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The Convict's Daughter: The Scandal That Shocked a Colony

The Convict's Daughter: The Scandal That Shocked a Colony

Kiera Lindsey

$32.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE MAY 2016 ----- A dramatic and fast-paced biography of a currency lass born to convicts who gained their freedom and then their fortune in 1840s Sydney. At the age of 15 Mary Ann Gill slipped out her bedroom window to elope with a gentleman settler, but when her father discovered his daughter's disappearance he pursued the couple and fired two pistols at his daughter's suitor, unleashing a national scandal.

One wet autumn evening in 1848, fifteen-year-old Mary Ann Gill stole out of a bedroom window in her father's Sydney hotel and took a coach to a local racecourse. There she was to elope with James Butler Kinchela, wayward son of the former Attorney-General. Her enraged father pursued them on horseback and fired two pistols at his daughter's suitor, narrowly avoiding killing him.

What followed was Australia's most scandalous abduction trial of the era, as well as an extraordinary story of adventure and misadventure, both in Australia and abroad. Through humiliation, heartache, bankruptcy and betrayal, Mary Ann hung on to James' promise to marry her.

This is a compelling biography of a currency lass born when convicts were still working the streets of Sydney. Starting with just a newspaper clipping, historian Kiera Lindsey has uncovered the world of her feisty great, great, great aunt, who lived and loved during a period of dramatic social and political change.

The Convict's Daughter: The Scandal That Shocked a Colony by Kiera Lindsey at Abbey’s Bookshop 131 York Street Sydney


More of the latest releases for History
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The Hellenistic Age

The Hellenistic Age

Peter Thonemann

$26.95

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The three centuries which followed the conquests of Alexander are perhaps the most thrilling of all periods of ancient history. This was an age of cultural globalization: in the third century BC, a single language carried you from the Rhone to the Indus. A Celt from the lower Danube could serve in the mercenary army of a Macedonian king ruling in Egypt, and a Greek philosopher from Cyprus could compare the religions of the Brahmins and the Jews on the basis of first-hand knowledge of both. Kings from Sicily to Tajikistan struggled to meet the challenges of ruling multi-ethnic states, and Greek city-states came together under the earliest federal governments known to history. The scientists of Ptolemaic Alexandria measured the circumference of the earth, while pioneering Greek argonauts explored the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic coast of Africa. Drawing on inscriptions, papyri, coinage, poetry, art, and archaeology Peter Thonemann opens up the history and culture of the vast Hellenistic world, from the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC) to the Roman conquest of the Ptolemaic kingdom (30 BC).
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Seneca: A Life

Seneca: A Life

Emily Wilson

$29.99

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This book traces the eventful life of Seneca, the Roman philosopher, dramatist, essayist and rhetorician of the first century CE, who came from Spain to Rome, spent his youth in Egypt, was exiled to Corsica under Claudius but recalled after eight years, and rose to dizzying heights of wealth, power and social influence under Nero, before falling from favour and being forced to kill himself. The book analyzes the relationship of Seneca's life story to his literary self-fashioning, and the tensions between the external worlds of politics, consumerism, and social success, with the Stoic ideals of asceticism, virtue and self-control.
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Rome in the Ancient World: From Romulus to Justinian

Rome in the Ancient World: From Romulus to Justinian

David Potter

$55.00

An expanded new edition of David Potter’s lively history, which tells the extraordinary story of Rome from its origins, through the Republic and Empire, to the period of its decline and fall. 200 illustrations, including 30 maps and battle plans.
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Pictures from My Memory: My Story as a Ngaatjatjarra Woman

Pictures from My Memory: My Story as a Ngaatjatjarra Woman

Lizzie Marrkilyi Ellis ,  Laurent Dousset

$34.99

"I want our past to be recorded for future generations to read and know and understand how life was for us desert Aboriginal people and how we live our lives now. The Whiteman and the things that he brought with him hugely influenced the changes that occurred in our lives and in our society. I am a person that experienced these changes and I want to share, from my perspective, these experiences with my people and with all these persons around the world that show a great interest in Aboriginal people, and with all those who continually keep asking me the same old questions."

Pictures from my memory is a compelling autobiographical account of Lizzie Marrkilyi Elliss life as a Ngaatjatjarra woman from the Australian Western Desert. Born in the bush at the time of first contact between her family and White Australians, Elliss vivid personal reflections offer both an historical record and profound emotional insight into her unique experience of being woven between cultures her Aboriginal community and the Western worlds. Ellis shares her first memories as an Aboriginal child living in communities, through her schooling years on the reserves and the progressive culture changes that her family experienced, to her work as a renowned linguist and interpreter for judges and politicians.
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The Libertarian Alternative: How Freedom and Markets Can Rejuvenate Australia

The Libertarian Alternative: How Freedom and Markets Can Rejuvenate Australia

Chris Berg

$32.99

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Libertarianism-the philosophy of government that pairs free market economics with social liberalism- presents a vigorous challenge and viable political alternative to the old LeftuRight partisan shouting match. Libertarianism offers surprising new solutions to stagnant policy debates over issues such as immigration and civil rights, and provides a framework for tackling contemporary problems like privacy, the environment and technological change. In The Libertarian Alternative, Chris Berg offers a new agenda for restoring individual liberty in Australia, revitalising politics and strengthening our sagging economy.
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This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Jerry Brotton

$55.00

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In 1570, after numerous plots and assassination attempts against her, Elizabeth I of England was excommunicated by the Pope.

It was the beginning not only of the well-known identification of England with heroic Protestantism, but - which is almost entirely neglected by historians - of an English alignment with Islamic powers, and of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from the kings of Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakech in the hope of establishing an accord which would keep the common enemy of Catholic Spain at bay. This awareness of the Islamic world found its way into many of the great English cultural productions of the day - especially, of course, Shakespeare's Othello and The Merchant of Venice. 

Less well known is that in 1599 Thomas Dallam, who made the organ for King's College in Cambridge, was sent to Istanbul to play in front of Sultan Mehmed and Sir Anthony Shirley was at the court of the Savafid Shah Abbas the Great; the following year the Moroccan ambassador, Abd al-Wahid bin Mohammed al-Annuri, spent six months in London with his entourage. This Orient Isle shows that England's relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have ever appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.

Jerry Brotton, one of the UK's leading experts on cultural exchange, gives this neglected history the fullest study it has ever received.
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The Lost Tudor Princess: A Life of Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox

The Lost Tudor Princess: A Life of Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox

Alison Weir

$24.99

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Royal Tudor blood ran in her veins. Some thought Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox, should be queen of England. She ranked high at the court of her uncle, Henry VIII, and was lady of honour to five of his wives. Beautiful and tempestuous, she created scandal - twice - by falling in love with unsuitable men. Throughout her life her dynastic ties to two crowns proved hazardous. A born political intriguer, she was imprisoned in the Tower of London three times, once under sentence of death. Her husband and son were brutally murdered, she warred with two queens, and proved instrumental in securing the Stuart succession to the throne of England for her grandson. Alison Weir brings Margaret Douglas' captivating character out of the shadows for the first time.
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So Great a Prince: The Accession of Henry VIII

So Great a Prince: The Accession of Henry VIII

Lauren Johnson

$49.99

The King is dead: long live the King. In 1509, Henry VII was succeeded by his son Henry VIII, second monarch of the house of Tudor. But this is not the familiar Tudor world of Protestantism and playwrights. Decades before the Reformation, ancient traditions persist: boy bishops, pilgrimage, Corpus Christi pageants, the jewel-decked shrine at Canterbury. So Great a Prince offers a fascinating glimpse of a country and people that at first appear alien - in calendar and clothing, in counting the hours by bell toll - but which on closer examination are recognisably and understandably human. Lauren Johnson tells the story of 1509 not just from the perspective of king and court, but of merchant and ploughman; apprentice and laundress; husbandman and foreign worker. She looks at these early Tudor lives through the rhythms of the ritual year, juxtaposing political events in Westminster and the palaces of southeast England with the liturgical and agricultural events that punctuated the year for the ordinary people of England.
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Wolsey: The Life of King Henry VIII's Cardinal

Wolsey: The Life of King Henry VIII's Cardinal

John Matusiak

$32.99

Cardinal Wolsey is a controversial figure: a butcher's son, a man of letters and the Church, a divisive political expert, a man of principle - yet, to some, an arrogant upstart. As Lord Chancellor to the incorrigible Henry VIII he achieved much both at home and abroad, but his failure to achieve the mighty monarch's divorce from Catherine of Aragon saw him brought to his knees. John Matusiak explores the pragmatic cardinal's life and career to uncover a man of contradictions and extremes whose meteoric rise was marked by an equally inexorable descent into desperation, as he attempted in vain to satisfy the tempestuous master whose ambition ultimately broke him. Far from being another familiar portrait of an overweight and overweening spider or cautionary tale of pride preceding a fall, this is the gripping story of how consummate talent, noble intentions and an eagle eye for the main chance can contrive with the vagaries of power politics to raise an individual to unheard of heights before finally consuming him.
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Broken Vows: Tony Blair: The Tragedy of Power

Broken Vows: Tony Blair: The Tragedy of Power

Tom Bower

$32.99

The political thriller of the year - a dramatic re-evaluation of Tony Blair which disentangles the mystery of an extraordinary politician - and illuminates the ultimate tragedy of power.

When Tony Blair became prime minister in May 1997, he was, at forty-three, the youngest person to hold that office since 1812. With a landslide majority, his approval rating was 93 per cent and he went on to become Labour's longest-serving premier.

On his first election campaign, Blair had promised that 'New Labour' would modernize Britain, freeing it from sleaze, special interests and government secrecy. He vowed to give priority to social justice and equal opportunity for all.

So what went wrong? The invasion of Iraq was particularly controversial and unleashed public fury against a government accused of not being open and honest in its march to war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Alastair Campbell's 'dodgy' dossiers about WMDs sparked outrage, but did the contamination of New Labour's spin stretch beyond the wars?

What is the truth behind Blair's claims of rebuilding Britain's schools, hospitals and welfare services? Why did he covertly open the doors to mass immigration? And how is it that the same man who risked his government to destroy Slobodan Milosevic and Saddam Hussein has, since leaving office, earned millions of pounds serving dictators?

Tom Bower was one of those who in 1997 looked on in excited anticipation as Blair took up residence in Downing Street. Now, with unprecedented access to more than 180 Whitehall officials, military officers and politicians, he has uncovered the full story of Blair's decade in power. To distil the magic and the myths of an era all Britons experienced but have not properly understood, he has followed Blair's trail since his resignation - to Asia, the Middle East and America, where he has built an extraordinary commercial empire advising tycoons and tyrants.

The result is the political thriller of the year - a dramatic re-evaluation of Tony Blair which disentangles the mystery of an extraordinary politician - and illuminates the ultimate tragedy of power.
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In Europe's Shadow: Two Cold Wars and a Thirty-Year Journey Through Romania and Beyond

In Europe's Shadow: Two Cold Wars and a Thirty-Year Journey Through Romania and Beyond

Robert D. Kaplan

$34.99

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A riveting and timely account of Romania past and present, of a decades-long obsession with one country, and of the fate of Europe in the age of Vladimir Putin from the bestselling author of Balkan Ghosts.

Robert Kaplan first visited Romania in the 1970s, when he was a young journalist and the country was a bleak Communist backwater. What ensued was a lifelong fascination with a critical, often-overlooked country.

This is a vivid blend of memoir, travelogue, journalism, and history. Kaplan illuminates the history and culture of Romania while also telling a personal story about his own intellectual development.

And it's a bigger story about Europe: geography, imperialism, the question of fate in international relations, the Cold War, the Holocaust, and more.

Kaplan began this book well before Russia sparked a new Cold War with its aggression in Ukraine. Romania is a metaphor for Europe's current challenge in confronting Putin, and this is the book you must read to truly understand the crisis with Russia.
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The Cultural Revolution: A People's History, 1962-1976

The Cultural Revolution: A People's History, 1962-1976

Frank Dikotter

$27.99

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The final volume of 'The People's Trilogy', completing the unprecedented series on Maoist China, seen from the perspectives of ordinary people, begun by the Samuel Johnson prize-winning Mao's Great Famine.   

