forget. 

The book brings to life not only the most dramatic incidents of their careers - the massacre at Vellore, the conquest of Java, the deposition of the boy-king of Oudh, the disasters in Afghanistan, the Reliefs of Lucknow and Chitral - but also their personal ordeals: the bankruptcies in Scotland and Calcutta, the plagues and fevers, the deaths of children and deaths in childbirth. And it brings to life too the unrepeatable strangeness of their lives: the camps and the palaces they lived in, the balls and the flirtations in the hill stations, and the hot slow rides through the dust. 

An epic saga of love, war, intrigue and treachery, The Tears of the Rajas is surely destined to become a classic of its kind.
Irish History: An Illustrated A-Z

Irish History: An Illustrated A-Z

Seamas Mac Annaidh

$24.99

The history of Ireland is one of oppression and emancipation, characterized by foreign rule and the fight for freedom. It is a history in which religious and political conflicts sit side by side with a shared love of the ancient magic that enshrouds the island. The Irish have a great sense of national identity and this is reflected in their history: their heritage is ancient and their culture unique. Irish History offers a complete A to Z journey through a turbulent past that has shaped the country today. Every entry is tagged by one of seven themes, such as Culture and Politics, which can then be followed as threads throughout the book. This way, it provides a comprehensive background to, and a deeper understanding of, a great many characters and events.
The Italians

The Italians

John Hooper

$45.00

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A vivid and surprising portrait of the Italian people from an admired foreign correspondent  How can a nation that spawned the Renaissance have produced the Mafia? How could people concerned with  bella figura  (keeping up appearances) have elected Silvio Berlusconi as their leader - not once, but three times?

Sublime and maddening, fascinating yet baffling, Italy is a country of seemingly unsolvable riddles.  John Hooper's entertaining and perceptive new book is the ideal companion for anyone seeking to understand contemporary Italy and the unique character of the Italians. Digging deep into their history, culture, and religion, Hooper offers keys to understanding everything from their bewildering politics to their love of life and beauty. Looking at the facts that lie behind the stereotypes, he sheds new light on many aspects of Italian life: football and Freemasonry, sex, symbolism, and the reason why Italian has twelve words for a coat hanger, yet none for a hangover.

Even readers who think they know Italy well will be surprised, challenged, and delighted by The Italians.
Target: Italy: The Secret War Against Mussolini 1940-1943

Target: Italy: The Secret War Against Mussolini 1940-1943

Roderick Bailey

$22.99

The cloak-and-dagger war fought by British secret agents against Mussolini's Italy has been little known - until now. Target: Italy is the official history of the efforts of Britain's Special Operations Executive to strike at Fascist Italy in the Second World War and sever its alliance with Nazi Germany. Drawing on declassified documents, it reveals missions as remarkable as a plot to assassinate Mussolini and plans to arm the Mafia, and brings home the risks that secret agencies run when trying to undermine well-entrenched regimes. A powerful tale of desperate daring, tragic sacrifice and long-held wartime secrets.
The Garments of Court and Palace: Machiavelli and the World That He Made

The Garments of Court and Palace: Machiavelli and the World That He Made

Philip Bobbitt

$22.99

The Prince, a political treatise by the Florentine public servant and political theorist Niccolo Machiavelli, is widely regarded as the most important exploration of politics - and in particular the politics of power - ever written. In Garments of Court and Palace, Philip Bobbitt, a preeminent and original interpreter of modern statecraft, presents a vivid portrait of Machiavelli's Italy and demonstrates how The Prince articulates a new idea of government that emerged during the Renaissance. Bobbitt argues that when The Prince is read alongside the Discourses, modern readers can see clearly how Machiavelli prophesied the end of the feudal era and the birth of a recognizably modern polity. As this book shows, publication of The Prince in 1532 represents nothing less than a revolutionary moment in our understanding of the place of the law and war in the creation and maintenance of the modern state.
Japan Journeys: Famous Woodblock Prints of Cultural Japan

Japan Journeys: Famous Woodblock Prints of Cultural Japan

Andreas Marks

$21.99

From Mount Fuji to the temples of Kyoto,  Japan Journeys  offers a unique perspective on the country's most famous travel destinations. Art historian Andreas Marks has gathered together approximately two hundred Japanese woodblock prints depicting scenic spots and cultural icons that still delight visitors today.

Many of the prints are by masters such as Utagawa Hiroshige, Kitagawa Utamaro, and Utagawa Kunisada, and currently hang in prestigious galleries and museums worldwide. Katsuhika Hokusai, the artform's most celebrated artist, is also well represented, with many prints from his  Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido Road  series and  Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji  series, including his world-renowned  Great Wave  print.

In addition to prints showcasing Japan's natural beauty, Marks' carefully curated selection depicts roads and railways; favorite pastimes, such as blossom viewing and attending festivals; beloved entertainment, such as kabuki theater; the fashions they wore, and the food they ate. Marks is a leading expert on Japanese woodblock prints, and his Illuminating captions provide background context to the scenes depicted.

Images of Japan are a continual source of fascination and delight for visitors and armchair travelers alike, and this original gift book also provides a valuable resource for art historians, scholars, and anyone interested in Japanese art, history, and traditional culture.
Samurai Tales: Courage, Fidelity and Revenge in the Final Years of the Shogun

Samurai Tales: Courage, Fidelity and Revenge in the Final Years of the Shogun

Romulus Hilsborough ,  Kiyoharu Omino

$18.99

Samurai Tales is about the legendary men from the samurai class who fought for the helm of power in 19th century Japan. These are stories of courage, honour, fidelity, disgrace, fate, and destiny set in the bloody time of political change and social upheaval in the final years of the Shogun.
Auschwitz Report

Auschwitz Report

Primo Levi ,  Leonardo de Benedetti

$16.99

Immediately following his release from Auschwitz in 1945, Primo Levi, along with Dr Claudio Debenedetti, was asked to provide a report on living conditions in the concentration camp for Russian authorities. Published the following year, it was then forgotten and has until now remained unknown to a wider public. Representing the very first attempts at fathoming the horrors, the report details the deportation to Auschwitz, selections for work and extermination, everyday life in the camp, and the organization and operation of the gas chambers. Auschwitz Report is a significant addition to the oeuvre of the world's most renowned chronicler of the Holocaust.
Isis: The State of Terror

Isis: The State of Terror

Jessica Stern ,  J. M. Berger

$29.99

The first major book on ISIS to be published since the group exploded on the international stage in summer 2014.

