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History
Anzac: The Unauthorised Biography

Anzac: The Unauthorised Biography

Carolyn Holbrook

$34.99

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Raise a glass for an Anzac. Run for an Anzac. Camp under the stars for an Anzac. Is there anything Australians won't do to keep the Anzac legend at the centre of our national story?

But standing firm on the other side of the Anzac enthusiasts is a chorus of critics claiming that the appetite for Anzac is militarising our history and indoctrinating our children. So how are we to make sense of this struggle over how we remember the Great War?

Anzac, the Unauthorised Biography cuts through the clamour to provide a much-needed historical perspective on the battle over Anzac. It traces how, since 1915, Australia's memory of the Great War has declined and surged, reflecting the varied and complex history of the Australian nation itself. Most importantly, it asks why so many Australians persist with the fiction that the nation was born on 25 April 1915.
The Restoration of Rome: Barbarian Popes & Imperial Pretenders

The Restoration of Rome: Barbarian Popes & Imperial Pretenders

Peter Heather

$22.99

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In 476 AD the last of Rome's emperors was deposed by a barbarian general, the son of one of Attila the Hun's henchmen, and the imperial vestments were despatched to Constantinople. The curtain fell on the Roman Empire in Western Europe, its territories divided between successor kingdoms constructed around barbarian military manpower. But if the Roman Empire was dead, the dream of restoring it refused to die.

In many parts of the old Empire, real Romans still lived, holding on to their lands, the values of their civilisation, its institutions; the barbarians were ready to reignite the imperial flame and to enjoy the benefits of Roman civilisation, the three greatest contenders being Theoderic, Justinian and Charlemagne.

Ultimately, they would fail and it was not until the reinvention of the papacy in the eleventh century that Europe's barbarians found the means to generate a new Roman Empire, an empire which has lasted a thousand years.
Hitler's Last Witness: The Memoirs of Hitler's Bodyguard

Hitler's Last Witness: The Memoirs of Hitler's Bodyguard

Rochus Misch ,  Roger Moorhouse

$32.99

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After being seriously wounded in the 1939 Polish campaign, Rochus Misch was invited to join Hitler's SS-bodyguard. There he served until the war's end as Hitler's bodyguard, courier, orderly and finally as Chief of Communications.

On the Berghof terrace he watched Eva Braun organise parties; observed Heinrich Himmler and Albert Speer; and monitored telephone conversations from Berlin to the East Prussian FHQ on 20 July 1944 after the attempt on Hitler's life. Towards the end Misch was drawn into the Fuhrerbunker with the last of the 'faithful'. As defeat approached, he remained in charge of the bunker switchboard as his duty required, even after Hitler committed suicide. Misch knew Hitler as the private man and his position was one of unconditional loyalty.

His memoirs offer an intimate view of life in close attendance to Hitler and of the endless hours deep inside the bunker; and provide new insights into military events such as Hitler's initial feelings that the 6th Army should pull out of Stalingrad. Shortly before he died Misch wrote a new introduction for this English-language edition.

The book also contains a foreword by the Jewish author Ralph Giordano and a new introduction by Roger Moorhouse.
The Mongol Empire: Genghis Khan, His Heirs and the Founding of Modern China

The Mongol Empire: Genghis Khan, His Heirs and the Founding of Modern China

John Man

$32.99

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Genghis Khan is one of history's immortals: a leader of genius, driven by an inspiring vision for peaceful world rule. Believing he was divinely protected, Genghis united warring clans to create a nation and then an empire that ran across much of Asia. Under his grandson, Kublai Khan, the vision evolved into a more complex religious ideology, justifying further expansion. Kublai doubled the empire's size until, in the late 13th century, he and the rest of Genghis' 'Golden Family' controlled one fifth of the inhabited world.

Along the way, he conquered all China, gave the nation the borders it has today, and then, finally, discovered the limits to growth. Genghis' dream of world rule turned out to be a fantasy. And yet, in terms of the sheer scale of the conquests, never has a vision and the character of one man had such an effect on the world. Charting the evolution of this vision, John Man provides a unique account of the Mongol Empire, from young Genghis to old Kublai, from a rejected teenager to the world's most powerful emperor.
The Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic Europe

The Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic Europe

Graham Robb

$19.99

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"The idea that became this book arrived one evening like an unwanted visitor. It clearly expected to stay for a long time, and I knew that its presence in my home would be extremely compromising."

