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Anzac Treasures: The Gallipoli Collection of the Australian War Memorial

Anzac Treasures: The Gallipoli Collection of the Australian War Memorial

Peter Pedersen

$69.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE OCTOBER 2014 ----- A beautifully produced, lavishly illustrated commemorative volume drawing on the Memorial's unique collection of Gallipoli-related objects, photographs, artworks, diaries, letters, maps and personal memorabilia.

This landmark publication commemorates the centenary of the Great War's Gallipoli campaign, 25 April 1915 to 9 January 1916. ANZAC Treasures approaches the subject of Gallipoli not only from a military perspective but also in terms of its social impact and its role in commemoration and nation building. It does so through the Memorial's immensely rich and varied National Collection, which provides a tangible link to ANZAC and gives an unparalleled insight into its many facets. The legend and reality of ANZAC are encapsulated within the relics, photographs, artworks, documentary records, personal diaries and letters that are displayed to dramatic and moving effect in a beautifully designed and produced commemorative volume.

Dr Peter Pedersen, formerly Head of the Research Centre at the Australian War Memorial, is one of Australia's leading military historians. He has written eight books on the First World War and led many battlefield tours to Gallipoli, the Western Front and other battlefields in Europe and Asia. Dr Pedersen is currently consultant historian to the Australian Department of Veterans' Affairs.

Anzac Treasures: The Gallipoli Collection of the Australian War Memorial by Peter Pedersen at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
The Menzies Era

The Menzies Era

John Howard

$59.99

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An assessment of Australia's longest-serving Prime Minister, Sir Robert Menzies, by John Howard, Australia's second-longest serving Prime Minister, this is a significant, unique and fascinating history of the Menzies era - a time that laid the foundations for modern Australia.

Fresh from the success of his phenomenal bestselling memoir, Lazarus Rising, which has sold over 100,000 copies, John Howard now turns his attention to one of the most extraordinary periods in Australian history, the Menzies era, canvassing the longest unbroken period of government for one side of politics in Australia's history. The monumental Sir Robert Menzies held power for a total of over 18 years, making him the longest-serving Australian Prime Minister.

During his second term as Prime Minister, a term of over sixteen years - by far the longest unbroken tenure in that office - Menzies dominated Australian politics like no one else has ever done before or since, and these years laid the foundations for modern Australia. Through the Menzies era, there was huge economic growth, social change and considerable political turmoil.

Covering the impact of the great Labor split of 1955 as well as the recovery of the Labor Party under Whitlam's leadership in the late 1960s and the impact of the Vietnam War on Australian politics, this magisterial book offers a comprehensive assessment of the importance of the Menzies era in Australian life, history and politics.

John Howard, only ten when Menzies rose to power, and in young adulthood when the Menzies era came to an end, saw Menzies as an inspiration and a role model. His unique insights and thoughtful analysis into Menzies the man, the politician, and his legacy make this a fascinating, highly significant book.
The First Fleet

The First Fleet

Rob Mundle

$45.00

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Bestselling maritime biographer Rob Mundle is back on the ocean with a blockbuster.

Mundle tells the extraordinary story of the eighteenth century convoy of eleven ships that left England on 13 May 1787 for the 'lands beyond the seas'. Aboard were seafarers, convicts, marines, and a few good citizens - some 1300 in all - who had been consigned to a virtually unknown land on the opposite side of the world where they would establish a penal colony, and a nation. The fleet stopped at Tenerife, Rio de Janeiro and Cape Town before sailing across the notorious and challenging Southern Ocean, bound for Botany Bay. Somehow, all 11 ships arrived safely between 18 and 20 January, 1788. But, it's what happened during 252 days at sea while sailing half way around the world, and subsequently on land, that is almost beyond belief. No nation has ever been founded in such a courageous and dangerous manner. It's the basis for one hell of an adventure.
Crime, Punishment and Redemption: A Convict's Story

Crime, Punishment and Redemption: A Convict's Story

June Slee

$44.99

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John Ward, writing whilst incarcerated on Norfolk Island, tells a story of thwarted love that led him to a life of crime: including theft, sexual assault and more. In telling the candid story of his downfall he exposes his own ruthlessness and lack of empathy.

This book is an insight into the criminal mind, ably examined by author June Slee. It is a glimpse into 19th-century aristocratic life - dress, food, pastimes and prejudices - from a servant's perspective. And it is a unique record, perhaps the only extant diary ever written during the Australian penal era whilst its convict writer was imprisoned. Plus, Ward records a particular moment in our history: not only life aboard prison hulks which he describes in detail but also the timing of his arrival in Sydney when convicts were no longer being accepted; he was sent straight to Norfolk Island where we get a fascinating insight into the rule of Captain Alexander Maconochie. Moconochie believed in a system of improvement for convicts based on a marks system for good behaviour rather than humiliating punishment. In this way, Ward gained access to writing materials for his diary.
The Making of Australia: From a Corrupt Convict Settlement to the Remarkable Nation it is Today

The Making of Australia: From a Corrupt Convict Settlement to the Remarkable Nation it is Today

David Hill

$34.99

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This is the story of how a struggling convict settlement grew into six dynamic colonies and then the remarkable nation of Australia. Told through the key figures who helped build it into the thriving nation it is today, David Hill once again offers up Australian history at its most entertaining and accessible.

In his latest book, David Hill traces the story of our nation from its European beginnings to Federation. When James Cook landed on the east coast of Australia, the rest of the world had some idea of how empty, vast and wild this continent was, but so little was known of it that in 1788 most people thought it was two lands. In the subsequent years, its coastline was charted, its interior opened up, and its cities, laws and economy developed.

In this riveting, wide-ranging history, David Hill traces how this happened through the key figures who built this country into the thriving nation it is today: from its prescient and fair-minded first governor, Arthur Phillip, to the unpopular William Bligh, the victim of the country's first and only military coup; from the visionary builder and law-maker Lachlan Macquarie to William Wentworth, the son of a convict who secured Australia's first elected parliament; from Henry Parkes, the grand old man of politics who started the fraught process of Federation, to the first prime minister, Edmund Barton. It was Barton who formed the first Australian government just in time for the inaugural celebrations on 1 January 1901, when the nation of Australia was born!

David Hill is one of our most popular writers of Australian history. His previous books, The Forgotten Children, 1788, The Gold Rush and The Great Race have all been bestsellers.
Ned Kelly Under the Microscope: Solving the Forensic Mystery of Ned Kelly's Remains

Ned Kelly Under the Microscope: Solving the Forensic Mystery of Ned Kelly's Remains

Craig Cormick

$39.95

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Do we really need another Ned Kelly book? After all, his story is a part of Australian folklore and his legend has been captured in movies, books and paintings. The answer is yes, as this book is unique. It is a rigorous look at the forensic science behind investigations into Ned Kelly.

In 2009 the remains of Ned Kelly were dug up at Pentridge Prison and identified after an exhaustive forensic analysis by the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine. Analysing a skeleton more than 130 years old involved processes such as DNA extraction, 3D facial reconstruction, and identifying the skeleton by its injuries. However in 2011 the Victorian government announced that while it had identified the remains of Ned Kelly, the skull long thought to be his, was not, and so another twist in the scientific tale began.

Along with an exploration of the forensic analysis, this book unpicks some of the Kelly myths: Was Ned Kelly illiterate? Did Ned Kelly have a daughter? It sheds light on more recent urban myths does such as having a Ned Kelly tattoo puts you at risk of dying violently?

The identification of the remains of Ned Kelly is a remarkable story and definitely one worth telling.
Sydney Beaches: A History

Sydney Beaches: A History

Caroline Ford

$39.99

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Shark attacks and sewage slicks, lifesavers and surfers, amusement parks and beach camps - the beach is Sydney's most iconic landscape feature. From Palm Beach in the north to Cronulla in the south, Sydney's coastline teems with life.

People from around the city escape to the beaches to swim, surf, play, and lie in the sun. Sydney Beaches tells the story of how Sydneysiders developed their love of the beach, from 19th-century picnickers to the surfing and sun-baking pioneers a century later. But Sydney's beaches have another lesser-known, intriguing history. Our world-famous beach culture only exists because the first beachgoers demanded important rights. This book is also the story of these battles for the beach.

Accompanied by vibrant images of Sydney's seashore, this expansive and delightful book is the story of how a city developed a relationship with its ocean coast, and how a nation created a culture.
The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia

The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia

Don Watson

$45.00

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Most Australians live in cities and cling to the coastal fringe, yet our sense of what an Australian is - or should be - is drawn from the vast and varied inland called the bush. But what do we mean by 'the bush', and how has it shaped us? 

Starting with his forebears' battle to drive back nature and eke a living from the land, Don Watson explores the bush as it was and as it now is: the triumphs and the ruination, the commonplace and the bizarre, the stories we like to tell about ourselves and the national character, and those we don't. Via mountain ash and mallee, the birds and the beasts, slaughter, fire, flood and drought, swagmen, sheep and their shepherds, the strange and the familiar, the tragedies and the follies, the crimes and the myths and the hope - here is a journey that only our leading writer of non-fiction could take us on.

At once magisterial in scope and alive with telling, wry detail, The Bush lets us see our landscape and its inhabitants afresh, examining what we have made, what we have destroyed, and what we have become in the process. No one who reads it will look at this country the same way again.

'The grand Australian bush - the nurse and tutor of eccentric minds, the home of the weird, and of much that is different from things in other lands.' - Henry Lawson
Kokoda Secret: Ian Hutchison: Australian Hero

Kokoda Secret: Ian Hutchison: Australian Hero

S P Ramage

$49.99  $45.00

In this important book, we learn the truth about the Battle of Eora Creek Ridge (the 'Lost Battlefield') and why the magnitude of the victory has been covered up until now. What is the secret of Eora Creek that still haunts the Kokoda Campaign and is of national and international significance?

We also learn of the influences and events which shaped Colonel Ian Hutchison, a revered soldier and one of the great figures in Australian military history, and prepared him for command in both the Second World War and the Korean War.

As Commanding Officer of the 2/3 Australian Infantry Battalion in the Battle of Eora Creek on the Kokoda Trail, Hutchison was thrust unexpectedly into command, yet inspired his men to a smashing victory which was the turning point in the Kokoda Campaign. He continued to lead in further victories at Oivi, Soputa and Sanananda.

Kokoda Secret examines Hutchison's career from the time he joined the Militia as a regimental cadet at the age of 16 in 1929, until his retirement in 1963, during which period his career mirrored the development of the 20th-century Australian Army. Using groundbreaking research, extensive private papers and detailed interviews, this unique biography provides a compelling portrait of Colonel Ian Hutchison and a definitive study of battalion command in war and peace. In particular, it is a must-read for anyone interested in the truth of the Kokoda Campaign of 1942.

It is also of immense significance in shedding new light on other key issues and campaigns, including the Syrian Campaign, the Aitape-Wewak Campaign, the War Crime Trials in New Guinea, and the static phase of the Korean War.

Over 30 years after Hutchison's death, this book sets the record straight and gives this great Australian the credit he deserves.

Kokoda Secret: Ian Hutchison Australian Hero by S P Ramage at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
The Spy Catchers: The Official History of ASIO, 1949-1963

The Spy Catchers: The Official History of ASIO, 1949-1963

David Horner

$59.99

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For the first time, ASIO has opened its archives to an independent historian. With unfettered access to the records, David Horner tells the real story of Australia's domestic intelligence organisation, from shaky beginnings to the expulsion of Ivan Skripov in 1963.

From the start, ASIO's mission was to catch spies. In the late 1940s, the top secret Venona program revealed details of a Soviet spy ring in Australia, supported by leading Australian communists. David Horner outlines the tactics ASIO used in counterespionage, from embassy bugging to surveillance of local suspects. His research sheds new light on the Petrov Affair, and details incidents and activities that have never been revealed before.

This authoritative and ground-breaking account overturns many myths about ASIO, and offers new insights into broader Australian politics and society in the fraught years of the Cold War.
Gallipoli Diaries: The Anzacs' Own Story, Day by Day

Gallipoli Diaries: The Anzacs' Own Story, Day by Day

Jonathan King

$35.00

Gallipoli, for the average Australian, is the most famous battle that our volunteer soldiers ever fought, because it was our first entry as a nation into the war, and our people were keen to prove themselves. It would be, however, a long time before the families back home, and the nation as a whole, heard of the terrible conditions on the peninsula and the waste of life that took place there. Although Gallipoli was a crushing defeat, it was, and still is, celebrated as a victory. In this updated commemorative edition, published 100 years after the 25 April 1915 landing, the Gallipoli story is told day by day, using the words of the diggers, drivers, soldiers, and war correspondents at the front-line. War historian Jonathan King has gathered together an unequalled series of extracts from letters and diaries, written by hundreds of Anzacs at Gallipoli, accounting for every one of the 240 days of the eight-month campaign - and even identifying the actual days of the week. Reading the men's own words, including misspellings and mistakes, we share in the soldiers' experiences. These Australians, of exceptional calibre and good cheer, each wrote for different reasons, although many made light of their hardships. It is all here - the fear, the frustration, and the boredom, as they scrounged for bully beef; went mad from the flies, the lice, and the stench of the unburied dead; swapped cigarettes with enemy Turks; dodged shrapnel while swimming at the beach; celebrated birthdays; sheltered from rain and shivered in snow; and waited for action while praying for deliverance. Although generals, historians, and war scholars have had their stories told many times, it is only now, when we read the private words of the men at the front-line, that we can glimpse what Gallipoli was really like.
Australia and the War in the Air: Volume I - The Centenary History of Australia and the Great War

Australia and the War in the Air: Volume I - The Centenary History of Australia and the Great War

Michael Molkentin

$59.95

The first book in a new series that explores Australia’s role in the Great War.

From the earliest days of the Great War, Australians volunteered to fight in the air – warfare’s newest arena, and one that would transform the nature of military operations. In the squadrons of the Australian Flying Corps and with Britain’s flying services, Australian airmen fought in campaigns that spanned the length and breadth of the First World War; between 1914-18 they served in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and on the Western Front. By 1919 over 4 000 Australians had served with the empire’s flying units. Modest compared to some of the other British dominions, Australia’s part had been the most apparent. Whereas the other dominions had opted to provide manpower to serve the general imperial cause in Britain’s flying services, the Commonwealth’s insistence on a distinctly national contribution ensured recognition for Australia’s contribution to the empire’s effort in the air.

This book examines Australia’s role in history’s first major air war. Unlike previous accounts, which focus on the airmen of the Australian Flying Corps in isolation, this study conceives the Australian part as one of an imperial – and international – whole. In addition to using Australian involvement as a case study to analyse the impact air power had on military operations, this study also addresses aspects of organisation, training, administration and command – as well as the imperial politics and strategic issues that contextualised dominion participation in the war.

Drawing on archival records in Australasia, Europe and North America, Australia and the War in the Air provides a fresh perspective on Australia’s involvement in the Great War and a revaluation of air power’s early influence on warfare.
First Victory, 1914: The HMAS Sydney's Hunt for the German Raider Emden

First Victory, 1914: The HMAS Sydney's Hunt for the German Raider Emden

Mike Carlton

$34.99

In the opening months of the First World War, Emden's trail of destruction was tremendous. This one small ship and her skilled and gallant captain wrought havoc on the maritime trade of the British Empire, capturing and sinking ships at will. Australia, sending wool, wheat and gold across the Indian Ocean to sustain the Mother Country and despatching tens of thousands of young men to join the fight, had a vital interest in bringing Emden to her end. The battle, when it came, was short and bloody, an emphatic First Victory at sea for the newborn Royal Australian Navy. It remains to this day a celebrated epic of naval warfare. In the century since, many writers have been there before Mike Carlton. Most were German, some of them survivors of the battle, others later historians, and they have generally told the story well. British accounts vary in quality, from good to nonsense, and there have been some patchwork American attempts as well. Curiously, there has been very little written from an Australian point of view. This book is - in part - an attempt to remedy that, with new facts and perspectives brought into the light of day.
Cities That Shaped the Ancient World

Cities That Shaped the Ancient World

John Julius Norwich ,  Margarete Van Ess

$49.99

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Great cities marked the earliest development of civilisation. From the worlds first true cities, in Mesopotamia, to the spectacular urban centres of the Maya in Central America, the places described here represent almost three millennia of human history, society and culture.

Arranged geographically into five sections, each with an introduction by John Julius Norwich, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon, Troy and Jerusalem. Africa gave rise to the conurbations of ancient Egypt such as Thebes and Amarna, and also the Ethiopian capital of Aksum. Glorious European metropolises, including Athens and Rome, ringed the Mediterranean, but also stretched to Trier on the turbulent frontier of the Roman empire. Asia had bustling commercial centres such as Mohenjo-daro and Xianyang, while in the Americas the Mesoamerican and Peruvian cultures stamped their presence on the landscape, creating impressive monuments, as at Caral and Teotihuacan.

