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The End of the Cold War: 1985 - 1991

The End of the Cold War: 1985 - 1991

Robert Service

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ABBEY'S CHOICE AUGUST 2016 ----- The Cold War had seemed like a permanent fixture in global politics, and until its denouement, no Western or Soviet politician foresaw that the stand-off between the two superpowers - after decades of struggle over every aspect of security, politics, economics and ideas - would end in their lifetimes. Even after March 1985 when Mikhail Gorbachëv became the leader of the Soviet Union it was not preordained that global nuclear Armageddon could or would be averted peaceably.

But just four years later, the Berlin Wall was dismantled and perestroika spread throughout the former Soviet bloc. It was a sea change in world history, which resulted in the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

Drawing on pioneering archival research, Robert Service's gripping new investigation of the final years of the Cold War pinpoints the astonishing relationships among President Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachëv, Secretary of State George Shultz and the USSR's last Foreign Affairs Minister, Eduard Shevardnadze, who found a way to cooperate during times of extraordinary change around the world. The story is of American pressure and Soviet long-term decline and over-stretch. The End of the Cold War shows how that small, skillful group of statesmen were determined to end the Cold War on their watch. In the process, they irreversibly transformed the global geopolitical landscape.

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Hamilton Hume: Our Greatest Explorer

Hamilton Hume: Our Greatest Explorer

Robert Macklin

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ABBEY'S CHOICE AUGUST 2016 ----- While English-born soldiers, sailors and surveyors have claimed pride of place among the explorers of the young New South Wales colony, the real pathfinder was a genuine native-born Australian. Hamilton Hume, a man with a profound understanding of the Aboriginal people and an almost mystical relationship with the Australian bush, led settlers from the cramped surrounds of Sydney Town to the vast fertile country that would provide the wealth to found and sustain a new nation.

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Les Parisiennes: How the Women of Paris Lived, Loved and Died in the 1940s

Les Parisiennes: How the Women of Paris Lived, Loved and Died in the 1940s

Anne Sebba

$32.99
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ABBEY'S CHOICE AUGUST 2016 ----- What did it feel like to be a woman living in Paris from 1939 to 1949? These were years of fear, power, aggression, courage, deprivation and secrets until - finally - renewal and retribution. Even at the darkest moments of Occupation, with the Swastika flying from the Eiffel Tower and pet dogs abandoned howling on the streets, glamour was ever present. French women wore lipstick. Why?

It was women more than men who came face to face with the German conquerors on a daily basis - perhaps selling them their clothes or travelling alongside them on the Metro, where a German soldier had priority over seats. By looking at a wide range of individuals from collaborators to resisters, actresses and prostitutes to teachers and writers, Anne Sebba shows that women made life-and-death decisions every day, and often did whatever they needed to survive. Her fascinating cast of characters includes both native Parisian women and those living in Paris temporarily - American women and Nazi wives, spies, mothers, mistresses, and fashion and jewellery designers.

Some women, like the heiress Beatrice de Camondo or novelist Ir ne N mirovsky, converted to Catholicism; others like lesbian racing driver Violette Morris embraced the Nazi philosophy; only a handful, like Coco Chanel, retreated to the Ritz with a German lover. A young medical student, Anne Spoerry, gave lethal injections to camp inmates one minute but was also known to have saved the lives of Jews.

But this is not just a book about wartime. In enthralling detail Sebba explores the aftershock of the Second World War and the choices demanded. How did the women who survived to see the Liberation of Paris come to terms with their actions and those of others? Although politics lies at its heart, Les Parisiennes is a fascinating account of the lives of people of the city and, specifically, in this most feminine of cities, its women and young girls.

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Xerxes, King of Kings: The True Story

Xerxes, King of Kings: The True Story

Ian Macgregor Morris

$59.99
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Xsaya-rsa (Khshayarsha) to the Persians, Ahasuerus to the Jews, Xerxes to the Greeks. So great was his power, that he was hailed by the Persians as 'King of Kings', and by the Greeks as simply  The King.

Famed for his beauty and magnificence, he ruled over the greatest empire the world had known, and built cities the like of which the world had never seen. He was the king who re-conquered Egypt and subdued the rebels of Babylon; he was the king who captured Athens and burnt the temples of the Acropolis; and he was the king who defeated Leonidas, the greatest of the Warrior-Kings of Sparta. Some claim that he was the king who saved the Jews. The life of Xerxes, however, has never been told - until now.

Ian Macgregor Morris brings together a variety of evidence, literary and archaeological, to create a nuanced account that fully takes into account the context of fifth-century Persia. Macgregor Morris reviews the background of Xerxes' upbringing and his early taste of power, the problems of the succession, and the challenges he faced as a new king. 

The Greek expedition will be considered from a Persian perspective, while the effect of its failure on Persian policy in general, and on Xerxes in particular, forms a major theme of the later chapters. The character of Xerxes, so often depicted as hubristic, will be re-examined in terms of notions of Persian kingship, while his domestic policies on issues such as religious tolerance and the ambitious building programmes will be seen in light of the political events of the period.
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Augustus: The Biography

Augustus: The Biography

Jochen Bleicken ,  Anthea Bell

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He was named son and heir by a murdered dictator. He came to Rome with nothing, surrounded by ruthless enemies. Yet Augustus would become the first Roman Emperor, transforming the Republic into the greatest empire the world had seen. This is the definitive biography of the man who changed Western history. 'Masterful ...a breathtaking panorama of Roman politics at a crucial turning point in history' Simon J. V. Malloch, Literary Review'An unequalled biography' Harry Mount, Spectator 'Jochen Bleicken's biography of Rome's first emperor is excellent on the young Octavian and his wheeling and dealing' Natalie Haynes, Independent 'A superb account ...It should become standard reading for everyone interested in the foundations of the Roman empire' Peter Jones, BBC History Magazine
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Dynasty: The Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar

Dynasty: The Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar

Tom Holland

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Rome was first ruled by kings, then became a republic. But in the end, after conquering the world, the Republic collapsed. Rome was drowned in blood. So terrible were the civil wars that the Roman people finally came to welcome the rule of an autocrat who could give them peace. ' Augustus,' their new master called himself: 'The Divinely Favoured One'.
 
The lurid glamour of the dynasty founded by Augustus has never faded. No other family can compare for sheer unsettling fascination with its gallery of leading characters. Tiberius, the great general who ended up a bitter recluse, notorious for his perversions; Caligula, the master of cruelty and humiliation who rode his chariot across the sea; Agrippina, the mother of Nero, manoeuvring to bring to power the son who would end up having her murdered; Nero himself, racing in the Olympics, marrying a eunuch, and building a pleasure palace over the fire-gutted centre of his capital.
 
Now, in the sequel to Rubicon, Tom Holland gives a dazzling portrait of Rome's first imperial dynasty. DYNASTY traces the full astonishing story of its rule of the world: both the brilliance of its allure, and the blood-steeped shadows cast by its crimes. Ranging from the great capital rebuilt in marble by Augustus to the dank and barbarian-haunted forests of Germany, it is populated by a spectacular cast: murderers and metrosexuals, adulterers and druids, scheming grandmothers and reluctant gladiators.
 
DYNASTY is the portrait of a family that transformed and stupefied Rome.
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A Handful of Sand: The Gurindji Struggle, After the Walk-off

A Handful of Sand: The Gurindji Struggle, After the Walk-off

Charlie Ward

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Fifty years ago, a group of striking Aboriginal stockmen in the remote Northern Territory of Australia heralded a revolution in the cattle industry and a massive shift in Aboriginal affairs. Now, after many years of research, A Handful of Sand tells the story behind the Gurindji people's famous Wave Hill Walk-off in 1966 and questions the meanings commonly attributed to the return of their land by Gough Whitlam in 1975. Written with a sensitive, candid and perceptive hand, A Handful of Sand reveals the path Vincent Lingiari and other Gurindji elders took to achieve their land rights victory, and how their struggles in fact began, rather than ended, with Whitlam's handback.
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Yijarni: True Stories from Gurindji Country

Yijarni: True Stories from Gurindji Country

Felicity Meakins ,  Erika Charola

$39.95
On 23 August 1966, approximately 200 Gurindji stockmen and their families walked off Wave Hill Station in the Northern Territory, protesting against poor working conditions and the taking of their land by pastoralists. Led by Vincent Lingiari, this land-mark action in 1966 precipitated the equal wages case in the pastoral industry and the establishment of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. While it is well known that the Walk Off was driven by the poor treatment of Aboriginal workers, what is less well known is the previous decades of massacres and killings, stolen children and other abuses by early colonists. Told in both English and Gurindji, these compelling and detailed oral accounts of the events that Gurindji elders either witnessed or heard from their parents and grandparents, will ignite the interest of audiences nationally and internationally and challenge revisionist historians who question the extent of frontier battles and the legitimacy of the Stolen Generations.
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The Battle of Long Tan: Australia's Most Significant Battle of the Vietnam War

The Battle of Long Tan: Australia's Most Significant Battle of the Vietnam War

David W. Cameron

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On the afternoon of 18 August 1966, a rubber plantation near Long Tan, in Phuoc Tuy Province, South Vietnam, became the stage for one of the bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War involving Australian troops – and one of the most significant battles during the Vietnam War for the Australian Task Force.

The Australians had arrived at Nui Dat four months earlier to open up the province. While patrolling five kilometres east of Nui Dat, Delta Company of 6RAR, originally numbering just 105 Australians and three New Zealanders, collided with Viet Cong forces numbering around 2500 troops in the plantation, ahead of a planned Vietnamese ambush.

The enemy were surprised by their sudden appearances and attacked in force, using mortar, machine gun and small arms fire. Completely surrounded, and short on ammunition, the Australians could only guess at the overwhelming strength of the enemy that was attacking them. Morning light revealed a shattered woodland, trees bleeding latex – and hundreds of dead enemy soldiers who had fallen as part of numerous human-wave assaults against the small ANZAC force. What was first thought by the Australians to be a significant defeat quickly turned out to be a major victory.

Marking the battle's 50th anniversary, and drawing on unpublished first-hand accounts from servicemen at all levels of command, critically-acclaimed military historian David Cameron brings to life blow-by-blow the events of this famous battle as it unfolded – minute by minute, hour by hour – and reveals the deeds of heroism and mateship now part of Australia's Vietnam War story. His compelling account commemorates the men who fought in the rubber plantation of Long Tan – and those who did not come home.
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The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam

The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam

Christopher E. Goscha

$65.00
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Over the centuries the Vietnamese have beenboth colonizers themselves and the victims of colonization by others. Their country expanded, shrunk, split and sometimes disappeared, often under circumstances far beyond their control. Despite these often overwhelming pressures, Vietnam has survived as one of Asia's most striking and complex cultures. As more and more visitors come to this extraordinary country, there has been for some years a need for a major history - a book which allows the outsider to understand the many layers left by earlier emperors, rebels, priests and colonizers. Christopher Goscha's new work amply fills this role.

Drawing on a lifetime of thinking about Indo-China, he has created a narrative which is consistently seen from 'inside' Vietnam but never loses sight of the connections to the 'outside'. As wave after wave of invaders - whether Chinese, French, Japanese or American - have been ultimately expelled, we see the terrible cost to the Vietnamese themselves. Vietnam's role in one of the Cold War's longest conflicts has meant that its past has been endlessly abused for propaganda purposes and it is perhaps only now that the events which created the modern state can be seen from a truly historical perspective.

Christopher Goscha draws on the latest research and discoveries in Vietnamese, French and English. His book is a major achievement, describing both the grand narrative of Vietnam's story but also the byways, curiosities, differences, cultures and peoples that have done so much over the centuries to define the many versions of Vietnam.
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Double Diamonds: Australian Commandos in the Pacific War, 1941-45

Double Diamonds: Australian Commandos in the Pacific War, 1941-45

Karl James

$39.99
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During the Second World War, in the mountains and jungles of Timor, Bougainville and New Guinea, Australian commando units fought arduous campaigns against the Japanese. The story of these elite independent companies and commando squadrons, whose soldiers wore the distinctive double-diamond insignia, is told here for the first time. Through 130 powerful images from the Australian War Memorial's unparalleled collection - some never published before - Double Diamonds captures the operational history of these units and the personal stories of the men who served in them, many of whom lost their lives or the friends who trained and fought alongside them.
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Flagship: The Cruiser HMAS Australia II and the Pacific War on Japan

Flagship: The Cruiser HMAS Australia II and the Pacific War on Japan

Mike Carlton

$49.99
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The cruiser HMAS Australia II and the Pacific War on Japan.

In 1924 the grand old battle cruiser HMAS Australia I, once the pride of the nation, was sunk off Sydney Heads. She had saved Australia from a German attack in the Pacific in World War I, but after the war she was a victim in the race to disarm. There was a day of national mourning when they blew the bottom out of her.

In 1928 the RAN acquired a new ship of the same name, the fast, heavy cruiser HMAS Australia II, and she finally saw action when World War II began, patrolling the North Atlantic on the lookout for German battleships. By March 1942 Australia had returned home, where the ship was stunned by a murder.

One night one of her sailors, Stoker Riley, was found stabbed and bleeding to death. Before he died, he named his two attackers, who'd tried to kill him because, he said, he'd threatened to expose their homosexual activities.

At a hastily arranged court martial, the two men were found guilty and sentenced to death under British Admiralty law. Only weeks later Australia fought in the Battle of the Coral Sea near Papua New Guinea, the first sea battle to stop the Japan.
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Where are Our Boys?: How Newsmaps Won the Great War

Where are Our Boys?: How Newsmaps Won the Great War

Martin Woods

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In 1914, the newspaper map or newsmap began to supply readers with the geographical backdrop to the Great War, an important tool in explaining the progress of the war to the public at home. Day by day, for every campaign and battle, readers across the nation were deluged with maps, both in the pages of newspapers and pasted up in town and city streets, allowing them to follow Australian and Allied exploits. Drawn from scant news cables, out of date cartography, and the writer’s imagination, a semi-fictional war story emerged, of ANZAC successes and, sometimes, disasters.

‘Our boys’ were in Egypt, Palestine, Gallipoli, Belgium, Germany and France, in towns and villages most Australians had never heard of. Soon, these places were being discussed, with growing expertise, over maps in homes, pubs, churches and clubs. Those following the war at home were never allowed too close, as censorship rules dictated when maps could be published. Yet Where Are Our Boys? is not simply about propaganda. Maps in newspapers tracked the war’s many campaigns and the exploits of our boys, but most importantly allowed those at home to feel close to their brothers, husbands, fathers, uncles, neighbours and cousins. Maps naturally became central to commemorating events, people and places.

