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The RSL Book of World War One: True Stories of Aussie Courage and Mateship from the Annals of the RSL

The RSL Book of World War One: True Stories of Aussie Courage and Mateship from the Annals of the RSL

John Gatfield ,  Richard Landels

$32.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JANUARY 2015 ----- True stories of Aussie courage and mateship from the annals of the RSL. Publishing in the run up to the centenary of Gallipoli, this collection of 100 true stories of Aussie courage and mateship in World War I is the first in a series carrying the imprimatur of the RSL, an Australian icon which has supported serving and ex-service Defence Forces for nearly 100 years, stamping this series with authority and authenticity.

The stories have the human element: intimate, eyewitness accounts across the breadth of Australia's war from Gallipoli to the Western Front, related with humour, pathos and vivid detail. For example: The Gallipoli landing as related in an Anzac's letter home. An engineer who was one of the first ashore at Gallipoli and who cut steps up the cliffs for those who followed. General Monash on a mysterious meeting on an Anzac beach. Major General Pompey Elliott's story of a crackshot sniper. The curious case of the stolen cheese. Firsthand accounts of HMAS Sydney's victory over the Emden and a battle between HMAS Sydney and a Zeppelin. Charles Kingsford-Smith on meeting a German pilot after the war.  A Light Horse patrol daringly slipping through advancing Turkish troops to warn their mates of danger. A sapper's account of the battle of Fromelles. How the Melbourne Cup was run on the Western Front.

And there's so much more: daring rescues in 'no man's land' and desperate action in the trenches; stories from POWs, medicos, stretcherbearers and nurses; an account of the torpedoing of a ship repatriating wounded soldiers and one about the game of two-up and how it maintained morale among frontline soldiers - you'll even find out why soldiers wore women's underwear on the Western Front.
Mateship: A Very Australian History

Mateship: A Very Australian History

Nick Dyrenfurth

$29.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JANUARY 2015 ----- A 'mate' is a mate, right? Wrong, argues Nick Dyrenfurth in this provocative new look at one of Australia's most talked-about beliefs.  

In the first book-length exploration of our secular creed, one of Australia's leading young historians and public commentators turns mateship's history upside down. Did you know that the first Australians to call each other 'mate' were business partners? Or that many others thought that mateship would be the basis for creating an entirely new society - namely a socialist one? For some, the term 'mate' is 'the nicest word in the English language'; for others, it represents the very worst features in our nation's culture: conformity, bullying, corruption, racism, and misogyny. So what does mateship really mean?

Covering more than 200 years of white-settler history, Mateship demonstrates the richness and paradoxes of the Antipodean version of fraternity, and how everyone - from the early convicts to our most recent prime ministers, on both sides of politics - have valued it.
The English and Their History: The First Thirteen Centuries

The English and Their History: The First Thirteen Centuries

Robert Tombs

$59.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JANUARY 2015 ----- In The English and their History, the first full-length account to appear in one volume for many decades, Robert Tombs gives us the history of the English people, and of how the stories they have told about themselves have shaped them, from the prehistoric 'dreamtime' through to the present day.

If a nation is a group of people with a sense of kinship, a political identity and representative institutions, then the English have a claim to be the oldest nation in the world. They first came into existence as an idea, before they had a common ruler and before the country they lived in even had a name. They have lasted as a recognizable entity ever since, and their defining national institutions can be traced back to the earliest years of their history. The English have come a long way from those precarious days of invasion and conquest, with many spectacular changes of fortune. Their political, economic and cultural contacts have left traces for good and ill across the world. This book describes their history and its meanings from their beginnings in the monasteries of Northumbria and the wetlands of Wessex to the cosmopolitan energy of today's England. 

Robert Tombs draws out important threads running through the story, including participatory government, language, law, religion, the land and the sea, and ever-changing relations with other peoples. Not the least of these connections are the ways the English have understood their own history, have argued about it, forgotten it, and yet been shaped by it. These diverse and sometimes conflicting understandings are an inherent part of their identity. Rather to their surprise, as ties within the United Kingdom loosen, the English are suddenly beginning a new period in their long history. Especially at times of change, history can help us to think about the sort of people we are and wish to be.

This book, the first single-volume work on this scale for more than half a century, and which incorporates a wealth of recent scholarship, presents a challenging modern account of this immense and continuing story, bringing out the strength and resilience of English government, the deep patterns of division, and yet also the persistent capacity to come together in the face of danger.
The Struggle for Unity: A Story of Federation of Australia

The Struggle for Unity: A Story of Federation of Australia

Graham Wilcox

$35.00

The suggestion that the British colonies on the Australian continent might one-day unite to form a nation was first made early in the 19th century. By the 1870s many people took it for granted. However, despite a multitude of compelling arguments for federation, there were many people who fought against it.

Queensland’s destiny seemed driven by its north where Pacific Island labourers had been captured to work on sugar plantations in virtual slave conditions. This practice, opposed in the south, led to a strong movement for separation of the north from the south.

As Queensland approached its referendum to join the commonwealth a NO vote seemed to be the most likely outcome. This would have excluded Queensland from being a state of the nation of Australia.

Arthur Rutledge, a brilliant lawyer and Queensland Attorney-General was a delegate at the vital 1891 Federation Convention in Sydney and took part in the drafting of the Australian Constitution. His vision was nothing short of one nation covering the continent. It was his passion for this objective that drove him to reject lesser proposals being put forward by some other politicians.

Arthur Rutledge convinced Queenslanders, especially in the north, that their young thinly-populated colony could not survive if it were not part of the commonwealth. There had to be Unity in Queensland and Unity in Australia. With his persuasive campaign he managed to get Queensland across the line with a very slim majority. That success was also a significant influence on Western Australia to join the commonwealth; thus making the “Grand Island Continent” complete.

This book is the story of Sir Arthur Rutledge and his struggle to unite Australia as a nation.
Winning the Peace: Australia's Campaign to Change the Asia-Pacific

Winning the Peace: Australia's Campaign to Change the Asia-Pacific

Andrew Carr

$59.99

Winning the Peace explores how Australian governments have engaged with Asia over the last thirty years, attempting to use their defence and foreign policies to shape the region. While there were times of tension during this periodandmdash;such as the spikes around the end of the Cold War and during the early years of the War on Terrorandmdash;the Asian region has been largely defined by peace. Because of this peace and thanks to Australia's relative size as a middle power, governments' attempts to change how other states act and think has not been through the use of force but by military and diplomatic engagement and persuasion. Australia's smaller size has also meant it has had to be strategic in its efforts: to determine which changes were priorities, to reorganise and develop resources, to deploy those resources effectively and efficiently, and to sustain its efforts in the face of competition and rejection. Winning the Peace focuses on the three main 'campaigns' Australian governments have undertaken since the early 1980s to reshape the Asia-Pacific region in the national interest.
The Sex Lives of Australians: A History

The Sex Lives of Australians: A History

Frank Bongiorno

$24.99

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Cross-dressing colonists, effeminate bush-rangers and women-shortage woes - here is the first ever history of sex in Australia, from Botany Bay to the present day.