A team of expert historians and archaeologists - with firsthand knowledge and deep appreciation of each site - gives voices to these silent ruins, bringing them to life as the bustling state-of-the-art metropolises they once were.
The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses and the Rise of The Tudors

The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses and the Rise of The Tudors

Dan Jones

$39.99

The fifteenth century experienced the longest and bloodiest series of civil wars in British history. The crown of England changed hands violently seven times as the great families of England fought to the death for power, majesty and the right to rule. Dan Jones completes his epic history of medieval England with a new book about the Wars of the Roses - and describes how the Plantagenets tore themselves apart and were finally replaced by the Tudors. With vivid descriptions of the battle of Towton, where 28,000 men died in a single morning, to Bosworth, where the last Plantagenet king was hacked down, this is the real story behind Shakespeare's famous history plays.
Augustus: From Revolutionary to Emperor

Augustus: From Revolutionary to Emperor

Adrian Goldsworthy

$49.99

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In the year 44 BC, when Julius Caesar was killed, Augustus was a mere teenager who had been adopted into Caesar's household. His reaction to Caesar's death was to step forward and proclaim himself Caesar's rightful successor. The Senate did not take him seriously, but over the following months he raised his own army and, after defeating Mark Antony in battle, became one of the three most powerful men in Rome. He was not yet 20 years old.

Over the next ten years he consolidated his power in Rome, and finally overthrew the last of his rivals in 31 BC. From that moment on Rome became an empire, and Augustus its first emperor. This is the story of how one man rose to become the most powerful man in the world, and stabilised an empire that had been racked by decades of civil war. Augustus's achievements, and his legacy, are almost unparalleled.

Like Julius Caesar, he presided over a huge expansion in wealth and territory. Like Caesar he was honoured by having a month of the year named after him. But unlike Caesar he was able to keep hold of power for over 40 years, and bequeath the empire, whole, to his successors.
Augustus: A Biography

Augustus: A Biography

Jochen Bleicken ,  Anthea Bell

$49.99

Born to a plebeian family in 63 BC, Octavian was a young solder training abroad when he heard news of Julius Caesar's brutal assassination - and discovered that he was the dictator's sole political heir. With the opportunism and instinct for propaganda that were to characterize his rule, Octavian rallied huge financial, military and political backing to eliminate his opponents, end the bloody turmoil that had so long wracked Rome and, finally, take autocratic control of a state devoted to republicanism. He became Augustus - Rome's first Emperor, and the founder of the greatest empire the world had ever seen. In this monumental biography, translated into English for the first time by Anthea Bell, Jochen Bleicken tells the story of a man who found himself a demi-god in his own lifetime and paints a portrait of one of the most dramatic periods of Roman history.
England, Arise: The People, the King and the Great Revolt of 1381

England, Arise: The People, the King and the Great Revolt of 1381

Juliet Barker

$35.00

The dramatic and shocking events of the Peasants' Revolt of 1381 are to be the backdrop to Juliet Barker's latest book: a snapshot of what everyday life was like for ordinary people living in the middle ages. The same highly successful techniques she deployed in Agincourt and Conquest will this time be brought to bear on civilian society, from the humblest serf forced to provide slave-labour for his master in the fields to the prosperous country goodwife brewing, cooking and spinning her distaff and the ambitious burgess expanding his business and his mental horizons in the town. The book will explore how and why such a diverse and unlikely group of ordinary men and women from every corner of England united in armed rebellion against church and state to demand a radical political agenda which, had it been implemented, would have fundamentally transformed English society and anticipated the French Revolution by four hundred years. The book will not only provide an important reassessment of the revolt itself but will also be an illuminating and original study of English medieval life at the time.
Civil War: The History of England, Volume III

Civil War: The History of England, Volume III

Peter Ackroyd

$34.99

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In Civil War, Peter Ackroyd continues his dazzling account of England's history, beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king, James VI, who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England, and ends with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson, James II. The Stuart dynasty brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day.

More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king.  Ackroyd paints a vivid portrait of James I and his heirs. Shrewd and opinionated, the new King was eloquent on matters as diverse as theology, witchcraft and the abuses of tobacco, but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country in the reign of his hapless heir, Charles I.

Ackroyd offers a brilliant - warts and all - portrayal of Charles's nemesis Oliver Cromwell, Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator, who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as 'that man of blood', the king he executed.

England's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us, but so too is the cultural and social life of the period, notable for its extraordinarily rich literature, including Shakespeare's late masterpieces, Jacobean tragedy, the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes' great philosophical treatise, Leviathan. Civil War also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women, lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertainty.
Agincourt: My Family, the Battle, and the Fight for France

Agincourt: My Family, the Battle, and the Fight for France

Sir Ranulph Fiennes

$32.99

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On 25th October 1415, on a French hillside near the village of Agincourt, four men sheltered from the rain and prepared for battle. All four were English  knights, ancestors of Sir Ranulph Fiennes, and part of the army of England's King Henry V. Across the valley, four sons of the French arm of the Fiennes family were confident that the Dauphin's army would win the day...

600 years after the Battle of Agincourt, Sir Ranulph Fiennes casts new light on this epic event that has resonated throughout British and French history. He explains how his own ancestors were key players through the centuries of turbulent Anglo-French history  that led up to  Agincourt, and he uses his experience as expedition leader and soldier to give us a fresh perspective on one of the bloodiest periods of medieval history.

With fascinating detail on the battle plans, weaponry and human drama of Agincourt, this is a gripping evocation of a historical event integral to English identity.
Elizabeth: Renaissance Prince

Elizabeth: Renaissance Prince

Lisa Hilton

$29.99

Lisa Hilton's majestic biography of The Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I, provides vibrant new insights into the monarch's compelling, enthralling life story. It is a book that challenges readers to reassess Elizabeth's reign and the colourful drama, scandal and intrigue to which it is always linked. Using new research from sources in France and Italy, Hilton presents a fresh interpretation of Elizabeth as a queen who saw herself primarily as a Renaissance prince. She delivers a new perspective on the most intimate details of her life and her attempts to fashion England into a Renaissance state. Elizabeth was not an exceptional woman, but an exceptional ruler, and Hilton redraws English history with this animated portrait of an astounding life. Her biography maps the dramatic journey that Elizabeth took from being a timid, meek newly-crowned queen to one of the most powerful and vivid monarchs ever to rule England.
Gin Glorious Gin: How Mother's Ruin Became the Spirit of London

Gin Glorious Gin: How Mother's Ruin Became the Spirit of London

Olivia Williams

$35.00

Gin Glorious Gin is a vibrant cultural history of London seen through the prism of its most iconic drink. Leading the reader through the underbelly of the Georgian city via the Gin Craze, detouring through the Empire (with a G&T in hand), to the emergence of cocktail bars in the West End, the story is brought right up to date with the resurgence of class in a glass - the Ginnaissance. As gin has crossed paths with Londoners of all classes and professions over the past three hundred years it has become shorthand for metropolitan glamour and alcoholic squalor in equal measure. In and out of both legality and popularity, gin is a drink that has seen it all. Gin Glorious Gin is quirky, informative, full of famous faces - from Dickens to Churchill, Hogarth to Dr Johnson - and introduces many previously unknown Londoners, hidden from history, who have shaped the city and its signature drink.
Victoria: A Life

Victoria: A Life

A. N. Wilson

$49.99

hen Queen Victoria died in 1901, she had ruled for nearly sixty-four years. She was mother of nine and grandmother of forty-two, and the matriarch of Royal Europe, through the marriages of her children. To many, Queen Victoria is a ruler shrouded in myth and mystique - an aging, stiff widow, paraded as the figurehead to an all-male imperial enterprise. But in truth, Britain's longest reigning monarch was one of the most passionate, expressive, humorous and unconventional women who ever lived, and the story of her life continues to fascinate. A. N. Wilson's exhaustively researched and definitive biography includes a wealth of new material from previously unseen sources, to show us Queen Victoria as she's never been seen before. It explores the curious set of circumstances that led to Victoria's coronation, her strange and isolated childhood, her passionate marriage, Prince Albert's pivotal influence, her widowhood and subsequent intimate friendship with John Brown, set against the backdrop of this momentous epoch in Britain - and Europe's - history. Victoria is a towering achievement; a masterpiece of biography by a writer at the height of his powers.
Fatal Rivalry: Flodden 1513 - Henry VIII, James IV and the Battle for Renaissance Britain

Fatal Rivalry: Flodden 1513 - Henry VIII, James IV and the Battle for Renaissance Britain

George Goodwin

$22.99

The first in-depth examination of the Battle of Flodden, the biggest and bloodiest in British history. This book captures the importance of the key players in the story - the kings and their respective queens, their nobles, diplomats and generals - as the rivalry brought the two countries inexorably to war. Fatefully, it would be an error by James, that most charismatic of commanders, and in the thick of engagement, that would make him the last British king to fall in battle, would condemn the bulk of his nobility to a similarly violent death and settle his country's fate.
English History: Strange But True

English History: Strange But True

Richard Smyth

$17.99

Did you know that Mary Queen of Scots was a mighty 5ft 11in tall? Her cousin Elizabeth I, by contrast, was a miniscule 5ft 4in. Even with the heaviest bows, an English archer could fire six arrows a minute - or up to 54,000 arrows a minute at Agincourt. Charles I was once dug up by George III's doctor; the medical man kept a piece of Charles's spine and beard as a souvenir. This book contains hundreds of 'strange but true' facts and anecdotes about English history. Arranged into a miniature history of England, and with bizarre and hilarious true tales for every era, it will interest, surprise and delight readers everywhere.
Thomas Cromwell: The Untold Story of Henry VIII's Most Faithful Servant

Thomas Cromwell: The Untold Story of Henry VIII's Most Faithful Servant

Tracy Borman

$32.99

Thomas Cromwell is known to millions as the leading character in Hilary Mantel's bestselling Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. But who was the real Cromwell? Born a lowly tavern keeper's son, Cromwell rose swiftly through the ranks to become Henry VIII's right hand man, and one of the most powerful figures in Tudor history. The architect of England's break with the Roman Catholic Church and the dissolution of the monasteries, he oversaw seismic changes in our country's history. Influential in securing Henry's controversial divorce from Catherine of Aragon, many believe he was also the ruthless force behind Anne Boleyn's downfall and subsequent execution. But although for years he has been reviled as a Machiavellian schemer who stopped at nothing in his quest for power, Thomas Cromwell was also a loving husband, father and guardian, a witty and generous host, and a loyal and devoted servant. With new insights into Cromwell's character, his family life and his close relationships with both Cardinal Wolsey and Henry VIII, joint Chief Curator of Historic Royal Palaces Tracy Borman examines the life, loves and legacy of the man who changed the shape of England forever.
Berlin Now: The Rise of the City and the Fall of the Wall

Berlin Now: The Rise of the City and the Fall of the Wall

Peter Schneider

$29.99

In Berlin Now, and on the 25th Anniversary of the fall of the Wall, a legendary Berliner tells the inside story of the city. Over the last five decades, no other city has changed more than Berlin. Divided in 1961, reunited in 1989, it has morphed over the last twenty-five years into Europe's most vibrant melting-pot of artists, immigrants and entrepreneurs. Pieces of the wall are collected around the world. Blending memoir, history, anecdote and reportage, this legendary Berliner takes us behind the scenes - from wrenching stories of life under the Stasi, to the difference between East and West Berliners' sex-lives, to a present-day investigation of its arts scene, night-life, tumultuous politics and hidden quirks - revealing what makes Berlin the uniquely fascinating place it is.
Post-War Lies: Germany and Hitler's Long Shadow

Post-War Lies: Germany and Hitler's Long Shadow

Malte Herwig

$32.99

Post-War Lies is a superb portrait of a torn generation: the Nazi party's youngest members, those born between 1919 and 1927, who were raised on an ideological diet of racism and militarism. A number of them - from Pope Benedict XVI to writer Martin Walser - were later to become leading public figures in federal Germany. In this meticulously researched book, Malte Herwig reveals how Germany handled these former party members. For nearly half a century, it was an early case of 'Don't ask, don't tell.' While the US government held captured Nazi records - such as the party's central membership file - the German government used every available means to delay the return of the file until 1994. Herwig also found a list of high-ranking German politicians whose Nazi membership files had been secreted between the 1960s and late 1980s. Many of this generation kept quiet about their connection to the Nazi party, or denied it, or pushed it to the back of their minds and forgot all about it. Post-War Lies tells their hitherto unknown story, from the Third Reich to the post-war de-Nazification process and into the present. It is also a young historian's contribution to an important contemporary debate about historical truth and human honesty.
Gondola

Gondola

Donna Leon

$39.99

Of all the trademarks of Venice - and there are many, from the gilded Basilica of San Marco to the melancholy Bridge of Sighs - none is more ubiquitous than the gondola. In Gondola, the internationally acclaimed 'American with the Venetian heart', Donna Leon, tells its fascinating story. First used in medieval Venice as a deftly manoeuverable getaway boat, the gondola evolved over the centuries into a floating pleasure palace, bedecked in silk, that facilitated the romantic escapades of the Venetian elite. Today, the gondola wears black - a gleaming, elegant hue, and is manned by robust gondolieri in black-and-white-striped shirts and straw hats. A tourist favourite, the gondola has never ceased to be a part of authentic Venice. Each boat's 280 pieces are carefully fashioned in a maestro's workshop - though Leon also recounts a tale of an American friend who attempted to make a gondola all on his own. The feat took five years and countless do-overs. But the gondola is a work of art well worth the labour. And once its arched prow pushes off from the dock, the single Venetian at its oar just might break out in a barcarole, a popular Italian boat song. The best of these songs, as timeless as the allure of the gondola itself, are compiled into an accompanying CD.
A History of New York in 101 Objects

A History of New York in 101 Objects

Sam Roberts

$39.99

Inspired by A History of the World in 100 Objects, The New York Times' Sam Roberts chose fifty objects that embody the narrative of New York for a feature article in the paper. Many more suggestions came from readers, and so Roberts has expanded the list to 101. Here are just a few of what this keepsake volume offers: The Flushing Remonstrance, a 1657 petition for religious freedom that was a precursor to the First Amendment to the Constitution; Beads from the African Burial Ground, 1700s. Slavery was legal in New York until 1827, although many free blacks lived in the city. The African Burial Ground closed in 1792 and was only recently rediscovered; The bagel, early 1900s. The quintessential and undisputed New York food (excepting perhaps the pizza); The Automat vending machine, 1912. Put a nickel in the slot and get a cup of coffee or a piece of pie. It was the early twentieth century version of fast food; The I Love NY logo designed by Milton Glaser in 1977 for a campaign to increase tourism. Along with Saul Steinberg's famous New Yorker cover depicting a New Yorker's view of the world, it was perhaps the most famous and most frequently reproduced graphic symbol of the time. Unique, sometimes whimsical, always important, A History of New York in 101 Objects is a beautiful chronicle of the remarkable history of the Big Apple that will enrich your mind and rekindle memories.
JFK's Last Hundred Days: An Intimate Portrait of a Great President

JFK's Last Hundred Days: An Intimate Portrait of a Great President

Thurston Clarke

$22.99

Thurston Clarke's gripping account of the last months of the life of President John F. Kennedy weaves together his public and private life and addresses the most tantalizing mystery of all - not who killed him but who he was when he was killed, and where he would have led his country and the world. This re-examination of a critical period looks at all the areas of the president's fascinating life: the progress he made towards ending the Cold War, passing the Civil Rights Act and withdrawing US troops from Vietnam, as well as his grief at the death of his infant son Patrick, his ongoing battle with ill health and his renewed determination to be a good husband and father. The resulting portrait reveals the essence of this charismatic man, his personal transformation and the emergence of a great president. It also explains the widespread and enduring grief following his assassination, mourning the loss of his remarkable promise, which had become increasingly evident during his last hundred days.
1946: The Making of the Modern World

1946: The Making of the Modern World

Victor Sebestyen

$39.99

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With the end of the Second World War, a new world was born. The peace agreements that brought the conflict to an end implemented decisions that not only shaped the second half of the twentieth century, but continue to affect our world today and impact on its future.

In 1946 the Cold War began, the state of Israel was conceived, the independence of India was all but confirmed and Chinese Communists gained a decisive upper hand in their fight for power. It was a pivotal year in modern history in which countries were reborn and created, national and ideological boundaries were redrawn and people across the globe began to rebuild their lives.  In this remarkable history, the foreign correspondent and historian Victor Sebestyen draws on contemporary documents from around the world - including Stalin's personal notes from the Potsdam peace conference - to examine what lay behind the political decision-making.