Between 1965 and 1969 Mao Zedong unleashed violent campaigns in order to dispose of all who had previously opposed him after the Great Leap Forward. China became the site of one of the most deadly mass killings in human history, comparable to the gulags and the Holocaust. Entire villages were consumed by vehemence; old grudges avenged in the name of revolutionary purity, friends tormented by those close to them, victims systematically killed and cannibalised.

Until now, this devastating period of history has remained hidden, but with access to a wealth of new sources including interviews, untouched archives and self-published autobiographies offering insights that cannot be gleaned from official accounts, Dikotter drastically alters our understanding of Maoist China, revealing in harrowing detail how the lives of ordinary people were affected by the radical regime.

The Cultural Revolution completes Dikotter's magisterial and ground-breaking 'People's Trilogy' on China under Mao, highlighting the truth about those that suffered at the hands of the Red Guards and the premature deaths of tens of millions. Here Dikotter powerfully recounts the debauchery which the communists set loose, finally giving a voice to the revolutionary masses in a remarkable and authoritative work.
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One Child: The Story of China's Most Radical Experiment

One Child: The Story of China's Most Radical Experiment

Mei Fong

$29.99

For over three decades, China exercised unprecedented control over the reproductive habits of its billion citizens. Now, with its economy faltering just as it seemed poised to become the largest in the world, the Chinese government has brought an end to its one-child policy. It may once have seemed a shortcut to riches, but it has had a profound effect on society in modern China. Combining personal portraits of families affected by the policy with a nuanced account of China's descent towards economic and societal turmoil, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Mei Fong reveals the true cost of this most controversial of policies. Drawing on eight years spent documenting its repercussions, she reveals a dystopian legacy of second children refused documentation by the state, only children supporting their parents and grandparents, and villages filled with ineligible bachelors. An exceptional piece of on-the-ground journalism, One Child humanizes the policy that defined China and warns that the ill-effects of its legacy will be felt across the globe.
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A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to Isis

A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to Isis

Robert F. Worth

$32.99

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In 2011, a wave of revolution spread through the Middle East as protesters demanded an end to tyranny, corruption and economic decay. From Egypt to Yemen, a generation of young Arabs insisted on a new ethos of common citizenship. Their bravery and idealism stirred observers around the world and led militant jihadists to worry that they had been superseded by a new and peaceful uprising. Five years later, the utopian aspirations of 2011 have darkened. In one country after another, brutal terrorists and dictators have risen to the top as old divides reemerge and deepen. Egypt has become a more repressive police state than ever before; Libya, Syria and Yemen endure civil war and the extremists of ISIS have spread chaos and carnage across the region, and beyond it. A Rage for Order tracks the tormented legacy of what was once called the Arab Spring. Writing with bold literary ambition, the distinguished New York Times correspondent Robert F. Worth introduces a riveting cast of characters.

We meet a Libyan rebel who must decide whether to kill the torturer who murdered his brother; a Yemeni farmer who lives in servitude to a poetry-writing, dungeon-operating chieftain; two young Syrian women whose close friendship devolves into enmity as their sects go to war; and an Egyptian doctor who is caught between his loyalty to the Muslim Brotherhood and his hopes for a new, tolerant democracy. In a final chapter, Worth tells the moving story of the two eighty-something statesmen whose unlikely camaraderie allowed Tunisia to escape its neighbours' worst fates. Combining dramatic storytelling with an original analysis of the Arab world today, A Rage for Order captures the psychological and actual civil wars raging throughout the Middle East and explains how the dream of an Arab renaissance gave way to a new age of discord.
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The Killing of Osama Bin Laden: The Real Story Behind the Lies

The Killing of Osama Bin Laden: The Real Story Behind the Lies

Seymour M. Hersh

$27.99

In 2011, an elite group of US Navy SEALS stormed an enclosure in the Pakistani city of Abbottabad and killed Osama bin Laden, the man the United States had begun chasing before the devastating attacks of 9/11. The news did much to boost President Obama's first term and played a major part in his reelection victory of the following year. But much of the story of that night, as presented to the world, was incomplete, or a lie. The evidence of what actually went on remains hidden. At the same time, the full story of the United States' involvement in the Syrian civil war has been kept behind a diplomatic curtain, concealed by doublespeak. It is a policy of obfuscation that has compelled the White House to turn a blind eye to Turkey's involvement in supporting ISIS and its predecessors in Syria. This investigation, which began as a series of essays in the London Review of Books, has ignited a firestorm of controversy in the world media. In his introduction, Hersh asks what will be the legacy of Obama's time in office. Was it an era of 'change we can believe in' or a season of lies and compromises that continued George W. Bush's misconceived War on Terror?How did he lose the confidence of the general in charge of America's forces who acted in direct contradiction to the White House? What else do we not know?
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Towards the Flame: Empire, War and the End of Tsarist Russia

Towards the Flame: Empire, War and the End of Tsarist Russia

Dominic Lieven

$29.99

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WINNER OF THE PUSHKIN HOUSE RUSSIAN BOOK PRIZE 2016 'As much as anything, World War I turned on the fate of Ukraine' The decision to go to war in 1914 had catastrophic consequences for Russia. The result was revolution, civil war and famine in 1917-20, followed by decades of communist rule. Dominic Lieven's powerful and original book, based on exhaustive and unprecedented study in Russian and many other foreign archives, explains why this suicidal decision was made and explores the world of the men who made it, thereby consigning their entire class to death or exile and making their country the victim of a uniquely terrible political experiment under Lenin and Stalin. Dominic Lieven is a Senior Research Fellow of Trinity College,Cambridge University, and a Fellow of the British Academy. His book Russia Against Napoleon (Penguin) won the Wolfson Prize for History and the Prize of the Fondation Napoleon for the best foreign work on the Napoleonic era.
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The Diary of Lena Mukhina: A Girl's Life in the Siege of Leningrad

The Diary of Lena Mukhina: A Girl's Life in the Siege of Leningrad

Lena Mukhina ,  Amanda Love Darragh

$19.99

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In May 1941 Lena Mukhina was an ordinary teenage girl, living in Leningrad, worrying about her homework and whether Vova - the boy she liked - liked her. Like a good Soviet schoolgirl, she was also diligently learning German, the language of Russia's Nazi ally. And she was keeping a diary, in which she recorded her hopes and dreams. Then, on 22 June 1941, Hitler broke his pact with Stalin and declared war on the Soviet Union. All too soon, Leningrad was besieged and life became a living hell. Lena and her family fought to stay alive; their city was starving and its citizens were dying in their hundreds of thousands. From day to dreadful day, Lena records her experiences: the desperate hunt for food, the bitter cold of the Russian winter and the cruel deaths of those she loved. A truly remarkable account of this most terrible era in modern history, The Diary of Lena Mukhina is the vivid first-hand testimony of a courageous young woman struggling simply to survive.
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The Empress of Art: Catherine the Great and the Transformation of Russia

The Empress of Art: Catherine the Great and the Transformation of Russia

Susan Jaques

$49.95

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An art-oriented biography of the mighty Catherine the Great, who rose from seemingly innocuous beginnings to become one of the most powerful people in the world. A German princess who married a decadent and lazy Russian prince, Catherine mobilized support amongst the Russian nobles, playing off of her husband's increasing corruption and abuse of power. She then staged a coup that ended with him being strangled with his own scarf in the halls of the palace, and she being crowned the Empress of Russia. Intelligent and determined, Catherine modeled herself off of her grandfather in-law, Peter the Great, and sought to further modernize and westernize Russia. She believed that the best way to do this was through a ravenous acquisition of art, which Catherine often used as a form of diplomacy with other powers throughout Europe. She was a self-proclaimed glutton for art and she would be responsible for the creation of the Hermitage, one of the largest museums in the world, second only to the Louvre. Catherine also spearheaded the further expansion of St. Petersburg, and the magnificent architectural wonder the city became is largely her doing. There are few women in history more fascinating than Catherine the Great, and for the first time, Susan Jaques brings her to life through the prism of art.
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Paper: Paging Through History

Paper: Paging Through History

Mark Kurlansky

$39.95

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Paper is one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past two millennia, the ability to produce it in ever more efficient ways has supported the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art; it has formed the foundation of civilizations, promoting revolutions and restoring stability.

One has only to look at history's greatest press run, which produced 6.5 billion copies of Mao zhuxi yulu, Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-tung (Zedong)-which doesn't include editions in 37 foreign languages and in braille-to appreciate the range and influence of a single publication, in paper. Or take the fact that one of history's most revered artists, Leonardo da Vinci, left behind only 15 paintings but 4,000 works on paper. And though the colonies were at the time calling for a boycott of all British goods, the one exception they made speaks to the essentiality of the material; they penned the Declaration of Independence on British paper. Now, amid discussion of "going paperless"-and as speculation about the effects of a digitally dependent society grows rampant-we've come to a world-historic juncture.

Thousands of years ago, Socrates and Plato warned that written language would be the end of "true knowledge," replacing the need to excise memory and think through complex questions. Similar arguments were made about the switch from handwritten to printed books, and today about the role of computer technology. By tracing paper's evolution from antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the contributions made in Asia and the Middle East, Mark Kurlansky challenges common assumptions about technology's influence, affirming that paper is here to stay. Paper will be the commodity history that guides us forward in the twenty-first century and illuminates our times.
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Atlas of Lost Cities: A Travel Guide to Abandoned and Forsaken Destinations

Atlas of Lost Cities: A Travel Guide to Abandoned and Forsaken Destinations

Aude de Tocqueville

$45.00

The uniquely designed Atlas of Lost Cities details the destinies of 44 once-thriving urban centres that are now vacant ruins and empty ghost towns.

Like humans, cities are mortal. They are born, they thrive, and they eventually die. In ATLAS OF LOST CITIES, Aude de Tocqueville tells the compelling narrative of the rise and fall of such notable places as Pompeii, Teotihuac n, and Angkor. She also details the less well known, including Centralia, an abandoned Pennsylvania town consumed by unquenchable underground fire; Nova Citas de Kilamba in Angola, where housing, schools, and stores were built for 500,000 people that never came; and Epecuen, a tourist town in Argentina now swallowed up by water. Original artwork shows the location of the lost cities, as well as a depiction of how they looked when they thrived.
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Bad History: How We Got the Past Wrong

Bad History: How We Got the Past Wrong

Emma Marriott

$17.99

Sorting the facts from the historical fiction, Bad History exposes the falsehoods that have wrongly influenced our understanding of world history. Much of what we know about historical events is based on generally accepted 'facts': St Patrick was Irish; Roman gladiators would fight to the death; the Wild West was full of danger. However, history is, in fact, full of myths and misunderstandings that have been repeated so much over the years that we don't give them a second thought. Each entry in this informative book will discuss the case for and against these commonly accepted truths, and corrects what you thought you knew about history. Bad History provides a rigorously researched and entertaining read, perfect for any history enthusiast who wants to get their facts straight.
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Jungle of Stone: The True Story of Two Men, Their Extraordinary Journey, and the Discovery of the Lost Civilization of the Maya

Jungle of Stone: The True Story of Two Men, Their Extraordinary Journey, and the Discovery of the Lost Civilization of the Maya

William Carlsen

$48.95

One of the greatest stories of exploration never told: veteran Journalist William Carlsen brings to life the extraordinary lost story of once-famed 19th century American explorer John Lloyd Stephens, who rediscovered the ancient Mayan civilization in the jungles of Central America

The extraordinary true story of the rediscovery of the Mayan civilization: In the tradition of The Lost City of Z and Empire of Ice, comes the forgotten tale of 19th century American John Lloyd Stephens's quest to uncover and understand the ancient world's most advanced civilization amid the jungles of Central America.