Treasure maps and secret paths belong to childhood. An adult scholar who sees an undiscovered ancient world reveal itself, complete with charts, instruction manual and guidebook, is bound to question the functioning of his mental equipment…

When Graham Robb made plans to cycle the legendary Via Heraklea, he had no idea that the line he plotted - stretching from the south-western tip of the Iberian Peninsula, across the Pyrenees and towards the Alps - would change the way he saw a civilisation.

It was an ancient path that took him deep into the world of the Celts: their gods, their art, and, most of all, their sophisticated knowledge of science. Gradually, a lost map revealed itself, of an empire constructed with precision and beauty across vast tracts of Europe. Oriented according to the movements of the Celtic sun god, the map had been forgotten for almost two millennia. Its implications were astonishing.  

Minutely researched and rich in revelations, The Ancient Paths brings to life centuries of our distant history and reinterprets pre-Roman Europe. Told with all of Robb's grace and verve, it is a dazzling, unforgettable book.
A History of Ancient Greece in Fifty Lives

A History of Ancient Greece in Fifty Lives

David Stuttard

$39.99

In this original new approach to telling the Greek story, David Stuttard weaves together the lives of fifty movers and shakers of the Greek world into a continuous, chronologically organized narrative, from the early tyrant rulers Peisistratus and Polycrates, through the stirrings of democracy under Cleisthenes to the rise of Macedon under Philip II and Alexander the Great and the eventual decline of the Greek world as Rome rose. The political leaders, writers, artists and philosophers of ancient Greece turned a small group of city states into a pan-Mediterranean civilization, whose legacy can be found everywhere today. But who were these people, what do we know of their lives and how did they interact with one another?
Medieval People: Vivid Lives in a Distant Landscape - from Charlemagne to Piero Della Francesca

Medieval People: Vivid Lives in a Distant Landscape - from Charlemagne to Piero Della Francesca

Michael Prestwich

$49.99

This engrossing and often witty account tells the life stories of some 70 individuals who made the Middle Ages. There are kings and queens, popes and politicians, soldiers and merchants, scholars, authors and visionaries. They range from the important, such as El Cid or Frederick Barbarossa, to the little known, such as the dissolute Venetian nun Clara Sanuto. Some were astonishingly successful: the empire created by Chinggis Khan was one of the most extensive ever seen. Some, such as Charles the Bold, the over-ambitious 15th-century duke of Burgundy, were failures. Contrary to modern myth, medieval people did not believe the earth was flat; torture was far less common than in later centuries; and technological advances included guns, printing, blast furnaces, spectacles, stirrups and the compass. Full of insights such as these, this book shows how medieval people lived in an era that was more one of invention and innovation than of superstition and backwardness. It will appeal to all those who want a truer picture of a world often erroneously portrayed by bestselling novelists of today.
The Fortunes of Africa: A 5,000 Year History of Wealth, Greed and Endeavour

The Fortunes of Africa: A 5,000 Year History of Wealth, Greed and Endeavour

Martin Meredith

$32.99

Africa has been coveted for its riches ever since the era of the Pharoahs. In past centuries, it was the lure of gold, ivory and slaves that drew fortune-seekers, merchant-adventurers and conquerors from afar. In modern times, the focus of attention is on oil, diamonds and other valuable minerals. Land was another prize. The Romans relied on their colonies in north Africa for vital grain shipments to feed the population of Rome. Arab invaders followed in their wake, eventually colonising the entire region. In modern times, foreign corporations have acquired huge tracts of land to secure food supplies needed abroad, just as the Romans did. In this vast and vivid panorama of history, Martin Meredith follows the fortunes of Africa over a period of 5,000 years. With compelling narrative, he traces the rise and fall of ancient kingdoms and empires; the spread of Christianity and Islam; the enduring quest for gold and other riches; the exploits of explorers and missionaries; and the impact of European colonisation. He examines too the fate of modern African states and concludes with a glimpse of their future. His cast of characters includes religious leaders, mining magnates, warlords, dictators and many other legendary figures, among them Mansa Musa, ruler of the medieval Mali empire, said to be the richest man the world has ever known. 'I speak of Africa,' Shakespeare wrote, 'and of golden joys'. This is history on an epic scale.
Australia's Few and the Battle of Britain

Australia's Few and the Battle of Britain

Kristen Alexander

$49.99

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The were among 'The Few' - eight Australian Spitfire and Hurricane pilots that were engaged in the Battle of Britain.