Sebestyen uses a vast array of archival material and personal testimonies to explore how the lives of generations of people across continents were shaped by the events of 1946. Taking readers from Berlin to London, from Paris to Moscow, from Washington to Jerusalem and from Delhi to Shanghai, this is a vivid and wide-ranging account of both powerbrokers and ordinary men and women from an acclaimed author.
Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary at War, 1914-1918

Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary at War, 1914-1918

Alexander Watson

$59.99

For the empires of Germany and Austria-Hungary the Great War - which had begun with such high hopes for a fast, dramatic outcome - rapidly degenerated as invasions of both France and Serbia ended in catastrophe. For four years the fighting now turned into a siege on a quite monstrous scale. Europe became the focus of fighting of a kind previously unimagined. Despite local successes - and an apparent triumph in Russia - Germany and Austria-Hungary were never able to break out of the the Allies' ring of steel. In Alexander Watson's compelling new history of the Great War, all the major events of the war are seen from the perspective of Berlin and Vienna. It is fundamentally a history of ordinary people. In 1914 both empires were flooded by genuine mass enthusiasm and their troubled elites were at one with most of the population. But the course of the war put this under impossible strain, with a fatal rupture between an ever more extreme and unrealistic leadership and an exhausted and embittered people. In the end they failed and were overwhelmed by defeat and revolution.
The Fateful Year: England 1914

The Fateful Year: England 1914

Mark Bostridge

$22.99

The Fateful Year by Mark Bostridge is the story of England in 1914. War with Germany, so often imagined and predicted, finally broke out when people were least prepared for it. Here, among a crowded cast of unforgettable characters, are suffragettes, armed with axes, destroying works of art, schoolchildren going on strike in support of their teachers, and celebrity aviators thrilling spectators by looping the loop. A theatrical diva prepares to shock her audience, while an English poet in the making sets out on a midsummer railway journey that will result in the creation of a poem that remains loved and widely known to this day. With the coming of war, England is beset by rumour and foreboding. There is hysteria about German spies, fears of invasion, while patriotic women hand out white feathers to men who have failed to rush to their country's defence. In the book's final pages, a bomb falls from the air onto British soil for the first time, and people live in expectation of air raids. As 1914 fades out, England is preparing itself for the prospect of a war of long duration.
The Second World War

The Second World War

Antony Beevor

$24.99

The Second World War began in August 1939 on the edge of Manchuria and ended there exactly six years later with the Soviet invasion of northern China. The war in Europe appeared completely divorced from the war in the Pacific and China, and yet events on opposite sides of the world had profound effects. Using the most up-to-date scholarship and research, Beevor assembles the whole picture in a gripping narrative that extends from the North Atlantic to the South Pacific and from the snowbound steppe to the North African Desert. Although filling the broadest canvas on a heroic scale, Beevor's THE SECOND WORLD WAR never loses sight of the fate of the ordinary soldiers and civilians whose lives were crushed by the titanic forces unleashed in this, the most terrible war in history.
The Rich: From Slaves to Super Yachts - A 2,000 Year History

The Rich: From Slaves to Super Yachts - A 2,000 Year History

John Kampfner

$32.99

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From the Orwell Prize shortlisted author of Freedom for Sale, The Rich is the fascinating history of how economic elites from ancient Egypt to the present day have gained and spent their money.

Starting with Ancient Egypt and Greece and culminating with the oligarchies of modern Russia and China, it compares and contrasts the rich and powerful down the ages and around the world. What unites them? Have the same instincts of entrepreneurship, ambition, vanity, greed and philanthropy applied throughout?

As contemporary politicians, economists and the public wrestle with the inequities of our time - the parallel world inhabited by the ultra-wealthy at a time of broader hardship - it is salutary to look to history for explanations. This book synthesises thousands of years of human behaviour and asks the question: is the development of the globalised super-rich over the past twenty years anything new?
How the World Was Won: The Americanization of Everywhere

How the World Was Won: The Americanization of Everywhere

Peter Conrad

$39.99

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In this dazzling new book, cultural critic and historian Peter Conrad tells the story of the spectacular rise and subsequent waning of American influence across the world since 1945.

Politics, war and commerce form the inevitable backdrop to his tale, but Conrad also treats us to a kaleidoscopic presentation of Americas unstoppable creativity: its output of great, good and enjoyably bad art, of jeans and jazz, fast food and fridges, space travel, comic books and motorbikes, technologies and therapies, along with the heroic, erotic or violent cinematic visions that have Americanized even our dreams.
A History of the Modern Australian University

A History of the Modern Australian University

Hannah Forsyth

$34.99

A perceptive, clear-eyed account of Australian universities, recounting their history from the 1850s to the present. Investigating the changing nature of higher education, this book asks whether this success is likely to continue in the 21st century, as the university's hold over knowledge grows ever more tenuous.
Broken Nation: Australians in the Great War

Broken Nation: Australians in the Great War

Joan Beaumont

$35.00

The Great War is, for many Australians, the event that defined our nation. The larrikin diggers, trench warfare, and the landing at Gallipoli have become the stuff of the Anzac 'legend'. But it was also a war fought by the families at home. Their resilience in the face of hardship, their stoic acceptance of enormous casualty lists and their belief that their cause was just, made the war effort possible. Broken Nation is the first book to bring together all the dimensions of World War I. Combining deep scholarship with powerful storytelling, Joan Beaumont brings the war years to life: from the well-known battles at Gallipoli, Pozieres, Fromelles and Villers-Bretonneux, to the lesser known battles in Europe and the Middle East; from the ferocious debates over conscription to the disillusioning Paris peace conference and the devastating 'Spanish' flu the soldiers brought home. We witness the fear and courage of tens of thousands of soldiers, grapple with the strategic nightmares confronting the commanders, and come to understand the impact on Australians, at home and at the front, of death on an unprecedented scale.
Remembrance: 100 Years, 100 Memorials, 100 Australian Stori Es

Remembrance: 100 Years, 100 Memorials, 100 Australian Stori Es

Geoff Hocking

$49.95

This is a rich mosaic of a book about the persistence of memory. In a distinctively original and captivating way, this unique book shows how the terrible sacrifice of young Australians has reverberated across this country through time, and how the memories still resonate in so many different ways.Selected for their unique design, their grandeur or their simplicity, the one hundred memorials have been arranged alphabetically and represent the diversity of memorials to the Anzac spirit from each state and territory across the nation. This beautiful hardback book celebrates 100 years since the outbreak of World War One by featuring 100 memorials from across AustraliaFeatures photographs, both old and new, as well as ephemera, and 100 storiesIntroduction by Derek GuilleThe images in this book have been created by a community of photographers spread across all Australian states and territories who share a passion to document our culture and our values.
Rescue at 2100 Hours: The Untold Story of the Most Daring Escape of the Pacific War

Rescue at 2100 Hours: The Untold Story of the Most Daring Escape of the Pacific War

Tom Trumble

$22.99

February 1942. The Japanese invasion of Timor has begun and attempts to evacuate a group of 29 Australian airmen, charged with keeping an airfield operational until the last moment, are thwarted. Under the leadership of Bryan Rofe, a 24-year-old meteorological officer, the airmen make for remote jungle along the northwest coast. All attempts to rescue the group fail. Malaria-ravaged and starving, these men are taken to the limits of their endurance for 58 days. When a 300-strong Japanese patrol is sent to hunt them down all hope seems lost, until they receive a strange signal from sea - an American submarine has been dispatched to their position. With the Japanese closing in, only courage will keep them alive. Using diaries of the airmen and wartime records, Rofe's grandson Tom Trumble brings to life one of the greatest stories of survival and escape of the Second World War. From the young man who stepped up to bring his men home and the Japanese soldier sent to hunt down the Australians, to the American submarine captain and the Timorese fisherman who saved them, this is an insight into the extraordinary things that happen to ordinary men in war.
Retro Melbourne

Retro Melbourne

Fred Mitchell

$45.00

Retro Melbourne is a pictorial feast of rare images of the city, suburbs and country centres taken by photographer Fred Mitchell in the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s. Melbourne street scenes, people heading off to work, trams and traffic and businesses and buildings now long gone are displayed in beautiful colour shots alongside iconic images of country Victoria, suburban roads and advertisements of the era.

Complemented by a brief history of the southern city, including the growth of Melbourne and surrounding suburbs in the postwar era, Retro Melbourne provides a rare snapshot into the past life of a beautiful city.
Well May We Say...: The Speeches That Made Australia

Well May We Say...: The Speeches That Made Australia

Sally Warhaft

$34.99

Memorable speeches define a people and a place: they define a nation. It is impossible to imagine Australia's past without Peter Lalor's rallying cry at the Eureka Stockade or Ned Kelly's last words from the dock. Or to imagine recent decades without Pauline Hanson's controversial maiden speech in parliament or Gough Whitlam's famous words after the Dismissal, which give this endlessly engrossing collection its title. Since its publication in 2004, Well May We Say has become both an indispensable reference and a treasure trove for readers seeking inspiration. This second edition features a new introduction and the addition of defining speeches from the past ten years, among them the Apology to Australia's Indigenous Peoples and Julia Gillard's misogyny speech. It is a must for every Australian bookshelf.
A-Z of Convicts in Van Diemen's Land

A-Z of Convicts in Van Diemen's Land

Simon Barnard

$45.00

Seventy-three thousand convicts were transported to the British penal colony of Van Diemen's Land in the first half of the nineteenth century. They played a vital role in the building of the settlements, as well as the running of the newly established colony. Simon Barnard's A - Z of Convicts in Van Diemen's Land is a rich and compelling account of the lives of the men, women and children who were transported to Tasmania for crimes ranging from stealing bread to poisoning family members. Their sentences, punishments, achievements and suffering make for fascinating reading. And the spectacular illustrations, each one carefully drawn in meticulous detail from contemporary records, bring this extraordinary history to life.
ANZAC Sons

ANZAC Sons

Allison Paterson

$34.99

...Well dear Jim it breaks my heart to write thisletter. Our dear [brother] was killed yesterdaymorning at 5.30. The bullet killed him instantlyand he never spoke a word. I had just left himand gone down the trench to see the other ladswhen I was called back. Oh Jim it is awful...OhI do hope he is the last...It is April 27, 1918, Jims ...
The Long Paddock

The Long Paddock

Andrew Chapman ,  Tim Lee

$39.95

Drovers lead lives governed by the pace of their herds, the rhythm of the seasons and by the travelling stock routes on which they move. These pathways are known to most Australians as The Long Paddock.Acclaimed documentary photographer Andrew Chapman and award-winning journalist and author Tim Lee have followed in the pathways of the drovers across the vast plains of southern Australia. They have captured in stunning imagery and evocative writing the richness and beauty of a timeless tradition.
Australian Illustrated History Collection

Australian Illustrated History Collection

A.K. MacDougall

$49.95

Before Les Carlyon and Peter FitzSimons there was AK Macdougall - and now his two magnificent histories are together in one beautiful slipcase. Both richly illustrated, with photographs from the nation's archives, The Illustrated History of Australia and Australians at War tell the full remarkable story of Australia at home and at war. 'In a word: Humbling.' Herald Sun.Two classic histories in one beautiful slipcase - a great value gift for history loversTogether they feature more than one thousand pages of text and pictures.
The Cambridge Economic History of Australia

The Cambridge Economic History of Australia

Simon Ville ,  Glenn Withers

$190.00

Australia's economic history is the story of the transformation of an indigenous economy and a small convict settlement into a nation of nearly 23 million people with advanced economic, social and political structures. It is a history of vast lands with rich, exploitable resources, of adversity in war, and of prosperity and nation building. It is also a history of human behaviour and the institutions created to harness and govern human endeavour. This account provides a systematic and comprehensive treatment of the nation's economic foundations, growth, resilience and future, in an engaging, contemporary narrative. It examines key themes such as the centrality of land and its usage, the role of migrant human capital, the tension between development and the environment, and Australia's interaction with the international economy. Written by a team of eminent economic historians, The Cambridge Economic History of Australia is the definitive study of Australia's economic past and present.
Railways of Tasmania's Wild West

Railways of Tasmania's Wild West

Nick Anchen

$59.95

Tasmania's wild West Coast contained some of the most fascinating railways and tramways ever constructed in Australia. Built to tap the fabulous mineral wealth of mines such as Mount Bischoff and Mount Lyell, the remarkable engineering feats of these iron roads in the wilderness became the stuff of legend. Through the intriguing memories of locomotive enginemen, track gangers, 'railway children' and adventurous travellers - complimented by a wonderful collection of photographic images - Railways of Tasmania's Wild West tells the story of life in one of Australia's most enchanting regions.
The Archaeological Excavation Dictionary

The Archaeological Excavation Dictionary

Anna Kieburg

$39.99

This dictionary translates over 2,000 words and terms associated with archaeological excavations into eight languages - English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Turkish and Arabic - making it an essential tool for anyone digging abroad. It contains all necessary terms for the archaeological excavation and survey of sites of any period.
The Art of War

The Art of War

Sun Tzu ,  Jonathan Clements

$18.99

This is a new translation of The Art of War for the 21st century. As well as its historical importance it is one of the most influential political and business books of our era. This edition rediscovers the essential clarity of the ancient masterpiece, cited by generals from a dozen Chinese dynasties, international business leaders, and modern military field manuals. This edition also contains a full commentary on Sun Tzu, the man and his ideas, contemporary of Confucius and Buddha; and a critical guide to further reading. This is the perfect introduction to one of the world's best-known classics.
The Vikings and Their Enemies: Warfare in Northern Europe, 750-1100

The Vikings and Their Enemies: Warfare in Northern Europe, 750-1100

Philip Line

$75.00

The Vikings had an extraordinary historical impact. From the eighth to the eleventh centuries, they ranged across Europe - raiding, exploring, colonizing - and their presence was felt as far away as Russia and Byzantium. They are most famous as warriors, yet perhaps their talent for warfare is too little understood. Philip Line, in this scholarly and highly readable survey of the Viking age, uses documentary sources - the chronicles, sagas and poetry - and the latest archaeological evidence to describe how the Vikings and their enemies in northern Europe organized for war. His graphic survey includes Scandinavia, the British Isles, the Carolingian Empire and its successor kingdoms and the lands of the eastern Baltic. He gives an up-to-date interpretation of Viking approach to violence and their fighting methods that will be fascinating reading for anyone who is keen to understand how they operated and achieved so much in medieval Europe.
The Viking Age: A Reader

The Viking Age: A Reader

Angus A. Somerville ,  R. Andrew McDonald

$69.00

In assembling, translating, and arranging over a hundred primary source readings, Somerville and McDonald successfully illuminate the Vikings and their world for twenty-first-century students and instructors. The diversity of the Viking Age is brought to life through the range of sources presented, and the geographical and chronological coverage of these readings. The Norse translations, many of them new to this collection, are straightforward and easily accessible, and the chapter introductions contextualize the readings while allowing the sources to speak for themselves. The second edition of this popular reader has been revised and reorganized into fourteen chapters. Nearly twenty sources have been added, including material on children, games and entertainment, and runic inscriptions, as well as new readings on the martyrdom of Alfeah, the life of Saint Findan, and the martyrdom of Saint Edmund. The reader can be paired for classroom use with its companion volume, The Vikings and Their Age, authored by Somerville and McDonald. Together, these books provide comprehensive coverage for a course on the Vikings. Additional resources, such as a detailed bibliography and instructions on reading skaldic poetry, can be found on the History Matters website (www.utphistorymatters.com).
Jewels of Ancient Nubia

Jewels of Ancient Nubia

Yvonne J. Markowitz ,  Denise M. Doxey

$60.00

Located at the intersection of trade routes from central Africa, the ancient Near East, and the Classical world, ancient Nubia ruled the entire Nile Valley at the height of its power in the eighth century bc. Its neighbour and frequent rival Egypt called it the gold lands because its territories held such an abundance of the precious metal, and because its inhabitants produced some of the most finely crafted jewelry of the ancient world. This book features over 100 adornments and personal accessories from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, which houses the finest collection of Nubian jewelry outside Khartoum. The first comprehensive introduction to the sophisticated jewels of this great empire, it reveals how Nubian artisans employed techniques that would not be reinvented in Europe for another thousand years, and how the original owners valued such possessions not only for their inherent beauty, but also because they were imbued with magical meanings. Exquisite photography and an authoritative history written by leading experts make this book essential for both jewelry aficionados and anyone interested in the great cultures of the ancient world.
The Mummy's Curse: The True History of a Dark Fantasy

The Mummy's Curse: The True History of a Dark Fantasy

Roger Luckhurst

$30.95

In the winter of 1922-23 archaeologist Howard Carter and his wealthy patron George Herbert, the Fifth Earl of Carnarvon, sensationally opened the tomb of Tutenkhamen. Six weeks later Herbert, the sponsor of the expedition, died in Egypt. The popular press went wild with rumours of a curse on those who disturbed the Pharaoh's rest and for years followed every twist and turn of the fate of the men who had been involved in the historic discovery. Long dismissed by Egyptologists, the mummy's curse remains a part of popular supernatural belief. Roger Luckhurst explores why the myth has captured the British imagination across the centuries, and how it has impacted on popular culture. Tutankhamen was not the first curse story to emerge in British popular culture. This book uncovers the 'true' stories of two extraordinary Victorian gentlemen widely believed at the time to have been cursed by the artefacts they brought home from Egypt in the nineteenth century. These are weird and wonderful stories that weave together a cast of famous writers, painters, feted soldiers, lowly smugglers, respected men of science, disreputable society dames, and spooky spiritualists. Focusing on tales of the curse myth, Roger Luckhurst leads us through Victorian museums, international exhibitions, private collections, the battlefields of Egypt and Sudan, and the writings of figures like Arthur Conan Doyle, Rider Haggard and Algernon Blackwood. Written in an open and accessible style, this volume is the product of over ten years research in London's most curious archives. It explores how we became fascinated with Egypt and how this fascination was fuelled by myth, mystery, and rumour. Moreover, it provides a new and startling path through the cultural history of Victorian England and its colonial possessions.
Berenice II and the Golden Age of Ptolemaic Egypt