Imagine The Lost City of Z, except the fabled lost jungle civilization really was found-an “Egypt in the Americas” in which 1,500-year-old pyramids and temples were hidden in impenetrable tropical forests, along with evidence of astonishingly sophisticated art, writing, science, and culture.

In 1839, when John Lloyd Stephens, a dashing U.S. special ambassador to Central America, and Frederick Catherwood, an acclaimed British architect and draftsman, set out into the unexplored jungles of the Yucatan, Charles Darwin was aboard the H.M.S. Beagle, the Bible was the basic template of history, and most people believed the world was less than 6,000 years old. Deep in the jungles, they stumbled upon the wondrous ruins of the Mayan civilization-an astonishing find that would change western understanding of human history.

In Jungle of Stone, William Carlsen uncovers the rich history of the ruins as he follows Stephens and Catherwood's journey through present day Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. Drawing upon Stephens's journals and Cather's magnificent illustrations-which became the bestselling book Incidents of Travel in Yucatan-Carlsen artfully tells the enthralling story of two great voyagers and the world they discovered.
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Viking Nations: The Development of Medieval North Atlantic Identities

Viking Nations: The Development of Medieval North Atlantic Identities

Dayanna Knight

$80.00

How was the North Atlantic settled? How did the distinct cultures of medieval Iceland and Greenland come to be? Viking Nations is an interdisciplinary consideration of medieval North Atlantic settlement that focuses on not only site-related identity but also the active choices made to adopt elements of identity. It utilizes comparative analysis of evidence to highlight terrestrial and marine drivers to identity development in relation to the site context. By adopting this approach it is possible to more closely examine not only the settlement of the North Atlantic but also the apparent taming of the Vikings concurrently taking place. This book illustrates the priorities expressed by medieval settling populations in relation to particular contexts. It proposes a method for planning ships' cargos which corresponds to identity development amongst the constituent Atlantic archipelagos. This work is written for an educated audience desiring to know more about the medieval North Atlantic beyond Viking stereotypes. Enough detail is included that medieval specialists will also enjoy the book.
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Death on the Nile: Uncovering the Afterlife of Ancient Egypt

Death on the Nile: Uncovering the Afterlife of Ancient Egypt

Helen Strudwick ,  Julie Dawson ,  Wolfram Grajetzki ,  John Taylor

$90.00

'Death on the Nile: Uncovering the Afterlife of Ancient Egypt' reflects the continuing public fascination with Egyptian coffins, mummies and burials. This new volume draws on 100 objects from the Fitzwilliam Museum’s Egyptian collection, and deepens our understanding of the lives and concerns of ancient Egyptians as they prepared themselves for death and burial.

The book builds on the growing trend in Egyptology to use techniques of scientific analysis and imaging to examine artefacts from Egyptian antiquity. The Fitzwilliam Museum has carried out an extensive project, involving Egyptologists, research scientists and conservators, to investigate every aspect of its impressive collection of coffins and shed new light on their production in the workshops of ancient Egypt.

'Death on the Nile' traces the religious beliefs of the people for whom the coffins were created, and how those beliefs changed over time. Comparisons of contemporaneous coffins likewise reveal how the economic and political structure of the period determined the burial options available to individuals in different social strata. Choices of materials and methods used to create the coffins add to the human story of the daily concerns and aspirations of the customer, and practical realities for the craftsman.
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A Brief History of the Amazons: Women Warriors in Myth and History

A Brief History of the Amazons: Women Warriors in Myth and History

Lyn Webster Wilde

$22.99

'Golden-shielded, silver-sworded, man-loving, male-child slaughtering Amazons,' is how the fifth-century Greek historian Hellanicus described the Amazons, and they have fascinated humanity ever since. Did they really exist? For centuries, scholars consigned them to the world of myth, but Lyn Webster Wilde journeyed into the homeland of the Amazons and uncovered astonishing evidence of their historic reality. North of the Black Sea she found archaeological excavations of graves of Iron Age women buried with arrows, swords and armour. In the hidden world of the Hittites, near the Amazons' ancient capital of Thermiscyra in Anatolia, she unearthed traces of powerful priestesses, women-only religious cults, and an armed, bisexual goddess - all possible sources for the ferocious women. Combining scholarly penetration with a sense of adventure, Webster Wilde has produced a coherent and absorbing book that challenges preconceived notions, still disturbingly widespread, of what men and women can do.
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Mycenae: From Myth to History

Mycenae: From Myth to History

Robert McCabe ,  Athina Cacouri ,  John Guare ,  Lisa Wace French

$80.00

The Mycenaean civilization flourished more than 800 years before the classical Greeks, with a complex society, strong artistic tendencies, and a distinct system of writing. Famous for its lion gate and citadel, Mycenae was long believed to be the city that fought Troy in Homer's epic, the Iliad. But after flourishing nearly three thousand years ago the society vanished, becoming nothing more than a legend.

Mycenae brings readers into the heart of this mystery, as it was being solved, through lively text, stunning photographs, and an original take on Greek history and mythology.  Using the pivotal summer of 1954 - a year after Linear B, the mysterious language present on all Mycenaean artifacts, was decoded - as her entry point, author Athina Cacouri reveals the fascinating archaeological history of the site, from the pioneering work of Heinrich Schliemann to the discovery of hundreds of  seal stones,  marked with an unknown language.

Cacouri's text is complemented by the photographs of Robert McCabe, whose lens captured the site before it was opened to the general public, giving his atmospheric images a poignant, unmatched immediacy.  An original play, commissioned for this volume from renowned American playwright John Guare, sets the mythological stage for the archaeological discoveries to come by recounting the history of the House of Atreus and King Agamemnon's Trojan War, while commentary on the photographs from archaeologist Lisa Wace French ties those myths to very real discoveries at the site. An essay by Daniel Fallu, detailing the importance of Mycenae's geology, rounds out this unparalleled survey of one of Greece's treasured archaeological sites. 

A multifaceted look at a brilliant civilization and the tireless work that led to its rediscovery, Mycenae is a fast-paced, lushly illustrated exploration of one of the most intriguing mysteries of antiquity that is sure to delight lovers of classical civilization, photography, and travel.
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The Treasures of Alexander the Great: How One Man's Wealth Shaped the World

The Treasures of Alexander the Great: How One Man's Wealth Shaped the World

Frank L. Holt

$35.95

War, the most profitable economic activity in the ancient world, transferred wealth violently from the vanquished to the victor. Invasions, massacres, confiscations, deportations, the sacking of cities, and the selling of survivors into slavery all redistributed property with epic consequences for kings and commoners alike.

The most notable example occurred in the late fourth century BC, when Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire. For all of its savagery, this invasion has generally been heralded as a positive economic event for all concerned. Even those harshly critical of the king today tend to praise his plundering of Persia as a means of liberating the moribund resources of the East. To test that popular interpretation, this book investigates the kinds and quantities of treasure seized by the Macedonian king, from gold and silver to land and slaves. It reveals what became of the king's wealth, and what Alexander's redistribution of these vast resources can tell us about his much-disputed policies and personality.

Although war made Alexander unbelievably wealthy, it distracted him from managing his spoils competently. Much was wasted, embezzled, deliberately destroyed, or idled again unprofitably. These facts force us to reassess the notion, prevalent since the nineteenth century, that Alexander the Great used the profits of war to improve the ancient economies in the lands that he conquered.
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Henry VI, Margaret of Anjou and the Wars of the Roses: From Contemporary Chronicles, Letters and Records

Henry VI, Margaret of Anjou and the Wars of the Roses: From Contemporary Chronicles, Letters and Records

Keith Dockray

$44.99

Henry VI (1422-61), a man 'more given to God and devout prayer than handling worldly and temporal things', was the third, and least successful, Lancastrian king of England; his wife Margaret of Anjou, 'a great and strong laboured woman', became a formidable political force in her own right; and the Wars of the Roses, so dramatically portrayed by William Shakespeare as bloody dynastic struggles fought for the possession of the crown, brought the usurpation of Edward IV (1461-83), the humiliation and exile of Margaret of Anjou, and the murder of her husband in the Tower of London. Combining a framework of interpretation and a rich selection of passages from contemporary and near-contemporary sources, this compilation enables readers to appreciate just why the rule of Henry VI resulted in the outbreak of the Wars of the Roses, what these internecine conflicts were like, and how they culminated in the end of the House of Lancaster.Keith Dockray was formerly Senior Lecturer in Medieval and Early Modern History at the University of Huddersfield.This volume, following in the footsteps of his Edward IV: From Contemporary Chronicles, Letters and Records (2015) and Richard III: From Contemporary Chronicles, Letters and Records (2013) completes a trilogy of source readers covering English kings, politics and war circa 1450 to 1485.
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Setting the World on Fire: The Brief, Astonishing Life of St Catherine of Siena

Setting the World on Fire: The Brief, Astonishing Life of St Catherine of Siena

Shelley Emling

$39.99

One of only two patron saints of Italy, the other being St. Francis of Assisi, St. Catherine was ahead of her time. As a political powerhouse in late 14th century Europe - a time of war, social unrest and one of the worst natural disasters of all time, the plague - she worked for peace between Christians while campaigning for a holy crusade against Muslims. She was a peacemaker during Siena's revolution of 1368, sometimes addressing huge crowds; she convinced Pope Gregory XI to return the papacy to Rome at a time when the Catholic Church was unravelling. She was illiterate but grew into a great writer by dictating to assistants. She was frail and punished herself mercilessly, often starving herself. It's easy to see why feminists through the years have sought to claim the patronage of St. Catherine. From her refusal to marry to her assertion that her physical appearance was of no importance, the famous Saint is ripe for modern interpretation. How did this girl, the second-youngest of 25 children of a middle-class dyer, grow to become one of the most beloved spiritual figures of all time, a theological giant to rank alongside the likes of Thomas Aquinas? In Setting the World on Fire, Emling gives an intimate portrayal of this fascinating and revolutionary woman.
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Hannibal and Scipio: PocketGiants

Hannibal and Scipio: PocketGiants

Greg Fisher

$17.99

In 218, Hannibal Barca, desperate to avenge the defeat of Carthage in the First Punic War, launched an ambitious ground invasion of Italy. With just a small force, he crossed the Alps – a feat reckoned to be impossible – and pitted his polyglot army against Rome’s elite citizen infantry. At Cannae, in 216, Hannibal destroyed an 80,000-strong Roman force in one afternoon, delivering a blow unequalled in Roman history for half a millennium to come.

The Romans had no answer to Hannibal until the young Scipio volunteered to take over Rome’s armies in Spain, which were close to defeat, and left leaderless by the death of Scipio’s own father and uncle. In the decade which followed, Scipio turned Rome’s desperate fortunes into a stunning victory over Carthage. The portrait of Hannibal and Scipio takes the reader through one of the greatest military campaigns in history, driven by two remarkable and fascinating men.
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Imagining the Future

Imagining the Future

Julianne Schultz ,  Brendan Gleeson

$27.99

Australian politics and national life are trapped in a permanent present. There are few opportunities to imagine the future, and even fewer to create it. Politics, commerce, media all focus relentlessly on the here and now. This breeds a corrosive cynicism. Yet when alternatives are presented they are often embraced and quickly become the new normal.

Griffith Review 52: Imagining the Future will imagine new possibilities. It is time to envisage the future, without fear, as a landscape to be won through human striving and expression.

Contributors include Al Gore, Tim Flannery, Maria Tumarkin, Anthony Funnel, Margaret Simons, Tony Birch, Don Henry, Ashley Hay, Leah Kaminsky, Graeme Davison, Tony Davis, Jane Gleeson-White and many more.