The war produced more maps than any time before in history, giving us along the way some of the most beautiful, and sometimes misleading, maps ever published. Where Are Our Boys? tells the story of how the war was fought and won from the opening salvos in 1914 to Gallipoli and victory on the Western Front. In the end, though, these maps were needed most to help understand the conflict and to comprehend the great human costs.
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44 Days: 75 Squadron and the Fight for Australia

44 Days: 75 Squadron and the Fight for Australia

Michael Veitch

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In March and April 1942, RAAF 75 Squadron bravely defended Port Moresby for 44 days when Australia truly stood alone against the Japanese. This group of raw young recruits scrambled ceaselessly in their Kittyhawk fighters to an extraordinary and heroic battle, the story of which has been left largely untold.

 

The recruits had almost nothing going for them against the Japanese war machine, except for one extraordinary leader named John Jackson, a balding, tubby Queenslander - at 35 possibly the oldest fighter pilot in the world - who said little, led from the front, and who had absolutely no sense of physical fear.

 

Time and time again this brave group were hurled into battle, against all odds and logic, and succeeded in mauling a far superior enemy - whilst also fighting against the air force hierarchy. After relentless attack, the squadron was almost wiped out by the time relief came, having succeeded in their mission - but also paying a terrible price.

 

Michael Veitch, actor, presenter and critically acclaimed author, brings to life the incredible exploits and tragic sacrifices of this courageous squadron of Australian heroes.

 


44 Days: 75 Squadron and the Fight for Australia by Michael Veitch at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street Sydney

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Moments in Time: A Book of Australian Postcards

Moments in Time: A Book of Australian Postcards

Jim Davidson

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At the height of the postcard boom, when there were several deliveries of the post every day, you could send a postcard in the morning to arrange a meeting for that afternoon. Postcards were indeed the emails of their day. Old postcards have an immediacy about them that is striking: they provide a rich source of imagery and, together with their messages, they give us a glimpse of another life, another time. Among the 300 postcards in this book, most are from the late 1880s to the 1950s, with a few included from the following decades to today. There are postcards of just about everything - war and peace, disasters and celebrations, holidays and home life, sports and theatre, rural and city living, love for 'The Dear Old Country' and pride in Australia - to name a few. Author Jim Davidson takes readers on a historical journey through an extraordinary range of postcards that provide fascinating insights to moments in time.
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Long Tan: The Start of a Lifelong Battle: 50th Anniversary Edition

Long Tan: The Start of a Lifelong Battle: 50th Anniversary Edition

Harry Smith

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On the afternoon of 18 August 1966, just five kilometres from the main Australian Task Force base at Nui Dat, a group of Viet Cong soldiers walked into the right flank of Delta Company, 6 RAR. Under a blanket of mist and heavy monsoon rain, amid the mud and shattered rubber trees, a dispersed Company of 108 men held its ground with courage and grim determination against a three-sided attack from a force of 2,500 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army troops. When the battle subsided, 18 Australian soldiers lay dead and 24 had been wounded. Battlefield clearance revealed 245 enemy bodies with captured documents later confirming the count at over 500 enemy killed and 800 wounded. These men were led by a gruff and gusty perfectionist, Major Harry Smith. Now, some 50 years after the battle, Harry tells his story.

Long Tan is more than just an account of a historic battle. Harry Smith takes his readers on an extraordinary journey - one that ultimately reveals a remarkable cover-up at the highest military and political echelons.  Written in partnership with award-winning journalist Toni McRae, Long Tan is also Harry's life story and portrays his many personal battles, from failed marriages to commando-style killing; from a horrific parachute accident through to his modern-day struggles with bureaucracy for recognition for his soldiers. Harry's battles are tempered by his love of sailing, where he has at last found some peace. Long Tan portrays the wrenching, visceral experience of a man who has fought lifelong battles, in a story that he is only now able to tell. Harry can still hear the gunfire and smell the blood spilt at Long Tan. For him, the fight continues.
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From Quarantine to Q Station

From Quarantine to Q Station

Arbon Publishing

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Before the development of modern medicine, infectious diseases posed a major public health threat. The only known means of protecting communities from outbreaks was to isolate sufferers and those with whom they had been in contact. For immigrants in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries who had already endured the long voyage to Australia, quarantine could be a frightening and traumatic experience.

Separated from healthy family members, those in quarantine had no way of knowing whether they would see their loved ones again. Some children left the Quarantine Station as orphans, and some women as widows, alone in a strange country with no means of support.

Once home to generations of Aboriginal people attracted by the abundance of seafood, the deep coves, fresh breezes, clean water supply and remoteness from the fledgling colony of Sydney made North Head an ideal place for the creation of a quarantine area. From Quarantine to Q Station tells the fascinating story of the evolution of this site, from its early days as the colonial Quarantine Station through its transformation to the peaceful accommodation and conference facility known as Q Station.

Richly illustrated with more than 200 colour, sepia and black and white photographs, many dating from the late-1800s, this captivating, well-researched book takes readers on an evocative journey through time. Newspaper articles, archaeological research and anecdotes from detainees bring the past to life, while modern preservation and restoration efforts are described in fascinating detail.
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How to be a Tudor: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Everyday Life

How to be a Tudor: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Everyday Life

Ruth Goodman

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The real Wolf Hall - a time traveller's guide to daily life in Tudor England. The Tudor era encompasses some of the greatest changes in our history. But while we know about the historical dramas of the times - most notably in the court of Henry VIII - what was life really like for a commoner like you or me? To answer this question, the renowned method historian and historical advisor to the BBC Ruth Goodman has slept, washed and cooked as the Tudors did - so you don't have to! She is your expert guide to this fascinating era, drawing on years of practical historical study to show how our ancestors coped with everyday life, from how they slept to how they courted. Using a vast range of sources, she takes you back to the time when soot was used as toothpaste and the upper crust of bread was served to the wealthier members of the house. Exploring how the Tudors learnt, danced and even sat and stood according to the latest fashion, she reveals what it all felt, smelt and tasted like, from morning until night.
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London: A Travel Guide Through Time

London: A Travel Guide Through Time

Matthew Green

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Step back in time and discover the sights, sounds and smells of London through the ages in this enthralling journey into the capital's rich, teeming and occasionally hazardous past. 'London: A Travel Guide Through Time is easily the most engaging social history of the capital since the books of Liza Picard a decade ago.' - Londonist

Let time traveller Dr Matthew Green be your guide to six extraordinary periods in London's history - the ages of Shakespeare, medieval city life, plague, coffee houses, the reign of Victoria and the Blitz. We'll turn back the clock to the time of Shakespeare and visit a savage bull and bear baiting arena on the Bankside. In medieval London, we'll circle the walls as the city lies barricaded under curfew, while spinning further forward in time we'll inhale the 'holy herb' in an early tobacco house, before peering into an open plague pit.

In the 18th century, we'll navigate the streets in style with a ride on a sedan chair, and when we land in Victorian London, we'll take a tour of freak-show booths and meet the Elephant Man. You'll meet pornographers and traitors, actors and apothecaries, the mad, bad and dangerous to know, all desperate to show you the thrilling and vibrant history of the world's liveliest city.

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The Water Kingdom

The Water Kingdom

Philip Ball

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A secret history of China - a fresh new way of thinking about a people, a civilisation, an epic story. The Water Kingdom takes us on a grand journey through China's past and present, offering a unique window through which we can begin to grasp the overwhelming complexity and teeming energy of the country and its people. Water is a key that unlocks much of Chinese history and thought. The ubiquitous relationship that the Chinese people have had with water has made it an enduring metaphor for philosophical thought and artistic expression. From the Han emperors to Mao, the ability to manage the waters - to provide irrigation and defend against floods - became a barometer of political legitimacy, and attempts to do so have involved engineering works on a gigantic scale. Yet the strain that economic growth is putting on its water resources today may be the greatest threat to China's future. The Water Kingdom is an epic, spell-binding story. Our guides are travellers and explorers, poets and painters, bureaucrats and activists, who have themselves struggled to come to terms with living in a world so shaped and permeated by water.
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The Rival Queens: Catherine De' Medici, Her Daughter Marguerite De Valois, and the Betrayal That Ignited a Kingdom

The Rival Queens: Catherine De' Medici, Her Daughter Marguerite De Valois, and the Betrayal That Ignited a Kingdom

Nancy Goldstone

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Catherine de' Medici, the infamous queen mother of France, was a consummate pragmatist and powerbroker who dominated the throne for 30 years. Her youngest daughter Marguerite, the glamorous 'Queen Margot', was a passionate free spirit, the only adversary whom her mother could neither intimidate nor fully control. When Catherine forces the Catholic Marguerite to marry her Protestant cousin Henry of Navarre she creates not only savage conflict within France but also a potent rival within her own family. Treacherous court politics, poisonings, international espionage and adultery form the background to a story whose fascinating array of characters include such celebrated figures as Elizabeth I, Mary, Queen of Scots, and Nostradamus.
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How the French Think: An Affectionate Portrait of an Intellectual People

How the French Think: An Affectionate Portrait of an Intellectual People

Sudhir Hazareesingh

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Explores the French commitment to rationalism and ideology, their belief in the State, their cult of heroes and their contempt for materialism. This book describes their fetishes, their fondness for general notions, their current fixations with the nation and collective memory, their messianic instincts and their devotion to universalism.
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The Ottoman Endgame: War, Revolution and the Making of the Modern Middle East, 1908-1923

The Ottoman Endgame: War, Revolution and the Making of the Modern Middle East, 1908-1923

Sean McMeekin

$27.99
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Montefiore  Shortlisted for the Duke of Westminster Medal for Military Literature  The Ottoman Endgame is the first, and definitive, single-volume history of the Ottoman empire's agonising war for survival. 

Beginning with Italy's invasion of Ottoman Tripoli in September 1911, the Empire was in a permanent state of emergency, with hardly a frontier not under direct threat. Assailed by enemies on all sides, the Empire-which had for generations been assumed to be a rotten shell-proved to be strikingly resilient, beating off major attacks at Gallipoli and in Mesopotamia before finally being brought down in the general ruin of the Central Powers in 1918. As the Europeans planned to partition all its lands between them and with even Istanbul seemingly helpless in the face of the triumphant Entente, an absolutely unexpected entity emerged: modern Turkey.  Under the startling genius of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, a powerful new state emerged from the Empire's fragments. 

This is the first time an author has woven the entire epic together from start to finish - and it will cause many readers to fundamentally re-evaluate their understanding of the conflict.  The consequences, well into the 21st century, could not have been more momentous - with countries as various as Serbia, Greece, Libya, Armenia, Iraq and Syria still living with them.
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The Fall of Heaven: The Pahlavis and the Final Days of Imperial Iran

The Fall of Heaven: The Pahlavis and the Final Days of Imperial Iran

Andrew Scott Cooper

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In this remarkably human portrait of one of the twentieth century's most complicated personalities, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, Andrew Scott Cooper traces the Shah's life from childhood through his ascension to the throne in 1941. He draws the turbulence of the post-war era during which the Shah survived assassination attempts and coup plots to build a modern, pro-Western state and launch Iran onto the world stage as one of the world's top five powers. Readers get the story of the Shah's political career alongside the story of his courtship and marriage to Farah Diba, who became a power in her own right, the beloved family they created, and an exclusive look at life inside the palace during the lranian Revolution.

Cooper's investigative account ultimately delivers the fall of the  Pahlavi dynasty through the eyes of those who were there: leading lranian revolutionaries; President Jimmy Carter and White House officials; US Ambassador William Sullivan and his staff in the American embassy in Tehran;  American families caught up in the drama; even Empress Farah herself, and the rest of the lranian imperial family.  Intimate and sweeping at once, The Fall of Heaven recreates in stunning detail the dramatic and final days of one of the world's most legendary ruling families, the unseating of which helped set the stage for the current state of the Middle East.
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All Things Made New: Writings on the Reformation

All Things Made New: Writings on the Reformation

Diarmaid MacCulloch

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The Reformation which engulfed England and Europe in the sixteenth century was one of the most highly-charged, bloody and transformative periods in their history. Ever since, it has remained one of the most contested. Diarmaid MacCulloch is one of the leading British historians of this turbulent and endlessly fascinating era. Many essays in this volume expand upon his now classic Reformation: Europe's House Divided, tracing, for example, the evolution of the English Prayer Book and Bible or reassessing the impact of the Reformation on Catholicism.

Henry VIII and his archbishop, Thomas Cranmer, are both central presences, and MacCulloch swiftly dispatches some of the received wisdom about them. Throughout the book, he brilliantly undermines one persistent English tradition of interpreting the Reformation - that it never really happened - and establishes that Anglicanism was really a product of Charles II's Restoration in 1660 rather than the 'Elizabethan Settlement' of 1559. The inexhaustible variety of the Reformation is seen in a delightful mix of writings on angels, Protestant opinions about the Virgin Mary and such diverse personalities as William Byrd, John Calvin and the extraordinary seventeenth-century forger Robert Ware, some of whose malicious fantasies have polluted parts of Reformation history ever since. All Things Made New shows Diarmaid MacCulloch at his best - learned, far-seeing, sometimes subversive, and often witty.

At the end of his essay on the great Elizabethan divine Richard Hooker, he writes 'The disputes which currently wrack Western Christianity are superficially about sexuality, social conduct or leadership style: at root, they are about what constitutes authority for Christians. The contest for the soul of the Church in the West rages around the question as to how a scripture claiming divine revelation relates to those other perennial sources of human revelation, personal and collective consciousness and memory; whether, indeed, there can be any relationship between the two.' There is much wisdom, as well as much enjoyment, in this book.
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Agents of Empire: Knights, Corsairs, Jesuits and Spies in the Sixteenth-Century Mediterranean World

Agents of Empire: Knights, Corsairs, Jesuits and Spies in the Sixteenth-Century Mediterranean World

Noel Malcolm

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In the second half of the sixteenth century, most of the Christian states of Western Europe were on the defensive against a Muslim superpower - the Empire of the Ottoman sultans. There was violent conflict, from raiding and corsairing to large-scale warfare, but there were also many forms of peaceful interaction across the surprisingly porous frontiers of these opposing power-blocs.

Agents of Empire describes the paths taken through the eastern Mediterranean and its European hinterland by members of a Venetian-Albanian family, almost all of them previously invisible to history. They include an archbishop in the Balkans, the captain of the papal flagship at the Battle of Lepanto, the power behind the throne in the Ottoman province of Moldavia, and a dragoman (interpreter) at the Venetian embassy in Istanbul. 

Through the life-stories of these adventurous individuals over three generations, Noel Malcolm casts the world between Venice, Rome and the Ottoman Empire in a fresh light, illuminating subjects as diverse as espionage, diplomacy, the grain trade, slave-ransoming and anti-Ottoman rebellion.  He describes the conflicting strategies of the Christian powers, and the extraordinarily ambitious plans of the sultans and their viziers. Few works since Fernand Braudel's classic account of the sixteenth-century Mediterranean, published more than sixty years ago, have ranged so widely through this vital period of Mediterranean and European history.