Berenice II and the Golden Age of Ptolemaic Egypt

Dee L. Clayman

$33.95

Berenice II (c. 264-221 BCE), daughter of King Magas of Cyrene and wife of Ptolemy III Euergetes, came to embody all the key religious, political, and artistic ideals of Ptolemaic Alexandria. Though she arrived there nearly friendless, with the taint of murder around her, she became one of the most accomplished and powerful of the Macedonian queens descended from the successors of Alexander the Great. She was at the center of a group of important poets and intellectuals associated with the Museum and Library, not the least of which was Callimachus, the most important poet of the age. These men wrote poems not just for her, but about her, and their eloquent voices projected her charisma widely across the Greek-speaking world. Though the range of Berenice's interests was impressive and the quantity and quality of the poetry she inspired unparalleled, today she is all but known. Assimilating the scant and scattered evidence of her life, Dee L. Clayman presents a woman who was more powerful and fascinating than we had previously imagined. Berenice II and the Golden Age of Ptolemaic Egypt offers a portrait of a woman who had access to the cultural riches of both Greece and Egypt and who navigated her way carefully through the opportunities and dangers they presented, ultimately using them to accrue unprecedented honors that were all but equal to those of the king.
The Agincourt War: A Military History of the Hundred Years War from 1369 to 1453

The Agincourt War: A Military History of the Hundred Years War from 1369 to 1453

Alfred H. Burne

$44.99

Henry V's stunning victory at Agincourt was a pivotal battle of the Hundred Years War, reviving England's military fortunes and changing forever the course of European warfare. In this exciting and readable account Colonel Burne recreates the years leading up to Agincourt and its bitter aftermath. He also puts the battle in the perspective of the other important, yet less well known, engagements of the war such as the battles of Verneuil and Fresnay. As with the battles, so with its commanders: Henry V is known to all, but Colonel Burne gives rightful honour to Talbot, Salisbury, Bedford, Chandos and many others. On the French side he details the parts played by Bertrand du Gueschlin and of course Joan of Arc. Colonel Burne's outstanding reconstruction of the war is written for layman and historian alike and conveys the drama that Agincourt and its heroes have always so vividly evoked. This new edition of a classic text includes a new introduction by Anne Curry, the world's leading authority on the battle of Agincourt.
The Black Prince

The Black Prince

David R. Cook

$16.99

This book tells the story of the life and times of the Black Prince, one of the greatest warriors of the Middle Ages and an exemplar of English chivalry. A legendary figure in English history, the Black Prince, the eldest son of King Edward III, achieved his greatest triumph at the Battle of Poitiers during the Hundred Years War between England and France. From his childhood the prince had a special devotion to Canterbury Cathedral, to which he gave generously throughout his lifetime. He is buried at the heart of the cathedral in one of its most magnificent tombs - adorned with an effigy, a painted canopy and the prince's own arms and armour.
The Last Ironsides: The English Expedition to Portugal, 1662-1668

The Last Ironsides: The English Expedition to Portugal, 1662-1668

Jonathon Riley

$55.00

When Charles II returned home he began the search for a dynastic marriage. He fixed upon the Infanta of Portugal, Catherine of Braganza, whose dowry included the possession of Tangier, Bombay and valuable trade concessions. The Portuguese had been fighting for their independence from Spain for twenty years and needed alliances to tip the scales in their favour.

In return for the concessions Charles agreed to send to Portugal a regiment of horse and two of foot, which provided an excuse to ship away the remnants of the Cromwellian armies that had not been disbanded at the Restoration. The prospect of service was at first well received - Major-General Morgan drew forth his regiment of foot consisting of 1000 proper men besides officers, and made a short speech, acquainting them that his Majesty had been graciously pleased to design them for honourable service abroad. There were also officers and men who had remained loyal to the crown to them Charles owed a debt of employment, Former Royalists therefore made up the balance of the regiment of horse - uncomfortable bedfellows for their former enemies.

The author's detailed but lively text is fully supported by a range of illustrations and specially-commissioned maps.
Richard III and the Princes in the Tower

Richard III and the Princes in the Tower

Alison Weir

$19.99

This includes a new foreword by the author. The story of the death, in sinister circumstances, of the boy-king Edward V and his younger brother Richard, Duke of York, is one of the most fascinating murder mysteries in English history. It is a tale with profound moral and social consequences, rich in drama, intrigue, treason, scandal and violence. In this gripping book Alison Weir re-examines all the evidence - including that against the Princes' uncle, Richard III, whose body was recently discovered beneath a Leicester car park. She brilliantly reconstructs the whole chain of events leading to their murder and reveals how, why and by whose order they died. It previously published as The Princes in the Tower.
Joan of Arc: A Life Transfigured

Joan of Arc: A Life Transfigured

Kathryn Harrison

$44.95

The profoundly inspiring and fully documented saga of Joan of Arc, the young peasant girl whose voices moved her to rally the French nation and a reluctant king against British invaders in 1428, has fascinated artistic figures as diverse as William Shakespeare, Mark Twain, Voltaire, George Bernard Shaw, Bertolt Brecht, Carl Dreyer, and Robert Bresson. Was she a divinely inspired saint? A schizophrenic? A demonically possessed heretic, as her persecutors and captors tried to prove? Every era must retell and reimagine the Maid of Orleans's extraordinary story in its own way, and in Joan of Arc: A Life Transfigured, the superb novelist and memoirist Kathryn Harrison gives us a Joan for our time--a shining exemplar of unshakable faith, extraordinary courage, and self-confidence during a brutally rigged ecclesiastical inquisition and in the face of her death by burning. Deftly weaving historical fact, myth, folklore, artistic representations, and centuries of scholarly and critical interpretation into a compelling narrative, she restores Joan of Arc to her rightful position as one of the greatest heroines in all of human history.
The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood

The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood

Irving L. Finkel

$22.99

In THE ARK BEFORE NOAH, British Museum expert Dr Irving Finkel reveals how decoding the symbols on a 4,000 year old piece of clay enable a radical new interpretation of the Noah's Ark myth. A world authority on the period, Dr Finkel's enthralling real-life detective story began with a most remarkable event at the British Museum - the arrival one day in 2008 of a single, modest-sized Babylonian cuneiform tablet - the palm-sized clay rectangles on which our ancestors created the first documents. It had been brought in by a member of the public and this particular tablet proved to be of quite extraordinary importance. Not only does it date from about 1850 BC, but it is a copy of the Babylonian Story of the Flood, a myth from ancient Mesopotamia revealing among other things, instructions for building a large boat to survive a flood. But Dr Finkel's pioneering work didn't stop there. Through another series of enthralling discoveries he has been able to decode the story of the Flood in ways which offer unanticipated revelations to readers of THE ARK BEFORE NOAH.
The Histories: Volume 1 (Books I to V)

The Histories: Volume 1 (Books I to V)

Laonikos Chalkokondyles ,  Anthony Kaldellis

$47.95

Among Greek histories of the fall of Constantinople in 1453, the work of Laonikos (ca. 1430 ca. 1465) has by far the broadest scope. Born to a leading family of Athens under Florentine rule, he was educated in the Classics at Mistra by the Neoplatonist philosopher Plethon.

In the 1450s, Laonikos set out to imitate Herodotus in writing the history of his times, a version in which the armies of Asia would prevail over the Greeks in Europe. The backbone of the Histories,  a text written in difficult Thucydidean Greek, is the expansion of the Ottoman Empire from the early 1300s to 1464, but Laonikos's digressions give sweeping accounts of world geography and ethnography from Britain to Mongolia, with an emphasis on Spain, Italy, and Arabia. 

Following the methodology of Herodotus and rejecting theological polemic, Laonikos is the first Greek writer to treat Islam as a legitimate cultural and religious system. He followed Plethon in viewing the Byzantines as Greeks rather than Romans, and so stands at the origins of Neo-Hellenic identity.

This translation makes the entire text of The Histories available in English for the first time, over two volumes.
The Histories: Volume 2 (Books VI to X)

The Histories: Volume 2 (Books VI to X)

Laonikos Chalkokondyles ,  Anthony Kaldellis

$47.95

Among Greek histories of the fall of Constantinople in 1453, the work of Laonikos (ca. 1430 ca. 1465) has by far the broadest scope. Born to a leading family of Athens under Florentine rule, he was educated in the Classics at Mistra by the Neoplatonist philosopher Plethon.

In the 1450s, Laonikos set out to imitate Herodotus in writing the history of his times, a version in which the armies of Asia would prevail over the Greeks in Europe. The backbone of the Histories,  a text written in difficult Thucydidean Greek, is the expansion of the Ottoman Empire from the early 1300s to 1464, but Laonikos's digressions give sweeping accounts of world geography and ethnography from Britain to Mongolia, with an emphasis on Spain, Italy, and Arabia. 

Following the methodology of Herodotus and rejecting theological polemic, Laonikos is the first Greek writer to treat Islam as a legitimate cultural and religious system. He followed Plethon in viewing the Byzantines as Greeks rather than Romans, and so stands at the origins of Neo-Hellenic identity.

This translation makes the entire text of The Histories available in English for the first time, over two volumes.
The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

John D. Grainger

$59.99

The Seleukid kingdom was the largest state in the world for a century and more between Alexander's death and the rise of Rome. It was ruled for all that time by a succession of able kings, but broke down twice, before eventually succumbing to dynastic rivalries, and simultaneous external invasions and internal grasps for independence. The first king, Seleukos I, established a pattern of rule which was unusually friendly towards his subjects, and his policies promoted the steady growth of wealth and population in many areas which had been depopulated when he took them over. In particular the dynasty was active in founding cities from Asia Minor to Central Asia. Its work set the social and economic scene of the Middle East for many centuries to come. Yet these kings had to be warriors too as they defended their realm from jealous neighbours. John D Grainger's trilogy charts the rise and fall of this superpower of the ancient world. In the first volume, John D Grainger relates the remarkable twists of fortune and daring that saw Seleukos, an officer in an elite guard unit, emerge from the wars of the diadochi (Alexander's successors) in control of the largest and richest part of the empire of the late Alexander the Great. After his conquests and eventual murder, we then see how his successors continued his policies, including the repeated wars with the Ptolemaic rules of Egypt over control of Syria. The volume ends with the deep internal crisis and the wars of the brothers, which left only a single member of the dynasty alive in 223 BC.
AD69: Emperors, Armies and Anarchy

AD69: Emperors, Armies and Anarchy

Nic Fields

$59.99

With the death of Nero by his own shaky hand, the ill-sorted, ill-starred Iulio-Claudian dynasty came to an ignominious end, and Rome was up for the taking. This was 9 June, AD 68. The following year, commonly known as the 'Year of the Four Emperors', was probably one of Rome's worst. Nero's death threw up a critical question for the Empire. How could a new man occupy the vacant throne in Rome and establish a new dynasty? This situation had never arisen before, since in all previous successions the new emperor had some relation to his predecessor, but the psychotic and paranoid Nero had done away with any eligible relatives. And how might a new emperor secure his legal position and authority with regards to the Senate and to the army, as well as to those who had a vested interest in the system, the Praetorian Guard? The result was that ambitious and unscrupulous generals of the empire fell into a bloody power struggle to decide who had the right to wear the imperial purple. Tacitus, in his acid way, remarks that 'one of the secrets of ruling had been revealed: an emperor could be created outside Rome'. This was because imperial authority was ultimately based on control of the military. Thus, to retain power a player in the game of thrones had to gain an unshakable control over the legions, which were dotted along the fringes of the empire. Of course, this in turn meant that the soldiers themselves could impose their own choice. Indeed, it turned out that even if an emperor gained recognition in Rome, this counted for nothing in the face of opposition from the armies out in the frontier provinces. It was to take a tumultuous year of civil war and the death of three imperial candidates before a fourth candidate could come out on top, remain there, and establish for himself a new dynasty. Nic Fields narrates the twists and turns and the military events of this short but bloody period of Roman history.
Marcus Agrippa: Right-Hand Man of Caesar Augustus

Marcus Agrippa: Right-Hand Man of Caesar Augustus

Lindsay Powell

$75.00

Marcus Agrippa personified the term 'right-hand man'. As Emperor Augustus' deputy, he waged wars, pacified provinces, beautified Rome, and played a crucial role in laying the foundations of the Pax Romana for the next two hundred years - but he served always in the knowledge he would never rule in his own name. Why he did so, and never grasped power exclusively for himself, has perplexed historians for centuries. In his teens he formed a life-long friendship with Julius Caesar's great nephew, Caius Octavius, which would change world history. Following Caesar's assassination on the Ides of March 44 BC, Agrippa was instrumental in asserting his friend's rights as the dictator's heir. He established a reputation as a bold admiral, defeating Sextus Pompeius at Mylae and Naulochus (36 BC), culminating in the epoch-making Battle of Actium (31 BC), which eliminated Marcus Antonius and Queen Cleopatra as rivals. He proved his genius for military command on land by ending bloody rebellions in the Cimmerian Bosporus, Gaul, Hispania and Illyricum. In Gaul Agrippa established the vital road network that helped turn Julius Caesar's conquests into viable provinces. As a diplomat, he befriended Herod the Great of Judaea and stabilised the East. As minister of works he overhauled Rome's drains and aqueducts, transformed public bathing in the city, created public parks with great artworks and built the original Pantheon. Agrippa became co-ruler of the Roman Empire with Augustus and married his daughter Julia. His three sons were adopted by his friend as potential heirs to the throne. Agrippa's unexpected death in 12 BC left Augustus bereft, but his bloodline lived on in the imperial family, through Agrippina the Elder to his grandson Caligula and great grandson Nero. MARCUS AGRIPPA is lucidly written by the author of the acclaimed biographies Eager for Glory and Germanicus. Illustrated with colour plates, figures and high quality maps, Lindsay Powell presents a penetrating new assessment of the life and achievements of the multifaceted man who put service to friend and country before himself.
Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I

Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I

Charles Spencer

$49.99

January, 1649. After seven years of fighting in the bloodiest war in Britain's history, Parliament had overpowered King Charles I and now faced a problem: what to do with a defeated king, a king who refused to surrender? Parliamentarians resolved to do the unthinkable, to disregard the Divine Right of Kings and hold Charles I to account for the appalling suffering and slaughter endured by his people. A tribunal of 135 men was hastily gathered in London, and although Charles refused to acknowledge the power of his subjects to try him, the death sentence was unanimously passed. On an icy winter's day on a scaffold outside Whitehall, in an event unique in English history, the King of England was executed. When the dead king's son, Charles II, was restored to the throne, he set about enacting a deadly wave of retribution against all those - the lawyers, the judges, the officers on the scaffold - responsible for his father's death. Some of the 'regicides' - the killers of the king - pleaded for mercy, while others stoically awaited their sentence. Many went into hiding in England, or fled to Europe or America. Those who were caught and condemned suffered agonising and degrading ends, while others saw out their days in hellish captivity. Bestselling historian Charles Spencer explores this violent clash of ideals through the individuals whose fates were determined by that one, momentous decision. A powerful tale of revenge from the dark heart of royal history and a fascinating insight into the dangers of political and religious allegiance in Stuart England, these are the shocking stories of the men who dared to kill a king.
Sherlock Holmes: The Man Who Never Lived and Will Never Die

Sherlock Holmes: The Man Who Never Lived and Will Never Die

Alex Werner ,  The Museum Of London Group

$65.00

Ever since his creation, Sherlock Holmes has enthralled readers. Our perception of him and his faithful companion, Dr Watson, has been shaped by a long line of film, TV and theatre adaptations. This richly illustrated book, compiled by Alex Werner, Head of History Collections at the Museum of London, is an essential guide to the great fictional detective and his world. Using the museum's unrivalled collections of photographs, paintings and original artefacts, it illuminates the capital city that inspired the Sherlock Holmes stories, in particular its fogs, Hansom cabs, criminal underworld, famous landmarks and streets. Accompanying the landmark exhibition at the Museum of London, the first since 1951, this book explores how Arthur Conan Doyle's creation of Sherlock Holmes has transcended literature and continues to attract audiences to this day. Authoritatively written by leading experts, headed by Sir David Cannadine, this thought-provoking companion sheds new light on the famous sleuth and reveals the truth behind the fiction, over 125 years after the first Sherlock Holmes story was written.
The Suffragette Bombers: Britain's Forgotten Terrorists

The Suffragette Bombers: Britain's Forgotten Terrorists

Simon Webb

$59.99

In the years leading up to the First World War, the United Kingdom was subjected to a ferocious campaign of bombing and arson. Those conducting this terrorist offensive were members of the Women's Social and Political Union; better known as the suffragettes. The targets for their attacks ranged from St Paul's Cathedral and the Bank of England in London to theatres and churches in Ireland. The violence, which included several attempted assassinations, culminated in June 1914 with an explosion in Westminster Abbey. Simon Webb explores the way in which the suffragette bombers have been airbrushed from history, leaving us with a distorted view of the struggle for female suffrage. Not only were the suffragettes far more aggressive than is generally known, but there exists the very real and surprising possibility that their militant activities actually delayed, rather than hastened, the granting of the parliamentary vote to British women.
Witches: James I and the English Witch Hunts

Witches: James I and the English Witch Hunts

Tracy Borman

$19.99

September 1613. In Belvoir Castle, the heir of one of England's great noble families falls suddenly and dangerously ill. His body is 'tormented' with violent convulsions. Within a few short weeks he will suffer an excruciating death. Soon the whole family will be stricken with the same terrifying symptoms. The second son, the last male of the line, will not survive. It is said witches are to blame. And so the Earl of Rutland's sons will not be the last to die. Witches traces the dramatic events which unfolded at one of England's oldest and most spectacular castles four hundred years ago. The case is among those which constitute the European witch craze of the 15th-18th centuries, when suspected witches were burned, hanged, or tortured by the thousand. Like those other cases, it is a tale of superstition, the darkest limits of the human imagination and, ultimately, injustice - a reminder of how paranoia and hysteria can create an environment in which nonconformism spells death. But as Tracy Borman reveals here, it is not quite typical. The most powerful and Machiavellian figure of the Jacobean court had a vested interest in events at Belvoir. He would mastermind a conspiracy that has remained hidden for centuries.
Decisive Battles of the English Civil War