Published with the support of the University of Melbourne and the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute.
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Platform Papers #47: After the Creative Industries

Platform Papers #47: After the Creative Industries

Justin O'Connor

$16.99

In the 1990s, the 'creative industries' was a new concept aimed at mobilising the energies of culture in support of a new kind of economy: entrepreneurial, multicultural, youthful and digitally savvy 'Culture' moved to the top table of policy-making, and a revolution in Higher Education was proclaimed, with 'creativity' a central resource. Yet, only twenty years later the Australian Government has launched an innovation program in which culture and the cultural industries are nowhere to be seen. This Platform Paper charts the rise and fall of the concept in Australia, and argues that while undoubtedly a victim of its own hubristic rhetoric, its rapid disappearance leaves a hole in policy-making that those in the cultural sector ignore at their peril. Justin O'Connor outlines what a new agenda for the cultural economy might look like, 'after' the Creative Industries.
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The Burma Spring: Aung San Suu Kyi and the New Struggle for the Soul of a Nation

The Burma Spring: Aung San Suu Kyi and the New Struggle for the Soul of a Nation

Rena Pederson

$25.95

Award-winning journalist and former State Department speechwriter Rena Pederson brings to light fresh details about the charismatic Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi: the inspiration for Burma's (now Myanmar) first steps towards democracy. Suu Kyi's party will be a major contender in the 2015 elections, a revolutionary breakthrough after years of military dictatorship. Using exclusive interviews with Suu Kyi since her release from fifteen years of house arrest, as well as recently disclosed diplomatic cables, Pederson uncovers new facets to Suu Kyi's extraordinary story. The Burma Spring will also surprise readers by revealing the extraordinary steps taken by First Lady Laura Bush to help Suu Kyi, and also how former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton injected new momentum into Burma's democratic rebirth. Pederson provides a never before seen view of the harrowing hardships the people of Burma have endured and the fiery political atmosphere in which Suu Kyi's has fought a life-and-death struggle for liberty in this fascinating part of the world.
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The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong: My Untold Story of the Struggle for Tibet

The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong: My Untold Story of the Struggle for Tibet

Anne F. Thurston ,  Gyalo Thondup

$24.99

For over half a century, noodlemaker Gyalo Thondup has been a familiar figure in the Himalayan hill town of Kalimpong. But it was not until 2010 that the townsfolk discovered his true identity: Gyalo Thondup is none other than the older brother of the Dalai Lama and his special envoy, a trusted interlocutor between Tibet and foreign leaders from Chiang Kai-shek to Jawaharlal Nehru, Zhou Enlai to Deng Xiaoping.

Indeed, only the Dalai Lama himself has played a more important role in the political history of modern, tragedy-ridden Tibet. Now, for the first time, Gyalo Thondup is prepared to tell his story. His remarkable account offers an intimate, personal look at the Dalai Lama and his immediate family, as well as an insider's view of the vicious and sometimes deadly struggles within the Potala Palace - the seat of power in Tibet. His is a story of the 'real' Tibet - a country that is secular as well as sacred, where the source of conflict is not just with China but between Tibetans themselves.

Candid and insightful, this long-awaited account reveals Gyalo Thondup to have been a key figure in the great game played out by China, India, Russia and the United States over the strategically important Tibetan plateau.
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A Kim Jong-Il Production: Kidnap. Torture. Murder. Making Movies North Korean Style

A Kim Jong-Il Production: Kidnap. Torture. Murder. Making Movies North Korean Style

Paul Fischer

$26.99

It opens with a double-kidnapping...

Madame Choi, South Korea's most famous actress, is lured to Hong Kong, drugged and smuggled out on a ship. When her ex-husband, Shin Sang-Ok, Korea's most acclaimed director, goes to look for her, he vanishes too. The pair wake to find themselves in North Korea. They are imprisoned, tortured and brainwashed for five years, never seeing one another.

Then they meet North Korea's murderous head of propaganda and next leader, Kim Jong-Il. He tells them they have a choice - go back to prison or make movies for him...

This is the true story of how the couple did as they were told - making a cult classic along the way - while secretly plotting a daring escape to the West.
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The Unseen ANZAC: How an Enigmatic Polar Explorer Created Australia's World War I Photographs

The Unseen ANZAC: How an Enigmatic Polar Explorer Created Australia's World War I Photographs

Jeff Maynard

$29.99

The previously untold story of an extraordinary man and a great war photographer.

Cameras were banned at the Western Front when the Anzacs arrived in 1916, prompting correspondent Charles Bean to argue continually for Australia to have a dedicated photographer. He was eventually assigned an enigmatic polar explorer - George Hubert Wilkins.

Within weeks of arriving at the front, Wilkins' exploits were legendary. He did what no photographer had previously dared to do. He went 'over the top' with the troops and ran forward to photograph the actual fighting. He led soldiers into battle, captured German prisoners, was wounded repeatedly, and was twice awarded the Military Cross - all while he refused to carry a gun and armed himself only with a bulky glass-plate camera.

Wilkins ultimately produced the most detailed and accurate collection of World War I photographs in the world, which is now held at the Australian War Memorial. After the war, Wilkins returned to exploring and, during the next 40 years, his life became shrouded in secrecy. His work at the Western Front was forgotten, and others claimed credit for his photographs.

Throughout his life, Wilkins wrote detailed diaries and letters, but when he died in 1958 these documents were locked away. Jeff Maynard follows a trail of myth and misinformation to locate Wilkins' lost records and to reveal the remarkable, true story of Australia's greatest war photographer.
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Our Vietnam Nurses

Our Vietnam Nurses

Annabelle Brayley

$34.99

From the bestselling author of Bush Nurses and Nurses of the Outback comes this collection of compelling and moving stories of our heroic nurses in the Vietnam War Being a nurse always requires a cool head, a steady hand and an open heart. But if you're working in a war zone, the challenges are much harder. When Australia joined the Vietnam War, civilian and military nurses were there to save lives and comfort the wounded. With spirit and good humour, they worked hard and held strong, even though most of them were completely unprepared for the war before they landed in the middle of it. Working incredibly long hours and surrounded by chaos and turmoil, these brave nurses and medics were integral to our war effort. These fifteen stories show a side to the Vietnam War that has received little recognition but played an important part in shaping Australia's presence in the war. From flying with critically wounded Australian soldiers out of turbulent war zones, to being held at gunpoint, the compassion, courage and grace under fire in Our Vietnam Nurses will inspire and astound.
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Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London

Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London

Catharine Arnold

$22.99

The life of William Shakespeare, Britain's greatest dramatist, was inextricably linked with the history of London. Together, the great writer and the great city came of age and confronted triumph and tragedy. Triumph came when Shakespeare's company, the Chamberlain's Men, opened the Globe playhouse on Bankside in 1599, under the patronage of Queen Elizabeth I. Tragedy touched the lives of many of his contemporaries, from fellow playwright Christopher Marlowe to the disgraced Earl of Essex, while London struggled against the ever-present threat of riots, rebellions and outbreaks of plague.

Globe takes its readers on a tour of London through Shakespeare's life and work, as, in fascinating detail, Catharine Arnold tells how acting came of age. We learn about James Burbage, founder of the original Theatre in Shoreditch, who carried timbers across the Thames to build the Globe among the bear-gardens and brothels of Bankside, and of the terrible night in 1613 when the theatre caught fire during a performance of King Henry VIII. Rebuilt, the Globe continued to stand as a monument to Shakespeare's genius until 1642 when it was destroyed on the orders of Oliver Cromwell. 

And finally we learn how 300 years later, Shakespeare's Globe opened once more upon the Bankside, to great acclaim, rising like a phoenix from the flames Arnold creates a vivid portrait of Shakespeare and his London from the bard's own plays and contemporary sources, combining a novelist's eye for detail with a historian's grasp of his unique contribution to the development of the English theatre. This is a portrait of Shakespeare, London, the man and the myth.
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Ministers at War: Winston Churchill and His War Cabinet, 1940-1945

Ministers at War: Winston Churchill and His War Cabinet, 1940-1945

Jonathan Schneer

$21.99

June 1940: France has fallen and Great Britain is the only nation left standing between Nazi Germany and total domination of Europe. Faced by the greatest possible crisis, Winston Churchill's emergency coalition government must lead the way. In this illuminating and engrossing work, award-winning historian Jonathan Schneer draws on original research to disclose, for the first time, the inner machinations of Britain's wartime government. Dispelling the popular myth that the War Cabinet constituted an unbreakable 'band of brothers', Schneer reveals that they were in fact a 'team of rivals', steeped in quarrels, power plays, unexpected alliances and intrigue. Beyond the war itself, Ministers at War traces how the prospect of peace saw this ensemble of political titans fall apart, ultimately paving the way for a unified, progressive government and the birth of the welfare state.
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The Post Book: History of the European Post in 50 Exclusive Documents

The Post Book: History of the European Post in 50 Exclusive Documents

Vincent Schouberechts

$49.99

By awarding the European post monopoly to the Thurn & Taxis family 500 years ago, a truly continental postal service was born. Moreover, 1516 also saw the early birth of the Royal Mail. The perfect occasion to celebrate this milestone in history with a wonderful history book, aimed at both philatelists and laymen with an interest in world history. Written by a world class expert with unrivalled access to unique documents, this book brings together storytelling with high quality reproductions of rarely seen objects. The letter in which Emperor Charles V confirms the monopoly of the Thurn & Taxis family; the first transatlantic letter of 1512; the very first postage stamp and envelope...Read all about those and 47 other historical objects in this ambitious book, which covers the entire history of the postal service in Europe from 1516 until the founding of the Universal Postal Union in 1875, as well as important milestones before and after. Lose yourself in the captivating history of the postal service and get to know the role of Belgium and other European countries in this book, filled with amusing anecdotes and important facts.
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Heyday: Britain and the Birth of the Modern World

Heyday: Britain and the Birth of the Modern World

Ben Wilson

$49.99

Heyday brings to life one of the most extraordinary periods in modern history. From 1851, in the space of little more than a decade, the world was reshaped by technology, trade, mass migration and war. As instantaneous electric communication bridged the vast gulfs that separated human societies, millions of settlers travelled to the far corners of the Earth, building vast cities out of nothing in lightning-quick time. A new generation of fast steamships and railways connected these burgeoning frontier societies, shrinking the world and creating an interlinked global economy.

In the company of fortune-seekers and ordinary migrants, we journey to these rapidly expanding frontiers, savouring the frenetic activity and optimism of the boom-towns of the 1850s in Australia, New Zealand the United States. This is a story not only of rapid progress, but of the victims of an assurgent West: indigenous peoples who stood in the pathways of economic expansion, Asian societies engulfed by the forces of modernisation. We join, among others, Muslim guerrilla fighters in the Caucasus mountains and freelance empire-builders in the jungles of Nicaragua, British free trade zealots preying on China and samurai warriors resisting Western incursions in Japan. No less important are the inventions, discoveries and technologies that powered progress, and the great engineering projects that characterised the Victorian heyday, notably the transatlantic telegraph cable.

In a fast-paced, kaleidoscopic narrative, Ben Wilson recreates a time of explosive energy and dizzying change, a rollercoaster ride of booms and bust, witnessed through the eyes of the men and women reshaping its frontiers. At the centre stands Great Britain. The country was the peak of its power between 1851 and the mid-1860s as it attempted to determine the destinies of hundreds of millions of people. Heyday is a dazzlingly innovative take on a period of extraordinary transformation, a little-known decade that was fundamental in the making not only of Britain but of the modern world.
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Jeremy Hutchinson's Case Histories: From Lady Chatterley's Lover to Howard Marks

Jeremy Hutchinson's Case Histories: From Lady Chatterley's Lover to Howard Marks

Thomas Grant

$19.99

Born in 1915 into the fringes of the Bloomsbury Group, Jeremy Hutchinson went on to become the greatest criminal barrister of the 1960s, '70s and '80s. The cases of that period changed society for ever and Hutchinson's role in them was second to none. In Case Histories, Jeremy Hutchinson's most remarkable trials are examined, each one providing a fascinating look into Britain's post-war social, political and cultural history.