In this fascinating social history, Frank Bongiorno uses striking examples to chart the changing sex lives of Australians. Tracing the story up to the present, Bongiorno shows how the quest for respectability always has another side to it. Along the way he raises some intriguing questions - What did it mean to be a 'mate'? How did modern warfare affect soldiers' attitudes to sex? Why did the law ignore lesbianism for so long? - and introduces some remarkable characters, both reformers and radicals.

This is a thought-provoking and enlightening journey through the history of sex in Australia. With a foreword by Michael Kirby, AC CMG.
Steel on Steel: Inside the Battle for the Future of Australia's Biggest Railroad

Steel on Steel: Inside the Battle for the Future of Australia's Biggest Railroad

Stephen Baines

$34.95

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Steel on Steel is the inside story of the privatisation of the freight arm of Queensland Rail, written by Stephen Baines, a senior executive involved intimately in the struggle for the railroad's future.

An icon that touched every part of life in Queensland, QR was famously catapulted into the private sector in 2010 after more than 140 years of government ownership. The privatisation was the second biggest in Australian history, and the most difficult. It involved simultaneously a massive de-merger from the passenger business, and a $4.6 billion initial public offering (IPO). For eighteen months, this IPO was Australia's ultimate corporate soap opera. 

This book describes how this big idea was conceived and executed in the face of unprecedented outrage and opposition.
The First Dismissal: How Governor Macquarie Invented an Idea of Australia, a Convict Built it and Britain Tried to Tear it Down

The First Dismissal: How Governor Macquarie Invented an Idea of Australia, a Convict Built it and Britain Tried to Tear it Down

Luke Slattery

$9.99

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While violent revolution and social upheaval rocked Europe, far away in New South Wales, Governor Lachlan Macquarie was sowing the seeds for the Australian idea of the 'fair go'.

Macquarie was a reformer and an emancipator. He believed that a person's worth - be they gentry, infantry or convict - lay in what they were capable of doing, not what they had done in the past. He freed the brilliant, mercurial convict Francis Greenway and appointed him government architect for the buildings that would shape a new nation. But to the Tory British government of 1820, Macquarie and Greenway's unconventional alliance threatened NSW's very legitimacy as a penal colony.

Here Luke Slattery breathes dramatic life into Australia's first political dismissal and, along the way, maps Macquarie and Greenway's bold collaborations and extraordinary architectural - and cultural - legacy.
Australian Tragic: Gripping Tales from the Dark Side of Our History

Australian Tragic: Gripping Tales from the Dark Side of Our History

Jack Marx

$22.99

These are stories of catastrophe and misfortune, intrigue and passion, betrayal and tragedy, some you may think you know - others, you have never heard of - but all will capture your imagination. They range across our past and our present: the heartbreaking story of the fire at Luna Park; the unstoppable opportunist who snatched innocent men and women from Palm Island to be part of P.T. Barnum's 'Greatest Show on Earth'; a world-class boxer who lost his battle with alcohol and ended up in an unmarked American grave; Steve Irwin, who was written off as a joke by the media, only to be hailed as a hero on his sudden death; and a man who heroically survived a war to find himself crushed and defeated by events much closer to home.

Heartbreaking and shocking, gothic and weird, these fascinating stories are all true, and told to remind us of the Australia we don't know, the one that simmers with love and hate, of hopes raised and futures dashed, unheralded and unnoticed... until now.
Combat Colonels of the AIF in the Great War

Combat Colonels of the AIF in the Great War

David Clare Holloway

$34.99

Combat Colonels seeks to address the regrettable gap in Australia's documented history of its combat colonels. Its purpose is to name all the Commanding Officers who led units into actions in the Great War and to describe their lives before and, for those who survived, after the war. From these pages emerge the men who shaped Australia's battlefield history - both the professional soldiers and the former teachers, accountants, salesmen, clerks, farmers and others from a broad range of occupations whose leadership on and off the battlefield proved so crucial. These are men Australia cannot afford to forget.
Penrith: The makings of a City

Penrith: The makings of a City

Lorraine Stacker

$69.95

The first colonial travellers to inland Australia took the western road through the plains round Sydney. At the foot of the towering Blue Mountains, where they crossed the Nepean River, simple buildings of the convict era formed the tiny township of Penrith. 

On that splendid natural stage the story told in this book unfolds. Lorraine Stacker traces events and developments that have made Penrith the mature city it is today. 

In chronological order, with a wealth of detail, her book studies land use and settlement, civic amenities, local government and changing patterns of urban growth. It looks beyond Penrith, to all areas now within the City’s municipal boundaries—reviewing the local histories of places such as St. Marys and Emu Plains, that once progressed independently. 

Since 1988—when the history of Penrith’s formative epoch was published in Darug and Dungaree—readers have longed for a book that would carry the story forward. This new book takes it into the 21st century, and includes an index to both volumes.
The Wentworth Lectures: Honouring Fifty Years of Australian Indigenous Studies

The Wentworth Lectures: Honouring Fifty Years of Australian Indigenous Studies

Robert Tonkinson

$39.95

The Wentworth Lectures are a reflection of the changing values in Australia's society and the evolution of ethical research in Australia. They are a fitting symbol of Australia's maturing nationhood and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the first peoples of the land. As well as their resilience and journey to reclaim and preserve their identity, their histories, their cultural heritage - their stories. There have been eighteen Wentworth lecturers, all of whom have been given full rein as to the topic and content. A veritable who's who of Australian Indigenous studies, all deal to some extent with wider political, social and economic, and in some cases, religious, factors prevalent at the time of their writing.
The King's Bed: Sex, Power and the Court of Charles II

The King's Bed: Sex, Power and the Court of Charles II

Don Jordan ,  Michael Walsh

$35.00

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To refer to the private life of Charles II is to abuse the adjective. His personal life was anything but private. His amorous liaisons were largely conducted in royal palaces surrounded by friends, courtiers and literally hundreds of servants and soldiers. Gossip radiated throughout the kingdom. 

Charles spent most of his wealth and his intellect on gaining and keeping the company of women, from the lowest sections of society such as the actress Nell Gwyn to the aristocratic Louise de Kerouaille. Some of Charles' women played their part in the affairs of state, colouring the way the nation was run. Don Jordan and Michael Walsh take us inside Charles' palace, where we will meet court favourites, amusing confidants, advisors jockeying for political power, mistresses past and present as well as key figures in his inner circle such as his 'pimpmasters' and his personal pox doctor.