Decisive Battles of the English Civil War

Malcolm Wanklyn

$44.99

In this stimulating and original investigation of the decisive battles of the English Civil War, Malcolm Wanklyn reassesses what actually happened on the battlefield and as a result sheds new light on the causes of the eventual defeat of Charles I. Taking each major battle in turn -Edgehill, Newbury I, Cheriton, Marston Moor, Newbury II, Naseby, and Preston - he looks critically at contemporary accounts and at historians' narratives, explores the surviving battlegrounds and retells the story of each battle from a new perspective. His lucid, closely argued analysis questions traditional assumptions about each battle and the course of the war itself.
England's Fortress: New Perspectives on Thomas, 3rd Lord Fairfax

England's Fortress: New Perspectives on Thomas, 3rd Lord Fairfax

Andrew Hopper ,  Philip Major

$195.00

Overshadowed in the popular imagination by the figure of Oliver Cromwell, historians are increasingly coming to recognize the importance of Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Lord Fairfax of Cameron, in shaping the momentous events of mid-seventeenth-century Britain. As both a military and political figure he played a central role in first defeating Charles I and then later supporting the restoration of his son in 1660. 'England's Fortress': New Perspectives on Thomas, 3rd Lord Fairfax shines new light on this significant yet surprisingly understudied figure through a selection of essays addressing a wide range of topics, from military history to poetry.Divided into two sections, the volume reflects key aspects of Fairfax's life and career which are, nevertheless, as interconnecting as they are discrete: Fairfax the soldier and statesman, and Fairfax the husband, horseman and scholar. This fresh account of Fairfax's reputations and legacy questions assumptions about neatly demarcated seventeenth-century chronological, geographic and cultural boundaries. What emerges is a man who subverts as much as he reinforces assumed characteristics of martial invincibility, political disengagement and literary dilettantism.
Wolsey: The Life of King Henry VIII's Cardinal

Wolsey: The Life of King Henry VIII's Cardinal

John Matusiak

$44.99

Cardinal Wolsey is a controversial figure: a butcher's son, a man of letters and the Church, a divisive political expert, a man of principle - yet, to some, an arrogant upstart. As Lord Chancellor to the incorrigible Henry VIII he achieved much both at home and abroad, but his failure to achieve the mighty monarch's divorce from Catherine of Aragon saw him brought to his knees. John Matusiak explores the pragmatic cardinal's life and career to uncover a man of contradictions and extremes whose meteoric rise was marked by an equally inexorable descent into desperation, as he attempted in vain to satisfy the tempestuous master whose ambition ultimately broke him. Far from being another familiar portrait of an overweight and overweening spider or cautionary tale of pride preceding a fall, this is the gripping story of how consummate talent, noble intentions and an eagle eye for the main chance can contrive with the vagaries of power politics to raise an individual to unheard of heights before finally consuming him.
Ming: The Golden Empire

Ming: The Golden Empire

Kevin McLoughlin

$50.00

A collection of original Ming artefacts from Nanjing Museum, including Chinese National Treasures, will be on display at the National Museum of Scotland 27 June - 19 October 2014, in the only UK showing of this internationally significant exhibition. The Ming Empire was founded in 1368 and lasted for 276 years. The Ming - meaning brilliant or bright - was a period of important social transformation that resulted in a thriving consumer culture, and was the starting point of modern China. The exhibition - and the book - will showcase exquisite paintings, gold, porcelain, textiles, pottery and calligraphy. A painting from the early Ming illustrates the symbolic grandeur of Beijing's newly built Forbidden City. Beautiful furniture, musical instruments, Buddhist artefacts and items of personal adornment also help to bring to life the elegant tastes and concerns of this gilded age. A painting from the early Ming illustrates the symbolic grandeur of Beijing's newly built Forbidden City. Beautiful furniture, musical instruments, Buddhist artefacts and items of personal adornment also help to bring to life the elegant tastes and concerns of this gilded age.
Paris: The Story of a Great City

Paris: The Story of a Great City

Danielle Chadych

$39.95

An intriguing, concise history of Paris, beautifully illustrated by works from the archives of the museums of Paris, this delightful book takes the reader on a journey from the earliest settlement in the area to the grand architecture of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, bringing them right up to the present day and the ever-changing landscape of Europe's biggest metropolitan city. Acknowledging along the way the people and events that have helped to shape its history - from the Sun King to one of the world's most significant and bloodiest revolutions, to the artists, writers and entertainers who have sought and found inspiration from the city's streets.
The Downfall of Money: Germany's Hyperinflation and the Destruction of the Middle Class

The Downfall of Money: Germany's Hyperinflation and the Destruction of the Middle Class

Frederick Taylor

$19.99

Many theorists believed a hundred years ago, just as they did at the beginning of our twenty-first century, that the world had reached a state of economic perfection, a never before seen condition of beneficial human interdependence that would lead to universal growth and prosperity. And yet the early years of the Weimar Republic in Germany witnessed the most complete and terrifying unravelling of a major country's financial system to have occurred in modern times. The story of the Weimar Republic's financial crisis has a clear resonance in the second decade of the twenty-first century, when the world is anxious once more about what money is, what it means and how we can judge if its value is true. The Downfall of Money will tell anew the dramatic story of the hyperinflation that saw the once-solid German mark, worth 4.2 to the dollar in 1914, trading at over four trillion by the autumn of 1923. It is a trajectory of events uncomfortably relevant for today's uncertain world. The Downfall of Money will reveal the real causes of the crisis, what this collapse meant to ordinary people, and also trace its connection to Germany's subsequent catastrophic political history. By drawing on a wide range of sources and making sense for the general reader of the vast amount of specialist research that has become available in recent decades, it will provide a timely, fresh and surprising look at this chilling period in history.
Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance in the Last Year of WW II

Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance in the Last Year of WW II

Randall Hansen

$45.00

In the last months of the war, Hitler ordered the poisoning, blocking, and wrecking of all ports across Europe; the destruction of all industries, railroads, bridges, utilities supplies, archives and museums in Europe; and the destruction of the most beautiful city in the world: Paris. Thanks to the determination and bravery of a few, including those who paid with their lives, Hitler's orders were often disobeyed. The result was a profound and lasting effect on the war and its aftermath. In this fascinating and gripping book, Randall Hansen explores the extraordinary phenomenon of disobedience and its consequences: Would Rommel have opened the Western Front to the Allies on July 20, 1944 had he not been shot up a few days earlier? Did Albert Speer single-handedly prevent the destruction of bridges, factories, towns,and all features of civilized life? Did the actions of one Prussian General save Paris from total devastation? And why were some German cities defended to the last man, leading to a great loss of life and the cities' complete destruction, while others surrendered without a fight?
The Devils' Alliance: Hitler's Pact with Stalin, 1939-1941

The Devils' Alliance: Hitler's Pact with Stalin, 1939-1941

Roger Moorhouse

$46.95

History remembers the Soviets and the Nazis as bitter enemies and ideological rivals, the two mammoth and opposing totalitarian regimes of World War II whose conflict would be the defining and deciding clash of the war. Yet for nearly a third of the conflict's entire timespan, Hitler and Stalin stood side by side as partners. The Pact that they agreed had a profound--and bloody--impact on Europe, and is fundamental to understanding the development and denouement of the war. In The Devils' Alliance, acclaimed historian Roger Moorhouse explores the causes and implications of the Nazi-Soviet Pact, an unholy covenant whose creation and dissolution were crucial turning points in World War II. Forged by the German foreign minister, Joachim von Ribbentrop, and his Soviet counterpart, Vyacheslav Molotov, the nonaggression treaty briefly united the two powers in a brutally efficient collaboration. Together, the Germans and Soviets quickly conquered and divided central and eastern Europe--Poland, the Baltic States, Finland, and Bessarabia--and the human cost was staggering: during the two years of the pact hundreds of thousands of people in central and eastern Europe caught between Hitler and Stalin were expropriated, deported, or killed. Fortunately for the Allies, the partnership ultimately soured, resulting in the surprise June 1941 German invasion of the Soviet Union. Ironically, however, the powers' exchange of materiel, blueprints, and technological expertise during the period of the Pact made possible a far more bloody and protracted war than would have otherwise been conceivable. Combining comprehensive research with a gripping narrative, The Devils' Alliance is the authoritative history of the Nazi-Soviet Pact--and a portrait of the people whose lives were irrevocably altered by Hitler and Stalin's nefarious collaboration.
The Combat History of the 21st Panzer Division 1943 - 45

The Combat History of the 21st Panzer Division 1943 - 45

Werner Kortenhaus

$129.95

At long last, Werner Kortenhaus' history of the 21st Panzer Division has been published in English, containing key acts that are missing elsewhere For years, one of the most essential sources for study of the Normandy invasion was known only to a select few and nearly unobtainable even to those who knew of its existence. None of the major English language histories of the Normandy Invasion refer to it, even though it is the history of the only German armoured division that was in place in the Caen area at the moment of the invasion. In revising and updating his account, originally released in two massive typed volumes, Werner Kortenhaus has exhaustively researched all available sources in German, French and English to supplement his own experiences and those of his fellows and the many individuals whom he interviewed. The result is a seamless account of the Normandy invasion in the British sector from the German viewpoint that sheds new light on many controversial issues. Helion's English edition includes a significant number of rare photographs and many maps. Werner Kortenhaus' study represents a significant contribution to English language material available regarding a Heer panzer division, besides its extensive coverage of German armoured operations in Normandy, Lorraine, Alsace and elsewhere.
Weimar: From Enlightenment to the Present

Weimar: From Enlightenment to the Present

Michael H. Kater

$62.00

Historian Michael H. Kater chronicles the rise and fall of one of Germany's most iconic cities in this fascinating and surprisingly provocative history of Weimar. Weimar was a center of the arts during the Enlightenment and hence the cradle of German culture in modern times. Goethe and Schiller made their reputations here, as did Franz Liszt and the young Richard Strauss. In the early twentieth century, the Bauhaus school was founded in Weimar. But from the 1880s on, the city also nurtured a powerful right-wing reactionary movement, and fifty years later, a repressive National Socialist regime dimmed Weimar's creative lights, transforming the onetime artists' utopia into the capital of its first Nazified province and constructing the Buchenwald death camp on its doorstep. Kater's richly detailed volume offers the first complete history of Weimar in any language, from its meteoric eighteenth-century rise up from obscurity through its glory days of unbridled creative expression to its dark descent back into artistic insignificance under Nazi rule and, later, Soviet occupation and beyond.
The Age of Wrath: A History of the Delhi Sultanate

The Age of Wrath: A History of the Delhi Sultanate

Abraham Eraly

$29.99

The Delhi Sultanate period (1206–1526) is commonly portrayed as an age of chaos and violence—of rapacious, plundering kings, turbulent dynasties, and the aggressive imposition of Islam on India. But it was also the era that saw the creation of a pan-Indian empire, on the foundations of which the Mughals and the British later built their own Indian empires.

The encounter between Islam and Hinduism also transformed, among other things, India's architecture, literature, music and food. Abraham Eraly brings this fascinating period vividly alive, portraying the many kings—mad, brilliant, astute, cruel—who ruled during this period, and discussing the political, social and cultural developments that transformed India. Combining erudition with powerful storytelling, analysis with anecdote, The Age of Wrath is a superb book.
Japanese Design: Art, Aesthetics and Culture

Japanese Design: Art, Aesthetics and Culture

Patricia J. Graham

$27.99

What exactly is the singular attraction of Japanese design? And why does Japanese style speak so clearly to so many people all over the world? The Japanese sensibility often possesses an intuitive, emotional appeal, whether it's a silk kimono, a carefully raked garden path, an architectural marvel, a teapot, or a contemporary work of art. This allure has come to permeate the entire culture of Japan--it is manifest in the most mundane utensil and snack food packaging, as well as in Japanese architecture and fine art. In Japanese Design, Asian art expert and author Patricia J. Graham explains how Japanese aesthetics based in fine craftsmanship and simplicity developed. Her unusual, full-color presentation reveals this design aesthetic in an absorbing way, using a combination of insightful explanations and more than 160 stunning photos. Focusing upon ten elements of Japanese design, Graham explores how visual qualities, the cultural parameters and the Japanese religious traditions of Buddhism and Shinto have impacted the appearance of its arts. Japanese Design is a handbook for the millions of us who have felt the special allure of Japanese art, culture and crafts. Art and design fans and professionals have been clamoring for this--a book that fills the need for an intelligent, culture-rich overview of what Japanese design is and means.
Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free

Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free

Hector Tobar

$32.99

Pulitzer-prize-winning journalist Hector Tobar offers the definitive account of a heart-stopping survival story: the 2010 collapse of the San Jose mine and the international rescue effort that somehow managed to save all 33 miners, who had been trapped half a mile beneath the surface for 69 days. The rescue was watched by more 1 billion viewers worldwide. No other writer has been granted the deep and exclusive access to the miners that Hector Tobar has, and no one else can capture and recreate this unique drama so vividly, from the conflicts and the emotions that enveloped the men during their first fortnight below ground, when death by starvation loomed as their likely fate, to the subsequent weeks during which they established contact with the outside world. All the while, they remain trapped inside a still-thundering mountain that could collapse upon them at any moment.
Mecca: The Sacred City

Mecca: The Sacred City

Ziauddin Sardar

$29.99

Mecca is the heart of Islam. It is the birthplace of Muhammad, the direction towards which Muslims turn when they pray and the site of pilgrimage which annually draws some three million Muslims from all corners of the world. Yet Mecca's importance goes beyond religion. What happens in Mecca and how Muslims think about the political and cultural history of Mecca has had and continues to have a profound influence on world events to this day. In this captivating book, Ziauddin Sardar unravels the significance of Mecca. Tracing its history, from its origins as a 'barren valley' in the desert to its evolution as a trading town and sudden emergence as the religious centre of a world empire, Sardar examines the religious struggles and rebellions in Mecca that have powerfully shaped Muslim culture. Interweaving stories of his own pilgrimages to Mecca with those of others, Sardar offers a unique insight into not just the spiritual aspects of Mecca - the passion, ecstasy and longing it evokes - but also the conflict between heritage and modernity that has characterised its history. He unpeels the physical, social and cultural dimensions that have helped transform the city and also, though accounts of such Orientalist travellers as Richard Burton and Charles Doughty, the strange fascination that Mecca has long inspired in the Western imagination. And, ultimately, he explores what this tension could mean for Mecca's future. An illuminative, lyrical and witty blend of history, reportage and memoir, this outstanding book reflects all that is profound, enlightening and curious about one of the most important religious sites in the world.
Under Fire

Under Fire

Fred Burton ,  Samuel M. Katz

$19.99

On the night of September 11, 2012, the American diplomatic mission at Benghazi, Libya, came under ferocious attack by a heavily armed group of Islamic terrorists. The prolonged fire fight, and the attack hours later on a nearby CIA outpost, resulted in the deaths of four Americans, including the American ambassador to Libya. After the fall of Qaddafi, Benghazi was transformed into a hotbed of fundamentalist fervour and a den of spies for the northern half of the African continent. Moreover, it became the centre of gravity for terrorist groups strategically situated in the violent whirlwinds of the Arab Spring. On the eleventh anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, a group of heavily armed Islamic terrorists had their sights set on the U.S. presence in the city. Based on the exclusive cooperation of eyewitnesses and confidential sources within the intelligence, diplomatic, and military communities, Fred Burton and Samuel M. Katz reveal for the first time the terrifying twelve-hour ordeal confronted by Ambassador Christopher Stevens, Sean Smith, his Diplomatic Security (DS) contingent, and the CIA security specialists who raced to rescue them.
The Case for Palestine: The Perspective of an Australian Observer

The Case for Palestine: The Perspective of an Australian Observer

Paul Heywood-Smith

$24.95

Paul Heywood-Smith's interest in the Arab-Israeli conflict commenced in London in 1973 at the time of the Yom Kippur War. He was then a young lawyer imbued with the values derived from the fight against apartheid and opposition to the Vietnam War. His thesis is that the conflict is the defining conflict of our time, and has had that status for at least sixty years. It is behind the rise of militant Islam. It was the impetus for 9/11 and 7/7. The Case for Palestine presents the history and the issues objectively - and subjectively - in a way comprehensible by all in society. Not to be informed of the Arab-Israeli conflict is to fail to understand what is happening in our lives: in respect of our privacy, our national defence, our security when travelling, our future and our children's future. Heywood-Smith argues that it is the responsibility of all adult and thinking members of the world community to inform themselves of the background to the conflict and the current issues associated with its resolution. It is not good enough for thinking people to say to themselves 'it's too hard'. Nor is it good enough to say: 'I am not anti-Semitic; I must support Israel.' 'Compelling, confronting and controversial. A must read for anyone who wants to understand this interminable and tragic conflict.' - Nick Xenophon, Senator for South Australia
Gaza: A History