Accessibly and entertainingly written, Case Histories provides a definitive account of Jeremy Hutchinson's life and work. From the sex and spying scandals which contributed to Harold Macmillan's resignation in 1963 and the subsequent fall of the Conservative government, to the fight against literary censorship through his defence of Lady Chatterley's Lover and Fanny Hill, Hutchinson was involved in many of the great trials of the period. He defended George Blake, Christine Keeler, Great Train robber Charlie Wilson, Kempton Bunton (the only man successfully to 'steal' a picture from the National Gallery), art 'faker' Tom Keating, and Howard Marks who, in a sensational defence, was acquitted of charges relating to the largest importation of cannabis in British history. He also prevented the suppression of Bernardo Bertolucci's notorious film Last Tango in Paris and did battle with Mary Whitehouse when she prosecuted the director of the play Romans in Britain.

Above all else, Jeremy Hutchinson's career, both at the bar and later as a member of the House of Lords, has been one devoted to the preservation of individual liberty and to resisting the incursions of an overbearing state. Case Histories provides entertaining, vivid and revealing insights into what was really going on in those celebrated courtroom dramas that defined an age, as well as painting a picture of a remarkable life.
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Cameron at 10: The Inside Story 2010-2015

Cameron at 10: The Inside Story 2010-2015

Anthony Seldon ,  Peter Snowdon

$24.99

As dusk descended on 11 May 2010, David Cameron entered 10 Downing Street as the youngest prime minister since Lord Liverpool in 1812. He stood at the head of the first Coalition government in 65 years, with the country in dire economic straits following a deep financial crisis. From the early heady days of the Rose Garden partnership with the Liberal Democrats to the most bitterly contested general election in years, ‘Cameron at 10’ highlights forty dramatic moments in an exceptionally turbulent period in British politics.

The book contains all the highs and lows on the domestic front as well as providing revealing insights into the Prime Minister’s relationships with foreign leaders, particularly the German Chancellor Angela Merkel and US President Barack Obama. With unprecedented access to the ‘inner circle’ of politicians and civil servants that surround the Prime Minister, from Chancellor George Osborne and former Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg to all of Cameron’s personal team, this is the most intimate account of a serving prime minister that has ever been published.
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The English Castles Story

The English Castles Story

Marc Alexander

$24.99

Revealing the turbulent and dramatic history of England's castles.

To use a phrase from Shakespeare, castles are 'stories in stones'. They remained the architectural landmarks of 1,000 years of British history. The Norman flair for castle building reflected the necessity of controlling a defeated population, rewarding European knights who had aided William the Conqueror, and protecting the realm against rebellion and Scandinavian predators who were a constant threat, and established the Feudal system which unified the English into a nation.

They have also provided the setting for some of the most dramatic deeds in British history in war and political conflict. In this well researched and vividly illustrated book, Marc Alexander explores the story of England's castles, featuring many of the most colourful examples of England's impressive range of castles.
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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan

Kim Barker

$27.99

A true-life Catch-22 set in the war-torn countries of Afghanistan and Pakistan, by one of the region's longest-serving correspondents.

Kim Barker is not your typical, impassive foreign correspondent - she is candid, self-deprecating, and funny. At first an awkward newbie in Afghanistan, she grows into a wisecracking, seasoned reporter with grave concerns about the ability of US might to win hearts and minds in the region. As she does the 'Taliban shuffle' between conflict zones, Barker offers a close-up account of the war in Afghanistan and Pakistan, chronicling the years after America's initial routing of the Taliban.

When Barker arrives in Kabul, foreign aid is at a record low, electricity is a pipe dream, and of the few remaining foreign troops, some aren't allowed out after dark. Meanwhile, in the vacuum left by the US and NATO, the Taliban is regrouping.

Swift, funny, and wholly original, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot unforgettably captures the absurdity and tragedy of our modern wars.
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The Chinese People's Liberation Army: Its History, Traditions, and Air Sea, and Land Capabilities in the 21st Century

The Chinese People's Liberation Army: Its History, Traditions, and Air Sea, and Land Capabilities in the 21st Century

Benjamin Lai

$49.99

When Mao Zedong proclaimed The People's Republic of China in 1949, China was a poor and wrecked society after years of continuous wars. For centuries, in fact, China had been seen as a sort of plunder-zone to be invaded, and then a backwater until the late 1980s, when domestic policy brought about monumental changes. The result was that in the past quarter-century China has grown to be the second largest economy in the world, and its military has grown proportionately. 

Successive decades of economic growth have transformed China - in addition to the weapons revolution during the computer age-so that by now the People's Liberation Army (PLA) has become a modern fighting force. No longer having to rely on massed infantry attacks, it now features a formidable arsenal including nuclear submarines, ICBMs, stealth fighters, and modern battle tanks. Perhaps ominously for other maritime powers, the Chinese have also focused on beyond-the-horizon missile technology, as well as anti-aircraft systems, and have also explored the possibilities of cyber-warfare. What is today's PLA really like? What are its traditions and histories, and how is it armed and equipped? How does it recruit and train? 

This book describes some of the lesser known battles and wars the Chinese have undertaken, and the development of their key weapons systems. The United States, having opened the door to drone warfare,  have had an attentive audience for such technologies in Beijing. The last chapter provides thoughts on how the Chinese view matters of security. It is not yet known whether foreign powers can still enforce their territorial wills on China, but future attempts will meet an increased challenge.

This book will be of interest not only to general readers but to policy-makers and militaries in the West, who may not yet realize that a new China has replaced the old.
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Street of Eternal Happiness: Big City Dreams Along a Shanghai Road

Street of Eternal Happiness: Big City Dreams Along a Shanghai Road

Rob Schmitz

$35.00

A timely and engaging look at the new China told through the stories of its ordinary people.

Shanghai: a global city in the midst of a renaissance, where dreamers arrive each day to partake in a mad torrent of capital, ideas and opportunity. Rob Schmitz is one of them. He immerses himself in his neighbourhood, forging relationships with ordinary people who see a brighter future in the city's sleek skyline.

There's Zhao, whose path from factory floor to shopkeeper is sidetracked by her desperate measures to ensure a better future for her sons. Down the street lives Auntie Fu, a fervent capitalist forever trying to improve herself while keeping her sceptical husband at bay. Up a flight of stairs, CK sets up shop to attract young dreamers like himself, but learns he's searching for something more. As Schmitz becomes increasingly involved in their lives, he makes surprising discoveries which untangle the complexities of modern China: a mysterious box of letters that serve as a portal to a family's - and country's - dark past, and an abandoned neighbourhood where fates have been violently altered by unchecked power and greed.

A tale of twenty-first-century China, Street of Eternal Happiness profiles China's distinct generations through multifaceted characters who illuminate an enlightening, humorous and, at times, heartrending journey along the winding road to the Chinese dream. Each story adds another layer of humanity to modern China, a tapestry also woven with Schmitz's insight as a foreign correspondent. The result is an intimate and surprising portrait that dispenses with the tired stereotypes of a country we think we know, immersing us instead in the vivid stories of the people who make up one of the world's most captivating cities.
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Paris Changing: Revisiting Eugene Atget's Paris

Paris Changing: Revisiting Eugene Atget's Paris

Christopher Rauschenberg ,  Clark Worswick ,  Alison Nordstrom ,  Rosamond Bernier

$49.50

Between 1888 and 1927 Eugene Atget meticulously photographed Paris and its environs, capturing in thousands of photographs the city's parks, streets and buildings as well as its diverse inhabitants. His images preserved the vanishing architecture of the ancient regime as Paris grew into a modern capital and established Atget as one of the twentieth century's greatest and most revered photographers.

Christopher Rauschenberg spent a year in the late '90s revisiting and rephotographing many of Atget's same locations. Paris Changing features seventy-four pairs of images beautifully reproduced in duotone. By meticulously replicating the emotional as well as aesthetic qualities of Atget's images, Rauschenberg vividly captures both the changes the city has under-gone and its enduring beauty. His work is both an homage to his predecessor and an artistic study of Paris in its own right. Each site is indicated on a map of the city, inviting readers to follow in the steps of Atget and Rauschenberg themselves. Essays by Clark Worswick and Alison Nordstrom give insight into Atget's life and situate Rauschenberg's work in the context of other rephotography projects. 

The book concludes with an epilogue by Rosamond Bernier as well as a portfolio of other images of contemporary Paris by Rauschenberg. If a trip to the city of lights is not in your immediate future, this luscious portrait of Paris then and now is definitely the next best thing.
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Chasing Gold: The Incredible Story of How the Nazis Stole Europe's Bullion

Chasing Gold: The Incredible Story of How the Nazis Stole Europe's Bullion

George M. Taber

$26.95

For the entire history of human civilization, gold has enraptured people around the globe. The Nazis were no less enthralled by it, and felt that gold was the solution to funding Hitler's war machine. Gold was also on the mind of FDR across the Atlantic, as he worked with Europe's other leaders to bring the United States and the rest of the world out of a severe depression. FDR was hardly the first head of state to turn to gold in difficult times. Throughout history, it has been the refuge of both nations and people in trouble, working at times when nothing else does. Desperate people can buy a loaf of bread or bribe a border guard. Gold can get desperate nations oil to keep tanks running or munitions to fight a war. If the price is right, there is always someone somewhere willing to buy or sell gold. And it was to become the Nazi's most important medium of exchange during the war. Chasing Gold is the story of how the Nazis attempted to grab Europe's gold to finance history's bloodiest war. It is filled with high drama and close escapes, laying bare the palate of human emotions. Walking through the tale are giants of world history, as well as ordinary people called upon to undertake heroic action in an extraordinary time.
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Berlin: City of Imagination

Berlin: City of Imagination

Rory MacLean

$22.99

The first single-volume biography of Berlin, one of the world's great cities - told via twenty-one portraits, from medieval times to the twenty-first century. A city devastated by Allied bombs, divided by a Wall, then reunited and reborn, Berlin today resonates with the echo of lives lived, dreams realised and evils executed. No other city has repeatedly been so powerful and fallen so low. And few other cities have been so shaped and defined by individual imaginations. Through vivid portraits spanning five centuries, Rory MacLean reveals the varied and rich history of Berlin, from its brightest to its darkest moments. We encounter an ambitious prostitute refashioning herself as a princess, a Scottish mercenary fighting for the Prussian Army, Marlene Dietrich flaunting her sexuality and Hitler fantasising about the mega-city Germania. The result is a uniquely imaginative biography of one of the world's most volatile yet creative cities.
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India's War: The Making of Modern South Asia, 1939-1945

India's War: The Making of Modern South Asia, 1939-1945

Srinath Raghavan

$79.99

Between 1939 and 1945 India changed to an extraordinary extent. Millions of Indians suddenly found themselves as soldiers, fighting in Europe and North Africa but also - something simply never imagined - against a Japanese army threatening to invade eastern India. Many more were pulled into the vortex of wartime mobilization. Srinath Raghavan's compelling and original book gives both a surprising new account of the fighting and of life on the home front. For Indian nationalists the war has tended to be seen as a distraction from the quest for national independence - but Raghavan shows that in fact the war lay at the very heart of how and why colonial rule ended in South Asia. By seeing the Second World War through Indian eyes, Raghavan transforms our understanding of the conflict - with famous battles such as those in North Africa and Iraq reinterpreted, as well as fascinating and little known campaigns such as the destruction of Italian northeast Africa. Time and again, it was Indian troops that made Britain into a global power and, as the war came to an end, it was the Indian army that fought the final battles which marked the end both of the Japanese empire, and of the British.
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India's War: World War II and the Making of Modern South Asia

India's War: World War II and the Making of Modern South Asia

Srinath Raghavan

$57.95

Between 1939 and 1945 India underwent extraordinary and irreversible change. Hundreds of thousands of Indians suddenly found themselves in uniform, fighting in the Middle East, North and East Africa, Europe and - something simply never imagined - against a Japanese army poised to invade eastern India. With the threat of the Axis powers looming, the entire country was pulled into the vortex of wartime mobilization. By the war's end, the Indian Army had become the largest volunteer force in the conflict, consisting of 2.5 million men, while many millions more had offered their industrial, agricultural, and military labor. It was clear that India would never be same - the only question was: would the war effort push the country toward or away from independence? 