Drawing on their unusual access to intelligence sources and material, law enforcement, and groundbreaking research into open source intelligence, Jessica Stern and J M Berger outline the origins of ISIS (known variously as ISIL and IS) as the formidable terrorist group it has quickly become. 'ISIS: The State of Terror' delves into the 'ghoulish pornography' of pro-jihadi videos, the seductive appeal of 'jihadi chic' and the startling effectiveness of the Islamic State's use of social media as a means of luring and recruiting citizens from countries such as the United States, Great Britain, and France-using recent examples such as Douglas McCain, the American citizen from Minnesota who joined ISIS and died in combat fighting on the side of the Islamic State. 

Although the picture Stern and Berger paint is bleak, 'State of Terror' also offers well-informed thoughts on potential government responses to ISIS - most importantly, emphasizing that we must alter our present conceptions of terrorism and react to the rapidly changing jihadi landscape, both online and off, as quickly as the terrorists do.

'ISIS: The State of Terror' is not only a compelling account of the evolution of a terrorist organization, but also a necessary book that attempts to answer the question of what our next move - as a country, as a government, as the world - should be.
The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution

The Rise of Islamic State: ISIS and the New Sunni Revolution

Patrick Cockburn

$21.99

Out of the failures of Iraq and Afghanistan, the Arab Spring and Syria, a new threat emerges. While Al Qaeda is weakened, new jihadi movements, especially ISIS, are starting to emerge. In military operations in June 2014 they were far more successful than Al Qaeda ever were, taking territory that reaches across borders and includes the city of Mosul. The reports of their military coordination and brutality are chilling. While they call for the formation of a new caliphate once again the West becomes a target. How could things have gone so badly wrong? In The Rise of Islamic State, Cockburn analyzes the reasons for the unfolding of US and the West's greatest foreign policy debacle and the impact that it has on the war-torn and volatile Middle East.
Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide

Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide

Thomas De Waal

$35.95

The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in 1915-16 was a brutal mass crime that prefigured other genocides in the 20th century. By various estimates, more than a million Armenians were killed and the survivors were scattered across the world. Although it is now a century old, the issue of what most of the world calls the Armenian Genocide of 1915 has not been consigned to history. It is a live and divisive political issue that mobilizes Armenians across the world, touches the identity and politics of modern Turkey, and has consumed the attention of U.S. politicians for years.

In Great Catastrophe, the eminent scholar and reporter Thomas de Waal looks at the changing narratives and politics of the Armenian Genocide and tells the story of recent efforts by courageous Armenians, Kurds, and Turks to come to terms with the disaster as Turkey enters a new post-Kemalist era. The story of what happened to the Armenians in 1915-16 is well-known. Here we are told the much less well-known story of what happened to Armenians, Kurds, and Turks in its aftermath. 

First Armenians were divided between the Soviet Union and a worldwide diaspora, with different generations and communities of Armenians constructing new identities, while bitter intra-Armenian quarrels sometimes broke out into violence. In Turkey, the Armenian issue was initially forgotten and suppressed, only to return to the political agenda in the context of the Cold War, an outbreak of Armenian terrorism in the 1970s and the growth of modern  identity politics  in the age of genocide-consciousness. In the last decade, Turkey has begun to confront its taboos and finally face up to the Armenian issue. New, more sophisticated histories are being written of the deportations of 1915, now with the collaboration of Turkish scholars.

In Turkey itself there has been an astonishing revival of oral history, with tens of thousands of people coming out of the shadows to reveal a long-suppressed Armenian identity. However, a normalization process between the Armenian and Turkish states broke down in 2010.  Drawing on archival sources, reportage and moving personal stories, de Waal tells the full story of Armenian-Turkish relations since the Genocide in all its extraordinary twists and turns.  He strips away the propaganda to look both at the realities of a terrible historical crime and also the divisive  politics of genocide  it produced.

This book throws light not only on our understanding of Armenian-Turkish relations but also of how mass atrocities and historical tragedies shape contemporary politics.
The Great Seljuk Empire

The Great Seljuk Empire

A. C. S. Peacock

$69.99

The first textbook introduction to the history of the Great Seljuk Islamic Empire to be published in English. The Great Seljuk Empire was the Turkish state which dominated the Middle East and Central Asia in the 11th and 12th centuries. This book surveys that period, which was one of exceptional importance, witnessing profound demographic, religious, political and social changes in the Islamic Middle East. The Turkish invasions played a role in provoking the Crusades, led to the collapse of Byzantine power in Anatolia and brought about the beginnings of Turkish settlement in what is now Turkey and Iran, permanently altering their ethnic and linguistic composition. The first book in a western language to offer an overview of this major Islamic empire; It provides a narrative history and a thematic analysis of the empire's institutions and aspects of life in the Seljuk world; examines the political, administrative, military, religious, economic and social organisation of the Great Seljuk Empire using a wide variety of historical and literary sources; draws on the evidence of archaeology and material culture; Illustrated with images, maps, charts and family trees and text boxes introduce key themes and institutions.
Iranian Tigers at War: Northrop F-5A/B, F-5E/F and Sub-Variants in Iranian Service Since 1966

Iranian Tigers at War: Northrop F-5A/B, F-5E/F and Sub-Variants in Iranian Service Since 1966

Babak Taghvaee

$36.95

The development of the F-5 lightweight supersonic fighter in the mid-1950s was almost a gamble for the Northrop Corporation, but ultimately resulted in one of most commercially successful combat aircraft in modern history. Iran was one of its major export customers, yet the long and often violent history of deployment of the F-5 in that country has largely escaped attention of historians.

No less than 309 aircraft of five major variants of the jet  -  the F-5A, F-5B, RF-5A, F-5E and F-5F  -  have provided the backbone of the frontline strength of the Iranian Air Force since the mid-1960s. Additional examples were clandestinely purchased from Ethiopia and Vietnam in the 1980s. The type bore the brunt of combat operations during the long war with Iraq, 1980-1988, and remains a mainstay of the Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force as of today. 

This breathtaking account provides a detailed chronological history of the F-5 in combat service in Iran, a history dominated by long-range strikes against some of best defended targets inside Iraq, and by thousands of dramatic close-air-support and reconnaissance sorties, but also fierce air combats against the then most modern fighter types in Iraqi service, including the MiG-23s and MiG-25s. It is completed with practically unknown stories of their combat presence in Pakistan, Afghanistan and the war against drug traffickers in recent years. Good though the F-5 has been, the advances of domestic Iranian aircraft building companies have resulted in attempts to continue the F-5 line with further redesign and developments, resulting in a number of indigenous variants. Combined, this means that the diverse and involved story about one of most interesting military aircraft of modern times is still far from over.