Gaza: A History

Jean-Pierre Filiu

$49.95

Through its millennium-long existence, Gaza has often been bitterly disputed while simultaneously and paradoxically enduring prolonged neglect. Jean-Pierre Filiu's book is the first com--prehensive history of Gaza in any language. Squeezed between the Negev and Sinai deserts on the one hand and the Mediterranean Sea on the other, Gaza was contested by the Pharaohs, the Persians, the Greeks, the Romans, the Byzantines, the Arabs, the Fatimids, the Mamluks, the Crusaders and the Ottomans. Napoleon had to secure it in 1799 to launch his failed campaign on Palestine. In 1917, the Brit--ish Empire fought for months to conquer Gaza, before establishing its mandate on Palestine. In 1948, 200,000 Palestinians sought refuge in Gaza, a marginal area neither Israel nor Egypt wanted. Palestinian nationalism grew there, and Gaza has since found itself at the heart of Palestinian history. It is in Gaza that the fedayeen movement arose from the ruins of Arab national--ism. It is in Gaza that the 1967 Israeli occupation was repeatedly challenged, until the outbreak of the 1987 intifada. And it is in Gaza, in 2007, that the dream of Palestinian statehood appeared to have been shattered by the split between Fatah and Hamas. The endurance of Gaza and the Palestinians make the publication of this history both timely and significant.
Waterloo: Four Days That Changed Europe's Destiny

Waterloo: Four Days That Changed Europe's Destiny

Tim Clayton

$49.99

'The best of the many books commemorating next year's 200th anniversary of Napoleon's final defeat at the Battle of Waterloo' Evening Standard The bloodbath at Waterloo ended a war that had engulfed the world for over twenty years. It also finished the career of the charismatic Napoleon Bonaparte. It ensured the final liberation of Germany and the restoration of the old European monarchies, and it represented one of very few defeats for the glorious French army, most of whose soldiers remained devoted to their Emperor until the very end. Extraordinary though it may seem, much about the Battle of Waterloo has remained uncertain, with many major features of the campaign hotly debated. Most histories have depended heavily on the evidence of British officers that were gathered about twenty years after the battle. But the recent publication of an abundance of fresh first-hand accounts from soldiers of all the participating armies has illuminated important episodes and enabled radical reappraisal of the course of the campaign. What emerges is a darker, muddier story, no longer biased by notions of regimental honour, but a tapestry of irony, accident, courage, horror and human frailty. An epic page turner, rich in dramatic human detail and grounded in first-class scholarly research, Waterloo is the real inside story of the greatest land battle in British history, the defining showdown of the age of muskets, bayonets, cavalry and cannon.
Furies: War in Europe, 1450-1700

Furies: War in Europe, 1450-1700

Lauro Martines

$19.99

We think of the Renaissance as a shining era of human achievement-a pinnacle of artistic genius and humanist brilliance, the time of Shakespeare, Michelangelo, and Montaigne. Yet it was also an age of constant, harrowing warfare. Armies, not philosophers, shaped the face of Europe as modern nation-states emerged from feudal society. In Furies, one of the leading scholars of Renaissance history captures the dark reality of the period in a gripping narrative mosaic. As Lauro Martines shows us, total war was no twentieth-century innovation. These conflicts spared no civilians in their path. A Renaissance army was a mobile city-indeed, a force of twenty thousand or forty thousand men was larger than many cities of the day. And it was a monster, devouring food and supplies for miles around. It menaced towns and the countryside-and itself-with famine and disease, often more lethal than combat. Fighting itself was savage, its violence increased by the use of newly invented weapons, from muskets to mortars. For centuries, notes Martines, the history of this period has favored diplomacy, high politics, and military tactics. Furies puts us on the front lines of battle, and on the streets of cities under siege, to reveal what Europe's wars meant to the men and women who endured them.
Battle Story: Blenheim 1704

Battle Story: Blenheim 1704

James Falkner

$22.99

Blenheim has gone down in history as one of the turning points of the War of the Spanish Succession - and some would say in the history of conflict in Europe. The overwhelming Allied victory ensured the safety of Vienna from the Franco-Bavarian army, thus preventing the collapse of the Grand Alliance. Bavaria was knocked out of the war, and Louis XIV's hopes for a quick victory came to an end. France suffered over 30,000 casualties. If you truly want to understand what happened and why - read Battle Story.
Napoleon on Campaign: Classic Images of Napoleon at War

Napoleon on Campaign: Classic Images of Napoleon at War

H. A. Carruthers

$49.99

These are the magnificent works of Detaille, Meissonier, Vernet, Lady Butler, Hillingford and many of the other artists who sought to capture on canvas the most celebrated incidents of the Napoleonic Wars. Through their battle paintings these great artists tell an intriguing tale, of power, greatness, greed and hubris. Each image is captivating in its own way and opens the door to a bygone world of martial splendour. The rise and fall of Napoleon makes for a gripping, and tragic story, and these great works inside are arranged chronologically in order to let the images do the talking and provide an opportunity to allow the reader a unique chance to revel in the glorious and timeless work of the artists. Gathered together in a single volume for the first time this wonderful book makes for essential reading for anyone with an interest in the Napoleonic era.
Double Down

Double Down

John Heilemann ,  Mark Halperin

$19.99

'What am I supposed to do when he starts spewing his bullshit?' Barack Obama preparing for his first debate with Mitt Romney. In their runaway bestseller Game Change / Race of a Lifetime, Mark Halperin and John Heilemann captured the full drama of Barack Obama's improbable, dazzling victory over the Clintons, John McCain and Sarah Palin. With the same masterly reporting, unparalleled access, and narrative skill, Double Down picks up the story in the Oval Office, where the president is beset by crises both inherited and unforeseen - facing defiance from his political foes, disenchantment from voters, disdain from the nation's powerful finance figures and dysfunction within the West Wing. As 2012 looms, leaders of the Republican Party, salivating over Obama's political fragility, see a chance to wrestle back control of the White House - and the country. So how did the Republicans screw it up? How did Obama survive the onslaught and defy the predictions of a one-term presidency? Double Down follows the gaudy carnival of Republican contenders - ambitious and flawed, famous and infamous, charismatic and cartoonish - as Mitt Romney, the straitlaced, can-do, gaffe-prone multimillionaire from Massachusetts, scraped and scratched his way to the nomination, while Obama is seen storming out of a White House meeting with his high command after accusing them of betrayal, and gradually transforming a tense detente with Bill Clinton into political gold. Double Down takes you into back rooms and closed-door meetings, laying bare the secret history of the 2012 campaign in a panoramic account of an election that was as hard fought as it was lastingly consequential.
The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew it

The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew it

John W. Dean

$34.99

Watergate forever changed American politics, and in light of the revelations about the NSA's widespread surveillance program, the scandal has taken on new significance. Yet remarkably, four decades after Nixon was forced to resign, no one has told the full story of his involvement in Watergate. In The Nixon Defense, former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, draws on his own transcripts of almost a thousand conversations, as well as documents in the archives to uncover what exactly Nixon knew and when he knew it.
Wilson

Wilson

A. Scott Berg

$24.99

One hundred years after his inauguration, Woodrow Wilson still stands as one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, and one of the most enigmatic. And now, after more than a decade of research and writing, Pulitzer Prize-winning author A. Scott Berg has completed Wilson - the most personal and penetrating biography ever written about the 28th President. In addition to the hundreds of thousands of documents in the Wilson Archives, Berg was the first biographer to gain access to two recently-discovered caches of papers belonging to those close to Wilson. From this material, Berg was able to add countless details - even several unknown events - that fill in missing pieces of Wilson's character and cast new light on his entire life. From the scholar-President who ushered the country through its first great world war to the man of intense passion and turbulence, from the idealist determined to make the world 'safe for democracy', to the stroke-crippled leader whose incapacity, and the subterfuges around it, were among the century's greatest secrets, the result is an intimate portrait written with a particularly contemporary point of view - a book at once magisterial and deeply emotional about the whole of Wilson's life, accomplishments and failings. This is not just Wilson the icon - but Wilson the man.
American Slavery

American Slavery

Heather Andrea Williams

$14.95

Europeans, Africans, and American Indians practiced slavery long before the first purchase of a captive African by a white land-owner in the American colonies; that, however, is the image of slavery most prevalent in the minds of Americans today. This Very Short Introduction begins with the Portuguese capture of Africans in the 1400s and traces the development of American slavery until its abolition following the Civil War. Historian Heather Andrea Williams draws upon the rich recent scholarship of numerous highly-regarded academics as well as an analysis of primary documents to explore the history of slavery and its effects on the American colonies and later the United States of America. Williams examines legislation that differentiated American Indians and Africans from Europeans as the ideology of white supremacy flourished and became an ingrained feature of the society. These laws reflected the contradiction of America's moral and philosophical ideology that valorized freedom on one hand and justified the enslavement of a population deemed inferior on another. She explores the tense and often violent relationships between the enslaved and the enslavers, and between abolitionists and pro-slavery advocates as those who benefited from the institution fought to maintain and exert their power. Williams is attentive to the daily labors that enslaved people performed, reminding readers that slavery was a system of forced labor with economic benefits that produced wealth for a new nation, all the while leaving an indelible mark on its history.
Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America

Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America

Jonathan Darman

$46.95

In politics, the man who takes the highest spot after a landslide is not standing on solid ground.

In this riveting work of narrative nonfiction, Jonathan Darman tells the story of two giants of American politics, Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan, and shows how, from 1963 to 1966, these two men--the same age, and driven by the same heroic ambitions--changed American politics forever.

The liberal and the conservative. The deal-making arm twister and the cool communicator. The Texas rancher and the Hollywood star. Opposites in politics and style, Johnson and Reagan shared a defining impulse: to set forth a grand story of America, a story in which he could be the hero. In the tumultuous days after the Kennedy assassination, Johnson and Reagan each, in turn, seized the chance to offer the country a new vision for the future. Bringing to life their vivid personalities and the anxious mood of America in a radically transformative time, Darman shows how, in promising the impossible, Johnson and Reagan jointly dismantled the long American tradition of consensus politics and ushered in a new era of fracture. History comes to life in Darman's vivid, fly-on-the wall storytelling.

From Johnson's election in 1964, the greatest popular-vote landslide in American history, to the pivotal 1966 midterms, when Reagan burst forth onto the national stage, Landslide brings alive a country transformed--by riots, protests, the rise of television, the shattering of consensus--and the two towering personalities whose choices in those moments would reverberate through the country for decades to come.
The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights

The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights

William P. Jones

$21.95

It was the final speech of a long day, August 28, 1963, when hundreds of thousands gathered on the Mall for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In a resounding cadence, Martin Luther King Jr. lifted the crowd when he told of his dream that all Americans would join together to realise the founding ideal of equality. The power of the speech created an enduring symbol of the march and the larger civil rights movement. King's speech still inspires us fifty years later, but its very power has also narrowed our understanding of the march. In this insightful history, William P. Jones restores the march to its full significance.

The opening speech of the day was delivered by the leader of the march, the great trade unionist A. Philip Randolph, who first called for a march on Washington in 1941 to press for equal opportunity in employment and the armed forces. To the crowd that stretched more than a mile before him, Randolph called for an end to segregation and a living wage for every American. Equal access to accommodations and services would mean little to people, white and black, who could not afford them. Randolph's egalitarian vision of economic and social citizenship is the strong thread running through the full history of the March on Washington Movement. It was a movement of sustained grassroots organising, linked locally to women's groups, unions, and churches across the country.

Jones's fresh, compelling history delivers a new understanding of this emblematic event and the broader civil rights movement it propelled.
Shadow Warrior: William Egan Colby and the CIA

Shadow Warrior: William Egan Colby and the CIA

Randall Bennett Woods

$32.95

World War II commando, Cold War spy, and CIA director under presidents Nixon and Ford, William Egan Colby played a critical role in some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. A quintessential member of the greatest generation, Colby embodied the moral and strategic ambiguities of the postwar world, and first confronted many of the dilemmas about power and secrecy that America still grapples with today. In Shadow Warrior, eminent historian Randall B. Woods presents a riveting biography of Colby, revealing that this crusader for global democracy was also drawn to the darker side of American power. Aiming to help reverse the spread of totalitarianism in Europe and Asia, Colby joined the U.S. Army in 1941, just as America entered World War II. He served with distinction in France and Norway, and at the end of the war transitioned into America's first peacetime intelligence agency: the CIA. Fresh from the fight against fascism, Colby zealously redirected his efforts against international communism. He insisted on the importance of fighting communism on the ground, doggedly applying guerilla tactics for counterinsurgency, sabotage, surveillance, and information-gathering on the new battlefields of the Cold War. Over time, these strategies became increasingly ruthless; as head of the CIA's Far East Division, Colby oversaw an endless succession of assassination attempts, coups, secret wars in Laos and Cambodia, and the Phoenix Program, in which 20,000 civilian supporters of the Vietcong were killed. Colby ultimately came clean about many of the CIA's illegal activities, making public a set of internal reports--known as the family jewels --that haunt the agency to this day. Ostracized from the intelligence community, he died under suspicious circumstances--a murky ending to a life lived in the shadows. Drawing on multiple new sources, including interviews with members of Colby's family, Woods has crafted a gripping biography of one of the most fascinating and controversial figures of the twentieth century.
A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination

A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination

Philip Shenon

$27.99

The questions have haunted our nation for half a century: Was the President killed by a single gunman? Was Lee Harvey Oswald part of a conspiracy? Did the Warren Commission discover the whole truth of what happened on November 22, 1963? Philip Shenon, a veteran investigative journalist who spent most of his career at The New York Times, finally provides many of the answers. Though A CRUEL AND SHOCKING ACT began as Shenon's attempt to write the first insider's history of the Warren Commission, it quickly became something much larger and more important when he discovered startling information that was withheld from the Warren Commission by the CIA, FBI and others in power in Washington. Shenon shows how the commission's ten-month investigation was doomed to fail because the man leading it - Chief Justice Earl Warren - was more committed to protecting the Kennedy family than getting to the full truth about what happened on that tragic day. A taut, page-turning narrative, Shenon's book features some of the most compelling figures of the twentieth century-Bobby Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, J. Edgar Hoover, Chief Justice Warren, CIA spymasters Allen Dulles and Richard Helms, as well as the CIA's treacherous 'molehunter,' James Jesus Angleton. Based on hundreds of interviews and unprecedented access to the surviving commission staffers and many other key players, Philip Shenon's authoritative, scrupulously researched book will forever change the way we think about the Kennedy assassination and about the deeply flawed investigation that followed.
Land of the Free: WarGames Rules for North America 1754-1815

Land of the Free: WarGames Rules for North America 1754-1815

Joe Krone

$55.00

Land of the Free is the new set of wargaming rules from Osprey that allow players to recreate the various conflicts that broke out in North America shortly prior to and just after Independence, including the French and Indian Wars, the Revolution and the War of 1812. This set of rules lets players begin their campaigns with small warbands of 10-20 miniatures of any scale and develop their forces over time, building them into armies hundreds strong. A unique system of command points and the need to carefully manage resources or risk becoming vulnerable to counter-attack have to be finely balanced against the need to gain objectives throughout the game, creating a challenging, but enjoyable environment for your armies.
Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy: A Memoir

Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy: A Memoir

Christopher R Hill

$46.95

An inside the room memoir from one of our most distinguished ambassadors who--in a career of service to the country--was sent to some of the most dangerous outposts of American diplomacy. From the wars in the Balkans to the brutality of North Korea to the endless war in Iraq, this is the real life of an American diplomat. Hill was on the front lines in the Balkans at the breakup of Yugoslavia. He takes us from one-on-one meetings with the dictator Milosevic, to Bosnia and Kosovo, to the Dayton conference, where a truce was brokered. Hill draws upon lessons learned as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cameroon early on in his career and details his prodigious experience as a US ambassador. He was the first American Ambassador to Macedonia; Ambassador to Poland, where he also served in the depth of the cold war; Ambassador to South Korea and chief disarmament negotiator in North Korea; and Hillary Clinton's hand-picked Ambassador to Iraq. Hill's account is an adventure story of danger, loss of comrades, high stakes negotiations, and imperfect options. There are fascinating portraits of war criminals (Mladic, Karadzic), of presidents and vice presidents (Clinton, Bush and Cheney, and Obama), of Secretaries of State (Madeleine Albright, Colin Powell, Condoleezza Rice, and Hillary Clinton), of Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, and of Ambassadors Richard Holbrooke and Lawrence Eagleburger. Hill writes bluntly about the bureaucratic warfare in DC and expresses strong criticism of America's aggressive interventions and wars of choice.
The Return of George Washington: 1783-1789

The Return of George Washington: 1783-1789

Edward Larson

$46.95

After commanding the Continental Army to victory in the Revolutionary War, General Washington stunned the world: He retired. Four years later, as he rode from Mount Vernon to lead the Constitutional Convention, he was the one American who could united the rapidly disintegrating country. This is the little-known story of the return of George Washington. In this groundbreaking new look at our first citizen, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson masterfully chronicles how George Washington saved the United States by coming out of retirement four years after the War of Independence to lead a country on the brink of dissolution and secure its future. Though the period between the Revolution and the Presidency has previously been neglected in studies of Washington's life, Larson's striking reassessment shows that Washington's greatness in fact rests on these years--1783 to 1789--and rightfully elevates our foremost Founding Father's forgotten years to a central place in the American story. In December 1783, Washington, the most powerful and popular man in America, stepped down as commander in chief and returned to private life as a farmer and landowner. Yet as Washington found happiness in successfully growing his Virginia estate, the fledgling American experiment foundered under the Articles of Confederation. Sectional bickering paralyzed government; debts went unpaid; the economy stagnated; national security was neglected; the union of states was in peril.When a Constitutional Convention was called to forge a new government, its chances of success were slim. Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and other leaders realized only one American--the retired hero George Washington--could unite the fractious states. After months of anguish, Washington answered the call and left his beloved Mount Vernon in the spring of 1787 to preside over the convention in Philadelphia. Although Washington is overlooked in most accounts, Larson brilliantly uncovers Washington's vital role in shaping the Constitution--and shows, as never before, how it was only with Washington's spirited behind-the-scenes influence that the delegates passed, and the states later ratified, the founding document that has guided our government to this day. From the moment of General Washington's resignation to his victory in the first federal elections and his triumphant inauguration in New York as our first President, The Return of George Washington is a landmark work that will forever change our understanding and appreciation of America's great founder.
The Royalist Revolution: Monarchy and the American Founding