The astonishing private life of Charles II reveals much about the man he was and why he lived and ruled as he did. The King's Bed tells the compelling story of a king ruled by his passion.
Battlefields in Britain

Battlefields in Britain

C. V. Wedgwood

$14.99

Written by the notable historian, Dame Veronica Wedgwood and originally published in the Collin's Pictures of Britain series, this book is an accessible text listing and explaining the major battles that occured within the British Isles from the Norman Conquest up to the 1940s.

Battles listed include: Hastings, The Welsh Wars, Falkirk, Bannockburn, Barnet, Tewkesbury, Bosworth, Flodden, Edgehill, Marston Moor, Inverlochy, Naseby, Dunbar, Killiecrankie and Culloden. Each battle is accompanied by a battle map from the era. At the end of her description of the Battle of Culloden, Wedgwood movingly alludes to the impending threat of a German invasion and the airmen caught up in the Battle of Britain who  left the quivering air signed with their honour.
Royal Ceremony: The Pageantry Explained

Royal Ceremony: The Pageantry Explained

Christopher Lee

$22.99

A concise, authoritative guide to the meaning behind the ritualized pageantry of the British royal family - for the fascinated, bewildered, or amused.

From Elgar to Elton John, the British have always had a penchant for pageantry. Royalty is perhaps the best example of their flair for ceremony, yet rarely do they apply the magnifying glass and question why the Queen and those around her do what they do. This comprehensive new handbook explains the history and reason behind it all. It explains the characters involved, from the Queen's Piper to the Master of Horse; the dress and costume; the principles of coronation; the royal funeral and royal wedding; and the presentation of the monarch in relation to his or her state functions.

The author's experience as a long standing royal commentator and correspondent makes him the perfect guide through the labyrinth of costume and ritual, both in England and around the world.
1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born

1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born

Christopher Bray

$19.99

There is Britain before 1965 and Britain after 1965 - and they are not the same thing.

1965 was the year Britain democratised education, it was the year pop culture began to be taken as seriously as high art, the time when comedians and television shows imported the methods of modernism into their work. It was when communications across the Atlantic became instantaneous, the year when, for the first time in a century, British artists took American gallery-goers by storm. In 1965 the Beatles proved that rock and roll could be art, it was when we went car crazy, and craziness was held to be the only sane reaction to an insane society. It was the year feminism went mainstream, the year, did she but know it, that the Thatcher revolution began, the year taboos were talked up - and trashed. It was when racial discrimination was outlawed and the death penalty abolished; it marked the appointment of Roy Jenkins as Home Secretary, who became chief architect in legislating homosexuality, divorce, abortion and censorship. It was the moment that our culture, reeling from what are still the most shocking killings of the century, realised it was a less innocent, less spiritual place than it had been kidding itself. It was the year of consumerist relativism that gave us the country we live in today and the year the idea of a home full of cultural artefacts - books, records, magazines - was born.

It was the year when everything changed - and the year that everyone knew it.
British Paratrooper 1940-45

British Paratrooper 1940-45

Rebecca R. Skinner ,  Graham Turner

$29.99

Inspired by the exploits of the German Fallschirmjager in the blitzkrieg campaigns, Winston Churchill called for the formation of a 5,000-strong Airborne Force in June 1940. From these beginnings The Parachute Regiment became one of the foremost units of the British Army both in World War II and up to the present day. This new history of the British Paratrooper, from 1940 to 1945, details the unique training, weapons and equipment used by these elite troops. A wealth of first-hand and until now unpublished materials brings the history of the ordinary paratrooper to life, drawing on the author's position as a former curator of the Regimental Museum. Illustrations and photographs illuminate the equipment and combat performance of the elite 'Paras' in the context of some of the most significant campaigns of World War II, including D-Day and Operation Market-Garden.
London: The Story of a Great City

London: The Story of a Great City

Jerry White

$39.95

No city can lay claim to a more dramatic history than London. Engulfed in calamities that seemed to mark its end - fire, plague, riot, civil war - from each crisis, it has emerged stronger than ever. Its cultural life, and the long heritage that underpins it, has made London one of the most visited and best-loved places on Earth. It is this extraordinary story that London: the Story of a Great City encapsulates, the rise of the city from a remote outpost of Rome's northern empire, the growth of trade that sent money and ships to every corner of the earth, the roll-call of great Londoners from Shakespeare to Dickens, from Cromwell to Churchill, the strength of its institutions, with Parliament prominent among them, the endurance of its people in the face of disaster and war, its innovations in enterprise and pleasure, its dark side in crime and mayhem, and the positive example it gives the world as a tolerant city in the face of global movements of people. The Museum of London's uniquely rich collections will illuminate the whole of London's history through artefacts, documents, maps, paintings and photographs.
The War Behind the Wire: The Life, Death and Glory of British Prisoners of War, 1914-18

The War Behind the Wire: The Life, Death and Glory of British Prisoners of War, 1914-18

John Lewis-Stempel

$22.99

On capture, British officers and men were routinely told by the Germans 'For you the war is over'. Nothing could be further from the truth. British Prisoners of War merely exchanged one barbed-wire battleground for another. In the camps the war was eternal. There was the war against the German military, fought with everything from taunting humour to outright sabotage, with a literal spanner put in the works of the factories and salt mines prisoners were forced to slave in. British PoWs also fought a valiant war against the conditions in which they were mired. They battled starvation, disease, Prussian cruelties, boredom, and their own inner demons. And, of course, they escaped. Then escaped again. No less than 29 officers at Holzminden camp in 1918 burrowed their way out via a tunnel (dug with a chisel and trowel) in the Great Escape of the Great War. It was war with heart-breaking consequences: more than 12,000 PoWs died, many of them murdered, to be buried in shallow unmarked graves. Using contemporary records - from prisoners' diaries to letters home to poetry - John Lewis-Stempel reveals the death, life and, above all, the glory of Britain's warriors behind the wire. For it was in the PoW camps, far from the blasted trenches, that the true spirit of the Tommy was exemplified.
The British Policewoman

The British Policewoman

Joan Lock

$29.95

Here, now fully updated for the twenty-first century, is the complex and fascinating history of the formation of the British Women Police. Full of drama, intrigue and humour, it also captures, through well-authenticated primary material, the colour and manner of the times. Remarkable women abound in this book, from the wealthy and eccentric Margaret Damer Dawson to the excitement-hungry ex-suffragette Mary Allen; and from the alluring but ill-starred Mrs Stanley to the tireless Mrs Peto. A few famous faces like Winston Churchill, Lady Astor and Adolf Hitler also feature, as does the women police's arch-enemy: the magistrate Frederick Mead. The pressure for the appointment of women police began well before World War I. Anti-white-slave traffic organizations felt they would help to stem the flow of prostitutes to and from Europe and suffragettes wanted them to ensure fairer treatment for women from the police and courts of law. But it was the Great War that gave them a launching pad for their battle. Early policewomen fought much public and police prejudice, wondering all the time how far to hold out for their ideals and how much to compromise for the sake of some official recognition; the eternal problem when breaking new ground. Their story, which was played out not only in the streets and courts of Great Britain and the House of Commons but in a defeated Germany and strife-torn 1920s Ireland, as well as in prohibition-era USA, ended in victory with their official integration into the force in the 1970s, but the battle did not end there, as our story shows...
The Coward?: The Rise and Fall of the Silver King

The Coward?: The Rise and Fall of the Silver King

Steve R. Dunn

$39.95

Barely three days after Britain declared war on Germany in August 1914, Rear Admiral Ernest Troubridge – a rising star of the British Navy – made a decision that seemed inexplicable and was to dominate the rest of his life and naval career. Commanding the 1st Cruiser Squadron, heading for an engagement with the German battle cruiser Goeben in the Mediterranean and having clearly signalled his intention to engage the German ship, Troubridge suddenly changed his mind, turned his vessels away, and allowed the enemy ship to escape. 