Jack Kennedy (Sydney), Stuart Walch (Hobart), Dick Glyde (Perth), Ken Holland (Sydney), Pat Hughes (Cooma and Sydney), Bill Millington (Adelaide), John Crossman (Newcastle) and Des Sheen (Canberra).

Only one survived.

During the summer and autumn of 1940, the Luftwaffe launched their campaign to gain superiority over the RAF, especially Fighter Command. The result was the first major battle of World War II (or any war) fought entirely in the air.

The Luftwaffe's defeat by 'The Few' marked a turning point in the Allies' favour. The Battle of Britain is one of the most significant battles of the war, and until now, the role of the Australian 'Few' has received little attention.

Kristen Alexander gives a personal account of eight Australian participants, drawing heavily on primary source material and original research. She follows these young men from childhood, through their education, training, personal relationships and flying careers, to death in combat (in the case of seven of the eight men), and beyond that to commemoration.
Maralinga: The Chilling Expose of Our Secret Nuclear Shame and Betrayal of Our Troops and Country

Maralinga: The Chilling Expose of Our Secret Nuclear Shame and Betrayal of Our Troops and Country

Frank Walker

$32.99

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The facts are shocking. The treachery is chilling. The fallout ongoing. During the 1950s-60s, with the blessing of Prime Minister Robert Menzies, the British government used Australia as its nuclear laboratory. They exploded twelve atomic bombs on Australian soil - at the Monte Bello Islands, Emu Field and Maralinga.

Sixteen thousand Australian servicemen were guinea pigs. RAAF pilots were ordered to fly into nuclear mushroom clouds, soldiers told to walk into radioactive ground zero, sailors retrieved highly contaminated debris - none of them aware of the dangers they faced. But the betrayal didn't end with our soldiers.

Secret monitoring stations were set up around the continent to measure radiation levels and a clandestine decades-long project stole bones from dead babies to see how much fallout had contaminated their small bodies - their grieving parents were never told. Investigative journalist Frank Walker's Maralinga is a must-read true story of scientists treating an entire population as lab rats and politicians sacrificing their own people in the pursuit of power.
The Europeans in Australia: Volume Three - Nation

The Europeans in Australia: Volume Three - Nation

Alan Atkinson

$49.99

Nation, the third and final volume in the landmark history of Australia told from the point of view of settlers from Europe, covers Federation, World War I and its aftermath. The culmination of Alan Atkinson's extraordinary career in the writing and teaching of Australian history, The Europeans in Australia is the first such large, single author account since Manning Clark's A History of Australia.
The Ghosts of Roebuck Bay: The 1942 Bombing of Broome, and its Tragic Aftermath

The Ghosts of Roebuck Bay: The 1942 Bombing of Broome, and its Tragic Aftermath

Ian W. Shaw

$32.99

The Japanese attack on Broome is the second most deadly air raid on Australia soil in our history and yet it's almost entirely overlooked. On 3 March 1942, nine Japanese Zero planes strafed the small town planning to destroy the aerodrome and American planes. With no notice, the townsfolk could only put up minimal opposition and in an attack that lasted only an hour, almost one hundred men, women and children lost their lives. Not a single operational aircraft remained in Broome, but the shocking loss of human life can never be truly calculated. The Ghosts of Roebuck Bay tells the story of this tragedy, shining light on a story that has slipped through the cracks of history. A captivating tale of refugees and soldiers, of reputations made and lost, of survival and spirit that resonates to today.
Britain Against Napoleon: The Organisation of Victory, 1793-1815

Britain Against Napoleon: The Organisation of Victory, 1793-1815

Roger Knight

$27.99

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Britain Against Napoleon is the first book to explain how the British state successfully organised itself to overcome Napoleon - and how very close it came to defeat.