The Royalist Revolution: Monarchy and the American Founding

Eric Nelson

$46.95

Generations of students have been taught that the American Revolution was a revolt against royal tyranny. In this revisionist account, Eric Nelson argues that a great many of our founding fathers saw themselves as rebels against the British Parliament, not the Crown. The Royalist Revolution interprets the patriot campaign of the 1770s as an insurrection in favor of royal power driven by the conviction that the Lords and Commons had usurped the just prerogatives of the monarch. Leading patriots believed that the colonies were the king s own to govern, and they urged George III to defy Parliament and rule directly. These theorists were proposing to turn back the clock on the English constitution, rejecting the Whig settlement that had secured the supremacy of Parliament after the Glorious Revolution. Instead, they embraced the political theory of those who had waged the last great campaign against Parliament s usurpations: the reviled Stuart monarchs of the seventeenth century. When it came time to design the state and federal constitutions, the very same figures who had defended this expansive conception of royal authority John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and their allies returned to the fray as champions of a single executive vested with sweeping prerogatives. As a result of their labors, the Constitution of 1787 would assign its new president far more power than any British monarch had wielded for almost a hundred years. On one side of the Atlantic, Nelson concludes, there would be kings without monarchy; on the other, monarchy without kings.
Washington Journal: The Watergate Scandal, 1973 - 1974

Washington Journal: The Watergate Scandal, 1973 - 1974

Elizabeth Drew

$39.99

2014 marks the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation from the White House, and no book has captured the extraordinary upheaval of America during the Watergate years better than Elizabeth Drew's Washington Journal. The book that established Drew's reputation as one of the shrewdest and sharpest writers on American politics, Washington Journal took in the emerging scandal with tremendous clarity and force. Unfolding over the course of a single year, from September 1973 to August 1974, Washington Journal is the record of the near-dissolution of a nation's political conscience - told from within. Cool and understated - and all the more devastating for its understatement - Washington Journal was immediately hailed upon its publication in 1975 as a landmark work of journalism. With a new afterword that brings this all too relevant book squarely into the present and reflects on what has changed - and what hasn't - in the last forty years, Washington Journal is available again, at long last, ready for its place in the pantheon of great political writing.
Smoking Typewriters: The Sixties Underground Press and the Rise of Alternative Media in America

Smoking Typewriters: The Sixties Underground Press and the Rise of Alternative Media in America

John McMillian

$26.95

How did the New Left uprising of the 1960s happen? What caused millions of young people-many of them affluent and college educated-to suddenly decide that American society needed to be completely overhauled? In Smoking Typewriters, historian John McMillian shows that one answer to these questions can be found in the emergence of a dynamic underground press in the 1960s. Following the lead of papers like the Los Angeles Free Press, the East Village Other, and the Berkeley Barb, young people across the country launched hundreds of mimeographed pamphlets and flyers, small press magazines, and underground newspapers. New, cheaper printing technologies democratized the publishing process and by the decade's end the combined circulation of underground papers stretched into the millions. Though not technically illegal, these papers were often genuinely subversive, and many of those who produced and sold them-on street-corners, at poetry readings, gallery openings, and coffeehouses-became targets of harassment from local and federal authorities. With writers who actively participated in the events they described, underground newspapers captured the zeitgeist of the '60s, speaking directly to their readers, and reflecting and magnifying the spirit of cultural and political protest. McMillian pays special attention to the ways underground newspapers fostered a sense of community and played a vital role in shaping the New Left's highly democratic movement culture. Deeply researched and eloquently written, Smoking Typewriters captures all the youthful idealism and vibrant tumult of the 1960s as it delivers a brilliant reappraisal of the origins and development of the New Left rebellion.
Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Legacy, America's Creed

Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Legacy, America's Creed

John Ragosta

$36.95

For over one hundred years, Thomas Jefferson and his Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom have stood at the center of our understanding of religious liberty and the First Amendment. Jefferson's expansive vision - including his insistence that political freedom and free thought would be at risk if we did not keep government out of the church and church out of government - enjoyed a near consensus of support at the Supreme Court and among historians, until Justice William Rehnquist called reliance on Jefferson demonstrably incorrect. Since then, Rehnquist's call has been taken up by a bevy of jurists and academics anxious to encourage renewed government involvement with religion. In <i>Religious Freedom: Jefferson's Legacy, America's Creed</i>, the historian and lawyer John Ragosta offers a vigorous defense of Jefferson's advocacy for a strict separation of church and state. Beginning with a close look at Jefferson's own religious evolution, Ragosta shows that deep religious beliefs were at the heart of Jefferson's views on religious freedom. Basing his analysis on that Jeffersonian vision, Ragosta redefines our understanding of how and why the First Amendment was adopted. He shows how the amendment's focus on maintaining the authority of states to regulate religious freedom demonstrates that a very strict restriction on federal action was intended. Ultimately revealing that the great sage demanded a firm separation of church and state but never sought a wholly secular public square, Ragosta provides a new perspective on Jefferson, the First Amendment, and religious liberty within the United States.
Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief

Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief

George Henry Davis '86 Professor of History James M McPherson (Princeton University)

$49.95

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of  Battle Cry of Freedom,  a powerful new reckoning with Jefferson Davis as military commander of the Confederacy.

History has not been kind to Jefferson Davis. His cause went down in disastrous defeat and left the South impoverished for generations. If that cause had succeeded, it would have torn the United States in two and preserved the institution of slavery. Many Americans in Davis's own time and in later generations considered him an incompetent leader, if not a traitor. Not so, argues James M. McPherson. In  Embattled Rebel, McPherson shows us that Davis might have been on the wrong side of history, but it is too easy to diminish him because of his cause's failure.

In order to understand the Civil War and its outcome, it is essential to give Davis his due as a military leader and as the president of an aspiring Confederate nation. Davis did not make it easy on himself. His subordinates and enemies alike considered him difficult, egotistical, and cold.

Most critical appraisals of Davis emphasize his choices in and management of generals rather than his strategies, but no other chief executive in American history exercised such tenacious hands-on influence in the shaping of military strategy. And while he was imprisoned for two years after the Confederacy's surrender awaiting a trial for treason that never came, and lived for another twenty-four years, he never once recanted the cause for which he had fought and lost. McPherson gives us Jefferson Davis as the commander in chief he really was, showing persuasively that while Davis did not win the war for the South, he was scarcely responsible for losing it.
Gettysburg, 1863

Gettysburg, 1863

Brooks D. Simpson

$43.00  $38.70

Gettysburg, 1863 offers readers an account of the great battle, as well as a succinct discussion of Gen. Robert E. Lee's offensive in June 1863 and the battle's aftermath as the Confederates made their way across the Potomac River some ten days later. Brooks D. Simpson outlines the decisions that the commanders on the field made and details how the action unfolded. He explores many aspects of the battle: the weaponry, the medical care administered, the terrain, the tactics, the art of command, and the experiences of civilians. His description of the preparations for the Confederate cannonade preceding the July 3 assault against the Union center also highlights the artillery and ammunition involved. More than a traditional military history chronicle, Gettysburg, 1863 serves as a broader overview of the Battle of Gettysburg, examining its importance both in history and memory. Simpson's clear, concise retelling of this key event in American history will appeal to both lovers of history and those who are new to the study of the Civil War.
Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson

Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson

S C Gwynne

$55.00

From the author of the prizewinning New York Times bestseller Empire of the Summer Moon comes a thrilling account of how Civil War general Thomas Stonewall Jackson became a great and tragic American hero. Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon, even Robert E. Lee, he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country's greatest military figures. His brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. Jackson's strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future. In April 1862 Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. He had, moreover, given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked--hope--and struck fear into the hearts of the Union. Rebel Yell is written with the swiftly vivid narrative that is Gwynne's hallmark and is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict between historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson's private life, including the loss of his young beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. It traces Jackson's brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.
Lincoln's Citadel: The Civil War in Washington, DC

Lincoln's Citadel: The Civil War in Washington, DC

Kenneth J. Winkle

$22.95

The stirring history of a president and a capital city on the front lines of war and freedom.

In the late 1840s, Representative Abraham Lincoln resided at Mrs. Sprigg’s boardinghouse on Capitol Hill. Known as Abolition House, Mrs. Sprigg’s hosted lively dinner-table debates of antislavery politics by the congressional boarders. The unusually rapid turnover in the enslaved staff suggested that there were frequent escapes north to freedom from Abolition House, likely a cog in the underground railroad. These early years in Washington proved formative for Lincoln.

In 1861, now in the White House, Lincoln could gaze out his office window and see the Confederate flag flying across the Potomac. Washington, DC, sat on the front lines of the Civil War. Vulnerable and insecure, the capital was rife with Confederate sympathizers. On the crossroads of slavery and freedom, the city was a refuge for thousands of contraband and fugitive slaves. The Lincoln administration took strict measures to tighten security and established camps to provide food, shelter, and medical care for contrabands. In 1863, a Freedman’s Village rose on the grounds of the Lee estate, where the Confederate flag once flew.

The president and Mrs. Lincoln personally comforted the wounded troops who flooded wartime Washington. In 1862, Lincoln spent July 4 riding in a train of ambulances carrying casualties from the Peninsula Campaign to Washington hospitals. He saluted the “One-Legged Brigade” assembled outside the White House as “orators,” their wounds eloquent expressions of sacrifice and dedication. The administration built more than one hundred military hospitals to care for Union casualties.

These are among the unforgettable scenes in Lincoln’s Citadel, a fresh, absorbing narrative history of Lincoln’s leadership in Civil War Washington. Here is the vivid story of how the Lincoln administration met the immense challenges the war posed to the city, transforming a vulnerable capital into a bastion for the Union.
8 pages of illustrations
War Trophies or Curios?: The War Museum Collection from German New Guinea 1915-1920

War Trophies or Curios?: The War Museum Collection from German New Guinea 1915-1920

Barry Craig ,  Ron Vanderwal ,  Christine Winter (Geography Teacher, Sheffield)

$80.00

Showcases a unique and rarely seen collection of cultural objects from New Guinea. Referred to as 'war trophies' during the German possesion of New Guinea, before the takeover by Australian military forces in 1914. The Australian War Museum received the collection from the Department of Defence and later, donated it to the Melbourne Museum when they were also acknowledged as cultural objects and objects of traditional use, rather than 'war trophies' or'curios'.A description of each piece includes where it was made, its usage and cultural importance. Information about how the collection was accumulated is included along with a brief account of the WW1 German possession of New Guinea.
Putin's Kleptocracy: Who Owns Russia?

Putin's Kleptocracy: Who Owns Russia?

Karen Dawisha (University of Maryland, College Park)

$46.95

The raging question in the world today is who is the real Vladimir Putin and what are his intentions. Karen Dawisha's brilliant Putin's Kleptocracy provides an answer, describing how Putin got to power, the cabal he brought with him, the billions they have looted, and his plan to restore the Greater Russia. Russian scholar Dawisha describes and exposes the origins of Putin's kleptocratic regime. She presents extensive new evidence about the Putin circle's use of public positions for personal gain even before Putin became president in 2000. She documents the establishment of Bank Rossiya, now sanctioned by the US; the rise of the Ozero cooperative, founded by Putin and others who are now subject to visa bans and asset freezes; the links between Putin, Petromed, and Putin's Palace near Sochi; and the role of security officials from Putin's KGB days in Leningrad and Dresden, many of whom have maintained their contacts with Russian organized crime. Putin's Kleptocracy is the result of years of research into the KGB and the various thriving Russian crime syndicates. Dawisha's sources include Stasi archives; Russian insiders; investigative journalists in the US, Britain, Germany, Finland, France, and Italy; and Western officials who served in Moscow. Russian journalists wrote part of this story when the Russian media was still free. Many of them died for this story, and their work has largely been scrubbed from the Internet, and even from Russian libraries, Dawisha says. But some of that work remains.
Soviet Space Dogs

Soviet Space Dogs

Olesya Turkina ,  Damon Murray ,  Inna Cannon

$39.99

This book is dedicated to the Soviet Space Dogs, who played a crucial part in the Soviet Space programme. These homeless dogs, plucked from the streets of Moscow, were selected because they fitted the programmes criteria: weighing no more than 7kg, measuring no more than 35cm in length, robust, photogenic and with a calm temperament. These characteristics enabled the dogs to withstand the extensive training that was needed to prepare them for suborbital, then for orbital space fights. On 3 November 1957, the dog Laika was the first Earth-born creature to enter space, making her instantly famous around the world. She did not return. Her death, a few hours after launching, transformed her into a legendary symbol of sacrifice. Two further strays, Belka and Strelka, were the first beings to make it back from space, and were swiftly immortalized in childrens books and cartoons. Images of the Space Dogs proliferated, reproduced on everyday goods across the Soviet Union: cigarette packets, tins of sweets, badges, stamps and postcards all bore their likeness. This book uses these unique items to illustrate the story (in fact and fiction) of how they became fairy-tale idols. Monuments now commemorate their pioneering role in conquering the final frontier: their heroism will never be forgotten.
The Fall of Tsarism: Untold Stories of the February 1917 Revolution

The Fall of Tsarism: Untold Stories of the February 1917 Revolution

Semion Lyandres

$40.95

The Fall of Tsarism contains a series of gripping, plain-spoken testimonies from some of the leading participants of the Russian Revolution of February 1917, including the future revolutionary premier Alexander Kerenskii. Recorded in the spring of 1917, months before the Bolsheviks seized power, these interviews represent the earliest first-hand testimonies on the overthrow of the Tsarist regime known to historians. Hidden away and presumed lost for the better part of a century, they are now revealed to the world for the first time.
Year Zero: A History of 1945

Year Zero: A History of 1945

Ian Buruma

$22.99

Many books have been written, and continue to be written, about the Second World War: military histories, histories of the Holocaust, the war in Asia, or collaboration and resistance in Europe. Few books have taken a close look at the immediate aftermath of the worldwide catastrophe. Drawing on hundreds of eye-witness accounts and personal stories, this sweeping book examines the seven months (in Europe) and four months (in Asia) that followed the surrender of the Axis powers, from the fate of Holocaust survivors liberated from the concentration camps, and the formation of the state of Israel, to the incipient civil war in China, and the allied occupation of Japan. It was a time when terrible revenge was taken on collaborators and their former masters; of ubiquitous black markets, war crime tribunals; and the servicing of millions of occupation troops, former foes in some places, liberators in others. But Year Zero is not just a story of vengeance. It was also a new beginning, of democratic restorations in Japan and West Germany, of social democracy in Britain and of a new world order under the United Nations. If construction follows destruction, Year Zero describes that extraordinary moment in between, when people faced the wreckage, full of despair, as well as great hope. An old world had been destroyed; a new one was yet to be built.
1914: Fight the Good Fight: Britain, the Army and the Coming of the First World War

1914: Fight the Good Fight: Britain, the Army and the Coming of the First World War

Allan Mallinson

$19.99

'No part of the Great War compares in interest with its opening', wrote Churchill. 'The measured, silent drawing together of gigantic forces, the uncertainty of their movements and positions, the number of unknown and unknowable facts made the first collision a drama never surpassed.in fact the War was decided in the first twenty days of fighting, and all that happened afterwards consisted in battles which, however formidable and devastating, were but desperate and vain appeals against the decision of fate.' On of Britain's foremost military historians and defence experts tackles the origins - and the opening first few weeks of fighting - of what would become known as 'the war to end all wars'. Intensely researched and convincingly argued, Allan Mallinson explores and explains the grand strategic shift that occurred in the century before the war, the British Army's regeneration after its drubbings in its fight against the Boer in South Africa, its almost calamitous experience of the first twenty days' fighting in Flanders to the point at which the British Expeditionary Force - the 'Old Contemptibles' - took up the spade in the middle of September 1914: for it was then that the war changed from one of rapid and brutal movement into the more familiar vision of trench warfare on Western Front. In this vivid, compelling new history, Malliinson brings his experience as a professional soldier to bear on the circumstances, events, actions and individuals and speculates - tantalizingly - on what might have been...
Kidnap in Crete: The True Story of the Abduction of a Nazi General