The author's detailed text is fully supported by an extensive selection of photographs and colour profiles. 

Middle East@War - following on from our highly-successful Africa@War series, Middle East@War replicates the same format - concise, incisive text, rare images and high quality colour artwork providing fresh accounts of both well-known and more esoteric aspects of conflict in this part of the world since 1945.
Israeli Air Force Operations in the 1948 War: Israeli Winter Offensive Operation HOREV 22 December 1948-7 January 1949

Israeli Air Force Operations in the 1948 War: Israeli Winter Offensive Operation HOREV 22 December 1948-7 January 1949

Shlomo Aloni

$36.95

Operation HOREV - the Israeli winter offensive from December 1948 until January 1949 - practically ended Israel's War for Independence (also known as the 1948 Arab-Israeli War), with an Israeli victory that forced Egypt to seek ceasefire and to negotiate a settlement with the fledgling nation.

From HOREV Day 1 on 23 December 1948 until HOREV Day 16 on 7 January 1949, this title presents Israeli Air Force missions during Operation HOREV in heretofore unseen depth and detail. This title chronicles Israeli Air Force sorties during Operation HOREV; from Austers and Pipers to C-46s and C-47s; from Messerschmitts, Spitfires and P-51s to Beaufighters and B-17s; Israel Air Force operations are detailed spanning the timeline of the conflict down to every unearthed sortie in depth, and shown in a way that Israeli Air Force operations during Operation HOREV had never been presented before.

This level of detail has been made possible by extensive use of contemporary documentation. The detailed text is supported by numerous photographs and colour profiles. 

Middle East@War - following on from our highly-successful Africa@War series, Middle East@War replicates the same format - concise, incisive text, rare images and high quality colour artwork providing fresh accounts of both well-known and more esoteric aspects of conflict in this part of the world since 1945.
Israeli Air Force Operations in the 1956 Suez War, 29 October-8 November 1956

Israeli Air Force Operations in the 1956 Suez War, 29 October-8 November 1956

Shlomo Aloni

$36.95

By participating in 1956 Suez Crisis Israel exploited an opportunity to join forces with France and the United Kingdom in an attack against Egypt in order to accomplish diplomatic, military and political objectives: to open the Red Sea international shipping lane to ships sailing from and to Eilat; to strengthen its alliance with France; to end or at least to scale down Egyptian hosted Palestinian terror attacks against Israel; to launch a preventive war in order to crush Egyptian military power before its completion of the transition to Soviet weapons could tempt Egypt to attack Israel and in order to accomplish a profound victory to deter Egypt from pursuing a another round of war policy.

Operation KADESH was the Israeli part in the Anglo-French attack and this title chronicles Israeli Air Force operations along the timeline of Operation KADESH from day 1 on 29 October 1956 until day 11 on 8 November 1956 in thus far unmatched depth and detail; all known Israel Air Force missions and sorties are listed and described and all air combats between Israeli Mysteres and Egyptian MiGs and Vampires are presented and analyzed.

The large variety of aircraft flown Dassault Mysteres, Dassault Ouragans and Gloster Meteors; B-17 Flying Fortresses, P-51 Mustangs and De Havilland Mosquitoes; T-6 Texans (Harvards) and T-17 Kaydets (Stearmans); Nord 2501 Noratlases, C-47 Skytrains (Dakotas), Pipers and Consuls and even a pair of Sikorsky S-55 helicopters are all covered in this title, which presents Israeli Air Force operations during the Suez War in a depth and detail unseen in previous publications.

The text is supported by numerous photographs and color profiles.Middle East@War - following on from our highly successful Africa@War series, Middle East@War replicates the same format - concise, incisive text, rare images and high quality color artwork providing fresh accounts of both well-known and more esoteric aspects of conflict in this part of the world since 1945.
Palestine Speaks: Narratives of Life Under Occupation

Palestine Speaks: Narratives of Life Under Occupation

Cate Malek ,  Mateo Hoke

$32.99

For more than six decades, Israel and Palestine have been the center of one of the world's most widely reported yet least understood human rights crises. In Palestine Speaks men and women from the West Bank and Gaza describe in their own words how their lives have been shaped by the conflict. This includes eyewitness accounts of the most recent attacks on Gaza in 2014. The collection includes Ebtihaj, whose son, born during the first intifada, was killed by Israeli soldiers during a night raid almost twenty years later. Nader, a professional marathon runner from the Gaza Strip who is determined to pursue his dream of competing in international races despite countless challenges, including severe travel restrictions and a lack of resources to help him train.
Waterloo: Four Days That Changed Europe's Destiny

Waterloo: Four Days That Changed Europe's Destiny

Tim Clayton

$24.99

The bloodbath at Waterloo ended a war that had engulfed the world for over twenty years. It also finished the career of the charismatic Napoleon Bonaparte. It ensured the final liberation of Germany and the restoration of the old European monarchies, and it represented one of very few defeats for the glorious French army, most of whose soldiers remained devoted to their Emperor until the very end. Extraordinary though it may seem much about the Battle of Waterloo has remained uncertain, with many major features of the campaign hotly debated. Most histories have depended heavily on the evidence of British officers that were gathered about twenty years after the battle. But the recent publication of an abundance of fresh first-hand accounts from soldiers of all the participating armies has illuminated important episodes and enabled radical reappraisal of the course of the campaign. What emerges is a darker, muddier story, no longer biased by notions of regimental honour, but a tapestry of irony, accident, courage, horror and human frailty. An epic page turner, rich in dramatic human detail and grounded in first-class scholarly research, Waterloo is the real inside story of the greatest land battle in British history, the defining showdown of the age of muskets, bayonets, cavalry and cannon.
The Empire of Necessity: The Untold History of a Slave Rebellion in the Age of Liberty

The Empire of Necessity: The Untold History of a Slave Rebellion in the Age of Liberty

Greg Grandin

$22.99

SHORTLISTED FOR THE SAMUEL JOHNSON PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION 2014.