At a time when the First World War was just beginning and notions of bravery, patriotism, and duty were paramount, the story of Troubridge’s court martial and subsequent social and naval disgrace was and remains a complex one. Steve Dunn unpicks the mystery with his customary meticulous research and analysis. Was Troubridge a coward who avoided a fight, or a hero who put aside empty patriotism to save his ships and their crews from almost certain destruction? 

The Coward? is the first ever biography of Troubridge and a powerful story of how one decision changed a man’s life forever.
Mitterrand: A Study in Ambiguity

Mitterrand: A Study in Ambiguity

Philip Short

$19.99

Aesthete, sensualist, bookworm, politician of Machiavellian cunning: Francois Mitterrand was a man of exceptional gifts and exceptional flaws who, during his fourteen years as President, strove to drag his tradition-bound and change-averse country into the modern world. As a statesman and as a human being, he was the incarnation of the mercurial, contrarian France which Britain and America find so perennially frustrating. He embodied the ambiguities and the contradictions of a nation whose modern identity is founded on a stubborn refusal to fit into the Anglo-American scheme of things. Yet he changed France more profoundly than any of his recent predecessors, arguably including even his great rival, Charles de Gaulle.

During the war he was both the leader of a resistance movement and decorated for services to the collaborationist regime in Vichy. After flirting with the far Right, he entered parliament with the backing of conservatives and the Catholic Church before becoming the undisputed leader of the Left. As President he brought the French Communists into the government the better to destroy them.  And all the while he managed to find time for an extraordinarily complicated private life.

This is a human as much as a political biography, and a captivating portrait of a life that mirrored Mitterrand's times.
The Islamist Phoenix: IS and the Redrawing of the Middle East

The Islamist Phoenix: IS and the Redrawing of the Middle East

Loretta Napoleoni

$19.99

A timely, piercing study of the Islamic State, as its rise to prominence and domination of Middle Eastern politics, is explained in revealing detail by economist and bestselling author Loretta Napoleoni. Napoleoni illuminates the singularity of IS and how it differs from other jihadist organisations, particularly in terms of its economic structure and focus on consensus instead of pure violence. Napoleoni traces the beginnings of IS, its dynamic with al-Qaeda, and its current status as the first official Caliphate in over a century.
The Concise Untold History of the United States

The Concise Untold History of the United States

Oliver Stone ,  Peter Kuznick

$19.99

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Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone and historian Peter Kuznick examine the dark side of American history from the beginning of the twentieth century right up to the Obama administration.

Looking at American intervention in foreign conflicts in Latin American, Asia and the Middle East, including taking part in covert operations and interfering to overthrow elected leaders in favour of right-wing dictators, they ask whether US involvement around the globe is about democratic ideals, or political and economic gain.

From Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the Watergate scandal and the transformation of America into a national security state, The Concise Untold History lays bare how US presidents have ignored the constitution and international law to influence the course of world events for the interest of the few.
Citizens of the Green Room: Profiles in Courage and Self-Delusion

Citizens of the Green Room: Profiles in Courage and Self-Delusion

Mark Leibovich

$29.99

Hailed by The Washington Post as a  master of the political profile, Leibovich has spent his career writing memorable, buzz-worthy, and often jaw-dropping features about politicians and other notables. Currently chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, Leibovich punctures the inflated personas of the powerful, and in Citizens of the Green Room, he reveals the lives, stories, and peculiarities behind the public masks.

A brilliant reporter with a talent for subversive, engaging storytelling, Leibovich maintains a refreshing conviviality with many of his subjects even as he renders incisive and unflinching assessments. His features have driven the national conversation while exposing the fallibilities of the kingmakers and media stars: consider his 2007 profile of Hillary Clinton, which unearthed a treasure trove of old letters that the then senator had written as a vulnerable young college student; or his much-talked-about 2010 portrait of Glenn Beck, which laid bare the tortured soul and precarious standing of the once invincible host and his uneasy relationship with his soon-to-be ex-employer FOX News.

In the political arena, Leibovich's portraits of John Kerry, Paul Ryan, Chris Christie, and John McCain are already classics; they invariably remind us that great journalism and stylish writing are not only essential to the Republic but necessary to maintain the citizenry's sanity and humor in the face of made-for-TV government.
The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture

The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture

Senate Select Committee on Intelligence ,  United States ,  Diane Feinstein

$32.99

One of the most significant government reports in American history, this is the complete official summary report of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation of the Central Intelligence Agency’s interrogation and detention programs launched in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.

Based on over six million internal CIA documents, the report details secret prisons, prisoner deaths, and interrogation practices that have led many to call it “The Torture Report.” The report also examines charges that the CIA deliberately deceived elected officials about the extent and legality of its operations.

Over five years in the making, and delayed from publication by Agency-led protests after its declassification in April, 2014, this is the full and unexpurgated summary report as finally released by the United States government.
The Sphinx: Franklin Roosevelt, the Isolationists, and the Road to World War II

The Sphinx: Franklin Roosevelt, the Isolationists, and the Road to World War II

Nicholas Wapshott

$35.95

May 1938. Franklin Delano Roosevelt recently reelected to a second term as president sat in the Oval Office and contemplated two possibilities: the rule of fascism overseas, and a third term. With Hitler's reach extending into Austria, and with the atrocities of World War I still fresh in the American memory, Roosevelt faced the question that would prove one of the most defining in American history: whether to once again go to war in Europe.