Kidnap in Crete: The True Story of the Abduction of a Nazi General

Rick Stroud

$32.99

On a moonlit night in April 1944 a small band of fearless partisans, led by the British SOE agent Patrick Leigh Fermor, kidnapped a high-ranking Nazi general on the German-occupied island of Crete. In 1941 the German army invaded the strategically important Mediterranean island with the largest airborne force in history. The years of Nazi occupation that followed saw mass executions, widespread starvation and the brutal destruction of homes - but amid the horror, the Cretan resistance, the Andartes, with the support of a handful of British SOE agents, fought on heroically. In Cairo, Patrick Leigh Fermor came up with a plan to avenge the islanders' suffering. Under cover of darkness on 4 February 1944, he parachuted onto Crete's deserted Mount Dikti in preparation for his secret and high-risk mission. This is the story of the abduction of General Kreipe by Leigh Fermor, his second-in-command William Stanley Moss and their tight-knit group of partisans; of the midnight ambush of the general's car and the perilous drive through the garrison town of Heraklion and twenty-two heavily guarded roadblocks; of their epic, dangerous journey on foot and mule across rocky peaks, hiding from their German pursuers in mountain caves and ditches, towards the coast where a Royal Navy launch was waiting to spirit the general to Egypt. But success came at a price for the islanders left behind: German reprisals were swift, unsparing and devastating. With unprecedented access to first-hand accounts of the Cretan guerrilla fighters themselves, as well as SOE files, Leigh Fermor's own account and other private papers and diaries, this astonishing true story of daring in the battle against Hitler is told in full for the first time.
The Second World War: A Miscellany

The Second World War: A Miscellany

Norman Ferguson

$24.99

Have you ever wondered...Who was the youngest WW2 serviceman to fight in battle? How low did the Dambusters fly? How many ships were sunk at Pearl Harbor? From the Battle of Britain to the Siege of Leningrad, the horrors of the Holocaust to the D-Day landings, on the Home Front and abroad, the Second World War changed the political, social and economic structure of the world. Through its battles, aircraft, weapons, soldiers, campaigns and heroes, this comprehensive miscellany is a compelling guide to one of the most destructive and all-encompassing wars the world has ever seen.
Triumph: Jesse Owens and Hitler's Olympics

Triumph: Jesse Owens and Hitler's Olympics

Jeremy Schaap

$19.99

The remarkable behind-the-scenes story of one of the most iconic clashes in sports and world history. In 1936, against a backdrop of swastikas flying and storm troopers goose-stepping, an African-American athlete won a staggering four Olympic gold medals. Jesse Owens, the son of sharecroppers, had single-handedly crushed Hitler's myth of Aryan supremacy. The story of Jesse Owens at the 1936 games is that of a high-profile athlete giving a performance that transcends sports. But it is also the intimate and complex tale of the courage of one remarkable man. This is the incredible true story of one of the moment a black athlete beat Hitler at his own games.
The Forgotten Front: The East African Campaign 1914-1918

The Forgotten Front: The East African Campaign 1914-1918

Ross Anderson

$34.99

The First World War began in East Africa in August 1914 and did not end until 13 November 1918. In its scale and impact, it was the largest conflict yet to take place on African soil. Four empires and their subject peoples were engaged in a conflict that ranged from modern Kenya in the north to Mozambique in the south. The campaign combined heroic human endeavour and terrible suffering, set in some of the most difficult terrain in the world. The troops had to cope with extremes that ranged from arid deserts to tropical jungles and formidable mountains, and almost always on inadequate rations. Yet the East African campaign has languished in undeserved obscurity over the years, with many people only vaguely aware of its course of events. Indeed, Humphrey Bogart's famous film, The African Queen, inspired by an episode of the campaign, often provides its only lasting image. The Forgotten Front is the first full-scale history of this neglected campaign. Ross Anderson details the fighting and the strategic and political background to the war and the differing viewpoints of the principal protagonists.
The Second World War, the Complete Illustrated History

The Second World War, the Complete Illustrated History

Richard Overy

$49.95

This major work covers the whole six-year global conflagration that shattered and then re-shaped the world. From the German blitzkrieg against Poland in September 1939, to the surrender of Japan following the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki almost exactly six years later. After a seemingly endless run of Axis victories - the fall of France, the surrender of Singapore, and the Russian withdrawal to the outskirts of Moscow - this book shows how the Allies slowly turned the tide of war in their favor, winning a decisive victory over Rommel in north Africa and destroying the German 6th Army in Stalingrad. The pace then quickens as the long, hard struggle for victory reaches it dramatic climax with the D-Day landings and subsequent bitter campaign through western Europe to Germany, the Red Army's unstoppable march to Berlin, and the final brutal battles with the Japanese in the Far East. Each key event is presented precisely, spread by spread, with maps, photographs and documents, biographical features and timeline.
The Battle Book of Ypres: A Reference to Military Operations in the Ypres Salient 1914-18

The Battle Book of Ypres: A Reference to Military Operations in the Ypres Salient 1914-18

Beatrix Brice

$59.99

Of the many hard-fought battles on the Western Front, Ypres stands out as an example of almost inhuman endeavour. For four long years it was the focal point of desperate fighting. Officially there were four main battles in 1914, 1915, 1917 and 1918; these were more accurately peaks in a continuing struggle, for Ypres symbolised Belgian defiance, and the British continued to expend disproportionate resources on defending it. It never fell, although the Germans came close to its gates, and indeed its loss would have been a severe blow to morale. The Battle Book of Ypres, originally published in 1927 and now presented again as a special Centenary Edition, comprises a chronological account of the fighting in the Ypres Salient during the First World War, followed by a useful and unique alphabetical reference to the events in and around each hamlet, village or wood - names familiar to those who fought or followed the course of war all those years ago, names now once again lost in insignificance. The names given to each stage of the struggle by the Battle Nomenclature Committee are listed in the appendix. Also included is an index of formations and units, an annotated bibliography and a new Foreword by military historian Nigel Cave.
Kitchener's Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914 - 1916

Kitchener's Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914 - 1916

Peter Simkins

$44.99

Numbering over five million men, Britain's army in the First World War was the biggest in the country's history. Remarkably, nearly half those men who served in it were volunteers. 2,466,719 men enlisted between August 1914 and December 1915, many in response to the appeals of the Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener, by then a natural hero. Peter Simkins describes how Kitchener's New Armies were raised and reviews the main political, economic and social effects of the recruiting campaign. He examines the experiences and impressions of the officers and men who made up the New Armies. As well as analysing their motives for enlisting, he explores how they were fed, housed, equipped and trained before they set off for active service abroad. Drawing upon a wide variety of sources, ranging from government papers to the diaries and letters of individual soldiers, he questions long-held assumptions about the 'rush to the colours' and the nature of patriotism in 1914. The book will be of interest not only to those studying social, political and economic history, but also to general readers who wish to know more about the story of Britain's citizen soldiers in the Great War.
The Other First World War: The Blood-Soaked Russian Fronts 1914-1922

The Other First World War: The Blood-Soaked Russian Fronts 1914-1922

Douglas Boyd

$44.99

Winston Churchill called it 'the unknown war'. Unlike the long stalemate of the Western Front, the conflict 1914-18 between the Russian Empire and the Central Powers was a war of movement spanning a continent - from the Arctic to the Adriatic, Black and Caspian seas and from the Baltic in the west to the Pacific Ocean. The appalling scale of casualties provoked strikes in Russia's war industries and widespread mutinies at the front. As the whole fabric of society collapsed, German money brought the Bolsheviks to power in the greatest deniable dirty trick of the twentieth century, after which Russia stopped fighting, eight months before the Western Front armistice. The cost to Russia was 4 million men dead and as many held as POWs by the Central Powers. Wounded? No one has any idea how many. All the belligerent powers of the Russian fronts were destroyed: the German, Austro-Hungarian and Russian empires gone forever and the Ottoman Empire so crippled that it finally collapsed in 1922. During four years of brutal civil war that followed, Trotsky's Red Army fought the White armies, murdering and massacring millions of civilians, as British, American and other western soldiers of the interventionist forces fought and died from the frozen Arctic to the arid deserts of Iran. This is the story of that other First World War.
Singapore's Dunkirk

Singapore's Dunkirk

Geoffrey Brooke

$39.99

When Singapore fell so ignominiously to the Japanese in February 1942 many tens of thousands of men, women and children were left to their own devices. It was truly 'every man for himself'. To stay in Singapore meant certain captivity and every probability of barbarity at the hands of the Japanese that so many tried to escape. This book tells of some of the remarkable and shocking experiences that lay in store for those who chose this option. The only way out was by sea and every sort of craft was pressed into service. Ahead lay terrible dangers; storm, shipwreck, piracy, capture by a merciless enemy, starvation and death through lack of water to name but some. This is a shocking and inspiring book that embraces great courage, extraordinary endurance, appalling atrocities and even cannibalism.
The Steam Workshops of the Great Western Railway

The Steam Workshops of the Great Western Railway

Ken Gibbs

$39.99

The nineteenth century was a time of innovation and expansion across the industrial landscape, and nowhere more so than on the railways, as the new age of iron, steel and steam, literally, gathered pace. At the head of the race up was the iconic Great Western Railway. As this mighty corporation grew, it absorbed an astonishing 353 railway companies. Many of them had their own workshops, depots and manufacturing, often assembling locomotives to the designs of other companies. All these, along with the various designs, became the responsibility of the GWR on takeover, and followed its standardisation of components where this was possible. These works became the beating heart of the GWR's vast empire, where majestic engines were built and maintained by some of the most skillful and inventive engineers of the day. Retired GWR railwayman Ken Gibb presents a comprehensive portrait of the works from Brunel to the final days of steam in the mid-twentieth century, and beyond to the rediscovery and renovation of many of the workshops for their unique heritage.
VCs of the First World War: the Sideshows

VCs of the First World War: the Sideshows

Gerald Gliddon

$22.99

The thirteenth and final volume of the 'VCs of the First World War' series features the lives and careers of forty-six servicemen who won the coveted Victoria Cross in theatres of war - or 'Sideshows', as they became known - beyond the Western Front and Gallipoli. Opening with the stories of four VC winners who took part in the prolonged struggle to drive the German Army out of East Africa, VCs of the First World War: The Sideshows goes on to tell the stories of the two Indian Army winners of the VC defending the North-West Frontier. Finally, it covers the campaigns against the Austro-German forces in Italy; securing the oil wells in Mesopotamia (later Iraq); defending the Suez Canal and attacking the Ottoman Army in Palestine and lastly serving in Salonika in the Balkans. Each VC winner's act of bravery is recorded here in intricate detail, together with the background of the men and their lives after the war - if they survived.
Hundred Days: The End of the Great War

Hundred Days: The End of the Great War

Nick Lloyd

$49.99

Nick Lloyd's Hundred Days: The End of the Great War explores the brutal, heroic and extraordinary final days of the First World War. On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day in November 1918, the guns of the Western Front fell silent. The Armistice, which brought the Great War to an end, marked a seminal moment in modern European and World history. Yet the story of how the war ended remains little-known. In this compelling and ground-breaking new study, Nick Lloyd examines the last days of the war and asks the question: how did it end? Beginning at the heralded turning-point on the Marne in July 1918, Hundred Days traces the epic story of the next four months, which included some of the bloodiest battles of the war. Using unpublished archive material from five countries, this new account reveals how the Allies - British, French, American and Commonwealth - managed to beat the German Army, by now crippled by indiscipline and ravaged by influenza, and force her leaders to seek peace. This is a powerful and moving book by a rising military historian. Lloyd's depiction of the great battles of July-November provides compelling evidence of the scale of the Allies' victories and the bitter reality of German defeat . (Gary Sheffield (Professor of War Studies)). Lloyd enters the upper tier of Great War historians with this admirable account of the war's final campaign . (Publishers Weekly). Nick Lloyd is Senior Lecturer in Defence Studies at King's College London, based at the Joint Services Command & Staff College in Shrivenham, Oxfordshire. He specialises in British military and imperial history in the era of the Great War and is the author of two books, Loos 1915 (2006), and The Amritsar Massacre: The Untold Story of One Fateful Day (2011).
The M14 Battle Rifle

The M14 Battle Rifle

Leroy Thompson ,  Johnny Shumate ,  Alan Gilliland

$29.99

The M14 may have only been the primary US service rifle for a little over a decade before being replaced by the M16, but it is still considered by many experts to be the best rifle to ever see US service. Primarily designed for a war in Europe, where it would take its place alongside the other battle rifles like the FN FAL, the M14 saw most of its combat use in the early days of the Vietnam War. Maintained until 1970 for compatibility with NATO forces the M14 had a renaissance as a semi-automatic sniping weapon and since 2001 the M14 has been employed as a Designated Marksman Rifle, being employed by all branches of the US military, especially in Afghanistan where the open terrain makes longer-range engagements common. Featuring specially commissioned full-color artwork and archive and close-up photographs, this engaging study tells the story of the M14, the long-lived battle rifle that remains in front-line service with US forces more than 50 years after its first adoption.
Mapping the World

Mapping the World

Beau Riffenburgh

$39.95

Mapping the World takes you on a journey through the history of cartography and is essentially a history of the world and how its territories were discovered and explored. Maps have been an integral part of the way humans have lived for approximately 8,000 years. The first accurate maps were produced in Ancient Babylonia. The earliest world map is the Babylonian World Map, which is symbolic and not an exact representation. It deliberately doesn't include the Persians or the Egyptians. The Ancient Greeks also produced maps, although they were mostly imaginary reconstructions of the world. Maps have been crucial in the development of empires, have helped to win wars, and have encouraged man to venture further than his or her known boundaries. Beautifully illustrated, Mapping the World is a fascinating look at how the science of cartography developed, how maps are used not just for getting from A to B, and why cartography is so important to our history of the world and the world we live in. Nowadays, we take the use of Sat Nav and Google maps for granted, but this book reflects on the fact that it all began with human imagination and the desire for knowledge.
Predator

Predator

Richard Whittle

$34.99

The creation of the first weapon in history whose operators can stalk and kill an enemy on the other side of the globe was far more than clever engineering. As Richard Whittle shows in Predator, it was one of the most profound developments in the history of military and aerospace technology. Once considered fragile toys, drones were long thought to be of limited utility. The Predator itself was resisted at nearly every turn by the military establishment, but a few iconoclasts refused to see this new technology smothered at birth. The remarkable cast of characters responsible for developing the Predator includes a former Israeli inventor who turned his Los Angeles garage into a drone laboratory, two billionaire brothers marketing a futuristic weapon to help combat Communism, a pair of fighter pilots willing to buck their white-scarf fraternity, a cunning Pentagon operator nicknamed Snake, and a secretive Air Force organization known as Big Safari. When an Air Force team unleashed the first lethal drone strikes in 2001 for the CIA, the military's view of drones changed nearly overnight. Based on five years of research and hundreds of interviews, Predator reveals the dramatic inside story of the creation of a revolutionary weapon that forever changed the way we wage war and opened the door to a new age in aviation.
Centuries of Change: Which Century Saw the Most Change?

Centuries of Change: Which Century Saw the Most Change?

Ian Mortimer

$55.00

History's greatest tour guide is back. And he's ringing the changes. In a contest of change, which century from the past millennium would come up trumps? Imagine the Black Death took on the female vote in a pub brawl, or the Industrial Revolution faced the internet in a medieval joust - whose side would you be on? In this hugely entertaining book, celebrated historian Ian Mortimer takes us on a whirlwind tour of Western history, pitting one century against another in his quest to measure change. We journey from a time when there was a fair chance of your village being burnt to the ground by invaders, and dried human dung was a recommended cure for cancer, to a world in which explorers sailed into the unknown and civilisations came into conflict with each other on an epic scale. Here is a story of godly scientists, shrewd farmers, cold-hearted entrepreneurs and strong-minded women - a story of discovery, invention, revolution and cataclysmic shifts in perspective. Bursting with ideas and underscored by a wry sense of humour, this is a journey into the past like no other. Our understanding of change will never be the same again - and the lessons we learn along the way are profound ones for us all.
A Short History of Nuclear Folly: Mad Scientists, Dithering Nazis, Lost Nukes, and Catastrophic Cover-Ups

A Short History of Nuclear Folly: Mad Scientists, Dithering Nazis, Lost Nukes, and Catastrophic Cover-Ups

Rudolph Herzog ,  Jefferson S. Chase

$27.99

In the spirit of Dr. Strangelove and The Atomic Cafe, Rudolph Herzog has here created a bleakly sardonic catalogue of atomic blunders and nuclear near-misses revealing the hushed-up and forgotten episodes in which the great powers have gambled with catastrophe. Rudolph Herzog is already well know as the historian behind the popular history title Dead Funny, which looked at humour in Nazi Germany. Now, he turns to the archives once again to produce an account that will raise important questions on international nuclear policy.
The World the Railways Made: Christian Wolmar's Railway Library

The World the Railways Made: Christian Wolmar's Railway Library

Nicholas Faith ,  Christian Wolmar

$39.99

Across American praries, through Siberian tundra, over Argentinian pampas and deep into the heart of Africa, the modern world began with the arrival of the railway. The shock was sudden and universal: railways carried empire, capitalism and industrialization to every corner of the planet. For some, the 'Iron Road' symbolized the brute horrors of modernity; for others the way toward a brighter future. From 1825, when the first passenger service linked Stockton and Darlington to the outbreak of World War I, Nicholas Faith presents an engaging and entertaining journey through the first century of rail, introducing visionaries, engineers, surveyors, speculators, financiers and navvies - the heroes and the rogues of the mechanical revolution that turned the world upside down. The railway was the most important invention of the 19th Century, and THE WORLD THE RAILWAYS MADE argues that in the 21st Century, with high speed lines that can compete with air travel and over 190 metro systems in 54 countries underpinning the world's greatest cities, it remains just as relevant.
           
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