One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, seal hunter and abolitionist Captain Amasa Delano climbed aboard the Tryal, a distressed Spanish slaver. He spent all day on the ship, sharing food and water, yet failed to see that the slaves, having slaughtered most of the crew, were now their own masters. Later, when Delano realized the deception, he chased the ship down, responding with barbaric violence. Greg Grandin follows this group of courageous slaves and their persecutor from the horrors of the Middle Passage to their explosive confrontation. A page-turning and profoundly moving account of obsessive mania, imperial exploitation, and lost ideals, The Empire of Necessity captures the epic clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was shaping the so-called New World and the Age of Revolution.
The History and Lives of Notorious Pirates and Their Crews

The History and Lives of Notorious Pirates and Their Crews

Captain Charles Johnson ,  C Lovat Fraser

$18.99

There is a fascination surrounding the subject of pirates and pirate lore that centers around the romanticized impression of lawless, brutal ruffians pillaging ships, hunting for gold and treasure, and traveling in massive ships waving the skull-and-bones flag. The golden age of piracy produced many grandiose and notorious characters whose incredible stories have found their way into this one-of-a-kind book. Originally published in 1735, The History and Lives of Notorious Pirates and Their Crews grippingly chronicles the adventures and misadventures of the most infamous pirates who ruled the high seas at the turn of the eighteenth century. From Captain Spriggs' rampant use of torture on his victims, to Bartholomew Robert's incredibly successful pirating career, Blackbeard's legendary fearsome demeanor, and Captain Kidd's tragic end, these truly enthralling stories of privateers turned bandits will leave readers on the edge of their seats. Though the author's true identity is still debated, his book helped shape the very concept we hold of pirates today--influencing such writers as J. M. Barrie, Rafael Sabatini, and Robert Louis Stevenson.
Waterloo 1815 (3): Mont St Jean and Wavre

Waterloo 1815 (3): Mont St Jean and Wavre

John Franklin ,  Gerry Embleton

$34.99

Waterloo is one of the defining campaigns of European history. The name conjures up images of the terrible scale and grandeur of the Napoleonic Wars and the incredible combined effort that finally ended Napoleon's aspirations of power in Europe. Drawn from unpublished first-hand accounts, and using detailed illustrations, this comprehensive volume is the ideal resource for studying the intense fighting at the battles of Waterloo and Wavre, the final, decisive engagements of the Waterloo campaign. Those two battles are at the heart of this study, which explores the action at Mont St Jean where Wellington managed to hold the French at bay until the arrival of the Prussians under Blucher saw the Allies secure a hard-fought victory at the dramatic climax of the 'Hundred days'.
HRC: State Secrets and the Rebirth of Hillary Clinton

HRC: State Secrets and the Rebirth of Hillary Clinton

Amie Parnes ,  Jonathan Allen

$19.99

This is a riveting biography of Hillary Clinton, which combines deep reporting and West Wing-esque storytelling to reveal the strategising and last minute decision-making that have accompanied one of the greatest political comebacks in history. Masterfully unfolded by two White House correspondents, HRC offers a rare look inside the merciless Clinton political machine. Drawing on over two hundred top-access interviews with Hillary's intimates, colleagues, supporters, and enemies, it portrays a seasoned operator who negotiates political and diplomatic worlds with equal savvy. HRC puts readers in the room with Hillary during the most intense and pivotal moments of this era, as she mulls over the president-elect's offer to join the administration, pulls the strings to build a coalition for his war against Libya, and scrambles to deal with the fallout of the terrible events in Benghazi - all while keeping one eye focused on 2016.
Lincoln and the Jews: A History

Lincoln and the Jews: A History

Jonathan D. Sarna ,  Benjamin Shapell

$44.99

By the time his life ended, Lincoln had been involved with over one hundred Jews, stood against many of his antisemitic generals even as he needed them to win the war, and become an advocate for Jewish equality and acceptance. In a country rampant with prejudice, where Jews comprised less than one half of one percent of the population, the story of Lincoln and the Jews is astonishing.

Co-authored by highly respected professor Jonathan Sarna and Benjamin Shapell of The Shapell Foundation, Lincoln and the Jews will detail the untold manifold relationships Lincoln had with the Jewish community in Civil War era America.  A fascinating never-before-told story for fans of Lincoln, American history, and Judaica.
Believer: My Forty Years in Politics

Believer: My Forty Years in Politics

David Axelrod

$32.99

The man behind some of the greatest political changes of the last decade: David Axelrod has devoted a lifetime to questioning political certainties and daring to bring fresh thinking into the political landscape. Here he describes his career from his time as a jouralist to masterminding the election campaign for Barack Obama and offers a warm portrait of his 20 year friendship with the President and his time working alongside him, on the election campaign and then in the White House.
A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination

A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination

Philip Shenon

$27.99

The questions have haunted our nation for half a century: Was the President killed by a single gunman? Was Lee Harvey Oswald part of a conspiracy? Did the Warren Commission discover the whole truth of what happened on November 22, 1963?

Philip Shenon, a veteran investigative journalist who spent most of his career at The New York Times, finally provides many of the answers. Though this book began as Shenon's attempt to write the first insider's history of the Warren Commission, it quickly became something much larger and more important when he discovered startling information that was withheld from the Warren Commission by the CIA, FBI and others in power in Washington. Shenon shows how the commission's ten-month investigation was doomed to fail because the man leading it - Chief Justice Earl Warren - was more committed to protecting the Kennedy family than getting to the full truth about what happened on that tragic day.

A taut, page-turning narrative, Shenon's book features some of the most compelling figures of the twentieth century-Bobby Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, J.  Edgar Hoover, Chief Justice Warren, CIA spymasters Allen Dulles and Richard Helms, as well as the CIA's treacherous 'molehunter,' James Jesus Angleton.

Based on hundreds of interviews and unprecedented access to the surviving commission staffers and many other key players, Philip Shenon's authoritative, scrupulously researched book will forever change the way we think about the Kennedy assassination and about the deeply flawed investigation that followed.
Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis

Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis

Preston Lauterbach

$45.95

Following the Civil War, Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee, thrived as a cauldron of sex and song, violence and passion. But out of this turmoil emerged a center of black progress, optimism, and cultural ferment. Preston Lauterbach tells this vivid, fascinating story through the multigenerational saga of a family whose ambition, race pride, and moral complexity indelibly shaped the city that would loom so large in American life.