For more than twenty years after 1793, the French army was supreme in continental Europe. How was it that despite multiple changes of government and the assassination of a Prime Minister, Britain survived and eventually won a generation-long war against a regime which at its peak in 1807 commanded many times the resources and manpower?

This book looks beyond the familiar exploits (and bravery) of the army and navy during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. It shows the degree to which, because of the magnitude and intensity of hostilities, the capacities of the whole British population were involved: industrialists, farmers, shipbuilders, gunsmiths and gunpowder manufacturers.

The intelligence war was also central; but no participants were more important, Knight argues, than the bankers and international traders of the City of London, without whom the armies of Britain's allies could not have taken the field. 
The Underground Girls of Kabul: The Hidden Lives of Afghan Girls Disguised as Boys

The Underground Girls of Kabul: The Hidden Lives of Afghan Girls Disguised as Boys

Jenny Nordberg

$29.99

An Afghan woman's life expectancy is just 44 years, and her life cycle often begins and ends in disappointment: being born a girl and finally, having a daughter of her own. For some, disguising themselves as boys is the only way to get ahead. Nordberg follows women such as Azita Rafaat, a parliamentarian who once lived as a Bacha Posh, the mother of seven-year-old Mehran, who she is raising as a Bacha Posh as well, but for different reasons than in the past. There's Zahra, a teenage student living as a boy who is about to display signs of womanhood as she enters puberty. And Skukria, a hospital nurse who remained in a Bacha Posh disguise until she was twenty, and who now has three children of her own. Exploring the historical roots of this tradition, The Underground Girls of Kabul is a fascinating and moving investigation.
Danubia: A Personal History of Habsburg Europe

Danubia: A Personal History of Habsburg Europe

Simon Winder

$19.99

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ABBEY'S GUEST COMMENT ----- A brisk and witty waltz through hundreds of years of European history. Winder's humour and insights illuminate the muddle and mystery of one of the longest lasting and least coherent of the great Empires. Thoroughly enjoyable from start to finish. ~ Dave Taylor, English Cricket fan - out here for the 2013-14 Ashes series, Dave needed something stimulating to take his mind off the scoreline.

-----

Like Germania but better. This is the brilliant and entertaining companion to the Sunday Times top ten bestseller Germania. For centuries much of Europe was in the hands of the very peculiar Habsburg family. An unstable mixture of wizards, obsessives, melancholics, bores, musicians and warriors, they saw off - through luck, guile and sheer mulishness - any number of rivals, until finally packing up in 1918.

From their principal lairs along the Danube they ruled most of Central Europe and Germany and interfered everywhere - indeed the history of Europe hardly makes sense without them. Simon Winder's extremely funny new book plunges the reader into a maelstrom of alchemy, skeletons, jewels, bear-moats, unfortunate marriages and a guinea-pig village. Danubia is full of music, piracy, religion and fighting.

It is the history of a dynasty, but it is at least as much about the people they ruled, who spoke many different languages, lived in a vast range of landscapes, believed in many rival gods and often showed a marked ingratitude towards their oddball ruler in Vienna. Readers who discovered Simon Winder's genius for telling wonderful stories of middle Europe with Germania will be delighted by the eccentric and fascinating stories of the Habsburgs and their world.
Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France

Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France

Caroline Moorehead

$35.00

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High up in the mountains of the southern Massif Central in France lie tiny, remote villages united by a long and particular history. During the Nazi occupation, the inhabitants of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon and the other villages of the Plateau Vivarais Lignon saved several thousand people from the concentration camps. There were no informers, no denunciations, and no one broke ranks.

Together, the villagers held their silence, and kept persecuted people - resisters, freemasons, communists and above all Jews, many of them children and babies - from danger. During raids, the children would hide in the woods, their packs on their backs, waiting to hear the farmers' song which told them it was safe to return. After the War Le Chambon became one of only two places in the world to be honoured by Yad Vashem as Righteous Among Nations.