With a masterpiece of scholarship as well as story-telling, Agents of Empire builds up a panoramic picture, both of Western power-politics and of the interrelations between the Christian and Ottoman worlds.
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Pacific: The Ocean of the Future

Pacific: The Ocean of the Future

Simon Winchester

$24.99
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The Pacific is a world of tsunamis and Magellan, of the Bounty mutiny and the Boeing Company. It is the stuff of the towering Captain Cook and his wide-ranging network of exploring voyages, Robert Louis Stevenson and Admiral Halsey. It is the place of Paul Gauguin and the explosion of the largest-ever American atomic bomb, on Bikini atoll, in 1951. It has an astonishing recent past, an uncertain present and a hugely important future. The ocean and its peoples are the new lifeblood, fizz and thrill of America – which draws so many of its minds and so much of its manners from the sea – while the inexorable rise of the ancient center of the world, China, is a fixating fascination.

The presence of rogue states – North Korea most notoriously today – suggest that the focus of the responsible world is shifting away from the conventional post-war obsessions with Europe and the Middle East, and towards a new set of urgencies. Navigating the newly evolving patterns of commerce and trade, the world’s most violent weather and the fascinating histories, problems and potentials of the many Pacific states, Simon Winchester’s thrilling journey is a grand depiction of the future ocean.
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The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars

The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars

Daniel Beer

$65.00
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It was known as 'the vast prison without a roof'. From the beginning of the nineteenth century to the Russian Revolution, the tsarist regime exiled more than one million prisoners and their families beyond the Ural Mountains to Siberia. Daniel Beer's new book, The House of the Dead, brings to life both the brutal realities of an inhuman system and the tragic and inspiring fates of those who endured it. This is the vividly told history of common criminals and political radicals, the victims of serfdom and village politics, the wives and children who followed husbands and fathers, and of fugitives and bounty-hunters. Siberia served two masters: colonisation and punishment.

In theory, exiles would discover the virtues of self-reliance, abstinence and hard work and, in so doing, they would develop Siberia's natural riches and bind it more firmly to Russia. In reality, the autocracy banished an army not of hardy colonists but of half-starving, desperate vagabonds. The tsars also looked on Siberia as creating the ultimate political quarantine from the contagions of revolution. Generations of rebels - republicans, nationalists and socialists - were condemned to oblivion thousands of kilometres from European Russia. Over the nineteenth century, however, these political exiles transformed Siberia's mines, prisons and remote settlements into an enormous laboratory of revolution.

This masterly work of original research taps a mass of almost unknown primary evidence held in Russian and Siberian archives to tell the epic story both of Russia's struggle to govern its monstrous penal colony and Siberia's ultimate, decisive impact on the political forces of the modern world.

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The New Russia

The New Russia

Mikhail Gorbachev

$49.95
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After years of rapprochement, the relationship between Russia and the West is more strained now than it has ever been in the past 25 years. Putin's motives, his reasons for seeking confrontation with the West, remain for many a mystery. Not for Mikhail Gorbachev.

In this new work, Russia's elder statesman draws on his wealth of knowledge and experience to reveal the development of Putin's regime and the intentions behind it. He argues that in order to further his own personal power, Putin has corrupted the achievements of perestroika and created a system which offers no future for Russia. Faced with this, Gorbachev advocates a radical reform of politics and new fostering of pluralism and social democracy.

Gorbachev's insightful analysis moves beyond internal politics to address wider problems in the region, including the Ukraine conflict, as well as the global challenges of poverty and climate change. Above all else, he insists that solutions are to be found by returning to the atmosphere of dialogue and cooperation which was so instrumental in ending the Cold War.

This book represents the summation of Gorbachev's thinking on the course that Russia has taken since 1991 and stands as a testament to one of the greatest and most influential statesmen of the 20th century.
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The War in the West: A New History: Germany Ascendant 1939-1941

The War in the West: A New History: Germany Ascendant 1939-1941

James Holland

$24.99
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Are you ready for the truth about World War Two? The Second World War is the most cataclysmic and violent sequence of events in recent times. But for the past seven decades, our understanding of it has relied upon conventional wisdom, propaganda and an interpretation skewed by the information available.

James Holland has spent over twelve years conducting new research, interviewing survivors, visiting battlefields and archives that have never before been so accessible and challenging too-long-held assumptions about the war that shaped our world. In Germany Ascendant, the first part of this ground-breaking new history, James Holland introduces the war, beginning with the lead-up to its outbreak in 1939 and taking us up to mid-1941 as the Nazis prepared to unleash Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of Russia.  To tell the real story, he weaves together the experiences of dozens of individuals, from civilians and soldiers, to sailors, pilots, leading military strategists, industrialists and heads of state, and uncovers the strategy, tactics and events that informed not only the military aspects of the war but also the economic, political, and social aspects too. 

The War in the West is a truly monumental history of the war on land, in the air, and at sea. In it, James Holland has created a captivating and epic narrative which redefines and enhances our understanding of one of the most significant conflicts in history.
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The Battle of the Atlantic: How the Allies Won the War

The Battle of the Atlantic: How the Allies Won the War

Jonathan Dimbleby

$24.99
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The Battle of the Atlantic was the single most important - and longest - campaign of the Second World War. If Britain lost this vital supply route it lost the war. In Jonathan Dimbleby's brilliant and dramatic new account we see how this epic struggle for maritime mastery played out, from the politicians and admirals to the men on and under the sea and their families waiting at home. Filled with haunting and hair-raising stories of chases, ambushes, sinkings, stalkings, disasters and rescues, The Battle of the Atlantic is a monumental work of history as it was lived and fought.
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Too Important for the Generals: Losing and Winning the First World War

Too Important for the Generals: Losing and Winning the First World War

Allan Mallinson

$39.99
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Published as the world marks the centenary of one of the most infamous battles of the First World War, the Somme, this powerfully-argued and polemical new history of the war by one of Britain's most respected military historians explores how the war was fought, how near we came to losing it - and why winning proved so costly and why the Allied generals and politicians failed to find a less bloody strategy for victory.

‘War is too important to be left to the generals' snapped future French prime minister Georges Clemenceau on learning of yet another bloody and futile offensive on the Western Front.

One of the great questions in the ongoing discussions and debate about the First World War is why did winning take so long and exact so appalling a human cost? After all this was a fight that, we were told, would be over by Christmas.

Now, in his major new history, Allan Mallinson, former professional soldier and author of the acclaimed 1914: Fight the Good Fight, provides answers that are disturbing as well as controversial, and have a contemporary resonance. He disputes the growing consensus among historians that British generals were not to blame for the losses and setbacks in the ‘war to end all wars' – that, given the magnitude of their task, they did as well anyone could have. He takes issue with the popular view that the ‘amateur' opinions on strategy of politicians such as Lloyd George and, especially, Winston Churchill, prolonged the war and increased the death toll. On the contrary, he argues, even before the war began Churchill had a far more realistic, intelligent and humane grasp of strategy than any of the admirals or generals, while very few senior officers – including Sir Douglas Haig – were up to the intellectual challenge of waging war on this scale. And he repudiates the received notion that Churchill's stature as a wartime prime minister after 1940 owes much to the lessons he learned from his First World War ‘mistakes' – notably the Dardanelles campaign – maintaining that in fact Churchill's achievement in the Second World War owes much to the thwarting of his better strategic judgement by the ‘professionals' in the First – and his determination that this would not be repeated.

Mallinson argues that from day one of the war Britain was wrong-footed by absurdly faulty French military doctrine and paid, as a result, an unnecessarily high price in casualties. He shows that Lloyd George understood only too well the catastrophically dysfunctional condition of military policy-making and struggled against the weight of military opposition to fix it. And he asserts that both the British and the French failed to appreciate what the Americans' contribution to victory could be – and, after the war, to acknowledge fully what it had actually been.
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Landscapes of Communism: A History Through Buildings

Landscapes of Communism: A History Through Buildings

Owen Hatherley

$29.99
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During the course of the twentieth century, communism took power in Eastern Europe and remade the city in its own image. Ransacking the urban planning of the grand imperial past, it set out to transform everyday life, its sweeping boulevards, epic high-rise and vast housing estates an emphatic declaration of a non-capitalist idea. Now, the regimes that built them are dead and long gone, but from Warsaw to Berlin, Moscow to post - Revolution Kiev, the buildings, their most obvious legacy, remain, populated by people whose lives were scattered and jeopardized by the collapse of communism and the introduction of capitalism. Landscapes of Communism is an intimate history of twentieth-century communist Europe told through its buildings; it is, too, a book about power, and what power does in cities. Most of all, Landscapes of Communism is a revelatory journey of discovery, plunging us into the maelstrom of socialist architecture. As we submerge into the metros, walk the massive, multi-lane magistrale and pause at milk bars in the microrayons, who knows what we might find?
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Britain's Europe: A Thousand Years of Conflict and Cooperation

Britain's Europe: A Thousand Years of Conflict and Cooperation

Brendan Simms

$49.99
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Britain has always had a tangled, complex, paradoxical role in Europe's history. It has invaded and been invaded, changed sides, stood aloof, acted with both brazen cynicism and the cloudiest idealism. Every century troops from the British isles have marched across the mainland in pursuit of a great complex of different goals, foremost among them the intertwined defence of parliamentary liberty in Britain and the 'Liberties of Europe'. Dynastically Britain has been closely linked to countries as varied as Spain, the Netherlands, Germany and France. In this bracing and highly enjoyable book, Brendan Simms describes the highlights and low-points in the Euro-British encounter, from the Dark Ages to the present. The critical importance of understanding this history is shown in the final chapter, which dramatizes the issues around British relations with the European Union and the how, far from being a narrowly legalistic or financial concern, a referendum on continued membership raises all kinds of fascinating questions about both the United Kingdom's own horizons and what it can offer to the Union's vision of itself. Britain's Europe is a vital intervention at a moment of both great danger and great opportunity.
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The Great Cities in History

The Great Cities in History

John Julius Norwich

$21.99
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From the origins of urbanization in Mesopotamia to the global metropolises of today, great cities have marked the development of human civilization. The Great Cities in History tells their stories, from Uruk and Memphis to Tokyo and Sao Paulo. A galaxy of distinguished contributors evoke the character of each place - its people, its art and architecture, its government - and explain the reasons for its success. Richly illustrated with photographs, paintings, maps and plans, this volume is nothing less than a portrait of world civilization.
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A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Daily Life

A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Daily Life

Greg Jenner

$22.99
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Every day, from the moment our alarm clock wakes us in the morning until our head hits our pillow at night, we all take part in rituals that are millennia old. In this gloriously entertaining romp through human history - featuring new updates for the paperback edition - BBC Horrible Histories consultant Greg Jenner explores the hidden stories behind these daily routines. This is not a story of politics, wars or great events, instead Greg Jenner has scoured Roman rubbish bins, Egyptian tombs and Victorian sewers to bring us the most intriguing, surprising and sometimes downright silly nuggets from our past. It is a history of all those things you always wondered - and many you have never considered. It is the story of our lives, one million years in the making.
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The Celts: Search for a Civilization

The Celts: Search for a Civilization

Alice Roberts

$22.99
Alice Roberts goes in search of the Celts and their treasures in a narrative history to accompanying a new BBC series.
 
We know a lot about the Roman Empire. The Romans left monuments to their glories and written histories charting the exploits of their heroes. But there was another ancient people in Europe - feared warriors with chariots, iron swords, exquisite jewellery, swirling tattoos and strange rituals and beliefs. For hundreds of years Europe was theirs, not Rome's. They were our ancestors, and yet the scale of their achievements has largely been forgotten. They were the Celts.
 
Unlike the Romans they did not write their history, so the stories of many heroic Celtic men and women have been lost. And yet we can discover their deeds. . . you just have to know where to look.
 
From Denmark to Italy; Portugal to Turkey Alice Roberts takes us on a journey across Europe, revealing the remarkable story of the Celts: their real origins, how they lived and thrived, and their enduring modern legacy.
 
Using ground-breaking linguistic research, in addition to the latest archaeology and genetics, Alice Roberts will explore how this remarkable and advanced culture grew from the fringes of the continent and humiliated the might of Rome.
 
The Celts accompanies a substantial BBC series presented by Alice Roberts and Neil Oliver, and showing in October 2015.
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The Vikings: Raids, Culture, Lergacy

The Vikings: Raids, Culture, Lergacy

Marjolein Stern ,  Roderick Dale

$34.99
The impact of the Vikings is impossible to overstate. A people apparently condemned to a marginal existence in the remote wastes of Dark Age northern Europe, they burst onto an unsuspecting continent with extraordinary consequences. Initially they were pirates and raiders of astounding ferocity. In a matter of decades, they had laid waste to much of the coastal British Isles and had penetrated deep into France, threatening to snuff out for good an emerging Christendom.

They launched raids against Muslim Iberia and then into the Mediterranean. They pushed east across the Baltic and from there south along the river systems of western Russia to the Black Sea and Byzantium, establishing themselves as traders and slavers. They discovered and exploited sea-routes deep into the North Atlantic—to the Faroes, to Iceland and Greenland, and finally to America itself. They initiated routes of oceanic exploration that would be unmatched until Columbus five centuries later.

This book, accessible and vivid, sheds new light on the Viking Age. It examines their gods and belief systems, their technological advances, their extraordinary levels of craftsmanship, their social organization, their success as colonizers, their political coups, their military might, their commercial nous, and their remarkable self-belief. It provides a compelling portrait of a world decisively shaped by the Viking initiatives and imperatives.
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Early Iron Age Greek Warrior 1100-700 BC

Early Iron Age Greek Warrior 1100-700 BC

Raffaele D'Amato ,  Giuseppe Rava ,  Andrea Salimbeti

$22.99
The period from 1200 BC onwards saw vast changes in every aspect of life on both the Greek mainland and islands as monarchies disappeared and were replaced by aristocratic rule and a new form of community developed: the city-state. Alongside these changes a new style of warfare developed which was to be the determining factor in land warfare in Greece until the defeat of the Greek city-state by the might of Macedonia at Chaeronea in 338 BC. This mode of warfare was based on a group of heavily armed infantrymen organized in a phalanx formation - the classic hoplite formation - and remained the system throughout the classical Greek period. This new title details this pivotal period that saw the transition from the Bronze Age warriors of Homer to the origins of the men who fought the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars.
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In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World

In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World

Christian Marek

$102.00
This monumental book provides the first comprehensive history of Asia Minor from prehistory to the Roman imperial period. In this handsome English-language edition of the critically acclaimed German book, Christian Marek masterfully weaves together illuminating citations from the ancient sources with vivid sketches of civic institutions, urban and rural society, agriculture, trade and money, the influential Greek writers of the Second Sophistic, the notoriously bloody exhibitions of the gladiatorial arena, and more.
 