Robert Church, who would become  the South's first black millionaire,  was a mulatto slave owned by his white father. Having survived a deadly race riot in 1866, Church constructed an empire of vice in the booming river town. He made a fortune with saloons, gambling, and-shockingly-white prostitution. But he also nurtured the militant journalism of Ida B. Wells and helped revolutionize American music through the work of composer W.C. Handy, the man who claimed to have invented the blues. In the face of Jim Crow, the Church fortune helped fashion the most powerful black political organization of the early twentieth century. Robert and his son, Bob Jr., bought and sold property, founded a bank, and created a park and auditorium for their people finer than the places whites had forbidden them to attend. 

However, the Church family operated through a tense arrangement with the Democrat machine run by the notorious E. H.  Boss  Crump, who stole elections and controlled city hall. The battle between this black dynasty and the white political machine would define the future of Memphis. Brilliantly researched and swiftly plotted, Beale Street Dynasty offers a captivating account of one of America's iconic cities-by one of our most talented narrative historians.
Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth

Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth

Terry L. Alford

$35.95

With a single shot from a pistol small enough to conceal in his hand, John Wilkes Booth catapulted into history on the night of April 14, 1865, just as he hoped.  But his murder of President Abraham Lincoln - one of the most familiar events in American history - brought Booth infamy, not the acclaim he sought.  Booth was remarkably different from other presidential assassins.  Admired as an actor well before the tragedy at Ford's Theatre, the handsome and likeable twenty six year old was billed as  the youngest star in the world.  

Lincoln was among the thousands who applauded his performances.  Wealth, fame, and popularity came to Booth, but they meant little compared to the turbulent actor's passion to help the South win its independence.  When the war went badly for the Confederacy, he abandoned acting and plotted to abduct Lincoln and take him south as a prisoner.  Booth stalked Lincoln relentlessly during the last winter of the war, only to fail time and again to capture him. As the Confederacy collapsed in April, 1865, Booth decided that the only way he could revive the South and punish the North for the war would be to murder Lincoln - whatever the cost to himself or others.  How could someone so gifted and admired-someone with so much to lose-commit a crime that stunned and infuriated the nation?

The first biography of Booth ever written, Fortune's Fool answers that question.  Its cradle-to-grave portrait of one of America's most remarkable personalities sets it apart from other books on the Lincoln assassination.  The result of a quarter-century of research into government archives, historical libraries, and family records, it brings to life the exceptionally talented and troubling individual who committed the most consequential murder in American history.
The NYPD's First Fifty Years: Politicians, Police Commissioners, and Patrolmen

The NYPD's First Fifty Years: Politicians, Police Commissioners, and Patrolmen

Bernard Whalen ,  Jon Whalen ,  Chief William J Bratton

$39.99

The New York Police Department is an iconic symbol of one of the world's most famous cities. The blue uniforms of the men and women who serve on the force have long stood for integrity and heroism in the work to serve and protect the city's residents. And yet, as in any large public organization, the NYPD has also suffered its share of corruption, political shenanigans, and questionable leadership. In The NYPD's First Fifty Years, Bernard Whalen, himself a long-serving NYPD lieutenant, and his father, Jon, consider the men and women who have contributed to the department's past, both positively and less so. Starting with the official formation of the NYPD in 1898, they examine the commissioners, politicians, and patrolmen who during the next fifty years left a lasting mark on history and on one another. In the process, they also explore the backroom dealings, the hidden history, and the relationships that set the scene for the modern NYPD that so proudly serves the city today.
Stories from Langley: A Glimpse Inside the CIA

Stories from Langley: A Glimpse Inside the CIA

Edward F. Mickolus

$42.99

Applicants to the Central Intelligence Agency often asked Edward Mickolus what they might expect in a career there. Mickolus, who was a CIA intelligence officer, whose duties also included recruiting and public affairs, never had a simple answer.

If applicants were considering a life in the National Clandestine Service, the answer was easy. Numerous memoirs show the lives of operations officers collecting secret intelligence overseas, conducting counterintelligence investigations, and running covert action programs. But the CIA isn't only about case officers in far-flung areas of the world, recruiting spies to steal secrets. For an applicant considering a career as an analyst, a support officer, a scientist, or even a secretary, few sources provide reliable insight into what a more typical career at the CIA might look like.

This collection of the exploits and insights of twenty-nine everyday agency employees is Mickolus's answer. From individuals who have served at the highest levels of the agency to young officers just beginning their careers, Stories from Langley reveals the breadth of career opportunities available at the CIA and offers advice from agency officers themselves.
Dark Journey: Three Key New Zealand Battles of the Western Front

Dark Journey: Three Key New Zealand Battles of the Western Front

Glyn Harper

$29.99

Definitive account of three key NZ battles of the Western Front, WWI. this significant volume represents the culmination of over seven years' writing and research by esteemed military historian Glyn Harper. the book includes the revision and reissuing of his two earlier detailed histories of the New Zealand Divisions' major Western Front battles of World War One - Massacre at Passchendaele (2000), Spring Offensive (2003) - combined with a previously unpublished account of the third major battle of the Somme, at Bapaume, during which several VCs were awarded to New Zealand troops. Dark Journey presents the first comprehensive overview of New Zealand's involvement in World War One by one of our most highly regarded historians. It also provides deep analysis of the NZ war contribution, with startling revelations about the true scale of casualties, consistently under-reported in the past. this is Glyn Harper's master work, bringing together research and resources from his previous books, presenting the full story of New Zealand's Western Front experiences on a deservedly grand scale.
Four Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Romanov Grand Duchesses

Four Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Romanov Grand Duchesses

Helen Rappaport

$19.99

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On 17 July 1918, four young women walked down twenty-three steps into the cellar of a house in Ekaterinburg. The eldest was twenty-two, the youngest only seventeen. Together with their parents and their thirteen-year-old brother, they were all brutally murdered. Their crime: to be the daughters of the last Tsar and Tsaritsa of All the Russias. 

In Four Sisters acclaimed biographer Helen Rappaport offers readers the most authoritative account yet of the Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia. Drawing on their own letters and diaries, she paints a vivid picture of their lives in the dying days of the Romanov dynasty. We see, almost for the first time, their journey from a childhood of enormous privilege, throughout which they led a very sheltered and largely simple life, to young womanhood - their first romantic crushes, their hopes and dreams, the difficulty of coping with a mother who was a chronic invalid and a haeomophiliac brother, and, latterly, the trauma of the revolution and its terrible consequences. 