Just why and how Le Chambon and its outlying villages came to save so many people has never been fully told. But several of the remarkable architects of the mission are still alive, as are a number of those they saved. 

Caroline Moorehead travelled across the world to interview these people, and searched archives that few have seen, to bring us the unforgettable testimonies of many of those involved in this extraordinary account. It is a story of courage and determination, of a small number of heroic individuals who risked their lives to save others, and of what can be done when people come together to oppose tyranny.
Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles

Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles

Bernard Cornwell

$39.99

From the internationally bestselling author of the Sharpe novels and in the bicentenary year of the battle - this is the true story of Waterloo. On the 18th June, 1815 the armies of France, Britain and Prussia descended upon a quiet valley south of Brussels. In the previous three days the French army had beaten the British at Quatre Bras and the Prussians at Ligny. The Allies were in retreat. The blood-soaked battle of Waterloo would become a landmark in European history, to be examined over and again, not least because until the evening of the 18th, the French army was close to prevailing on the battlefield. Now, brought to life by the celebrated novelist Bernard Cornwell, this is the chronicle of the four days leading up to the actual battle and a thrilling hour by hour account of that fateful day. In his first work of non-fiction, Cornwell combines his storytelling skills with a meticulously researched history to give a riveting account of every dramatic moment, from Napoleon's escape from Elba to the smoke and gore of the battlefields. Through letters and diaries he also sheds new light on the private thoughts of Napoleon and the Duke of Wellington, as well as the ordinary officers and soldiers. Published to coincide with the bicentenary in 2015, Waterloo is a tense and gripping story of heroism and tragedy - and of the final battle that determined the fate of Europe.
Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic

Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic

Matthew Stewart

$36.95

Not only the erudite Thomas Jefferson, the wily and elusive Ben Franklin, and the underappreciated Thomas Paine, but also Ethan Allen, the hero of the Green Mountain Boys, and Thomas Young, the forgotten Founder who kicked off the Boston Tea Party these radicals who founded America set their sights on a revolution of the mind. Derided as infidels and atheists in their own time, they wanted to liberate us not just from one king but from the tyranny of supernatural religion. The ideas that inspired them were neither British nor Christian but largely ancient, pagan, and continental: the fecund universe of the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius, the potent (but nontranscendent) natural divinity of the Dutch heretic Benedict de Spinoza. Drawing deeply on the study of European philosophy, Matthew Stewart pursues a genealogy of the philosophical ideas from which America s revolutionaries drew their inspiration, all scrupulously researched and documented and enlivened with storytelling of the highest order. Along the way, he uncovers the true meanings of Nature s God, self-evident, and many other phrases crucial to our understanding of the American experiment but now widely misunderstood. Stewart s lucid and passionate investigation surprises, challenges, enlightens, and entertains at every turn, as it spins a true tale and a persuasive, exhilarating argument about the founding principles of American government and the sources of our success in science, medicine, and the arts.
Rendezvous with Destiny: How Franklin D. Roosevelt and Five Extraordinary Men Took America into the War and into the World

Rendezvous with Destiny: How Franklin D. Roosevelt and Five Extraordinary Men Took America into the War and into the World

Michael Fullilove

$24.99

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In the dark days between Hitler's invasion of Poland and the attack on Pearl Harbor, a group of highly unorthodox emissaries dispatched to Europe by President Franklin D. Roosevelt paved the way for America's entry into the war.

Sumner Welles, the buttoned-down diplomat eventually ruined by his sexual misdemeanours, met with Mussolini, Hitler and Chamberlain.

William 'Wild Bill' Donovan, war hero and future spymaster, visited an isolated United Kingdom  to determine whether it could hold out against the Nazis.

Harry Hopkins, frail social worker and New Dealer, became an unlikely confidant of Churchill and Stalin.

Averell Harriman, banker and railroad heir, ran the massive aid program out of London, where he romanced Churchill's daughter-in-law.

Wendell Willkie, the charismatic former Republican presidential candidate, raised British morale and helped FDR to win over wary Americans to the cause.