In the Land of a Thousand Gods is truly panoramic in scope. Blending rich narrative history with in-depth analyses of political, social, and economic achievements, it traces Asia Minor's shifting orientation between East and West in the ancient world and examines its roles as both a melting pot of nations and a bridge for cultural transmission. Marek takes readers from the earliest known Stone Age settlements to the appearance and downfall of Bronze and Iron Age empires. He covers the emergence of early Greek poetry and science, the invention of coinage, Persian domination and the prosperity of cities under the Hellenistic kings, and the establishment of Roman provinces. Marek draws on the latest research--in fields ranging from demography and economics to architecture and religion--to describe how Asia Minor became a civilized and wealthy part of the Roman Empire, and shows how the advancement of Hellenization and civic autonomy was the irreversible legacy of the Pax Romana.
 
A breathtaking work of scholarship, In the Land of a Thousand Gods is destined to become the standard reference book on the subject in English.
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The Battle of Actium 31 B.C.: War for the World

The Battle of Actium 31 B.C.: War for the World

Lee Fratantuono

$59.99
A good argument could be made that the Battle of Actium was the most significant military engagement in Roman history. On a bright September day, the naval forces of Octavian clashed with those of Antony and Cleopatra off the coast of western Greece. The victory Octavian enjoyed that day set the state for forty-four years of what would come to be known as the Augustan Peace, and was in no small way the dawn of the Roman Empire. Yet, despite its significance, what exactly happened at Actium has been a mystery, despite significant labours and effort on the part of many classicists and military historians both amateur and professional. Professor Lee Fratantuono re-examines the ancient evidence and presents a compelling and solidly documented account of what took place in the waters off the promontory of Leucas in late August and early September of 31 B.C.
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Four Days in September: The Battle of Teutoberg

Four Days in September: The Battle of Teutoberg

Jason R. Abdale

$59.99
For twenty years, the Roman Empire conquered its way through modern-day Germany, claiming all lands from the Rhine to the Elbe. However, when at last all appeared to be under control, a catastrophe erupted that claimed the lives of 10,000 legionnaires and laid Rome's imperial ambitions for Germania into the dust. In late September of 9 AD, three Roman legions, while marching to suppress a distant tribal rebellion, were attacked in a four-day battle with the Germanic barbarians. The Romans, under the leadership of the province's governor, Publius Quinctilius Varus, were taken completely by surprise, betrayed by a member of their own ranks: the German officer and secret rebel leader, Arminius. The defeat was a heavy blow to both Rome's military and its pride. Though the disaster was ruthlessly avenged soon afterwards, later attempts at conquering the Germans were half-hearted at best. Four days in September thoroughly examines the ancient sources and challenges the hypotheses of modern scholars to present a clear picture of the prelude to the battle, the fighting itself and its aftermath.
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East of Asia Minor: Rome's Hidden Frontier (Volumes 1 & 2)

East of Asia Minor: Rome's Hidden Frontier (Volumes 1 & 2)

Timothy Mitford

$571.95
The north-eastern frontier of the Roman Empire - one of the great gaps in modern knowledge of the ancient world - has long eluded research. It has defied systematic exploration and been insulated against all but passing survey by wars, instability, political sensitivities, language, and the region's wild, remote mountains, mostly accessible only on horseback or on foot. Its path lay across eastern Turkey, following the Euphrates valley northwards from Syria, through gorges and across great ranges, and passing over the Pontic Alps to reach the further shores of the Black Sea. Vespasian established Rome's frontier against Armenia half a century before Hadrian's Wall. Five times as long, and climbing seven times as high, it was garrisoned ultimately by four legions and a large auxiliary army, stationed in intermediate forts linked by military roads.

The two volumes of East of Asia Minor: Rome's Hidden Frontier - based on research, field work conducted largely on foot, and new discoveries - document the topography, monuments, inscriptions, and sighted coins of the frontier, looking in detail at strategic roads, bridges, forts, watch and signalling systems, and navigation of the Euphrates itself. Study of the terrain provides a foundation for interpreting the literary and epigraphic evidence for the frontier and its garrisons. Military activity, which extended to the Caucasus and the Caspian, is placed in the context of climate, geography, and inter-regional trade routes. 28 colour maps and over 350 photographs, plans, and travellers' sketches not only document the history of eastern Turkey as a frontier region of the Roman empire, but also reveal an ancient way of life, still preserved during the 1960s and 1970s, but now almost obliterated by the developments of the modern world.
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The Emperor Nero: A Guide to the Ancient Sources

The Emperor Nero: A Guide to the Ancient Sources

Anthony A. Barrett ,  Elaine Fantham ,  John C. Yardley

$66.00
Nero's reign (AD 54-68) witnessed some of the most memorable events in Roman history, such as the rebellion of Boudica and the first persecution of the Christians - not to mention Nero's murder of his mother, his tyranny and extravagance, and his suicide, which plunged the empire into civil war. The Emperor Nero gathers into a single collection the major sources for Nero's life and rule, providing students of Nero and ancient Rome with the most authoritative and accessible reader there is.
 
The Emperor Nero features clear, contemporary translations of key literary sources along with translations and explanations of representative inscriptions and coins issued under Nero. An informative introduction situates the emperor's reign within the history of the Roman Empire, and concise headnotes to chapters place the source material in historical and biographical context. Passages are accompanied by detailed notes and are organized around events, such as the Great Fire of Rome, or by topic, such as Nero's relationships with his wives. Complex events like the war with Parthia - split up among several chapters in Tacitus - are brought together in continuous narratives, making this the most comprehensible and user-friendly sourcebook on Nero available.
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The Moving City: Processions, Passages and Promenades in Ancient Rome

The Moving City: Processions, Passages and Promenades in Ancient Rome

Ida Ostenberg ,  Simon Malmberg ,  Jonas Bjornebye

$49.99
The Moving City: Processions, Passages and Promenades in Ancient Rome focusses on movements in the ancient city of Rome, exploring the interaction between people and monuments. Representing a novel approach to the Roman cityscape and culture, and reflecting the shift away from the traditional study of single monuments into broader analyses of context and space, the volume reveals both how movement adds to our understanding of ancient society, and how the movement of people and goods shaped urban development. Covering a wide range of people, places, sources, and times, the volume includes a survey of Republican, imperial, and late antique movement, triumphal processions of conquering generals, seditious, violent movement of riots and rebellion, religious processions and rituals and the everyday movements of individual strolls or household errands. By way of its longue duree, dense location and the variety of available sources, the city of ancient Rome offers a unique possibility to study movements as expressions of power, ritual, writing, communication, mentalities, trade, and - also as a result of a massed populace - violent outbreaks and attempts to keep order. The emerging picture is of a bustling, lively society, where cityscape and movements are closely interactive and entwined.
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Two Sisters: A True Story

Two Sisters: A True Story

Ngarta Jinny Bent ,  Jukuna Mona Chuguna ,  Pat Lowe ,  Eirlys Richards

$24.99
Ngarta and Jukuna lived in the Great Sandy Desert. They traversed country according to the seasons, just as the Walmajarri people had done for thousands of years. But it was a time of change. Desert people who had lived with little knowledge of European settlement were now moving onto cattle stations. Those left behind were vulnerable and faced unimaginable challenges. In 1961, when Jukuna leaves with her new husband, young Ngarta remains with a group of women and children. Tragedy strikes and Ngarta is forced to travel alone. Her survival depends on cunning and courage as she is pursued by two murderers in a vast unforgiving landscape. Jukuna's rich account may be the first autobiography written in an Aboriginal language. Presented in English and Walmajarri, her determination to see her language written has made her one of our most valued authors.
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Griffith Review #53: Our Sporting Life

Griffith Review #53: Our Sporting Life

Julianne Schultz

$27.99
Sport lies at the heart of what it means to be Australian. As we head towards the Rio Olympics and indulge in our own popular sporting competitions, Our Sporting Life endeavours to unpack Australia's ongoing and enduring love affair with sports of all kinds and attempts to unravel why these remain so important to us as a nation. Going far beyond the thrill of the competition and the desire to win, Our Sporting Life investigates the life of the athlete, the passion of the spectator and the intersection of these two parties within our culture. Written by outstanding sports writers and industry insiders, these essays explore issues of disability and inclusion, race, gender and violence alongside personal stories and lived accounts from the track and field. Griffith Review 53: Our Sporting Life enriches the sporting experience, leaving something to think about once the final siren has sounded. Contributors include William McInnes, Alicia Sometimes, Alex McClintock, Annie Zaidi and manymore.
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On Ops: Lessons for the Australian Army Since East Timor

On Ops: Lessons for the Australian Army Since East Timor

Tom Frame ,  Albert Palazzo

$39.99
No-one in the Australian government or Army could have predicted that in the 25 years following the end of the Cold War Army personnel would be deployed to Rwanda, Cambodia, Somalia, Bougainville, East Timor, Afghanistan, Iraq and the Solomon Islands. In a constructive critique of the modern Australian Army, On Ops examines the massive transformation that has taken place since troops were deployed to East Timor 1999. After decades of inactivity and the 'long peace' of the 1970s and 1980s the Army was stretched to the limit. Contributors include John Howard and Peter Leahy as well as Craig Stockings, David Horner and an impressive arrary of military historians, academics, intelligence experts and ex and current Army.
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The Chopper Boys: Helicopter Warfare in Africa

The Chopper Boys: Helicopter Warfare in Africa

Al J. Venter

$75.00
When The Chopper Boys was published 20 years ago, there were three editions, one each for Britain, the United States and South Africa. The book sold out in a short time and a revised edition of the work has been asked for many times in recent years from aviation enthusiasts, but in particular from the men and women who flew these beautiful machines. This new edition attempts to plug those holes by including chapters on ongoing hostilities against al-Qaeda in the Maghreb (AQIM) where the French air force is battling Islamic Jihadis in that country's northern mountains, as well ongoing events in Somalia. Also included is a section on the South African mercenary group Executive Outcomes who fought two successful anti-insurgency campaigns in Angola and Sierra Leone. The author also takes a long, hard look at the future of private military contracting work in the Third World, and specifically the role that chopper gunships are likely to play in future conflagrations on what some people still refer to as the 'Dark Continent'.
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Easternisation: War and Peace in the Asian Century

Easternisation: War and Peace in the Asian Century

Gideon Rachman

$35.00
The West's domination of world politics is coming to a close. The flow of wealth and power is turning from West to East and a new era of global instability has begun. Easternisation is the defining trend of our age - the growing wealth of Asian nations is transforming the international balance of power. This shift to the East is shaping the lives of people all over the world, the fate of nations and the great questions of war and peace. A troubled but rising China is now challenging America's supremacy, and the ambitions of other Asian powers - including Japan, North Korea, India and Pakistan - have the potential to shake the whole world. Meanwhile the West is struggling with economic malaise and political populism, the Arab world is in turmoil and Russia longs to reclaim its status as a great power. We are at a turning point in history: but Easternisation has many decades to run. Gideon Rachman offers a road map to the turbulent process that will define the international politics of the twenty-first century.
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In Other Words: Forty Years of Essays

In Other Words: Forty Years of Essays

Goenawan Mohamad ,  Jennifer Lindsay

$34.99
Goenawan Mohamad is one of Indonesia's foremost literacy figures and public intellectuals, and this translated volume of essays, from 1968 to 2014, demonstrates the breadth of his perceptive and elegant commentary on literature, faith, mythology, politics, history and Indonesian life. With almost 100 short essays, most taken from his popular columns in Tempo, the Indonesian-language news weekly, In Other Words shows a writer commited to Indonesia but grappling with universal themes and struggles, offering a fascinating insight into questions that concern us all.
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Middle Kingdom and Empire of the Rising Sun: Sino-Japanese Relations, Past and Present

Middle Kingdom and Empire of the Rising Sun: Sino-Japanese Relations, Past and Present

June Teufel Dreyer

$43.95
Japan and China have been rivals for more than a millennium. In more recent times, China was the more powerful until the late nineteenth century, while Japan took the upper hand in the twentieth. Now, China's resurgence has emboldened it even as Japan perceives itself falling behind, exacerbating long-standing historical frictions.

June Teufel Dreyer's Middle Kingdom and Empire of the Rising Sun provides a highly accessible overview of one of the world's great civilizational rivalries. Dreyer, a senior scholar of East Asia, begins in the seventh century in order to provide a historical background for the main story: by the mid-nineteenth century, the shrinking distances afforded by advances in technology and the intrusion of Western powers brought the two into closer proximity in ways that alternately united and divided them. In the aftermath of multiple wars between them, including a long and brutal conflict in World War II, Japan developed into an economic power but rejected any concomitant military capabilities. China's journey toward modernization was hindered by ideological and leadership struggles that lasted until the death of revolutionary leader Mao Zedong in 1976. 

Bringing the narrative up to the present day, Dreyer focuses on the issues that dominate China and Japan's fraught current relationship: economic rivalry, memories of World War II, resurgent nationalism, military tensions, Taiwan, the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands, and globalization. Dreyer argues that recent disputes should be seen as manifestations of embedded rivalries rather than as issues whose resolution would provide a lasting solution to deep-standing disputes.