In The Sphinx, Nicholas Wapshott recounts how an ambitious and resilient Roosevelt nicknamed  the Sphinx  for his cunning, cryptic rapport with the press devised and doggedly pursued a strategy to sway the American people to abandon isolationism and take up the mantle of the world's most powerful nation. Chief among Roosevelt s antagonists was his friend Joseph P. Kennedy, a stock market magnate and the patriarch of what was to become one of the nation's most storied dynasties. Kennedy's financial, political, and personal interests aligned him with a war-weary American public, and he counted among his isolationist allies no less than Walt Disney, William Randolph Hearst, and Henry Ford prominent businessmen who believed America had no business in conflicts across the Atlantic. The ensuing battle waged with fiery rhetoric, agile diplomacy, media sabotage, and petty political antics would land US troops in Europe within three years, secure Roosevelt's legacy, and set a standard for American military strategy for years to come.

With millions of lives and a future paradigm of foreign intervention hanging in the balance, The Sphinx captures a political giant at the height of his powers and an American identity crisis that continues to this day.
America in Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder

America in Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder

Bret Stephens

$29.99

In a brilliant book that will elevate foreign policy in the national conversation, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Bret Stephens makes a powerful case for American intervention abroad. 

In December 2011 the last American soldier left Iraq.  We're leaving behind a sovereign, stable, and self-reliant Iraq,  boasted President Obama. He was proved devastatingly wrong less than three years later as jihadists seized the Iraqi city of Mosul. The event cast another dark shadow over the future of global order - a shadow, which, Bret Stephens argues, we ignore at our peril. 

America in Retreat identifies a profound crisis on the global horizon. As Americans seek to withdraw from the world to tend to domestic problems, America's adversaries spy opportunity.  Vladimir Putin's ambitions to restore the glory of the czarist empire go effectively unchecked, as do China's attempts to expand its maritime claims in the South China Sea, as do Iran's efforts to develop nuclear capabilities. Civil war in Syria displaces millions throughout the Middle East while turbocharging the forces of radical Islam. Long-time allies such as Japan, Saudi Arabia, and Israel, doubting the credibility of American security guarantees, are tempted to freelance their foreign policy, irrespective of U.S. interests. 

Deploying his characteristic stylistic flair and intellectual prowess, Stephens argues for American reengagement abroad. He explains how military intervention in Iraq and Afghanistan was the right course of action, foolishly executed. He traces the intellectual continuity between anti-interventionist statesmen such as Henry Wallace and Robert Taft in the late 1940s and Barack Obama and Rand Paul today.  And he makes an unapologetic case for Pax Americana,  a world in which English is the default language of business, diplomacy, tourism, and technology; in which markets are global, capital is mobile, and trade is increasingly free; in which values of openness and tolerance are, when not the norm, often the aspiration.  

In a terrifying chapter imagining the world of 2019, Stephens shows what could lie in store if Americans continue on their current course. Yet we are not doomed to this future. Stephens makes a passionate rejoinder to those who argue that America is in decline, a process that is often beyond the reach of political cures. Instead, we are in retreat - the result of faulty, but reversible, policy choices. By embracing its historic responsibility as the world's policeman, America can safeguard not only greater peace in the world but also greater prosperity at home. 

At once lively and sobering, America in Retreat offers trenchant analysis of the gravest threat to global order, from a rising star of political commentary.
American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Donald Critchlow

$15.95

The Founding Fathers who drafted the United States Constitution in 1787 distrusted political parties, popular democracy, centralized government, and a strong executive office. Yet the country's national politics have historically included all those features. In American Political History: A Very Short Introduction, Donald Critchlow takes on this contradiction between original theory and actual practice. This brief, accessible book explores the nature of the two-party system, key turning points in American political history, representative presidential and congressional elections, struggles to expand the electorate, and critical social protest and third-party movements. The volume emphasizes the continuity of a liberal tradition challenged by partisan divide, war, and periodic economic turmoil. American Political History: A Very Short Introduction explores the emergence of a democratic political culture within a republican form of government, showing the mobilization and extension of the mass electorate over the lifespan of the country. In a nation characterized by great racial, ethnic, and religious diversity, American democracy has proven extraordinarily durable. Individual parties have risen and fallen, but the dominance of the two-party system persists. Fierce debates over the meaning of the U.S. Constitution have created profound divisions within the parties and among voters, but a belief in the importance of constitutional order persists among political leaders and voters. Americans have been deeply divided about the extent of federal power, slavery, the meaning of citizenship, immigration policy, civil rights, and a range of economic, financial, and social policies. New immigrants, racial minorities, and women have joined the electorate and the debates. But American political history, with its deep social divisions, bellicose rhetoric, and antagonistic partisanship provides valuable lessons about the meaning and viability of democracy in the early 21st century. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
The American West: A Very Short Introduction

The American West: A Very Short Introduction

Stephen Aron

$13.95

Part geographical location, part time period, and part state of mind, the American West is a concept often invoked but rarely defined. Though popular culture has carved out a short and specific time and place for the region, author and longtime Californian Stephen Aron tracks the West from the building of the Cahokia Mounds around 900 AD to the post-World War II migration to California. His Very Short Introduction stretches the chronology, enlarges the geography, and varies the casting, providing a history of the American West that is longer, larger, and more complicated than popular culture has previously suggested. It is a history of how portions of North America became Wests, how parts of these became American, and how ultimately American Wests became the American West. Aron begins by describing the expansion of Indian North America in the centuries before and during its early encounters with Europeans. He then explores the origins of American westward expansion from the Seven Years' War to the 1830s, focusing on the western frontier at the time: the territory between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River. He traces the narrative - temporally and geographically - through the discovery of gold in California in the mid-nineteenth century and the subsequent rush to the Pacific Slope. He shows how the passage of the Newlands Reclamation Act in 1902 brought an unprecedented level of federal control to the region, linking the West more closely to the rest of the United States, and how World War II brought a new rush of population (particularly to California), further raising the federal government's profile in the region and heightening the connections between the West and the wider world. Authoritative, lucid, and ranging widely over issues of environment, people, and identity, this is the American West stripped of its myths. The complex convergence of peoples, polities, and cultures that has decisively shaped the history of the American West serves as the key interpretive thread through this Very Short Introduction. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
For God King and People: Forging Commonwealth Bonds in Renaissance Virginia

For God King and People: Forging Commonwealth Bonds in Renaissance Virginia

Alexander B. Haskell

$69.00

By recovering a largely forgotten English Renaissance mindset that regarded sovereignty and Providence as being fundamentally entwined, Alexander Haskell reconnects concepts historians had before treated as separate categories and argues that the first English planters in Virginia operated within a deeply providential age rather than an era of early modern entrepreneurialism. These men did not merely settle Virginia; they and their London-based sponsors saw this first successful English venture in America as an exercise in divinely inspired and approved commonwealth creation. When the realities of Virginia complicated this humanist ideal, growing disillusionment and contention marked debates over the colony. Rather than just selling colonization to the realm, proponents instead needed to overcome profound and recurring doubts about whether God wanted English rule to cross the Atlantic and the process by which it was to happen. By contextualizing these debates within a late Renaissance phase in England, Haskell links increasing religious skepticism to the rise of decidedly secular conceptions of state power. Haskell offers a radical revision of accepted narratives of early modern state formation, locating it as an outcome, rather than as an antecedent, of colonial endeavor.
Lincoln and Liberty: Wisdom for the Ages