Compellingly readable, meticulously researched and deeply moving, Four Sisters gives these young women a voice, and allows their story to resonate for readers almost a century after their death.
Defending the Motherland: The Soviet Women Who Fought Hitler's Aces

Defending the Motherland: The Soviet Women Who Fought Hitler's Aces

Lyuba Vinogradova ,  Arch Tait ,  Antony Beevor

$32.99

Plucked from every background, and led by an N.K.V.D. Major, the new recruits who boarded a train in Moscow on 16th October 1941 to go to war had much in common with millions of others across the world. What made the 586th Fighter Regiment, the 587th Heavy-bomber Regiment and the 588th Regiment of light night-bombers unique was their gender: the Soviet Union was creating the first all-female active combat units in modern history. Drawing on original interviews with surviving airwomen, Lyuba Vinogradova weaves together the untold stories of the female Soviet fighter pilots of the Second World War. From that first train journey to the last tragic disappearance, Vinogradova's panoramic account of these women's lives follows them from society balls to unmarked graves, from landmark victories to the horrors of Stalingrad. Battling not just fearsome Aces of the Luftwaffe but also patronising prejudice from their own leaders, women such as Lilya Litvyak and Ekaterina Budanova are brought to life by the diaries and recollections of those who knew them, and who watched them live, love, fight and die.
A Spy Among Friends: Philby and the Great Betrayal

A Spy Among Friends: Philby and the Great Betrayal

Ben Macintyre

$19.99

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Kim Philby was the most notorious British defector and Soviet mole in history. Agent, double agent, traitor and enigma, he betrayed every secret of Allied operations to the Russians in the early years of the Cold War. Philby's two closest friends in the intelligence world, Nicholas Elliott of MI6 and James Jesus Angleton, the CIA intelligence chief, thought they knew Philby better than anyone, and then discovered they had not known him at all. This is a story of intimate duplicity; of loyalty, trust and treachery, class and conscience; of an ideological battle waged by men with cut-glass accents and well-made suits in the comfortable clubs and restaurants of London and Washington; of male friendships forged, and then systematically betrayed. With access to newly released MI5 files and previously unseen family papers, and with the cooperation of former officers of MI6 and the CIA, this definitive biography unlocks what is perhaps the last great secret of the Cold War.
The Oxford Illustrated History of World War Two

The Oxford Illustrated History of World War Two

Richard Overy

$61.95

World War Two was the most devastating conflict in recorded human history. It was both global in extent and total in character. It has understandably left a long and dark shadow across the decades. Yet it is three generations since hostilities formally ended in 1945 and the conflict is now a lived memory for only a few.  And this growing distance in time has allowed historians to think differently about how to describe it, how to explain its course, and what subjects to focus on when considering the wartime experience.

For instance, as World War Two recedes ever further into the past, even a question as apparently basic as when it began and ended becomes less certain. Was it 1939, when the war in Europe began? Or the summer of 1941, with the beginning of Hitler's war against the Soviet Union? Or did it become truly global only when the Japanese brought the USA into the war at the end of 1941? And what of the long conflict in East Asia, beginning with the Japanese aggression in China in the early 1930s and only ending with the triumph of the Chinese Communists in 1949? 

In The Oxford Illustrated History of World War Two a team of leading historians re-assesses the conflict for a new generation, exploring the course of the war not just in terms of the Allied response but also from the viewpoint of the Axis aggressor states. Under Richard Overy's expert editorial guidance, the contributions take us from the genesis of war, through the action in the major theatres of conflict by land, sea, and air, to assessments of fighting power and military and technical innovation, the economics of total war, the culture and propaganda of war, and the experience of war (and genocide) for both combatants and civilians, concluding with an account of the transition from World War to Cold War in the late 1940s. 

Together, they provide a stimulating and thought-provoking new interpretation of one of the most terrible and fascinating episodes in world history.
Double Cross in Cairo: The True Story of the Spy Who Turned the Tide of War in the Middle East

Double Cross in Cairo: The True Story of the Spy Who Turned the Tide of War in the Middle East

Nigel West

$39.99

As part of the infamous Double Cross operation, Jewish double agent Renato Levi proved to be one of the Allies' most devastating weapons in World War Two. 

ln 1941, with the help of Ml6, Levi built an extensive spy-ring in North Africa and the Middle East. But, most remarkably, it was entirely fictitious. This network of imagined informants peddled dangerously false misinformation to Levi's unwitting German handlers. His efforts would distort any enemy estimates of Allied battle plans for the remainder of the war.  His communications were infused with just enough truth to be palatable, and just enough imagination to make them irresistible. ln a vacuum of seemingly trustworthy sources, Levi's enemies not only believed in the CHEESE network, as it was codenamed, but they came to depend upon it. And, by the war's conclusion, he could boast of having helped the Allies thwart Rommel in North Africa, as well as diverting whole armies from the D-Day landing sites. He wielded great influence and, as a double agent, he was unrivalled. 

Until now, Levi's devilish deceptions and feats of derring-do have remained completely hidden.  Using recently declassified files, Double Cross in Cairo uncovers the heroic exploits of one of the Second World War's most closely guarded secrets.
Operation Chowhound: The Most Risky, Most Glorious US Bomber Mission of WWII

Operation Chowhound: The Most Risky, Most Glorious US Bomber Mission of WWII

Stephen Dando-Collins

$32.99

Beginning with a crazy plan hatched by a suspect prince, and an even crazier reliance on the word of the Nazis, Operation Chowhound was devised.

Between May 1 and May 8, 1945, 2,268 military units flown by the USAAF, dropped food to 3.5 million starving Dutch civilians in German-occupied Holland. It took raw courage to fly on Operation Chowhound, as American aircrews never knew when the German AAA might open fire on them or if Luftwaffe fighters might jump them. Flying at 400 feet, barely above the tree tops, with guns pointed directly at them, they would have no chance to bail out if their B-17s were hit - and yet, over eight days, 120,000 German troops kept their word, and never fired on the American bombers. As they flew, grateful Dutch civilians spelled out  Thanks Boys  in the tulip fields below. Many Americans who flew in Operation Chowhound would claim it was the best thing they did in the war.

In this gripping narrative, author Stephen Dando-Collins takes the reader into the rooms where Operation Chowhound was born, into the aircraft flying the mission, and onto the ground in the Netherlands with the civilians who so desperately needed help. James Bond creator Ian Fleming, Hollywood actress Audrey Hepburn, as well as Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and Churchill all play a part in this story, creating a compelling, narrative read.
The Spy with 29 Names: The Story of the Second World War's Most Audacious Double Agent

The Spy with 29 Names: The Story of the Second World War's Most Audacious Double Agent

Jason Webster

$22.99

He fought on both sides in the Spanish Civil War. He was awarded the Iron Cross by Hitler and an MBE by Britain. To MI5 he was known as Garbo. To the Abwehr, he was Alaric. He also went by Rags the Indian Poet, Mrs Gerbers, Stanley the Welsh Nationalist - and 24 other names. He tricked Hitler over D-Day. He was the greatest double agent in history. But who, exactly, was Juan Pujol?