In India's War, historian Srinath Raghavan paints a compelling picture of battles abroad and of life on the home front, arguing that the war is crucial to explaining how and why colonial rule ended in South Asia. World War II forever altered the country's social landscape, overturning many Indians' settled assumptions and opening up new opportunities for the nation's most disadvantaged people.  When the dust of war settled, India had emerged as a major Asian power with her feet set firmly on the path toward Independence. 

From Gandhi's early urging in support of Britain's war efforts, to the crucial Burma Campaign, where Indian forces broke the siege of Imphal and stemmed the western advance of Imperial Japan, Raghavan brings this underexplored theater of WWII to vivid life. The first major account of India during World War II, India's War chronicles how the war forever transformed India, its economy, its politics, and its people, laying the groundwork for the emergence of modern South Asia and the rise of India as a major power.
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The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi's Campaign to Transform India

The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi's Campaign to Transform India

Lance Price

$19.99

How did a 'chai wallah' who sold tea on trains as a boy become Prime Minister of India?

On May 16, 2014, Narendra Modi was declared the winner of the largest election ever conducted anywhere in the world, having fought a campaign unlike any before.

Political parties in Britain, Australia and North America pride themselves on the sophistication of their election strategies, but Modi's campaign was a master-class in modern electioneering. His team created an election machine that broke new ground in the use of social media, the Internet, mobile phones and digital technologies. Modi took part in thousands of public events, but in such a vast country it was impossible to visit every town and village. The solution? A 'virtual Modi' - a life-size 3D hologram - beamed to parts he could not reach in person. These pioneering techniques brought millions of young people to the ballot box - the holy grail of election strategists everywhere - as Modi trounced the governing Congress Party led by the Gandhi dynasty.

Former BBC correspondent and Downing Street communications expert Lance Price has been granted exclusive access to Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his team of advisers. With complete freedom to tell it as he finds it, he details Modi's rise to power, the extraordinary election victory and its aftermath. The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi's campaign to transform India lifts the lid on a whole new box of tricks, where message-management and IT wizardry combined to create a vote-winning colossus of awesome potency.
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Darien: A Journey in Search of Empire

Darien: A Journey in Search of Empire

John McKendrick

$44.99

The Company of Scotland and its attempts to establish the colony of Caledonia on the inhospitable isthmus of Panama in the late seventeenth century is one of the most tragic moments of Scottish history. Devised by William Paterson, the stratagem was to create a major trading station between Europe and the East. It could have been a triumph, but inadequate preparation and organization ensured it was a catastrophe - of the 3000 settlers who set sail in 1688 and 1699, only a handful returned, the rest having succumbed to disease, and the enormous financial loss was a key factor in ensuring union with England in 1707. Based on archive research in the UK and Panama, as well as extensive travelling in Darien itself, John McKendrick explores this fascinating and seminal moment in Scottish history and uncovers fascinating new information from New World archives about the role of the English and Spanish, and about the identities of the settlers themselves.
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Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architects of a New City

Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architects of a New City

Adina Hoffman

$39.99

A biographical excavation of one of the world's great, troubled cities. Equal parts biographical puzzle, architectural meditation, and probing detective story, Adina Hoffman's Till We Have Built Jerusalem offers a prismatic view into one of the world's most beloved and troubled cities. Panoramic yet intimate, this portrait of three architects who helped build modern Jerusalem is also a gripping exploration of the ways in which politics and aesthetics clash in a place of constant conflict. A beautifully written rumination on memory and forgetting, place and displacement, Till We Have Built Jerusalem uncovers ramifying levels of one great city's buried history as it asks what it means, everywhere, to be foreign and to belong.
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Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution

Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution

Mona Eltahawy

$22.99

Headscarves and Hymens explodes the myth that we should stand back and watch while women are disempowered and abused in the name of religion. In this laceratingly honest account, Eltahawy takes aim both at attitudes in the Middle East and at the western liberals who mistake misogyny for cultural difference. Her argument is clear: unless political revolution in the Arab world is accompanied by social and sexual revolution, no progress will be made. Headscarves and Hymens is the book the world has been crying out for: a powerful, fearless account of what it really means to be a woman in the Muslim world. It's a call to arms and it's about time.
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Inside the Middle East: Making Sense of the Most Dangerous and Complicated Region on Earth

Inside the Middle East: Making Sense of the Most Dangerous and Complicated Region on Earth

Avi Melamed ,  Lucy Aharish

$37.99

Acclaimed Israeli intelligence analyst Avi Melamed has spent more than thirty years interpreting Middle East affairs. His long-awaited Inside the Middle East challenges widely-accepted perceptions and provides a gripping and uniquely enlightening guide to make sense of the events unfolding in the region—to answer how the Arab world got to this point, what is currently happening, what the ramifications will be, how they will affect Israel, and what actions must immediately be undertaken, including how Western leaders need to respond.

Melamed considers all the major power players in the Middle East, explains the underlying issues, and creates a three-dimensional picture, an illustration that connects the dots and provides a fascinating roadmap. He elucidates developments such as the Arab Spring, the downfall of the Muslim Brotherhood, the rise of ISIS, the epic Sunni-Shiite animosity, the essence of the war in Syria, the role of the Caliphate and Jihad, and the looming nuclear arms race. He also provides a rare opportunity to journey into the psyche of Arab society. Look through the lens of its leaders and its most ruthless terrorists. See what makes them tick and what they want. Discover how they can be overtaken.

This unparalleled volume is a milestone in our understanding of the Middle East. It is the untold story of the struggles that will shape the region, and the world, for decades to come, and a groundbreaking guide that will shake you to the core, force you to reevalute your outlook, and give you tips to navigate the future.
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A Short History of the Middle East: From Ancient Empires to Islamic State

A Short History of the Middle East: From Ancient Empires to Islamic State

Gordon Kerr

$17.99

Situated at the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East has confounded the ambition of conquerors and peacemakers alike. Christianity, Judaism and Islam all had their genesis in the region but with them came not just civilization and religion, but also some of the great struggles of history. A Short History of the Middle East makes sense of the shifting sands of Middle Eastern History, beginning with the early cultures of the area and moving on to the modern world.
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Smuggling: Seven Centuries of Contraband

Smuggling: Seven Centuries of Contraband

Simon Harvey

$64.99

A cellar door creaking open in the middle of the night, or a hand slipping quickly into a trench coat - the most compelling transactions are surely those we never see. Smuggling can conjure images of adventure and rebellion in popular culture, but as this fascinating book shows, it has also had a profound effect on the geopolitics of the world.

Shining a light onto seven centuries of dark history, it illuminates a world of intrigue and fortune, hinged on furtive desires and those who have been willing to fulfil them.World-changing contraband has ranged from silk, spices and silver in the Age of Exploration to gold, opium, tea and rubber in times of empire, as well as drugs, people and blood diamonds today. Guns and art have always been smuggled, as have the most dangerous of all contraband - ideas. Central to this story are the (not always) legitimate forces of the Dutch and British East India Companies, the luminaries of the Spanish Empire, Napoleon Bonaparte, the Nazis, Soviet trophy brigades and the CIA, all of whom, at one point or another, have made smuggling part of their business. 

In addition, Simon Harvey traces out the smaller-time smugglers, the micro-economies of everyday goods, precious objects and people, drawing these stories together into a map of a subterranean world criss-crossed by smugglers' paths.All told, this is the story of an unrelenting drive of markets to subvert the law, and of the invisible seams that have sewn the globe together.
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Political Suicide

Political Suicide

Erin McHugh

$35.95

Just in time for the presidential election of 2016 comes Political Suicide, a history of the best and most interesting missteps, peccadilloes, bad calls, back room hijinks, sordid pasts, rotten breaks, and just plain dumb mistakes in the annals of American politics. They have tweeted their private parts to women they're trying to impress. They have gotten caught on tape doing and saying things they really shouldn't have. They have denied knowing about the underhanded doings of underlings - only to have a paper trail lead straight back to them. Nowadays, it seems like half of what we hear about politicians isn't about laws or governing, but is instead coverage focused on shenanigans, questionable morals, and scandals too numerous to count. And while we shake our heads in disbelief, we still can't resist poring over the details of these notorious incidents.In Political Suicide, the foibles of our politicians are brought from the tabloid pages to this entertaining - and cautionary - tale of American history.
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Admiral Bill Halsey: A Naval Life

Admiral Bill Halsey: A Naval Life

Thomas Alexander Hughes

$77.00

William Halsey was the most famous naval officer of World War II. His fearlessness in carrier raids against Japan, his steely resolve at Guadalcanal, and his impulsive blunder at the Battle of Leyte Gulf made him the Patton of the Pacific and solidified his reputation as a decisive, aggressive fighter prone to impetuous errors of judgment in the heat of battle.

In this definitive biography, Thomas Hughes punctures the popular caricature of the fighting admiral to reveal the truth of Halsey's personal and professional life as it was lived in times of war and peace. Halsey, the son of a Navy officer whose alcoholism scuttled a promising career, committed himself wholeheartedly to naval life at an early age. An audacious and inspiring commander to his men, he met the operational challenges of the battle at sea against Japan with dramatically effective carrier strikes early in the war. Yet his greatest contribution to the Allied victory was as commander of the combined sea, air, and land forces in the South Pacific during the long slog up the Solomon Islands chain, one of the war's most daunting battlegrounds. Halsey turned a bruising slugfest with the Japanese navy into a rout.

Skillfully mediating the constant strategy disputes between the Army and the Navy as well as the clashes of ego between General Douglas MacArthur and Admiral Chester Nimitz Halsey was the linchpin of America s Pacific war effort when its outcome was far from certain.
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A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln Vol. I, 1809 - 1849

A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln Vol. I, 1809 - 1849

Sidney Blumenthal

$57.95

The first of a three-volume history of Lincoln as a political genius-from his obscure beginnings to his presidency, assassination, and the overthrow of his post-Civil War dreams of Reconstruction. This first volume traces Lincoln from his painful youth, describing himself as "a slave," to his emergence as the man we recognize as Abraham Lincoln.

From his youth as a "newsboy," a voracious newspaper reader, Lincoln became a free thinker, reading Tom Paine, as well as Shakespeare and the Bible, and studying Euclid to sharpen his arguments as a lawyer.

Lincoln's anti-slavery thinking began in his childhood amidst the Primitive Baptist antislavery dissidents in backwoods Kentucky and Indiana, the roots of his repudiation of Southern Christian pro-slavery theology. Intensely ambitious, he held political aspirations from his earliest years. Obsessed with Stephen Douglas, his political rival, he battled him for decades. Successful as a circuit lawyer, Lincoln built his team of loyalists. Blumenthal reveals how Douglas and Jefferson Davis acting together made possible Lincoln's rise.

Blumenthal describes Lincoln a socially awkward suitor who had a nervous breakdown over his inability to deal with the opposite sex. His marriage to the upper class Mary Todd was crucial to his social aspirations and his political career. Blumenthal portrays Mary as an asset to her husband, a rare woman of her day with strong political opinions. He discloses the impact on Lincoln's anti-slavery convictions when handling his wife's legal case to recover her father's fortune in which he discovered her cousin was a slave.

Blumenthal's robust portrayal is based on prodigious research of Lincoln's record and of the period and its main players. It reflects both Lincoln's time and the struggle that consumes our own political debate.
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Tom Paine's Iron Bridge: Building a United States

Tom Paine's Iron Bridge: Building a United States

Edward G. Gray

$38.95

In a letter to his wife Abigail, John Adams judged the author of Common Sense as having "a better hand at pulling down than building." Adams's dismissive remark has helped shape the prevailing view of Tom Paine ever since. But, as Edward G. Gray shows in this fresh, illuminating work, Paine was a builder. He had a clear vision of success for his adopted country. It was embodied in an architectural project that he spent a decade planning: an iron bridge to span the Schuylkill River at Philadelphia.