Lincoln and Liberty: Wisdom for the Ages

Lucas E. Morel ,  Clarence Thomas

$62.00

Since Abraham Lincoln's death, generations of Americans have studied his life, presidency, and leadership, often remaking him into a figure suited to the needs and interests of their own time. This illuminating volume takes a different approach to his political thought and practice. Here, a distinguished group of contributors argue that Lincoln's relevance today is best expressed by rendering an accurate portrait of him in his own era. They seek to understand Lincoln as he understood himself and as he attempted to make his ideas clear to his contemporaries. What emerges is a portrait of a prudent leader who is driven to return the country to its original principles in order to conserve it.<br><br>The contributors demonstrate that, far from advocating an expansion of government beyond its constitutional limits, Lincoln defended both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. In his introduction, Justice Clarence Thomas discusses how Lincoln used the ideological and structural underpinnings of those founding documents to defeat slavery and secure the liberties that the Republic was established to protect. Other chapters reveal how Lincoln upheld the principle of limited government even as he employed unprecedented war powers.<br><br>Featuring contributions from leading scholars such as Michael Burlingame, Allen C. Guelzo, Fred Kaplan, and Matthew Pinsker, this innovative collection presents fresh perspectives on Lincoln both as a political thinker and a practical politician. Taken together, these essays decisively demonstrate that the most iconic American president still has much to teach the modern-day student of politics.
Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All

Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All

David Roediger

$35.00

How did America recover after its years of civil war? How did freed men and women, former slaves, react to their newly won freedoms? Building on, criticizing and extending previous historical accounts of the Reconstruction, David Roediger's radical new history finds fresh sources and texts that redefine the idea of freedom after the jubilee. Reinstating ex-slaves' own freedom dreams in constructing these histories, Roediger creates a masterful account of the emancipation, and its ramifications on a whole host of day-to-day concerns for whites and black alike, such as property relations, labor, and gender roles.
If This is A Woman: Inside Ravensbruck - Hitler's Concentration Camp For Women

If This is A Woman: Inside Ravensbruck - Hitler's Concentration Camp For Women

Sarah Helm

$32.99

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Ravensbruck Concentration Camp is the worst atrocity ever committed solely against women, but today the name of the camp is barely known. From Ravensbruck's earliest days, when Himmler offered his own land for the camp, this book follows every stage of the story through to the camp's liberation by the Red Army.

Based on meticulous research, If This Is A Woman lays bare the systematic brutalisation of mothers, pregnant women, children and babies. It details the extremes of cruelty enacted by SS guards and of suffering experienced by the prisoners, who were themselves reduced to inhuman acts. But at the heart of If This Is A Woman are stories of heroism and survival. The narrative centres on the experiences of women - from the farmer's wife to the aristocratic intellectual - who had the resilience, the mental and physcial strength to withstand their ordeal and to emerge from the camp alive.
Blood, Sweat and Courage: 41 Squadron RAF, September 1939-July 1942

Blood, Sweat and Courage: 41 Squadron RAF, September 1939-July 1942

Steve Brew

$79.99

Formed in 1916, 41 Squadron is one of the oldest Royal Air Force squadrons in existence. The unit saw service in the First World War, on Policing Duties in the Aden Protectorate during the 1930s, throughout the Second World War, and more recently in the First Gulf War and Yugoslavia. Until now, however, its History has not been written. Following the success of Blood, Sweat and Valour, focusing on the period August 1942 to May 1945, Blood, Sweat and Courage now completes the narrative of 41 Squadron's Second World War activity, concentrating on its operations between September 1939 and July 1942. Author Steve Brew recounts the unit's role within battles, operations, and larger strategies, and details experiences made by the pilots and ground crew participating in them. The Squadron's actions are often revealed for the first time, through records that have previously not been available. Brew evokes the feeling of the period, portraying not only a factual account but also one that captures the colour of life on a Second World War fighter squadron, with a balance between material of a documentary nature and narrative action, intertwining fact with personal recollections, serious events with humour, and sobering statistics with poignant afterthought.
Fall Gelb 1940 2: Airborne Assault on the Low Countries

Fall Gelb 1940 2: Airborne Assault on the Low Countries

Doug Dildy ,  Peter Dennis

$34.99

The great blitzkrieg campaign of May/June 1940 saw German forces pour through Holland and Belgium to confront the French and British. The assault was audacious; it relied on speed, feinting and manoeuvre as much as superior force, and in the end these qualities were to prove decisive to German success. Featuring vivid illustrations, illuminative bird's eye views and maps, this book charts the unfolding of an unprecedented 'lightning war', which saw the first ever airborne assault at a strategic level, and the largest clash of armour to date. Never in the history of warfare had the clash between such large, powerful, and apparently equal forces been decided so swiftly and conclusively.
Gallipoli - The Ottoman Campaign

Gallipoli - The Ottoman Campaign

Edward J. Erickson

$44.00

The Ottoman Army won a historic victory over the Allied forces at Gallipoli in 1915. This was one of the most decisive and clear-cut campaigns of the Great War. Yet the performance of the Ottomans, the victors, has often received less attention than that of the Allied army they defeated. Edward Erickson, in this perceptive study, now released in PB, concentrates on the Ottoman side of the campaign. He looks in detail at the Ottoman Army - its structure, tactics and deployment - and at the conduct of the commanders who served it so well. His pioneering work complements the extensive literature on other aspects of the Gallipoli battle, in particular those accounts that have focused on the experience of the British, Australians and New Zealanders. This highly original reassessment of the campaign will be essential reading for students of the Great War, especially the conflict in the Middle East. Endorsements 'Superb new book on the Ottoman perspective of Gallipoli. Erickson has provided extensive insights into the preparations for and execution of the defense of Gallipoli. He has drawn on multiple Turkish sources, including detailed maps...[ His] insights place the campaign into a clearer perspective, dousing many of the traditional views of the Ottoman Army that have been perpetrated in the English literature...Highly recommended.' Great War Forum 'Many modern and contemporary military analysts assert that the [Gallipoli] campaign was ill-fated from the start. In this crisply drafted monograph. Ed Erickson helps us understand why.' Stand To! 'This book is a must for every reader about Gallipoli...in order to see how the Ottoman Fifth Army fought a successful and prolonged campaign against an enemy with far greater resources.' The Gallipolian
Empire of Cotton: A New History of Global Capitalism

Empire of Cotton: A New History of Global Capitalism

Sven Beckert

$59.99

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For about 900 years, from 1000 to 1900, cotton was the world's most important manufacturing industry. It remains a vast business - if all the cotton bales produced in 2013 had been stacked on top of each other they would have made a somewhat unstable tower 40,000 miles high.