For anyone interested in the political dynamics of East Asia, this integrative history of the relationship between the region's two giants is essential reading.
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Revolution in the City of Heroes: A Memoir of the Battle That Sparked Indonesia's National Revolution

Revolution in the City of Heroes: A Memoir of the Battle That Sparked Indonesia's National Revolution

Suhario Padmodiwiryo ,  Frank Palmos

$29.95
The battle of Surabaya looms large in the history of Indonesia. Yet the story of this battle is not well known outside of that nation. Based on the diary of 24-year-old Indonesian medical student Suhario Padmodiwiryo, Revolution in the City of Heroes is an evocative first-hand account of the popular uprising in Surabaya. It vividly portrays the chaotic swirl of events and the heady emotion of young people ready to sacrifice their lives for independence, and is essential reading for Australians seeking to gain a better understanding of their increasingly important northern neighbour.
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City Dreamers: The Urban Imagination in Australia

City Dreamers: The Urban Imagination in Australia

Graeme Davison

$34.99
I became an urban historian because I believed that our cities deserved more of our curiosity and idealism. City Dreamers restores Australian cities, and those who created them, to their rightful place in the national imagination. Building on a lifetime's work, Graeme Davison views Australian history, from 1788 to the present day, through the eyes of city dreamers - such as Henry Lawson, Charles Bean and Hugh Stretton - and others who have helped make the cities we inhabit. Davison looks at significant individuals or groups that he calls snobs, slummers, pessimists, exodists, suburbans and anti-suburbans - and argues that there's a particular twist to the ways in which Australians think about cities. And the way we live in them. This extraordinary book excavates the cultural history of the Australian city by focusing on 'dreamers', those who battle to make and re-make our cities. It reminds us that for most of us the city is home, and it is there that we find belonging.
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The RSL Book of World War I: True Stories of Aussie Courage and the Mateshipfrom the Annals of the RSL

The RSL Book of World War I: True Stories of Aussie Courage and the Mateshipfrom the Annals of the RSL

John Gatfield ,  Richard Landels

$19.99
True stories from the frontlines of World War I Published to mark the centenary of the First World War and of the RSL in 2016, this is a collection of 100 true stories of Aussie courage from those who were in the action. The RSL, an Australian icon, has supported Australian veterans since 1916, pledging that their sacrifices will never be forgotten. Now from the annals of the RSL come these compelling yarns and memories, written by diggers for diggers and capturing the impact of war on those who took part. With eyewitness accounts ranging from Gallipoli to the Middle East and Western Front, Australia's Great War is brought to life with humour, pathos and vivid detail. Discover a rare account of the capture of German New Guinea, the first Australian action of the war, and experience the Gallipoli campaign through the diggers' eyes. There's the story of how a Light Horse patrol daringly slipped through advancing Turkish troops to warn their mates of danger, a sapper's-eye view of the battle of Fromelles, how the Melbourne Cup was run on the Western Front - and so much more. Collected here for the first time, these stories are a must-read record of World War I.
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Shooting the Picture: Press Photography in Australia

Shooting the Picture: Press Photography in Australia

Sally Young ,  Fay Anderson ,  Michael Gawenda

$45.00
Shooting The Picture is the story of Australian press photography from 1888 to today--the power of the medium, seismic changes in the newspaper industry, and photographers who were often more colourful than their subjects. This groundbreaking book explores our political leaders and campaigns, crime, war and censorship, international events, disasters and trauma, sport, celebrity, gender, race and migration. It maps the technological evolution in the industry from the dark room to digital, from picturegram machines to iPhones, and from the death knock to the ascendancy of social media. It raises the question whether these changes will spell the end of traditional press photography as we know it.
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Ambon: The Truth About One of the Most Brutal POW Camps in World War II and the Triumph of the Aussie Spirit

Ambon: The Truth About One of the Most Brutal POW Camps in World War II and the Triumph of the Aussie Spirit

Roger Maynard

$16.99
In February 1942 the Indonesian island of Ambon fell to the might of the advancing Japanese war machine. Among the captured Allied forces was a unit of 1150 Australian soldiers known as Gull Force, who had been sent to defend the island - a strategy doomed from the very beginning. Several hundred Australians were massacred in cold blood soon after the Japanese invasion. But that was only the start of a catalogue of horrors for the men who survived: incarcerated, beaten and often tortured by their captors, the brutality they endured lasted for the next three and a half years. And in this hellhole of despair and evil, officers and men turned against each other as discipline and morale broke down. Yet the epic struggle also produced heroic acts of kindness and bravery. Just over 300 of these gallant men lived to tell of those grim days behind the barbed wire. In AMBON, survivors speak of not just the horrors, but of the courage, endurance and mateship that helped them survive. The story of AMBON is one of depravity and of memories long buried - but also the triumph of the human spirit.
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The Changi Brownlow: An Inspirational Story of the Aussie Spirit

The Changi Brownlow: An Inspirational Story of the Aussie Spirit

Roland Perry

$16.99
After Singapore falls to the Japanese early in 1942, 70,000 prisoners including 15,000 Australians, are held as POWs at the notorious Changi prison, Singapore. To amuse themselves and fellow inmates, a group of sportsmen led by the indefatigable and popular 'Chicken' Smallhorn, created an Australian Football League, complete with tribunal, selection panel, umpires and coaches. The final game of the one and only season attracted 10,000 spectators, and a unique Brownlow Medal was awarded. Meet the main characters behind this spectacle: Peter Chitty, the farm hand from Snowy River country with unfathomable physical and mental fortitude, and one of eight in his immediate family who volunteered to fight and serve in WW2; 'Chicken' Smallhorn, the Brownlow Medal-winning little man with the huge heart; and 'Weary' Dunlop, the courageous doctor, who cares for the POWs as they endure malnutrition, disease and often inhuman treatment. This is a story of courage and the invincibility of the human spirit, and the Australian love of sport.
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The Men Who Came Out of the Ground: A Gripping Account of Australia's First Commando Campaign - Timor 1942

The Men Who Came Out of the Ground: A Gripping Account of Australia's First Commando Campaign - Timor 1942

Paul Cleary

$16.99
It was early 1942, Australia was in dire straits. The seemingly all-conquering Japanese military forces had rolled over south-east Asia. Singapore had Fallen. Only a few hundred men remained in Timor. These soldiers, the 2/2 Australian Independent Company - Sparrow Force - were all that stood between Japanese forces and Papua New Guinea. A Special Forces unit set up to fight a different kind of war, many were bushmen and crack shots, and all were trained to fight behind enemy lines. Mobilising the support of the locals, they adapted their bush skills to become the masters of this new kind of commando warfare. Always greatly outnumbered but relentless in their harassing campaign of skirmishes and ambushes, Sparrow Force tied down thousands of Japanese in a fierce guerrilla war - not just matching them but beating them. The Timor campaign became a defining moment Australia's military history.
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Redback One: The True Story of an Australian SAS Hero

Redback One: The True Story of an Australian SAS Hero

Robert Macklin ,  Robert Macklin

$16.99
Elite SAS Patrol Commander Stuart 'Nev' Bonner takes us inside the extraordinary and dangerous world of secret combat operations in this explosive, behind-the-scenes look at life inside the SAS. A world where capture means torture or death, and every move is trained for with precision detail to bring elite soldiers to the very peak of fighting ability. In a career spanning twenty years, fourteen of them in the SAS, Bonner shares with us the inside story of being out in front - and often behind enemy lines. From patrolling the mountains of East Timor to covert operations in Bougainville and the Solomon Islands, from sweeping into the Iraqi desert ahead of invading US forces to cripple Saddam Hussein's communications to patrolling in war-torn Baghdad and being in the middle of the disastrous Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan - this is a no-holds-barred account of what it's like to live, eat and breathe SAS.
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The Tiger Man of Vietnam

The Tiger Man of Vietnam

Frank Walker

$16.99
In 1963, Australian Army Captain Barry Petersen was sent to Vietnam. It was one of the most tightly held secrets of the Vietnam War. Petersen was ordered to train and lead guerrilla squads of Montagnard tribesmen against the Viet Cong in the remote Central Highlands. He successfully formed a fearsome militia, named 'Tiger Men'. A canny leader, he was courageous in battle, and his bravery saw him awarded the coveted Military Cross and worshipped by the hill tribes. But his success created enemies, not just within the Viet Cong. Some in US intelligence saw Petersen as having 'gone native' and were determined he had to go, by any means possible. He was lucky to make it out of the mountains alive. THE TIGER MAN OF VIETNAM reveals the compelling true story of a little-known Australian war hero.
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Entertainers: Iconic Images from 50 Years of Showbiz in Australia

Entertainers: Iconic Images from 50 Years of Showbiz in Australia

Bruce Postle

$29.99
For more than five decades and during the Golden age of press photography, Bruce Postle captured significant moments in Australian life. His collection of over 60,000 images is a national treasure chronicling the highs and lows, tragedies and triumphs, and heroes and villains have given Australia its unique character.

Entertainers presents 180 of Bruce Postle’s greatest images portraying the Australian and international acts that have lit up our stages for half a century. From Bill Haley and the Comets’ first show in Brisbane in 1952 to Lisa McCune wowing crowds in The Sound of Music, Entertainers is your access-all-areas pass to a uniquely Australian extravaganza.
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Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore

Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore

Julie Peakman

$19.99
Of picking, washing and cleaning my pretty little toes, which he took great delight in, and in which pleasurable, innocent, and inoffensive pastime he as often spent hours; twas the greatest gratification to him on earth, nor did he (said she) indulge in any other in all the time we spent together, he never was even rude enough to give me a kiss. So emerged the first expose of foot fetishism in the eighteenth-century. Revelations and racy anecdotes about the lives of the rich and famous of Dublin and London abound within Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore. From a violent domestic background, Peg blitzed her way through balls and masquerades creating scandals and gossip wherever she went, leaving dukes, barristers and lieutenants stranded in her wake. She was the first madame ever to write her memoirs, thereby setting the template for the whore's memoir. She wrote not merely to reveal herself but to expose the shoddy behaviour of others and her account of her life. In Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore, Julie Peakman brings her subject and the world through which she moved to glorious, bawdy life.
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A Brief History of the British Army

A Brief History of the British Army

John Lewis-Stempel ,  Jock Haswell

$24.99
The story of the British Army has many sides to it, being a tale of heroic successes and tragic failures, of dogged determination and drunken disorder. It involves many of the most vital preoccupations in the history of the island - the struggle against Continental domination by a single power, the battle for Empire - and a cast of remarkable characters - Marlborough, Wellington and Montgomery among them.

Yet the British, relying on their navy, have always neglected their army; from the time of Alfred the Great to the reign of Charles II wars were fought with hired forces disbanded as soon as conflict ended. Even after the struggles with Louis XIV impelled the formation of a regular army, impecunious governments neglected the armed forces except in times of national emergency.

In this wide-ranging account, Major Haswell sketches the medieval background before concentrating on the three hundred years of the regular army, leading up to its role in our own time. He presents an informed and probing picture of the organization of the army, the development of weaponry and strategy - and the everyday life of the British soldier through the centuries.

John Lewis-Stempel has brought Major Haswell's classic work right up to date by expanding the section on the dissolution of empire to include a full account of Northern Ireland and the Falklands War. He has added a new chapter to cover the Gulf War, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq; also the increasing role of special forces and the amalgamation of regiments.
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The Grand Old Duke of York: A Life of Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany 1763-1827

The Grand Old Duke of York: A Life of Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany 1763-1827

Derek Winterbottom

$62.95
Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany is famous because of the nursery rhyme which ridicules him for poor leadership but, as Derek Winterbottom's biography shows, he was far from incompetent as a commander. What is more, the famous rhyme does not even hint at his achievements as commander-in-chief of the British army during the Napoleonic Wars.

His career as a commander and administrator and his scandalous private life are long overdue for reassessment, and that is what this perceptive and absorbing study provides. He transformed the British military machine, and the Duke of Wellington admitted that without York's reforms he would not have had the army that fought so well in the Peninsular War and at Waterloo. York also led a turbulent personal life which was engulfed by scandal when his mistress was accused of using her influence over him to obtain promotion for ambitious officers.

Today the Duke of York is a neglected, often derided figure. This biography should go some way towards restoring his reputation as a commander and military reformer.
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London Then and Now: People and Places

London Then and Now: People and Places

Frank Hopkinson

$29.99
The great tourist destinations are all included: Buckingham Palace, Tower of London, Houses of Parliament, Whitehall, Trafalgar Square, Covent Garden, the British Museum, St. Pauls Cathedral and Hyde Park, along with classic London pubs, famous theatres, the grand stations, and Carnaby Street and the Kings Road. The book travels along the Thames through Hammersmith, Barnes and Richmond out to Hampton Court, plus we get a fleeting glimpse of Chuck Berry and the Rolling Stones posing on Park Lane and walking out of court in Southcombe Street. There are Dickensian street scenes, plus 'The Old Curiosity Shop' and coaching inns that Dickens visited. Sites include: Albert Hall, Albert Memorial, Bank of England, Grosvenor Square, Chelsea, Cleopatra's Needle, Selfridges, Earls Court, Fleet Street, Soho, Haymarket, Kensington High Street, Kew Gardens, Leicester Square, Oxford Street, Paddington, Piccadilly Circus, Savoy Hotel, V&A, Natural History Museum, National Theatre, Festival Hall, Waterloo and much more.
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Odd People: Hunting Spies in the First World War

Odd People: Hunting Spies in the First World War

Basil Thomson

$24.99
First World War espionage was a fascinating and dangerous affair, spawning widespread paranoia in its clandestine wake. The hysteria of the age, stoked by those within the British establishment who sought to manipulate popular panic, meant there was no shortage of suspects. Exaggerated claims were rife: some 80,000 Germans were supposedly hidden all over Britain, just waiting for an impending (and imagined) invasion.

No one could be trusted - Against this backdrop, as head of Scotland Yard's Criminal Investigation Department, it was Basil Thomson's responsibility to hunt, arrest and interrogate the potential German spies identifi ed by the nascent British intelligence services. Thomson's story is an extraordinary compendium of sleuthing and secrets from a real-life Sherlock Holmes, following the trails of the many specimens he tracked, including the famous dancer, courtesan and spy, Mata Hari.

Yet his activities gained him enemies, as did his criticism of British intelligence, his ambition to control MI5 and his efforts to root out left-wing revolutionaries - which would ultimately prove to be the undoing of his career. Odd People is the insightful and wittily observed account of Thomson's incomparably exciting job, offering us a rare glimpse into the dizzying world of spies and the mind of the detective charged with foiling their elaborate plots.