Using his intimate knowledge of Spain and his skills as a crime novelist, Jason Webster tells for the first time the full true story of the character who captured the imagination in Ben Macintyre's Double Cross.  He tells of Pujol's early life in Spain, his determination to fight totalitarianism - and his strange journey from German spy to MI5. Working for the British, whom he saw as the exemplars of freedom and democracy, he created a bizarre fictional network of spies - 29 of them - that misled the entire German high command, including Hitler himself. Above all, in Operation Fortitude he diverted German Panzer divisions away from Normandy, playing a crucial role in safeguarding D-Day and ending the war, and securing his reputation as the most successful double agent of the war. 

Meticulously researched, yet told with the verve of a thriller, The Spy with 29 Names uncovers the truth - far stranger than any fiction - about the spy behind one of recent history's most important and dramatic events.
Underground Warfare 1914-1918

Underground Warfare 1914-1918

Simon Jones

$44.99

Simon Jones's graphic history of underground warfare during the Great War uses personal reminiscences to convey the danger and suspense of this unconventional form of conflict. He describes how the underground soldiers of the opposing armies engaged in a ruthless fight for supremacy, covers the tunnelling methods they employed, and shows the increasingly lethal tactics they developed during the war in which military mining reached its apotheosis. While he concentrates on the struggle for supremacy by the British tunnelling companies on the Western Front, his wide-ranging study also tells the story of the little-known but fascinating subterranean battles fought in the French sectors. Vivid personal testimony is combined with a lucid account of the technical challenges - and ever-present perils - of tunnelling in order to give an all-round insight into the extraordinary experience of this underground war
The World's War

The World's War

David Olusoga

$19.99

Winner of the World War One Book of the Year 2015. A unique account of the millions of colonial troops who fought in the First World War, and why they were later air-brushed out of history. David Olusoga quotes extensively from soldiers' diaries and other eye-witness sources, bringing to life the searing experiences of these non-white troops. THE WORLD'S WAR unveils shocking truths such as: - The first soldier of the British Army to fire a shot in World War One was a black African. - By the end of 1914 one third of the British sector of the Western Front was held by Indian soldiers. - By 1917 the Western Front was the most multi-national, multi-racial, multi-faith place that had ever existed - a strange portent of Europe's future. - Germany created a special camp with a mosque and halal food in an attempt to persuade Muslim P.O.W.s to defect.
The Battle of Burma 1943-1945: From Kohima and Imphal Through to Victory

The Battle of Burma 1943-1945: From Kohima and Imphal Through to Victory

John Grehan ,  Martin Mace

$59.99

Despatches in this volume include that on operations in Burma and North-East India between November 1943 and June 1944, by General Sir George J. Giffard; the despatch on operations in Assam and Burma between June 1944 June and November 1944, by General Sir George J. Giffard, Commander-in-Chief; the despatch on Naval operations in the Ramree Island area (Burma) in January and February 1945 by Vice-Admiral Sir Arthur J. Power, Commander-in-Chief, East Indies Station; and the despatch on operations in Burma between November 1944 and August 1945 by Lieutenant-General Sir Oliver Leese. This unique collection of original documents will prove to be an invaluable resource for historians, students and all those interested in what was one of the most significant periods in British military history.
German Infantryman vs Russian Infantryman: 1914-15

German Infantryman vs Russian Infantryman: 1914-15

Robert Forczyk ,  Adam Hook

$29.99

The Eastern Front of World War I is sometimes overshadowed by the fighting in the West. But the clashes between Imperial Germany and Tsarist Russia in East Prussia, Poland and Lithuania were every bit as gruelling for the participants as the great battles in Western Europe. In spite of the crushing German victory at Tannenberg in August 1914, the war in the East would grind on into 1918, hampered by supply problems, difficult terrain and appalling weather conditions. In this study, author Robert Forczyk assesses the tactics and combat performance of both sides fighting in the brutal clashes at Gumbinnen, Goritten and Mahartse, examining their contrasting fortunes and revealing the evolving nature of infantry warfare on the Eastern Front during World War I.
Gunboats of World War I

Gunboats of World War I

Angus Konstam ,  Paul Wright

$24.99

Naval action in World War I conjures up images of enormous dreadnoughts slugging it out in vast oceans. Yet the truth is that more sailors were killed serving on gunboats and monitors operating far from the naval epicentre of the war than were ever killed at Jutland. Gunboat engagements during this war were bloody and hard fought, if small in scale. Austrian gunboats on the Danube fired the first shots of the war, whilst German, British and Belgian gunboats fought one of the strangest, most intriguing naval campaigns in history in far-flung Lake Tanganyika. From the Mediterranean to the Black Sea, from the Balkans to Mesopotamia, gunboats played an influential part in the story of World War I. This detailed technical guide to the gunboats of all the major navies of the war means that, for the first time, the story can be told.
Stirling's Desert Triumph: The SAS Egyptian Airfield Raids 1942

Stirling's Desert Triumph: The SAS Egyptian Airfield Raids 1942

Gavin Mortimer ,  Peter Dennis ,  Johnny Shumate ,  Alan Gilliland

$29.99

The night of July 26, 1942 saw one of the most audacious raids of World War II, just as the outcome of that conflict hung in the balance. In North Africa, a convoy of 18 Allied jeeps carrying Special Air Service personnel appeared out of the early-morning darkness and drove onto the Axis landing strip at Sidi Haneish in the Egyptian desert. Within the space of a few savage minutes 18 Axis aircraft were ablaze; a dozen more were damaged and scores of guards lay dead or wounded. The men responsible for the raid then vanished into the night as swiftly as they had arrived, prompting the Germans to dub the enemy leader, David Stirling, 'The Phantom Major'. Featuring full-colour artwork, gripping narrative and incisive analysis, this engaging study recounts the origins, planning, execution and aftermath of the daring raid that made the name of the SAS at the height of World War II.
Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid that Avenged Pearl Harbor

Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid that Avenged Pearl Harbor

James M. Scott

$57.95

In December 1941, as American forces tallied the dead at Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt gathered with his senior military counselors to plan an ambitious counterstrike against the heart of the Japanese Empire: Tokyo.