Sven Beckert's superb new book is a history of the overwhelming role played by cotton in dictating the shape of our world.

For centuries it was central to India's prosperity - a prosperity that was devastated by Britain's imperial takeover of the industry. It formed the core of Britain and Europe's industrial revolution. It revived and modernized slavery in the American South. Essential to billions of people and easily transported, cotton made fortunes, changed geographies and was crucial to modern capitalism and globalization.

Empire of Cotton is both a gripping narrative and a brilliant case history of how the world works.
The Story of Mankind

The Story of Mankind

Hendrik Willem Van Loon ,  Robert Sullivan ,  John Merriman

$23.95

Winner of the first John Newberry Medal, Hendrik Willem van Loon's The Story of Mankind, originally written for the author's grandchildren, has charmed generations with its warmth and wisdom. Beginning with the origins of human life and sweeping forward to illuminate all of history, van Loon's incomparable prose and illustrations presented a lively rendering of the people and events that have shaped world history. This new edition, updated by best-selling historian Robert Sullivan, continues van Loon's personable style and incorporates the most important developments of the early twenty-first century, including the war on terrorism, global warming, and the explosion of social media. The result remains extremely valid in broad outline if not detail and, as ever, a grand and thought-provoking read (Kirkus Reviews).
Nomads as Agents of Cultural Change: The Mongols and Their Eurasian Predecessors

Nomads as Agents of Cultural Change: The Mongols and Their Eurasian Predecessors

Reuvan Amitai ,  Michal Biran

$85.00

Since the first millennium BCE, nomads of the Eurasian steppe have played a key role in world history and the development of adjacent sedentary regions, especially China, India, the Middle East, and Eastern and Central Europe. Although their more settled neighbours often saw them as an ongoing threat and imminent danger - barbarians, in fact - their impact on sedentary cultures was far more complex than the raiding, pillaging, and devastation with which they have long been associated in the popular imagination.

The nomads were also facilitators and catalysts of social, demographic, economic, and cultural change, and nomadic culture had a significant influence on that of sedentary Eurasian civilisations, especially in cases when the nomads conquered and ruled over them. Not simply passive conveyors of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and physical artefacts, nomads were frequently active contributors to the process of cultural exchange and change. Their active choices and initiatives helped set the cultural and intellectual agenda of the lands they ruled and beyond. This volume brings together a distinguished group of scholars from different disciplines and cultural specialisations to explore how nomads played the role of agents of cultural change.

The beginning chapters examine this phenomenon in both east and west Asia in ancient and early medieval times, while the bulk of the book is devoted to the far flung Mongol empire of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. This comparative approach, encompassing both a lengthy time span and a vast region, enables a clearer understanding of the key role that Eurasian pastoral nomads played in the history of the Old World. It conveys a sense of the complex and engaging cultural dynamic that existed between nomads and their agricultural and urban neighbours, and highlights the non-military impact of nomadic culture on Eurasian history.

Nomads as Agents of Cultural Change illuminates and complicates nomadic roles as active promoters of cultural exchange within a vast and varied region. It makes available important original scholarship on the new turn in the study of the Mongol empire and on relations between the nomadic and sedentary worlds.
Archaeology

Archaeology

John Manley

$19.99

- When did archaeology begin? - Who were the first antiquarians in early modern Europe? - How did archaeology free human history from biblical creationism? - How did archaeology become a pseudo-scientific discipline? - Who built the first museum? Leading expert Dr John Manley starts by dealing with the processes and techniques used by archaeologists, in the past and today. He then uses the results of famous archaeological studies both to illustrate the power of archaeology, and to show specifically what archaeology has taught us about Roman, Egyptian, ancient, and surprisingly recent, history. In an exciting final chapter, Manley wonders how archaeology may adapt over time, exploring how the archaeologists of the future may examine our own era. Ideal for students or for general reading, this book delivers a thorough and comprehensive introduction to archaeology. All That Matters about archaeology. All That Matters books are a fast way to get right to the heart of key issues.
Byzantine Warship vs Arab Warship: 7th - 11th Centuries

Byzantine Warship vs Arab Warship: 7th - 11th Centuries

Angus Konstam ,  Peter Dennis

$29.99

For four hundred years the Byzantine Empire's naval forces vied with the warships of the Islamic world for mastery of the Mediterranean. At the heart of this confrontation were the fighting vessels of the two powers, the Byzantine dromon and the Arabic shalandi, both oared warships. In those four centuries of warfare between two major maritime powers, both the Byzantines and the Arabs left us records of their doctrine and tactics, as well as of how their ships were built. Featuring full-colour artwork and rigorous analysis from an authority on naval warfare, this enthralling book offers a glimpse of the long-lost world of war at sea in the age of Byzantium.
The Crusades: A Beginner's Guide

The Crusades: A Beginner's Guide

Andrew Jotischky

$21.99

In 1095 Pope Urban II launched the First Crusade to recover Jerusalem from the Seljuq Turks. Tens of thousands of people joined his cause, making it the single largest event of the Middle Ages. The conflict would rage for over 200 years, transforming Christian and Islamic relations forever. Andrew Jotischky takes readers through the key events, focussing on the experience of crusading, from both sides. Featuring textboxes with fascinating details on the key sites, figures and battles, this essential primer asks all the crucial questions: What were the motivations of the crusaders? What was it like to be a crusader or to live in a crusading society? And how do these events, nearly a thousand years ago, still shape the politics of today?
North Africa: A History from Antiquity to the Present

North Africa: A History from Antiquity to the Present

Phillip C. Naylor

$46.95

Now with a new afterword that surveys the North African Spring uprisings that roiled the region from 2011 to 2013, this is the most comprehensive history of North Africa to date, with accessible, in-depth chapters covering the pre-Islamic period through colonization and independence. Now with a new afterword that surveys the North African Spring uprisings that roiled the region from 2011 to 2013, this is the most comprehensive history of North Africa to date, with accessible, in-depth chapters covering the pre-Islamic period through colonization and independence.
In the Forbidden City

In the Forbidden City

Kwong Chiu Chiu ,  Ben Wang ,  Ben Wang (Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, China The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, China)

$21.99

Serving as the seat of imperial power for six centuries, the Forbidden City is one of China's most famous and enigmatic landmarks. Accompanied by a mischievous cat, readers will tour this colossal architectural structure, discovering the secrets hidden inside the palace walls. They will encounter the people who have walked through its halls and gardens, including emperors, empresses, and rebel leaders, and hear exciting tales about the power struggles and intrigues of everyday life.
Thunder Over the Reich: Flying the Luftwaffe's He 162 Jet Fighter