When Paine arrived in Philadelphia from England in 1774, the city was thriving as America's largest port. But the seasonal dangers of the rivers dividing the region were becoming an obstacle to the city's continued growth. Philadelphia needed a practical connection between the rich grain of Pennsylvania's backcountry farms and its port on the Delaware.

The iron bridge was Paine's solution. The bridge was part of Paine's answer to the central political challenge of the new nation: how to sustain a republic as large and as geographically fragmented as the United States. The iron construction was Paine's brilliant response to the age-old challenge of bridge technology: how to build a structure strong enough to withstand the constant battering of water, ice, and wind. The convergence of political and technological design in Paine's plan was Enlightenment genius. And Paine drew other giants of the period as patrons: Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and for a time his great ideological opponent, Edmund Burke.

Paine's dream ultimately was a casualty of the vicious political crosscurrents of revolution and the American penchant for bridges of cheap, plentiful wood. But his innovative iron design became the model for bridge construction in Britain as it led the world into the industrial revolution.
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Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse

Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse

Eric Jay Dolin

$42.95

Set against the backdrop of an expanding nation, Brilliant Beacons traces the evolution of America's lighthouse system from its earliest days, highlighting the political, military, and technological battles fought to illuminate the nation's hardscrabble coastlines. Beginning with Boston Light, America's first lighthouse, Dolin shows how the story of America, from colony to regional backwater, to fledging nation, and eventually to global industrial power, can be illustrated through its lighthouses. Even in the colonial era, the question of how best to solve the collective problem of lighting our ports, reefs, and coasts through a patchwork of private interests and independent localities telegraphed the great American debate over federalism and the role of a centralized government. As the nation expanded, throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, so too did the coastlines in need of illumination, from New England to the Gulf of Mexico, the Great Lakes, the Pacific Coast all the way to Alaska. In Dolin's hands we see how each of these beacons tell its own story of political squabbling, technological advancement, engineering marvel, and individual derring-do. In rollicking detail, Dolin treats readers to a memorable cast of characters, from the penny-pinching Treasury official Stephen Pleasonton, who hamstrung the country's efforts to adopt the revolutionary Fresnel lens, to the indomitable Katherine Walker, who presided so heroically over New York Harbor as keeper at Robbins Reef Lighthouse that she was hailed as a genuine New York City folk hero upon her death in 1931. He also animates American military history from the Revolution to the Civil War and presents tales both humorous and harrowing of soldiers, saboteurs, Civil War battles, ruthless egg collectors, and, most important, the lighthouse keepers themselves, men and women who often performed astonishing acts of heroism in carrying out their duties. In the modern world of GPS and satellite-monitored shipping lanes, Brilliant Beacons forms a poignant elegy for the bygone days of the lighthouse, a symbol of American ingenuity that served as both a warning and a sign of hope for generations of mariners; and it also shows how these sentinels have endured, retaining their vibrancy to the present day. Containing over 150 photographs and illustrations, Brilliant Beacons vividly reframes America's history.
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Reagan: The Life

Reagan: The Life

H. W. Brands

$33.95

In his magisterial new biography, H. W. Brands brilliantly establishes Ronald Reagan as one of the two great presidents of the twentieth century, a true peer to Franklin Roosevelt.Reagan conveys with sweep and vigor how the confident force of Reagan's personality and the unwavering nature of his beliefs enabled him to engineer a conservative revolution in American politics and play a crucial role in ending communism in the Soviet Union. Reagan shut down the age of liberalism, Brands shows, and ushered in the age of Reagan, whose defining principles are still powerfully felt today.

Reagan follows young Ronald Reagan as his ambition for ever larger stages compelled him to leave behind small-town Illinois to become first a radio announcer and then that quintessential public figure of modern America, a movie star. When his acting career stalled, his reinvention as the voice of The General Electric Theater on television made him an unlikely spokesman for corporate America. Then began Reagan's improbable political ascension, starting in the 1960s, when he was first elected governor of California, and culminating in his election in 1980 as president of the United States.

Employing archival sources not available to previous biographers and drawing on dozens of interviews with surviving members of Reagan's administration, Brands has crafted a richly detailed and fascinating narrative of the presidential years. He offers new insights into Reagan's remote management style and fractious West Wing staff, his deft handling of public sentiment to transform the tax code, and his deeply misunderstood relationship with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, on which nothing less than the fate of the world turned.

Reagan is a storytelling triumph, an irresistible portrait of an underestimated politician whose pragmatic leadership and steadfast vision transformed the nation.
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Hidden Waters of New York City: A History and Guide to 101 Forgotten Lakes, Ponds, Creeks, and Streams in the Five Boroughs

Hidden Waters of New York City: A History and Guide to 101 Forgotten Lakes, Ponds, Creeks, and Streams in the Five Boroughs

Sergey Kadinsky

$28.95

Beneath the asphalt streets of Manhattan, creeks and streams once flowed freely. The remnants of these once-pristine waterways are all over the Big Apple, hidden in plain sight. Hidden Waters of New York City offers a glimpse at the big city's forgotten past and ever-changing present, including: * Minetta Brook, which ran through today's Greenwich Village * Collect Pond in the Financial District, the city's first water source * Newtown Creek, separating Brooklyn and Queens * Bronx River, still a hotspot for urban canoeing and hiking Filled with eye-opening historical anecdotes and walking tours of all five boroughs, this is a side of New York City you've never seen.
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Apache Wars: The Hunt for Geronimo, the Apache Kid, and the Captive Boy Who Started the Longest War in American History

Apache Wars: The Hunt for Geronimo, the Apache Kid, and the Captive Boy Who Started the Longest War in American History

Paul Andrew Hutton

$49.95

In the tradition of Empire of the Summer Moon, a stunningly vivid historical account of the manhunt for Geronimo and the 25-year Apache struggle for their homeland
 
They called him Mickey Free. His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides - the Apaches and the white invaders-blamed him for it. A mixed-blood warrior who moved uneasily between the worlds of the Apaches and the American soldiers, he was never trusted by either but desperately needed by both. He was the only man Geronimo ever feared. He played a pivotal role in this long war for the desert Southwest from its beginning in 1861 until its end in 1890 with his pursuit of the renegade scout, Apache Kid.
 
In this sprawling, monumental work, Paul Hutton unfolds over two decades of the last war for the West through the eyes of the men and women who lived it. This is Mickey Free's story, but also the story of his contemporaries: the great Apache leaders Mangas Coloradas, Cochise, and Victorio; the soldiers Kit Carson, O. O. Howard, George Crook, and Nelson Miles; the scouts and frontiersmen Al Sieber, Tom Horn, Tom Jeffords, and Texas John Slaughter; the great White Mountain scout Alchesay and the Apache female warrior Lozen; the fierce Apache warrior Geronimo; and the Apache Kid.

These lives shaped the violent history of the deserts and mountains of the Southwestern borderlands - a bleak and unforgiving world where a people would make a final, bloody stand against an American war machine bent on their destruction.
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Endeavouring Banks: Exploring Collections from the Endeavour Voyage 1768-1771

Endeavouring Banks: Exploring Collections from the Endeavour Voyage 1768-1771

Neil Chambers

$69.99

When English naturalist Joseph Banks accompanied Captain Cook on his historic mission into the Pacific, he took with him a team of collectors and illustrators who returned with unprecedented collections of artefacts, specimens and drawings, opening up a whole world of knowledge as yet undiscovered by Europeans.

The book features original voyage specimens together with illustrations and descriptions of them, showing a rich diversity of newly discovered species. It also shows how Banks organised this material, planning but ultimately failing to publish it.

The objects showcased in this book tell the story of the Endeavour voyage and its impact ahead its 250th anniversary in 2018. Original artwork from the voyage is compared with the often stylised engravings later produced in London for the official account and new material from Bank’s journey is brought to life, much of which has never before been recorded in print.

Endeavouring Banks also considers the work of Banks’s often neglected artists – Sydney Parkinson, Herman Diedrich Sporing, and Alexander Buchan, as well as the priest Tupaia, who joined Endeavour in the Society Islands. Their surviving illustrations remain the most important body of images produced since Europeans entered this region.
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Frontier Shores: Collection, Entanglement, and the Manufacture of Identity in Oceania

Frontier Shores: Collection, Entanglement, and the Manufacture of Identity in Oceania

Shawn Rowlands

$43.95

In the late nineteenth century, the growing discipline of anthropology was both a powerful tool of colonial control and an ideological justification for it. As European empires and their commercial reach expanded, different populations became intertwined in relationships of exchange and power.

Frontier Shores accompanies the exhibitionEntangled Frontiers at the Bard Graduate Center Gallery and draws from the collection of the American Museum of Natural History. Focusing on Oceania-the vast region encompassing Australia, New Zealand, and the tropical Pacific Islands-it examines crosscultural contact and the contest for power between indigenous and non-indigenous people.

Many of Oceania's peoples were perceived in mainstream European scientific thought as belonging to humanity's lowest tiers. Although these notions have long since been discredited, Shawn C. Rowlands traces their impact on the development of anthropology, colonial policy, and national identity. Ultimately, Frontier Shores reveals important processes of "othering" and the difficult issue of manufacturing identity and authenticity.
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The Bomber Aircrew Experience: Dealing Out Punishment from the Air

The Bomber Aircrew Experience: Dealing Out Punishment from the Air

Philip Kaplan

$29.99

Fully illustrated with hundreds of color and black-and-white photographs, as well as dozens of interviews, Philip Kaplan's The Bomber Aircrew Experience offers an intimate glimpse into the life and times of these wartime airmen. The bomber boys recount their harrowing missions over Germany's industrial heartland, paving the way for Allied victory in the Second World War's European Theatre. Discover what it was like to man such planes as the great Flying Fortress and the Liberator, and what it was like for the British and Commonwealth boys flying night missions in the Lancasters, Halifaxes, and Stirlings. And then finally, learn about the development of the modern stealth bombers: the F-117 Nighthawk and the B-2 Spirit.
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Lusitania

Lusitania

Greg King ,  Penny Wilson

$27.99

Lusitania: She was a ship of dreams, carrying millionaires and aristocrats, actresses and impresarios, writers and suffragettes - a microcosm of the last years of the waning Edwardian Era and the coming influences of the Twentieth Century. When she left New York on her final voyage, she sailed from the New World to the Old; yet-an encounter with the machinery of the New World, in the form of a primitive German U-Boat, sent her - and her gilded passengers - to their tragic deaths and opened up a new era of indiscriminate warfare.

A hundred years after her sinking, Lusitania remains an evocative ship of mystery. Was she carrying munitions that exploded? Did Winston Churchill engineer a conspiracy that doomed the liner? Lost amid these tangled skeins is the romantic, vibrant, and finally heartrending tale of the passengers who sailed aboard her. Lives, relationships, and marriages ended in the icy waters off the Irish Sea; those who survived were left haunted and plagued with guilt. Now, authors Greg King and Penny Wilson resurrect this lost, glittering world to show the golden age of travel and illuminate the most prominent of Lusitania's passengers. 

Rarely was an era so glamorous; rarely was a ship so magnificent; and rarely was the human element of tragedy so quickly lost to diplomatic maneuvers and militaristic threats.
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Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor

Target Tokyo: Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor

James M. Scott

$26.95

In December 1941, as American forces tallied the dead at Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt gathered with his senior military counselors to plan an ambitious counterstrike against the heart of the Japanese Empire: Tokyo.

Four months later, on April 18, 1942, sixteen U.S. Army bombers under the command of daredevil pilot Jimmy Doolittle lifted off from the deck of the USS Hornet on a one-way mission to pummel the enemy’s factories, refineries, and dockyards and then escape to Free China. For Roosevelt, the raid was a propaganda victory, a potent salve to heal a wounded nation. In Japan, outraged over the deaths of innocent civilians - including children - military leaders launched an ill-fated attempt to seize Midway that would turn the tide of the war. But it was the Chinese who suffered the worst, victims of a retaliatory campaign by the Japanese Army that claimed an estimated 250,000 lives and saw families drowned in wells, entire towns burned, and communities devastated by bacteriological warfare.