The Dialogue Espionage Classics series began in 2010 with the purpose of bringing back classic out-of-print spy stories that should never be forgotten. From the Great War to the Cold War, from the French Resistance to the Cambridge Five, from Special Operations to Bletchley Park, this fascinating spy history series includes some of the best military, espionage and adventure stories ever told.
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Modern Greece: From the War of Independence to the Present

Modern Greece: From the War of Independence to the Present

Thomas W. Gallant

$39.99
Modern Greece is an updated and enhanced edition of a classic survey of Greek history since the beginning of the 19th century. Giving equal weighting to social, political and diplomatic aspects, it offers detailed coverage of the formation of the Greek nation state, the global Greek diaspora, the country's relationships with Europe and the United States and a range of other topics, including women, rural areas, nationalism and the Civil War, woven together in a nuanced and highly readable narrative. Fresh material and new pedagogical features have been added throughout, most notably: - new chapters on 19th-century nationalism and 'Boom to Bust in the Age of Globalization, 1989-2013'; - greater discussion of the late Ottoman context, Greeks outside of Greece and the international background to the Greek state formation; - revisions to take account of recent scholarship, Greekscholarship; - new timelines, maps, illustrations, charts, figures and primary source boxes; - an updated further reading section and bibliography. Modern Greece is a crucial text for anyone looking to understand the complex history of this now troubled nation and its place in the Balkans, Europe and the modern globalized world.
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Nineteen Seventy-Six: Penguin Specials

Nineteen Seventy-Six: Penguin Specials

Ragnar Baldursson

$9.99
The events of 1976 convulsed China: Mao died, the Gang of Four fell, hundreds of thousands perished in the Tangshan earthquake. Ragnar Baldursson, an idealistic true believer in the Chinese socialist experiment, was one of the few foreigners present to witness these events. Forty years on, living in a very different China, Ragnar revisits his experiences as a student in Beijing, offering rare glimpses of life during this turbulent and decisive year.
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A Billion Voices: China's Search for a Common Language

A Billion Voices: China's Search for a Common Language

David Moser

$9.99
Mandarin, Guoyu or Putonghua? 'Chinese' is a language known by many names, and China is a country home to many languages. Since the turn of the twentieth century linguists and politicians have been on a mission to create a common language for China. From the radical intellectuals of the May Fourth Movement, to leaders such as Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong, all fought linguistic wars to push the boundaries of language reform. Now, Internet users take the Chinese language in new and unpredictable directions. David Moser tells the remarkable story of China's language unification agenda and its controversial relationship with modern politics, challenging our conceptions of what it means to speak and be Chinese.
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Fighters in the Shadows: A New History of the French Resistance

Fighters in the Shadows: A New History of the French Resistance

Robert Gildea

$24.99
The story of the French Resistance is central to French identity, but it is a story built on myths. Not simply an effort to free the country from German occupation, it was part of a Europe-wide anti-fascist struggle, which included Spanish republicans, Italian and German anti-Nazis, communists, Jewish resisters and Christian rescuers. Robert Gildea returns to the testimonies of those involved, asking who they were, and what compelled them to take the terrible risks they did, bringing to the fore stories of the women resisters, whom history has neglected. Fighters in the Shadows is a vivid, gripping and entirely new account of one of the most compelling narratives of the Second World War.
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The French Revolution: From Enlightenment to Tyranny

The French Revolution: From Enlightenment to Tyranny

Ian Davidson

$54.99
A clear and fast-paced account of how and why the French Revolution descended into the Terror.

The fall of the Bastille on July 14, 1789 has become the commemorative symbol of the French Revolution. But this violent and random act was unrepresentative of the real work of the early revolution, which was taking place ten miles west of Paris, in Versailles. There, the nobles, clergy and commoners of France had just declared themselves a republic, toppling a rotten system of aristocratic privilege and altering the course of history forever.

The Revolution was led not by angry mobs, but by the best and brightest of France's growing bourgeoisie: young, educated, ambitious. Their aim was not to destroy, but to build a better state. In just three months they drew up a Declaration of the Rights of Man, which was to become the archetype of all subsequent Declarations worldwide, and they instituted a system of locally elected administration for France which still survives today. They were determined to create an entirely new system of government, based on rights, equality and the rule of law. In the first three years of the Revolution they went a long way toward doing so. Then came Robespierre, the Terror and unspeakable acts of barbarism.

In a clear, dispassionate and fast-moving narrative, Ian Davidson shows how and why the Revolutionaries, in just five years, spiralled from the best of the Enlightenment to tyranny and the Terror. The book reminds us that the Revolution was both an inspiration of the finest principles of a new democracy and an awful warning of what can happen when idealism goes wrong.
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The Last Communard: Adrien Lejeune, A Life in Revolution

The Last Communard: Adrien Lejeune, A Life in Revolution

Gavin Bowd

$31.99
The Last Communard offers a brilliant, striking portrait of revolutionary Europe through a remarkable personal story. In 1871, Adrien Lejeune fought on the barricades of the Paris Commune. He was imprisoned for treason when the Commune fell and narrowly avoided execution for his role in the struggle for a new future. In later life, he immigrated to Soviet Russia, finding fame as a revolutionary icon. In his native country, he was vaunted as a hero, a touchstone of revolutions past during France's interwar dramas. Abandoned by the Soviet regime, he languished, fortunes foundering, in Russia. Having led a long and extraordinary life, he died in Siberia in 1942 while fleeing Moscow as the Nazi armies swept across western Russia. It was another thirty years before he returned to Paris, his ashes coming to rest in the Communards' plot of the Pere Lachaise cemetery, on the centennial of the uprising, a symbol of France's undying radical tradition. Gavin Bowd's stunning narrative shows how an individual can be swept up in the fierce tides of history, and at the same time be defined by his own efforts to force those tides into a different, and better, course.Lejeune's life captures war and revolution in a tumultuous period of European history.
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The Nazi Hunters: The Ultra-Secret SAS Unit and the Hunt for Hitler's War Criminals

The Nazi Hunters: The Ultra-Secret SAS Unit and the Hunt for Hitler's War Criminals

Damien Lewis

$22.99
The Nazi Hunters is the incredible, hitherto untold story of the most secret chapter in the SAS's history. Officially, the world's most elite special forces unit was dissolved at the end of the Second World War, and not reactivated until the 1950s. Among their last actions was a disastrous commando raid into occupied France in 1944, which ended in the capture, torture and execution of 31 soldiers. It can now be revealed that the SAS never was dissolved: it lived on, commanded personally by Churchill and hidden even from the British government. They were tasked with hunting through the ruins of the Reich for the SS commanders responsible for the murder of their comrades, including many who had escaped the failed justice of the Nuremberg trials. Along the way, they discovered before anyone else the full horror of Hitler's regime, and the growing threat from Stalin's Russia. Still studied by the SAS today and a central part of their founding myth, the story of the Nazi hunters is now told by bestselling author Damien Lewis.
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Hitler's Interpreter

Hitler's Interpreter

Paul Schmidt ,  Alan Sutton

$59.95
As the main interpreter for Adolf Hitler during the key prewar moments, such as the Munich Agreement, the British Declaration of War and the surrender of France, Paul-Otto Schmidt was well placed to record his impressions of events from 1935 up to 1945. He was an interpreter working in the German foreign ministry where he served from 1923 to 1945, and being fluent in English and French he gained respect and was Hitler s usual first choice for the important meetings. During the war years he served as Hitler's interpreter during his meetings with Marshal Philippe Petain and Francisco Franco. After the 1942 Dieppe Raid resulted in thousands of Canadian soldiers captured, Schmidt was in charge of their interrogations. Schmidt s book is helpful in gaining an insight into the minutiae of Third Reich thinking and planning as much as planning went beyond Hitler s will. One classic nugget is from the early morning of 3 September 1939 when Britain issued its ultimatum to Germany, for it was Schmidt who had to hand the translation to Hitler: After an interval which seemed an age, he turned to Ribbentrop, who had remained standing by the window. What now? asked Hitler with a savage look, as though implying that his Foreign Minister had misled him about England s probable reaction.
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Hitler's Warrior: The Life and Wars of SS Colonel Jocken Peiper

Hitler's Warrior: The Life and Wars of SS Colonel Jocken Peiper

Danny S. Parker

$29.99
Handsome, intelligent, impetuous, and dedicated to the Nazi cause, SS Colonel Jochen Peiper (1915–1976) was one of the most controversial figures of World War II. After volunteering for the Waffen-SS at an early age, Peiper quickly rose to prominence as Heinrich Himmler’s ever-present personal adjutant in the early years of the war. Sent later to the fighting front with the fearsome 1st SS Panzer Division, Peiper became a legend for his flamboyant and brutal style of warfare. As one of Hitler’s favorites, he was chosen to spearhead the Ardennes Offensive, later known as the Battle of the Bulge.

After the war, Peiper became the central subject in the bitterly disputed Malmédy war crimes trial. Convicted but later released, he moved to eastern France. There, he and his past were discovered, and he died in a fiery gun battle by killers unknown even today.

In Hitler's Warrior, historian Danny Parker describes Peiper both on and off the battlefield and explores his complex personality. The rich narrative is supported by years of research that has uncovered previously unpublished archival material and is enhanced with information drawn from extensive interviews with Peiper's contemporaries, including German veterans.

This major new historical work is both a definitive biography of Hitler's most enigmatic warrior and a unique study of the morally inverted world of the Third Reich.
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The Stab-in-the-Back Myth and the Fall of the Weimar Republic: A History in Documents and Visual Sources

The Stab-in-the-Back Myth and the Fall of the Weimar Republic: A History in Documents and Visual Sources

George S. Vascik ,  Mark R. Sadler

$39.99
Using an array of contextualized primary documents and visual sources, this unique sourcebook explores the Stab-in-the-Back myth that developed in Germany in the wake of World War One, analyzing its role in the end of the Weimar Republic and its impact on the Nazi regime that followed.

A critical development in modern German and even European history that has received relatively little coverage until now, the Stab-in-the-Back Myth was an attempt by the German military, nationalists and anti-Semites to explain how the German war effort collapsed in November 1918 along with the German Empire. It purported that the German army did not lose the First World War but were betrayed by the civilians on the home front and the democratic politicians who had surrendered. The myth was one of the foundation myths of National Socialism, at times influencing Nazi behaviour in the 1930s and later their conduct in the Second World War.

The Stab-in-the-Back Myth and the Fall of the Weimar Republic draws on German government records, foreign and domestic newspaper accounts, diplomatic reports, diary entries and letters to provide different national and political perspectives on the issue. The sourcebook also includes chapter summaries, study questions, a further reading list, web links and a glossary, in addition to 26 visual sources and a range of maps, charts, tables and graphs. This is a vital text for all students looking at the history of the Weimar Republic, the legacy of the First World War and Germany in the 20th century.
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German Modernities from Wilhelm to Weimar: A Contest of Futures

German Modernities from Wilhelm to Weimar: A Contest of Futures

Geoff Eley ,  Jennifer L. Jenkins ,  Tracie Matysik

$45.00
What was German modernity? What did the years between 1880 and 1930 mean for Germany's navigation through a period of global capitalism, imperial expansion, and technological transformation?

German Modernities From Wilhelm to Weimar brings together leading historians of the Imperial and Weimar periods from across North America to readdress the question of German modernities. Acutely attentive to Germany's eventual turn towards National Socialism and the related historiographical arguments about 'modernity', this volume explores the variety of social, intellectual, political, and imperial projects pursued by those living in Germany in the Wilhelmine and Weimar years who were yet uncertain about what they were creating and which future would come. It includes varied case studies, based on cutting-edge research, which rethink the relationship of the early 20th century to the rise of Nazism and the Third Reich.

A range of political, social and cultural issues, including citizenship, welfare, empire, aesthetics and sexuality, as well as the very nature of German modernity, are analyzed and placed in a global context.German Modernities From Wilhelm to Weimar is a book of vital significance to all students of modern German history seeking to further understand the complex period from 1880 to 1930.
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Research Methods for History

Research Methods for History

Simon Gunn ,  Lucy Faire

$59.99
Historians have become increasingly sensitive to social and cultural theory since the 1980s, yet the actual methods by which research is carried out in History have been largely taken for granted. Research Methods for History encourages those researching the past to think creatively about the wide range of methods currently in use, to understand how these methods are used and what historical insights they can provide. This updated new edition has been expanded to cover not only sources and methods that are well-established in History, such as archival research, but also those that have developed recently, such as the impact of digital history research. The themes of the different chapters have been selected to reflect new trends in the subject, including landscape studies, material culture and ethics. Every chapter presents new insights and perspectives and will open researchers' minds to the expanding possibilities of historical research.
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Keeping the Jewel in the Crown: The British Betrayal of India

Keeping the Jewel in the Crown: The British Betrayal of India

Walter Reid

$39.99
When India became independent in 1947, the general view, which has prevailed until now, is that Britain had been steadily working for an amicable transfer of power for decades. In this book Walter Reid argues that nothing could be further from the truth. With reference to a vast amount of documentary material, from private letters to public records and state papers, he shows how Britain held back political progress in India for as long as possible - a policy which led to unimaginable chaos and suffering when independence was granted, and which created a legacy of hatred and distrust that continues to this day.
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The Hunt for Rob Roy: The Man and the Myths

The Hunt for Rob Roy: The Man and the Myths

David Stevenson

$22.99
This is the first time that Rob Roy's life has been written with a full range of sources. The picture that emerges is indeed striking, but not heroic. A man deeply wronged and oppressed, forced into outlawry, has to be modified by the clear evidence that he was only outlawed after undertaking a careful plan to swindle his creditors. The staunch Jacobite is revealed as a man who supplied intelligence to the government against them, the supposed warrior-leader never fought in a battle, and the reputed duellist instead was only known to have fought one duel,which he lost.Yet in some ways Roy remains an attractive figure. The fact that he survived, in spite of the odds against him, is a remarkable tribute to his tenacity of both body and spirit and to his charm that has persuaded most historians of his version of his life instead of that of his enemies.With this book Scotland may lose a hero of the old-fashioned and unreal sort, but it possesses a Rob Roy whose life-story emerges as one that was dramatic and certainly more human. This radical revision of popular views on Rob Roy is based on much recently discovered material and is the first new biography for thirty years.
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Secrets of the Samurai: The Martial Arts of Feudal Japan

Secrets of the Samurai: The Martial Arts of Feudal Japan

Oscar Ratti ,  Adele Westbrook

$29.99
Secrets of the Samurai is the definitive study of the martial arts of feudal Japan, explaining in detail the weapons, techniques, strategies, and principles of combat that made the Japanese warrior a formidable foe. Beginning with a panoramic survey of the tumultuous early struggles of warlords contending for political ascendancy, the work outlines the relentless progression of the military class toward absolute power. In addition to illustrating actual methods of combat, the authors discuss in detail the crucial training necessary to develop a warrior's inner power and to concentrate all his energies into a single force. Secrets of the Samurai is an essential text for anyone with an interest in Japanese combat techniques, weaponry, or military history. This edition also contains a new foreword by Adele Westbrook and numerous previously unpublished illustrations by Oscar Ratti.
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Inside the Islamic Republic: Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran

Inside the Islamic Republic: Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran

Mahmood Monshipouri

$77.00
The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the changing conditions of their society. This is all exacerbated by the global trend of communication and information expansion, as Iran has increasingly become the site of the burgeoning demands for women's rights, individual freedoms, and festering tensions and conflicts over cultural politics. These realities, among other things, have rendered Iran a country of unprecedented - and at time paradoxical - changes.
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The First Afghan War 1839-42: Invasion, Catastrophe and Retreat

The First Afghan War 1839-42: Invasion, Catastrophe and Retreat

Richard Macrory ,  Peter Dennis

$29.99
In 1839 forces of the British East India Company crossed the Indus to invade Afghanistan on the pretext of reinstating a former king Shah Soojah to his rightful throne. The reality was that this was another step in Britain's Great Game - Afghanistan would create a buffer to any potential Russian expansion towards India. This history traces the initial, campaign which would see the British easily occupy Kabul and the rebellion that two years later would see the British army humbled. Forced to negotiate a surrender the British fled Kabul en masse in the harsh Afghan winter. Decimated by Afghan guerilla attacks and by the harsh cold and a lack of food and supplies just one European - Dr Brydon would make it to the safety of Jalalabad five days later. This book goes on to trace the retribution attack on Kabul the following year, which destroyed the symbolic Mogul Bazaar before rapidly withdrawing and leaving Afghanistan in peace for nearly a generation.
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The Europeanization of the World: On the Origins of Human Rights and Democracy

The Europeanization of the World: On the Origins of Human Rights and Democracy

John M. Headley

$48.95
The Europeanization of the World puts forward a defense of Western civilization and the unique gifts it has bequeathed to the world-in particular, human rights and constitutional democracy-at a time when many around the globe equate the West with hubris and thinly veiled imperialism. John Headley argues that the Renaissance and the Reformation provided the effective currents for the development of two distinctive political ideas. The first is the idea of a common humanity, derived from antiquity, developed through natural law, and worked out in the new emerging global context to provide the basis for today's concept of universal human rights. The second is the idea of political dissent, first posited in the course of the Protestant Reformation and later maturing in the politics of the British monarchy.
 