Thunder Over the Reich: Flying the Luftwaffe's He 162 Jet Fighter

Wolfgang Wollenweber

$77.00

First Lieutenant Wolfgang Wollenweber's WWII odyssey, from combat operations in the Me110 over Russia with the 'Arctic Sea Hunters', to pitting the extraordinary He162 jet fighter against Allied fighters over Germany, and flying possibly the final Luftwaffe mission of WWII, may be the last great 'untold' story from a WWII Luftwaffe pilot. Posted to the Arctic front in 1943, Wollenweber flew Me110s on escort missions and ground attack, shooting down several Soviet aircraft in the process, for which he was awarded the Iron Cross First Class. As the fortunes of the war turned against the Third Reich, Wollenweber volunteered for defence duties and soon found himself training to fly the lethal Me163 Komet rocket fighter, before being transferred to the innovative 'wonder weapon'--the He162 Jet Fighter. The He162 'Volksjager' (People's Fighter) was meant to be capable of being flown by members of the Hitler Youth with only rudimentary flying experience, but instead turned out to be an unforgiving machine in untrained hands and while Wollenberger himself became one of the most experienced He162 pilots, he witnessed the brutal human toll it exacted on the unwary or unlucky. And as one of the few pilots to have flown the He162 in combat, he finally settles the vexed question of whether the He162 ever shot down an Allied aircraft. Wollenweber describes in his own words the shocking truth of the last desperate days of the Third Reich, and does not shy away from describing the horrors he witnessed and naming the corrupt and incompetent individuals he came across. This is a vividly told story and an important inside account not just of the revolutionary He162, but also the changing fortunes of the Luftwaffe - from happy hunting on the Russian front to its final disintegration over a destroyed homeland.
A History of Germany 1918-2014: The Divided Nation

A History of Germany 1918-2014: The Divided Nation

Mary Fulbrook

$41.95

<p>The fourth edition of A History of Germany, 1918-2014: A Divided Nation introduces students to the key themes of 20th century German history, tracing the dramatic social, cultural, and political tensions in Germany since 1918. Now thoroughly updated, the text includes new coverage of the Euro crisis and a review of Angela Merkel's Chancellorship. * New edition of a well-known, classic survey by a leading scholar in the field, thoroughly updated for a new generation of readers * Provides an overview of the turbulent history of Germany from the end of the First World War through the Third Reich and beyond, examining the character and consequences of war and genocide * Treats German history from 1918 to 2014 from the perspectives of instability, division and reunification, covering East and West German history in equal depth * Offers important reflections on Angela Merkel's Chancellorship as it extends into a new term * Concise, substantive coverage of this period make it an ideal resource for undergraduate students
Japanese Secret Projects: Experimental Aircraft of the IJA and IJN 1922-1945

Japanese Secret Projects: Experimental Aircraft of the IJA and IJN 1922-1945

Edwin M. Dyer

$59.95

This is the second volume in the Japanese Secret Project series, compiled by popular demand after the great success of the first volume. This popularity reveals that Secret and X-Plane aircraft projects remain highly popular with historians, enthusiasts, modellers and the flight sim community. Surprisingly, secret Japanese planes of World War 2 remain an area which has not been extensively covered due to scarcity of information. They do, however, have a large base of interest as unlike the majority of secret Luftwaffe programs that were resigned to the drawing board, the vast number of aircraft featured within this book actually flew or were in development. As with the first volume, the book is divided into two sections dedicated to the two air forces of the IJA and IJN, with over 40 aircraft examined, each with its history, variants, performance, and any combat records laid out in an easy to read fashion. This is beautifully complimented by stunning colour renditions of the aircraft in combat and colour profiles of genuine markings and camouflage. The majority of the book is dedicated to aircraft that were under development or in service during the war years, but there are examples of pre-war experimental aircraft, and a selection of missile projects. Sample aircraft projects include: Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Tachikawa Ki-104 fighter Kawasaki Ki-48-II Kai and Ki-174 suicide light bomber Nakajima Ki-117 high altitude fighter Kawasaki Ki-119 light bomber Imperial Japanese Navy Air Force Hitachi 'He-Type' heavy bomber Aichi S1A Denko night fighter Mitsubishi Q2M1 ASW bomber Kawanishi K-60 flying boat Yokosuka D5Y1 Myojo Kai suicide aircraft
European Slave Trading in the Indian Ocean, 1500--1850

European Slave Trading in the Indian Ocean, 1500--1850

Richard B. Allen

$55.00

Between 1500 and 1850, European traders shipped hundreds of thousands of African, Indian, Malagasy, and Southeast Asian slaves to ports throughout the Indian Ocean world. The activities of the British, Dutch, French, and Portuguese traders who operated in the Indian Ocean demonstrate that European slave trading was not confined largely to the Atlantic but must now be viewed as a truly global phenomenon. European slave trading and abolitionism in the Indian Ocean also led to the development of an increasingly integrated movement of slave, convict, and indentured labor during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the consequences of which resonated well into the twentieth century. Richard B. Allen's magisterial work dramatically expands our understanding of the movement of free and forced labor around the world. Drawing upon extensive archival research and a thorough command of published scholarship, Allen challenges the modern tendency to view the Indian and Atlantic oceans as self-contained units of historical analysis and the attendant failure to understand the ways in which the Indian Ocean and Atlantic worlds have interacted with one another. In so doing, he offers tantalizing new insights into the origins and dynamics of global labor migration in the modern world.
T-26 Light Tank: Backbone of the Red Army

T-26 Light Tank: Backbone of the Red Army

Steven J. Zaloga ,  Henry Morshead

$24.99

The T-26 was the first major Soviet armour program of the 1930s, beginning as a license-built version of the British Vickers 6-ton export tank. Although the T-26 retained the basic Vickers hull and suspension, the Red Army began to make extensive changes to the turret and armament, starting with the addition of a 45mm tank gun in 1933. The T-26 was built in larger numbers than any other tank prior to World War II. Indeed, more T-26 tanks were manufactured than the combined tank production of Germany, France, Britain, and the United States in 1931-40. This book surveys the development of the T-26 as well as its combat record in the Spanish Civil War, the war in China, the border wars with Poland and Finland in 1939-40, and the disastrous battles of 1941 during Operation Barbarossa.
The Spanish Civil War 1936-39: Republican Forces

The Spanish Civil War 1936-39: Republican Forces

Alejandro De Quesada ,  Stephen Walsh

$24.99

The Spanish Civil War was the curtainraiser to World War II and involved a complex collection of forces, particularly on the Republican side. This title illustrates how diverse the Republican forces were, drawn from loyal elements of the Spanish army that rejected the appeal of the rebel generals, a wide range of volunteer regional units and political militias, and supported by volunteers from many other countries, including Great Britain, France and Germany, in units known as the International Brigades. The wide range of equipment and uniforms worn by these troops is revealed, as is, the organization of militias into conventional brigades and divisions. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork, this second part of a two-part study depicts the fighting men of the Republican forces and examples of their foreign comrades.
           
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