Four months later, on April 18, 1942, sixteen U.S. Army bombers under the command of daredevil pilot Jimmy Doolittle lifted off from the deck of the USS Hornet on a one-way mission to pummel the enemy's factories, refineries, and dockyards and then escape to Free China. For Roosevelt, the raid was a propaganda victory, a potent salve to heal a wounded nation. In Japan, outraged over the deaths of innocent civilians - including children - military leaders launched an ill-fated attempt to seize Midway that would turn the tide of the war. But it was the Chinese who suffered the worst, victims of a retaliatory campaign by the Japanese Army that claimed an estimated 250,000 lives and saw families drowned in wells, entire towns burned, and communities devastated by bacteriological warfare. At the center of this incredible story is Doolittle, the son of an Alaskan gold prospector, a former boxer, and brilliant engineer who earned his doctorate from MIT. 

Other fascinating characters populate this gripping narrative, including Chiang Kai-shek, Lieutenant General Joseph  Vinegar Joe  Stilwell, and the feisty Vice Admiral William  Bull  Halsey Jr. Here, too, are indelible portraits of the young pilots, navigators, and bombardiers, many of them little more than teenagers, who raised their hands to volunteer for a mission from which few expected to return. Most of the bombers ran out of fuel and crashed. Captured raiders suffered torture and starvation in Japan's notorious POW camps. Others faced a harrowing escape across China-via boat, rickshaw, and foot-with the Japanese Army in pursuit.

Based on scores of never-before-published records drawn from archives across four continents as well as new interviews with survivors, Target Tokyo is World War II history of the highest order: a harrowing adventure story that also serves as a pivotal reexamination of one of America's most daring military operations.
A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Everyday Life

A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Everyday Life

Greg Jenner

$35.00

Who had the first pet? How old is monogamy? Who invented streets? Why did cows change the world? When was the first war and how was it fought? What is time and how have we measured it? Who invented cookery? When did we discover medicine, and when did it actually start working? Who wrote the first song? When did we first build permanent homes? How old is fashion? Told in a cheerful and wry style, A Million Years in a Day will answer all these questions and more. Drawing on his experience in making the past entertaining and accessible on the award-winning Horrible Histories television series, Greg Jenner will narrate the variety of ordinary life in easily-digestible thematic snippets, while also reminding us that our ancestors were not so very different from us. This is a history of everything you never considered, a smorgasbord of learning. It is the story of your life in a day, one million years in the making.
Great Railway Maps of the World

Great Railway Maps of the World

Mark Ovenden

$24.99

From Mark Ovenden, the author of London Underground by Design and Metro Maps of the World, comes Great Railway Maps of the World, a beautifully illustrated, comprehensive history of the greatest railway maps, and the story behind them. The history of the railway is the history of Britain - and France, and America, and Japan, and Russia, among many others. Featuring hundreds of images, covering two centuries of advertising, surveyors' maps, route guides, travel posters, photos, and Google Earth maps, this is a book brimming with history, data and anecdotes. It is a must-have guide for every train fanatic, armchair or ticketed, as well as lovers of graphic design, history and the romance of railway travel.
History's Greatest Discoveries and the People Who Made Them

History's Greatest Discoveries and the People Who Made Them

Joel Levy

$29.99

Spanning achievements from the moment that early man learned how to control fire to the announcement of the Higgs boson 'God particle', this book recounts the extraordinary stories of 50 of humankind's greatest discoveries in science and exploration. How does it feel to be the first person ever to glimpse the Jovian moons through a telescope, or to set foot in the New World? What led Pythagoras to prove his famous theorem and how was Einstein's mind- blowing theory of relativity confirmed to the world? Read about the excitement, joy and awe of some of history's greatest pioneers in these gripping accounts of their adventures and breakthroughs. The background, science and implications of each 'Eureka!' moment are explored in a concise and engaging style, with illustrations and maps that bring to life these incredible discoveries that have changed the world.
Kill Chain: Drones and the Rise of High-Tech Assassins

Kill Chain: Drones and the Rise of High-Tech Assassins

Andrew Cockburn

$34.99

Assassination by drone is a subject of deep and enduring fascination. Yet few understand how and why this has become our principal way of waging war. Kill Chain uncovers the real and extraordinary story; its origins in long-buried secret programs, the breakthroughs that made drone operations possible, the ways in which the technology works and, despite official claims, does not work. Taking the reader inside the well-guarded world of national security, the book reveals the powerful interests - military, CIA and corporate - that have led the drive to kill individuals by remote control. Most importantly of all, the book describes what has really happened when the theories underpinning the strategy - and the multi-billion dollar contracts they spawn - have been put to the test.
Women Who Ruled: History's 50 Most Remarkable Women

Women Who Ruled: History's 50 Most Remarkable Women

Claudia Gold, MD

$22.99

'Poisoners', 'whores', 'witches' and 'murderers' - or so their enemies claimed. From Queen Nefertiti of Egypt, to the villainous Catherine de Medici and her flying squadron, to England's 'Gloriana' Elizabeth I, and the modern phenomenon of female prime ministers - Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi, Margaret Thatcher and Benazir Bhutto - Claudia Gold looks at three and a half thousand years to examine the lives of fifty of the world's most exceptional rulers - all of them women. Each biographical profile sets its subject clearly in the culture and context of its time, enabling the author not only to tell the stories of these 50 astonishing women, but also to provide a fascinating and informative alternative social history.
Napoleon Wasn't Short and St Patrick Wasn't Irish: When History Gets it Wrong

Napoleon Wasn't Short and St Patrick Wasn't Irish: When History Gets it Wrong

Andrea Barham

$22.95

After falling for one historical misconception too many, the time is now right to launch a spirited fightback. The moment has come to set the record straight, once and for all. Leading the way in this modern crusade comes Napoleon Wasn't Short and St Patrick Wasn't Irish, a lighthearted guide that reveals the many myths, fabrications and ambiguities found in the annals of world history. For example, Winston Churchill was not born in a ladies' toilet, Lucrezia Borgia was not an infamous poisoner and as you've guessed, St Patrick Wasn't Irish...Written with wit and fascinating insight, and covering numerous subjects - from royalty to religion, saints to statesmen, inventors and explorers, and the lives of famous characters throughout history - this book is guaranteed to astonish and inform, amuse and entertain.
           
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