 Headley traces the development and implications of this first idea from antiquity to the present. He examines the English revolution of 1688 and party government in Britain and America into the early nineteenth century. And he challenges the now--common stance in historical studies of moral posturing against the West. Headley contends that these unique ideas are Western civilization's most precious export, however presently distorted. Certainly European culture has its dark side--Auschwitz is but one example. Yet as Headley shows, no other civilization in history has bequeathed so sustained a tradition of universalizing aspirations as the West.
 
The Europeanization of the World makes an argument that is controversial but long overdue. Written by one of our preeminent scholars of the Renaissance and Reformation, this elegantly reasoned book is certain to spark a much-needed reappraisal of the Western tradition.
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The Barbary Pirates 15th-17th Centuries

The Barbary Pirates 15th-17th Centuries

Angus Konstam ,  Gerry Embleton

$24.99
For the best part of three centuries the 'corsairs' or pirates from the 'Barbary' coasts of North Africa dominated the Western and Central Mediterranean. They made forays far into the Atlantic, preying on the shipping and coastal settlements across Christian Europe, ranging from Greece to West Africa and the British Isles. In the absence of organized European navies they seldom faced serious opposition, and the scope of their raiding was remarkable. As well as piracy and slave-raiding they fought as privateers, sharing their spoils with the rulers of the port-cities that provided them with ships, men, and a ready market. This book examines their development and their style of fighting, chronicles their achievements and failures, and illustrates their appearance and that of their ships, explaining why they were so feared and effective.
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Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Victorian Home

Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Victorian Home

Lucinda Hawksley

$60.00
Beautiful to look at and compelling to read, Bitten by Witch Fever is a highly original and captivating volume that interleaves facsimile sections of alluring, arsenic-laden wallpapers with thought-provoking narrative, tracing the arresting story of the use and effects of the toxic pigments ingrained in popular wallpapers of the nineteenth century. Lucinda Dickens Hawksley presents the history of Scheele's green and schweinfurt green, pigments created using arsenic, which produced the vibrant shades whose brilliance made them instant favourites with wallpaper designers and householders alike. With the aid of contemporary case studies and reports in the press, she reveals how, by the middle of the century, manufacturers were producing millions of rolls of arsenical wallpaper, with devastating consequences for those working in their factories and for those living in rooms decorated with the deadly designs. The wallpaper sections display dazzling long- lost work from the great designers and printers of the age, including Christopher Dresser, Corbiere, Son & Brindle, Charles Knowles & Co. and Morris & Co. - whose owner was famously dismissive of the fatal effects of living with arsenic-filled wallpapers.
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The Making of Donald Trump

The Making of Donald Trump

David Cay Johnston

$42.95
A Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who has covered Donald Trump's rise to power for 30 years, mostly for the New York Times, investigates the mogul's rise to power. Included is a thorough look at Trump's numerous ties to organised crime, his history of litigation, his family background including his father's involvement with the Ku Klux Klan, his philandering, a close look at his actual skill in running casinos , constructing buildings and managing real estate, his numerous bankruptcies and the questionable nature of his actual wealth.
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America Bewitched: The Story of Witchcraft After Salem

America Bewitched: The Story of Witchcraft After Salem

Owen Davies

$26.95
America Bewitched is the first major history of witchcraft in America - from the Salem witch trials of 1692 to the present day.

The infamous Salem trials are etched into the consciousness of modern America, the human toll a reminder of the dangers of intolerance and persecution. The refrain 'Remember Salem!' was invoked frequently over the ensuing centuries. As time passed, the trials became a milepost measuring the distance America had progressed from its colonial past, its victims now the righteous and their persecutors the shamed. Yet the story of witchcraft did not end as the American Enlightenment dawned - a new, long, and chilling chapter was about to begin.

Witchcraft after Salem was not just a story of fire-side tales, legends, and superstitions: it continued to be a matter of life and death, souring the American dream for many. We know of more people killed as witches between 1692 and the 1950s than were executed before it. Witches were part of the story of the decimation of the Native Americans, the experience of slavery and emancipation, and the immigrant experience; they were embedded in the religious and social history of the country. Yet the history of American witchcraft between the eighteenth and the twentieth century also tells a less traumatic story, one that shows how different cultures interacted and shaped each other's languages and beliefs.

This is therefore much more than the tale of one persecuted community: it opens a fascinating window on the fears, prejudices, hopes, and dreams of the American people as their country rose from colony to superpower.
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The Day the President Was Shot: The Secret Service, the FBI, a Would-Be Killer, and the Attempted Assassination of Ronald Reagan

The Day the President Was Shot: The Secret Service, the FBI, a Would-Be Killer, and the Attempted Assassination of Ronald Reagan

Bill O'Reilly

$29.99
The year was 1981. Just two months into his presidency, Ronald Reagan was shot after leaving a speaking engagement in Washington, D. C. The quick action of the Secret Service and medical professionals saved the president's life. Mere days after his near-death experience, Reagan's personal strength propelled him back into his presidential duties. Adapted from Bill O'Reilly's historical thriller Killing Reagan, with characteristically gripping storytelling, this story explores the events of the day Reagan was shot. From the scene of the shooting and the dramatic action of the Secret Service, to the FBI's interrogation of the shooter, the life-saving measures of the medical professionals and the president's extraordinary recovery, this is a page-turning account of an attempted assassination and its aftermath.
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Devotion: An Epic Story of Heroism, Brotherhood and Sacrifice

Devotion: An Epic Story of Heroism, Brotherhood and Sacrifice

Adam Makos

$22.99
Devotion is the gripping story of the US Navy's most famous aviator duo - Tom Hudner, a white, blue-blooded New Englander, and Jesse Brown, a black sharecropper's son from Mississippi. Against all odds, Jesse beat back racism to become the Navy's first black aviator. Against all expectations, Tom passed up a free ride at Harvard to fly fighter planes for his country. Barely a year after President Truman ordered the desegregation of the military, the two became wingmen in Fighter Squadron 32 and went on to fight side-by-side in the Korean War. In the war's climatic battle at the Chosin Reservoir, Tom and Jesse flew headlong into waves of troops in order to defend an entire division of Marines trapped on a frozen lake. Jesse was shot down and pinned in the burning wreckage of his fighter. Tom then faced an unthinkable choice - to see his friend burn to death or to go down in a blaze of glory, flouting the rules to crash-land behind enemy lines and save Jesse - or die trying. The question was crueller than the freezing wind: How far will you go to save a friend?
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The Lynching: The Epic Courtroom Battle That Brought Down the Klan

The Lynching: The Epic Courtroom Battle That Brought Down the Klan

Laurence Leamer

$32.99
The Lynching is the powerful, spellbinding true story of a brutal race-based killing in 1981 and the dramatic two trials during which the United Klans of America, the largest and most dangerous Klan organization in America, is exposed for the evil it represents. New York Times bestselling author Laurence Leamer tells a gripping story, weaving in such figures as legendary civil rights lawyer Morris Dees, Alabama governor George Wallace, and Klan Imperial Wizard Robert Shelton, and describes the Klan’s lingering effect on race relations in America today.

The story begins in March 1981, when Henry Hays and James Knowles, members of Klavern 900 of the UKA, picked up nineteen-year-old Michael Donald on the streets of Mobile, Alabama. They were seeking to retaliate after a largely black jury failed to convict a black man accused of murdering a white policeman. Hays and Knowles beat Donald, cut his throat, and left his body hanging from a tree branch in a racially mixed residential neighborhood. Arrested, charged, and convicted, Hays was sentenced to death—the first time in more than half a century that the state of Alabama had given that penalty to a white man for killing a black man.

Morris Dees, the cofounder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, saw the case as an opportunity to file a lawsuit against the UKA. His colleagues told him that his lawsuit was impossible to win and a folly. But Dees had heard that before. On behalf of Michael’s grieving mother, Mrs. Beulah Donald, Dees filed a first-of-its-kind civil suit and charged the Klan organization and its leaders with conspiracy. He proceeded to put the Klan leaders on trial, which produced some of the most audacious testimony of any civil rights trial—as well as a stunning and precedent-setting verdict. Dees destroyed the UKA and created a weapon that the SPLC used time and again against other racist organizations.

The Lynching is a suspenseful true story that takes us into the heart of darkness, but in the end shows that Michael Donald and other civil rights martyrs did not die in vain.
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Apache Warrior Versus US Cavalryman: 1846-86

Apache Warrior Versus US Cavalryman: 1846-86

Sean McLachlan ,  Adam Hook

$22.99
From the 1840s onward, United States military forces clashed with the Apache, a group of Native American peoples associated with the southwestern part of North America. US territorial expansion and conflict - first with Mexico and then during the Civil War - led to an escalation of hostilities that culminated in the defeat of the Apache leader Geronimo in 1886, although fighting continued into the 20th century. In this study the clashes at Cieneguilla (1854), First Adobe Walls (1864), and Cibecue Creek (1881) are assessed in detail. Fully illustrated and featuring contemporary accounts and specially commissioned artwork, this history examines exactly how the Apache were able to pose such a grave threat to US forces and how their initial advantages were gradually negated by the cavalry. Examining the tactics, equipment and training available to each side over four decades of evolving conflict, this is an eye-opening combatant's eye view of one of history's most intriguing campaigns.
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The Notorious Captain Hayes: The Remarkable True Story of William 'Bully' Hayes, Pirate of the Pacific

The Notorious Captain Hayes: The Remarkable True Story of William 'Bully' Hayes, Pirate of the Pacific

Joan Druett

$29.99
The incredible true story of William 'Bully' Hayes, the so-called 'Pirate of the Pacific': a story that separates the myth from the man. Famous throughout the Pacific, from the US to Australia and all points in between, Captain Bully Hayes has been the inspiration for writers ranging from Robert Louis Stevenson to James A. Michener and Frank Clune. Rousing films have been based on his life, and his name adorns bars and hotels all over the Pacific. But the truth is both less noble and more intriguing than the myth. The Hayes of legend was a product of the popular press at the time, the construction of editors who were determined to create a romantic figure to feed their readers' appetites. This, the first proper biography of this legendary nineteenth-century figure, simultaneously sorts the facts from the fantasy and recounts an amazing true story of a genuine rogue and adventurer, against the backdrop of the Pacific during the great age of sail and trade.
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Elegy: The First Day on the Somme

Elegy: The First Day on the Somme

Andrew Roberts

$22.99
On 1 July 1916, after a five-day bombardment, 11 British and 5 French divisions launched their long-awaited 'Big Push' on German positions on high ground above the Rivers Ancre and Somme on the Western Front. Some ground was gained, but at a terrible cost. In killing-grounds whose names are indelibly imprinted on 20th-century memory, German machine-guns - manned by troops who had sat out the storm of shellfire in deep dugouts - inflicted terrible losses on the British infantry. The British Fourth Army lost 57,470 casualties, the French Sixth Army suffered 1,590 casualties and the German 2nd Army 10,000. And this was but the prelude to 141 days of slaughter that would witness the deaths of between 750,000 and 1 million troops. Andrew Roberts evokes the pity and the horror of the blackest day in the history of the British army - a summer's day-turned-hell-on-earth by modern military technology - in the words of casualties, survivors, and the bereaved.
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False Flags: Disguised German Raiders of World War II

False Flags: Disguised German Raiders of World War II

Stephen Robinson

$39.99
An epic story of maritime daring and intrigue that will appeal to anyone interested in the world wars or maritime history, not just military experts. False Flags tells the epic untold story of German raider voyages to the South Seas during the early years of World War II.

In 1940 the raiders Orion, Komet, Pinguin and Kormoran left Germany and waged a 'pirate war' in the South Seas - part of Germany's strategy to attack the British Empire's maritime trade on a global scale. Their extraordinary voyages spanned the globe and are maritime sagas in the finest tradition of seafaring. The four raiders voyaged across the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans as well as the Arctic and Antarctic. They sank or captured 62 ships in a forgotten naval war that is now being told in its entirety for the first time. The Orion and Komet terrorised the South Pacific and New Zealand waters before Pearl Harbor when the war was supposed to be far away. The Pinguin sank numerous Allied merchant ships in the Indian Ocean before mining the approaches to Australian ports and capturing the Norwegian whaling fleet in Antarctica. 

The Kormoran raided the Atlantic but will always be remembered for sinking the Australian cruiser Sydney off Western Australia, killing all 645 sailors on board in tragic circumstances. False Flags is also the story of the Allied sailors who encountered these raiders and fought suicidal battles against a superior foe as well as the men, women and children who endured captivity on board the raiders as prisoners of the Third Reich.
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Heroes of the Skies

Heroes of the Skies

Michael Veitch

$24.99
Every veteran has a story. Sometimes these stories become part of family folklore. Sometimes they are too terrible to speak of. In April 1943 Cyril Burcher bombed a German U-boat, killing its entire crew. Thirty years later, a letter arrived for him out of the blue from the daughter of the U-boat captain. Cy Borsht jumped out of his burning Lancaster and parachuted into even more danger, being taken prisoner by the Germans for the duration of the war. Stan Pascoe can still remember the tension of the briefing room before every mission, which disappeared the minute he was in the aeroplane. For each of these airmen and the many others interviewed in this book, the very fact that they survived the war is miraculous enough; that they are still with us today to tell their stories is another amazing feat. In these thrilling, heart-stopping, haunting stories, the day-to-day bravery and luck of these men is brought into fierce focus once more.
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Intercept: The Secret History of Computers and Spies

Intercept: The Secret History of Computers and Spies

Gordon Corera

$22.99
The computer was born to spy, and now computers are transforming espionage. But who are the spies and who is being spied on in today's interconnected world? This is the exhilarating secret history of the melding of technology and espionage. Gordon Corera's compelling narrative, rich with historical details and characters, takes us from the Second World War to the internet age, revealing the astonishing extent of cyberespionage carried out today. Drawing on unique access to intelligence agencies, heads of state, hackers and spies of all stripes, INTERCEPT is a ground-breaking exploration of the new space in which the worlds of espionage, geopolitics, diplomacy, international business, science and technology collide. Together, computers and spies are shaping the future. What was once the preserve of a few intelligence agencies now matters for us all.
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Axis Aircraft in Latin America

Axis Aircraft in Latin America

Santiago Rivas

$86.95
Following World War I, and aided by German and Italian immigrants, the aviation industry of Latin America developed their first airlines. Commercial aviation was greatly influenced by the German aviation industry while the military focused on Italian aircraft. Famous types including the Junkers F13, Ju52/3m, Fiat CR.20, Dornier Wal, Focke Wulf Fw58 Weihe, and the only Japanese type, the Mitsubishi Betty are all featured and comprise a detailed history for enthusiasts and modelers alike.
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The German Corpse Factory: A Study in First World War Propaganda

The German Corpse Factory: A Study in First World War Propaganda

Stephen Badsey

$39.95
In Spring 1917, parts of the British press claimed that Germany was so short of essential fats and glycerine that the German Army was being forced to boil down the bodies of its own dead soldiers, causing a brief scandal of accusation and counter-accusation, including the claim that the story was the invention of the British official propaganda organisations.