At the center of this incredible story is Doolittle, the son of an Alaskan gold prospector, a former boxer, and brilliant engineer who earned his doctorate from MIT. Other fascinating characters populate this gripping narrative, including Chiang Kai-shek, Lieutenant General Joseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell, and the feisty Vice Admiral William "Bull" Halsey Jr. Here, too, are indelible portraits of the young pilots, navigators, and bombardiers, many of them little more than teenagers, who raised their hands to volunteer for a mission from which few expected to return. Most of the bombers ran out of fuel and crashed. Captured raiders suffered torture and starvation in Japan’s notorious POW camps. Others faced a harrowing escape across China - via boat, rickshaw, and foot - with the Japanese Army in pursuit.

Based on scores of never-before-published records drawn from archives across four continents as well as new interviews with survivors, Target Tokyo is World War II history of the highest order: a harrowing adventure story that also serves as a pivotal reexamination of one of America’s most daring military operations.
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Capturing Enigma: How HMS  Petard  Seized the German Naval Codes

Capturing Enigma: How HMS Petard Seized the German Naval Codes

Stephen Harper

$24.99

An attack by a British destroyer on a German U-boat in the Eastern Mediterranean in October 1942 altered the course of the entire war. The capture of secret coding material from U-559, at the cost of two of HMS Petard's crew, enabled Bletchley Park's codebreakers to successfully crack the U-boat cypher. It was the crucial factor in defeating Hitler's Atlantic U-boat wolf packs before they succeeded in starving Britain into defeat in the winter of 1942-1943. Here is the true story of how HMS Petard attacked and captured U-559 in the darkness of a Mediterranean night. It describes how members of her crew swam across to the slowly sinking U-boat and captured vital German Enigma codebooks. But the damage sustained by U-559 in the earlier attack proved fatal and without warning she sank before Petard could take her in tow. Two of the destroyer's crew were trapped in the conning tower and went to the bottom with her. Both men were later recommended for posthumous awards of the Victoria Cross but the Admiralty, concerned this might draw unwanted attention from German Intelligence, instead ordered posthumous awards of the George Cross, the highest civilian award for bravery.
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Dreadnought Battleship: Owners' Workshop Manual

Dreadnought Battleship: Owners' Workshop Manual

Chris McNab

$67.95

When HMS Dreadnought was commissioned into the Royal Navy in 1906 this revolutionary new class of big-gun iron-clad warship immediately changed the face of naval warfare, rendering all other battleships worldwide obsolete. Known collectively as 'Dreadnoughts', these powerful warships from Britain and Germany fought at the Battle of Jutland in May 1916, in the greatest clash of naval firepower in history. Chris McNab gives detailed insights into the design, operation and combat history of these incredible vessels, including coverage of the restoration in Belfast of the light cruiser HMS Caroline - the only surviving Jutland veteran.
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The First Day on the Somme

The First Day on the Somme

Martin Middlebrook

$26.99

Martin Middlebrook's The First Day on the Somme is a compelling and intensely moving account of the blackest day in the history of the British army. On 1 July, 1916, a continuous line of British soldiers climbed out from the trenches of the Somme into No Man's Land and began to walk slowly towards dug-in German troops armed with machine-guns and defended by thick barbed wire. By the end of that day, as old tactics were met by the reality of modern warfare, there had been more than 60,000 British casualties - a third of them fatalities. Martin Middlebrook's now-classic account of the blackest day in the history of the British army draws on official sources from the time, and on the words of hundreds of survivors: normal men, many of them volunteers, who found themselves thrown into a scene of unparalleled tragedy and horror, killed as much by the folly of their commanders as by the bullets of their enemies. Martin Middlebrook is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the author of many important books on military history including The Kaiser's Battle - March 1918, The Falklands War - 1982.
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The Secret War: Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas, 1939-1945

The Secret War: Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas, 1939-1945

Sir Max Hastings

$57.95

From one of the foremost historians of the period and the acclaimed author of Inferno and Catastrophe: 1914, The Secret War is a sweeping examination of one of the most important yet underexplored aspects of World War II intelligenc showing how espionage successes and failures by the United States, Britain, Russia, Germany, and Japan influenced the course of the war and its final outcome.

Spies, codes, and guerrillas played unprecedentedly critical roles in the Second World War, exploited by every nation in the struggle to gain secret knowledge of its foes, and to sow havoc behind the fronts. In The Secret War, Max Hastings presents a worldwide cast of characters and some extraordinary sagas of intelligence and resistance, to create a new perspective on the greatest conflict in history.
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Titanic Unseen: Titanic and Her Contemporaries - Images from the Bell and Kempster Albums

Titanic Unseen: Titanic and Her Contemporaries - Images from the Bell and Kempster Albums

Senan Molony

$60.00

Titanic was meant to be another success in a litany of past glories for the White Star Line. Her fate was an unexpected shock and global tragedy, ensuring her immortality in the minds of millions even 100 years later. But her untimely demise often overshadows her remarkable life - the distinguished heritage of her fleet, the ingenuity of those who built her and the dedication of those who worked on board, many of whom would later become heroes. Titanic Unseen provides a unique insight into what it meant to build, deploy and operate the great ships of the White Star Line in the Titanic era. Weaving together images from the evocative albums of White Star crew member Philip Bell and Harland & Wolff engineer John Kempster, it is a revelatory portrait of this iconic vessel.
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The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War

The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War

Hew Strachan

$38.95

The First World War, now a century ago, still shapes the world in which we live, and its legacy lives on, in poetry, in prose, in collective memory and political culture. By the time the war ended in 1918, millions lay dead. Three major empires lay shattered by defeat, those of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottomans. A fourth, Russia, was in the throes of a revolution that helped define the rest of the twentieth century. The Oxford History of the First World War brings together in one volume many of the most distinguished historians of the conflict, in an account that matches the scale of the events. From its causes to its consequences, from the Western Front to the Eastern, from the strategy of the politicians to the tactics of the generals, they chart the course of the war and assess its profound political and human consequences. Chapters on economic mobilization, the impact on women, the role of propaganda, and the rise of socialism establish the wider context of the fighting at sea and in the air, and which ranged on land from the trenches of Flanders to the mountains of the Balkans and the deserts of the Middle East. First published for the 90th anniversary of the 1918 Armistice, this highly illustrated revised edition contains significant new material to mark the 100th anniversary of the war's outbreak.
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White Magic: The Age of Paper

White Magic: The Age of Paper

Lothar Muller

$33.95

Paper is older than the printing press, and even in its unprinted state it was the great network medium behind the emergence of modern civilization. In the shape of bills, banknotes and accounting books it was indispensible to the economy. As forms and files it was essential to bureaucracy. As letters it became the setting for the invention of the modern soul, and as newsprint it became a stage for politics.

In this brilliant new book Lothar Muller describes how paper made its way from China through the Arab world to Europe, where it permeated everyday life in a variety of formats from the thirteenth century onwards, and how the paper technology revolution of the nineteenth century paved the way for the creation of the modern daily press. His key witnesses are the works of Rabelais and Grimmelshausen, Balzac and Herman Melville, James Joyce and Paul Valery.

Muller writes not only about books, however: he also writes about pamphlets, playing cards, papercutting and legal pads. We think we understand the ?Gutenberg era?, but we can understand it better when we explore the world that underpinned it: the paper age.

Today, with the proliferation of digital devices, paper may seem to be a residue of the past, but Muller shows that the humble technology of paper is in many ways the most fundamental medium of the modern world.
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Banana: A Global History

Banana: A Global History

Lorna Piatti-Farnell

$24.99

For over a century, the banana has been the world's favourite fruit. Quick and easy to eat, tasty and versatile, the banana is a staple of many diets around the globe. Its history, however, is more than simply a succession of happy family scenes and appealing exotic locations. The growth and development of the fruit we know and love today is entangled with colonial practices, capitalist enterprise, sexual politics and even horrific murders.Banana: A Global History takes us from the agricultural beginnings of the banana in New Guinea to its almost ubiquitous presence in culinary repertoires around the globe, from the United States to the Caribbean, from regions of Africa to the heart of Southeast Asia. The book gives us an insight into the life of the banana over millennia, focusing on our recent history and its cultural affair with the fruit. The global life of the banana is traced in cultural practices, advertising, commercial schemes and the unmissable icons of popular culture, from nineteenth-century medical manuals to cookbooks, songs, the famous 'banana peel gag' and the well-known Miss Chiquita icon.
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Fats: A Global History

Fats: A Global History

Michelle Phillipov

$24.99

No other food is as nutritionally crucial, symbolically important or controversial as fat. Butter, oil, tallow, lard, schmaltz - culinary fats have not only shaped world cuisines, they are themselves steeped in cultural and symbolic meanings. From Paleolithic times to contemporary popular culture, fats have been simultaneously essential to life and a decadent indulgence. Alternately reviled and revered, fats have been linked to both power and poverty, and associated with sex and death.Fats: A Global History tells the story of this extraordinary substance. In her engaging and wide-ranging account, Michelle Phillipov considers the changing fates and fortunes of fats across time and around the globe. From their past associations with prestige and social authority, to their links to the food industry practices and health scares of the twentieth century, to fat's current renaissance in media and popular culture, she explores the complex meanings, debates and controversies that have surrounded this most basic of foods.Featuring a selection of recipes from around the world, Fats: A Global History reveals the sometimes surprising history of the cultural life of culinary fat.
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Onions and Garlic: A Global History

Onions and Garlic: A Global History

Martha Jay

$24.99

Do you know your onions? From large, sweet onions to shallots, garlic, chives and leeks, the allium family contains some of the most popular vegetables in the world. Shy of the spotlight - except when repelling vampires, preserving mummies, curing heart disease or predicting the future - this lowly yet universal family of plants has been a friend to mankind from earliest times. Onions and Garlic follows the trail of these cherished plants through history and across the globe, tracing their story back to the earliest civilizations of the Fertile Crescent and the recipes of ancient Mesopotamia. Traders spread onion varieties through Central Asia and from there they moved across the world, as civilizations from the ancient Romans and Greeks to the Koreans and Japanese found this humble family of vegetables an indispensable part of their cuisines - and of their culture. The book reveals the close relationship between the allium and human worlds: the Welsh have proudly adopted the leek as their national symbol; in many societies, garlic has long been identified as a magical herb with supernatural origins; while onions symbolized the simple peasant life to French painters of the nineteenth century. Celebrated, denigrated, avoided or sought-after, the story of the allium family is filled with fine cuisine and art, peasants and kings, colonization and conquest, magic and medicine. But most of all, it's the story of a very ordinary vegetable.
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Melon: A Global History

Melon: A Global History

Sylvia Lovegren

$24.99

Perfumed, sweet, succulent, cooling; a ripe melon can be one of the most delicious of fruits. Sylvia Lovegren untangles the melon's long and complex history and follows the journeys of the varied fruits known as melons from the sandy wastes of the Kalahari Desert, to the ancient kingdom of Ur in Mesopotamia, to the exotic oases of the Silk Road, and on to Jesuit outposts in Upper Canada, slave plantations in Brazil, Pueblo Indian gardens in the American southwest, and to the farmers in Japan who produce luscious and expensive square melons grown in glass boxes. While melons are appreciated for their healthfulness today, in the past this alluring fruit was often feared as an enticing but deadly menace. This book explores the reasons for the varied reactions to melons across the globe and through history, and the fascinating story is rounded out with folk tales, humorous stories, contests and cultural artefacts inspired by melons. Melon also looks at the attempts by scientists and growers to preserve or even genetically revive ancient melon strains while improving the modern melons that come to the market and our tables.Richly illustrated and illuminated with ancient, medieval and modern recipes, Melon is a delightful look at the surprising history of one of the world's most complex and delicious fruits.
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