Behind the scenes, British propaganda experts opposed exploiting the story as it was obviously false, and contrary to their basic principles of never telling an obvious lie in an official statement. But at the time, the British government refused to deny that the  German Corpse Factory  might really exist. 

In 1925 the scandal re-erupted in New York, when the former head of British military intelligence on the Western Front, in the United States on a speaking tour, was quoted in newspapers as having confessed to making the whole German Corpse Factory story up, a claim that he immediately denied. As a gesture of friendship on the occasion of the Locarno treaties, the British government now accepted the German government position that the story was a lie, but in fact neither government knew what had really happened in 1917.

This book provides the answers to these questions according to the best historical evidence available. It uses the scandal of the  German Corpse Factory  as a case-study to explore the true nature of British official propaganda and its organisations in the First World War, including the events of 1917 and who might really have been responsible for the story. 

It also shows how this brief episode was taken up by the German government after 1918, and by interest groups in Britain and the United States after 1925, to paint a false picture of British propaganda, with far-reaching consequences for the peace of Europe, and for all subsequent understanding of the First World War.
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Lucifer Rising: British Intelligence and the Occult in the Second World War

Lucifer Rising: British Intelligence and the Occult in the Second World War

Nicholas Booth

$49.99
Summer 1940. In the desperate fight against Nazi Germany, nothing is considered too outlandish, so the British secret services turn to figures from the occult world to help turn the tide of war. What begins as a mission to understand Hitler's supposed astrological advice soon becomes more bizarre, with often hilarious, unintended consequences. It is a story of misinformation, false predictions and some of the most surreal secret operations of the Second World War. Incredibly, it is all true. Featuring an eccentric cast of characters, including the creator of James Bond, a cross-dressing astrologer, a spymaster who walked around in public with his pet bear and the self-proclaimed 'wickedest man in the world', best-selling author Nicholas Booth weaves together an amazing narrative of spying, sabotage and black propaganda. Using hitherto secret files - many only released in the last few years - Lucifer Rising unravels for the first time the myths surrounding these operations, culminating with perhaps the most curious of all: the arrival by parachute of Rudolf Hess in Scotland in May 1941.
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The Winter Fortress: The Epic Mission to Sabotage Hitler's Atomic Bomb

The Winter Fortress: The Epic Mission to Sabotage Hitler's Atomic Bomb

Neal Bascomb

$49.99
It's 1942 and the Nazis are racing to build an atomic bomb. They have the physicists, but they don't have enough 'heavy water' - essential for their nuclear designs. For two years, the Nazis have occupied Norway, and with it the Vemork hydroelectric plant, the world's sole supplier of heavy water. Under threat of death, its engineers push production into overtime. For the Allies, Vemork must be destroyed. But how could they reach the plant, high in a mountainous valley? The answer became the most dramatic commando raid of the war: the British SOE brought together a brilliant scientist and eleven refugee Norwegian commandos, who, with little more than parachutes, skis and tommy guns, would destroy Hitler's nuclear ambitions. Based on exhaustive research and never-before-seen diaries and letters, The Winter Fortress is a compulsively readable narrative about a group of young men who survived the cold of a Norwegian winter and evaded the clutches of the Gestapo, to save the world from destruction.
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Air Wars 1920-1939: The Development and Evolution of Fighter Tactics

Air Wars 1920-1939: The Development and Evolution of Fighter Tactics

Philip MacDougall

$59.95
Spain (1936-9), China (1937 onwards), Mongolia (1939), Finland (1939-40) and France (1939-40) were a testing ground for a new approach to air tactics with western democracies and totalitarian states analyzing the resulting lessons. Attention in Air Wars 1920-1939: The Development and Evolution of Fighter Tactics is given to the means by which intelligence on aerial tactics was collected and why it was not always fully absorbed, resulting in many nations having to relearn the same lessons at the outset of the Second World War. Finland, during the Winter War, while not involved in Spain or any other air war of the time, better applied the lessons being learned than that of the Soviet Union, which had been directly involved in air wars fought over China, Mongolia and Spain. In the case of Britain, not only were the lessons of Spain ignored, but so too that of its own experimental fighter unit, the AFDE (Air Fighting Development Establishment) that had been formed in 1934 and which was reinforcing the intelligence received from those real air war conflicts.
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Concorde: The Rise and Fall of the Supersonic Airliner

Concorde: The Rise and Fall of the Supersonic Airliner

Jonathan Glancey

$24.99
In Concorde, Jonathan Glancey tells the story of this magnificent and hugely popular aircraft anew, taking the reader from the moment Captain Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier in 1947 through to the last commercial flight of the supersonic airliner in 2003. It is a tale of national rivalries, technological leaps, daring prototypes, tightrope politics, and a dream of a Dan Dare future never quite realized. Jonathan Glancey traces the development of Concorde not just through existing material and archives, but through interviews with those who lived with the supersonic project from its inception. The result is a compelling mix of overt technological optimism, a belief that Britain and France were major players in the world of civil as well as military aviation, and faith in an ever faster, ever more sophisticated future.
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Douglas Haig: From the Somme to Victory

Douglas Haig: From the Somme to Victory

Gary Sheffield ,  Saul David

$29.99
Douglas Haig is the single most controversial general in British history. In 1918, after his armies had won the First World War, he was feted as a saviour. But within twenty years his reputation was in ruins, and it has never recovered. Drawing on previously unknown private papers and new scholarship unavailable when The Chief was first published, eminent First World War historian Gary Sheffield reassesses Haig's reputation, assessing his critical role in preparing the army for war.
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Fw 200 Condor Units of World War 2

Fw 200 Condor Units of World War 2

Chris Goss ,  Chris Davey ,  Mark Postlethwaite

$22.99
The Fw 200 Condor first made an appearance over Norway in April 1940, flying with the unit that eventually become synonymous with it - Kampfgeschwader 40. As the war in the west progressed, and German forces advanced, French airfields opened up, allowing the Condor to fly around the UK and out into the Atlantic, where it rapidly established itself as one of the key menaces to Allied shipping. Able to attack shipping directly, or able to guide U-Boats to their prey the Condor scored its first major success when it crippled the liner Empress of Great Britain. But the tables were to turn on the 'Scourge of the Atlantic' as mechanical failures induced by their harsh operating environment and changes in Allied tactics began to take a toll. Vulnerable to aerial attack, the deployment of Allied carriers and their associated fighters combined with the introduction of more loing range maritime patrol aircraft exposed the Condor's deficiencies. Packed with rare first-hand accounts, profile artwork and photographs, this is the history of one of the unsung types to take to the skies during World War 2.
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Lancaster: Reaping the Whirlwind

Lancaster: Reaping the Whirlwind

Martin A. Bowman

$49.99
Detailing the Lancaster's history from 1942-45, this study brings everything together to tell a concise history of the world's most famous aircraft of all time and undoubtedly the finest bomber of the Second World War. A superlative and unique colour section of over fifty contemporary photographs of the Lancaster is featured, while the text is complemented by over 150 rare and seldom seen black and white images. Well researched and expertly written, this account is a must read to those interested in the Lancaster and aviation history in general. The book also includes many unique and incredible eyewitness accounts of the raids by Lancaster crews, making Lancaster: Reaping the Whirlwind both a gripping and fascinating read.
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Modern Snipers

Modern Snipers

Leigh Neville

$32.99
The years since 9/11 have seen major changes in the way snipers are employed on the modern battlefield, alongside an incredibly rapid evolution in their weapons, equipment and training. This book covers the 14 years of near-constant warfare since the dawn of the 21st century, documenting where, when and how snipers have been deployed; their rifles, optics and their ancillary equipment such as laser range finders; their training and tactics and accounts of real-life operations involving sniper teams. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have reaffirmed the importance of snipers in both conventional and unconventional warfare, and this new study covers these developments in depth, as well as looking at the role of the sniper in police and counterterrorism environments.
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Operation Big Ben: The Anti-V2 Spitfire Missions

Operation Big Ben: The Anti-V2 Spitfire Missions

Craig Cabell

$55.00
When Hitler unleashed his V1 and V2 rockets on Great Britain in 1944, it was the first military attack on the British civilian population without invasion. Innocent families were wiped out without mercy and terror gripped the nation. Churchill and the Crossbow Committee knew that widespread panic would soon ensue, because the British public were becoming increasingly anxious about the Nazis superior technology, which was destroying their lives. This book concentrates on the day-to-day activity of Spitfires during Operation Big Ben and the work of the various strands of British intelligence before and during it. In this book Operation Big Ben is separated from Operation Crossbow, (the anti-V1 operation) to show how the British government stepped up its urgency to counter the V2 threat.
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River Plate 1939: The Sinking of the Graf Spee

River Plate 1939: The Sinking of the Graf Spee

Angus Konstam ,  Tony Bryan

$29.99
Days before the outbreak of World War II a handful of German commerce raiders put out to sea to prey on Allied merchantmen. Amongst them was the Panzerschiff ('armoured ship') Graf Spee, a formidable warship that boasted the firepower of a battleship but the size, speed and range of a cruiser. When World War II commenced, under the command of Captain Langsdorff the Graf Spee began a hunting spree across the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean that eventual took her to the River Plate in search of her next victim - an Allied convoy. Instead she found three Royal Navy cruisers under the command of Commodore Harwood, eager to put an end to the 'pocket battleship' that had been terrorizing Allied merchant ships. Featuring full colour artwork, archive photographs and meticulous research, this comprehensive volume explores the thrilling story behind the Battle of the River Plate, an engagement that unquestionably demonstrated the effectiveness of British seapower and diplomacy on an international stage.
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The Somme

The Somme

A. H. Farrar-Hockley ,  Charles Messenger

$37.99
Originally published in 1964, this is a critically acclaimed classic history of the military engagements of the Somme that raged from July to November 1916. It tells of bloody battles interspersed with trench actions of dreadful intensity. In addition to the key confrontations, Farrar-Hockley provides a detailed background to the Somme planning and why it failed with dreadful casualties. In its entirety, the conflict along the Somme scarred the minds of a whole generation, becoming recorded by historians as the graveyard of the 'flower of British manhood'. With a new introduction by Charles Messenger, and a touching foreword by the author's son, Dair Farrar-Hockley, this new edition of The Somme is a testament to those who gave their lives on this famous battlefield.
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Their Trade is Treachery: The Full, Unexpurgated Truth About the Russian Penetration of the World's Secret Defences

Their Trade is Treachery: The Full, Unexpurgated Truth About the Russian Penetration of the World's Secret Defences

Harry Chapman Pincher

$24.99
Harry Chapman Pincher is regarded as one of the finest investigative reporters of the twentieth century. Over the course of a glittering six-decade career, he became notorious as a relentless investigator of spies and their secret trade, proving to be a constant thorn in the side of the establishment. So influential was he that Prime Minister Harold Macmillan once asked, 'Can nothing be done to suppress Mr Chapman Pincher?' 

It is for his sensational 1981 book, Their Trade is Treachery, that he is perhaps best known. In this extraordinary volume he dissected the Soviet Union's infiltration of the western world and helped unmask the Cambridge Five. He also outlined his suspicions that former MI5 chief Roger Hollis was in fact a super spy at the heart of a ring of double agents poisoning the secret intelligence service from within.  However, the Hollis revelation was just one of the book's many astounding coups. Its impact at the time was immense and highly controversial, sending ripples through the British intelligence and political landscapes. Never before had any writer penetrated so deeply and authoritatively into this world  -  and few have since.  Available now for the first time in thirty years, this eye-opening volume is an incomparable and definitive account of the thrilling nature of Cold War espionage and treachery.  The best collection of military, espionage, and adventure stories ever told. 

The Dialogue Espionage Classics series began in 2010 with the purpose of bringing back classic out-of-print spying and espionage tales. From WWI and WWII to the Cold War, D-Day to the SOE, Bletchley Park to the Comet Line this fascinating spy history series brings you the best stories that should never be forgotten.
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Bread

Bread

Scott Cutler Shershow

$19.99
Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things. Bread is an object that is always in process of becoming something else: flower to grain, grain to dough, dough to loaf, loaf to crumb. Bread is also often a figure or vehicle of social cohesion: from the homely image of breaking bread together to the mysteries of the Eucharist. But bread also commonly figures in social conflict - sometimes literally, in the bread riots that punctuate European history, and sometimes figuratively, in the ways bread operates as ethnic, religious or class signifier. Drawing on a wide range of sources, from the scriptures to modern pop culture, Bread tells the story of how this ancient and everyday object serves as a symbol for both social communion and social exclusion. Object Lessons is published in partnership with an essay series in The Atlantic.
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Speeches That Influenced the World

Speeches That Influenced the World

Alan Whiticker

$29.99
Speeches that Influenced the World is a collection of the most potent and memorable speeches throughout history. These speeches highlight recurring themes such as politics and power, war and peace, civil rights and human rights. What they all have in common is the power to inspire – emotionally, politically and socially.

Many of history’s greatest orators and pivotal moments are featured. These speeches shaped and changed the world. Different eras and many nations are represented, with several speeches from famous women – speeches of clarity and hope. Many historic names are featured – JFK, Martin Luther King, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Margaret Thatcher, Aung Sun Suu Kyi and Hilary Clinton – but there are also lesser known orators who are remembered for making their mark on history too.

The passing of time allows many speeches to take on a deeper meaning and poignancy. Others have become an iconic part of history. The greatest speeches in history are featured in Speeches that Influenced the World.
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