Together, they shaped the future of America, the Second World War, and the modern world. Michael Fullilove restores Roosevelt's unlikely envoys to their proper place in history. Rendezvous with Destiny is stirring and important history, written with the pace of a thriller.
World Without End: The Global Empire of Philip II

World Without End: The Global Empire of Philip II

Hugh Thomas

$49.99

Following Rivers of Gold and The Golden Age, World Without End is the conclusion of a magisterial three-volume history of the Spanish Empire by Hugh Thomas, its foremost worldwide authority World Without End is the climax of Hugh Thomas' great history of the Spanish Empire in the Americas.

It describes the conquest of Paraguay and the River Plate, of the Yucatan in Mexico, the only partial conquest of Chile, and battles with the French over Florida, and then, in the 1580s, the extraordinary projection of Spanish power across the Pacific to conquer the Philippines. More significantly, it describes how the Spanish ran the greatest empire the world had seen since Rome - as well as conquistadores, the book is people with viceroys, judges, nobles, bishops, inquisitors and administrators of many different kinds, often in conflict with one another, seeking to organise the native populations into towns, to build cathedrals, hospitals and universities.

Behind them - sometimes ahead of them - came the religious orders, the Franciscans, Dominicans, Augustinians, and finally the Jesuits, builders of convents and monasteries, many of them of astonishing beauty, and reminders of the pervasiveness of religion and the self-confidence of the age. Towering above them all, though moving rarely from the palace of the Escorial outside Madrid, is the figure of King Philip II, the central figure in the book. The Venetian ambassador thought him 'the arbiter of the world'.

Once the Philippines had been consolidated, Philip's advisors contemplated an invasion of China: the Jesuit Father Sanchez called it 'the greatest enterprise which has ever been proposed to any monarch in the world'. It was an enterprise never undertaken, but never explicitly abandoned. Was it a great or a terrible empire? In contrast to other empire builders, the Spaniards entered upon arguments with each other about their right to rule other peoples, and their ruthlessness was often tempered by humanity.
The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis

The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis

Arthur Allen

$33.95

The gruesome disease typhus, transmitted by body lice, afflicts the desperate: refugees, soldiers and ghettoised peoples. The Nazis, who equated the louse with parasitic, subhuman Jews, so feared the disease that they granted special status to the Polish scientist Rudolf Weigl, the only one who could make an effective vaccine. Weigl's laboratory became a centre of intellectual activity and resistance. Among his assistants was Ludwik Fleck, later sent to Buchenwald, where he deceived the Nazis and undermined their medical trials. Drawing on extensive research and interviews, Arthur Allen tells a harrowing story of two brave scientists, who put their training to the best use, at the highest personal risk.
Warsaw 1944: Hitler, Himmler and the Crushing of a City

Warsaw 1944: Hitler, Himmler and the Crushing of a City

Alexandra Richie

$29.99

The traumatic story of one of the last major battles of World War II, in which the Poles fought off German troops and police, street by street, for sixty-three days. The Warsaw Uprising of August 1944 was a shocking event in a hideous war. This is the first account to recall the tragedy from both German and Polish perspectives and asks why, when the war was nearly lost, Hitler and Himmler decided to return to Warsaw bent on murder, deportation, and destruction. This was the only time in history that a European capital has ever been emptied of its entire population and destroyed entirely. Hundreds were thrown from windows, burned alive, trampled to death. The murder of 40,000 innocents on 5th August was the largest battlefield massacre of the war. But the Poles did not give in. Organized and popular, the Uprising, which had been expected to last under a week, fought off German troops including Himmler's most notorious SS battalions street by street, for sixty-three days. Using first-hand accounts, Richie charts the atrocities and the breakdown of SS morale, but she also goes on to examine the long-term implications of Stalin's refusal to help and how the Uprising affected negotiations over the fate of post-war Europe, sowing the seeds of the Cold War. But above all else 'Warsaw 1944' is the story of a city's unbreakable spirit, in the face of unspeakable barbarism.
The Long Shadow: The Great War and the Twentieth Century

The Long Shadow: The Great War and the Twentieth Century

David Reynolds

$19.99

In Britain we have lost touch with the Great War. Our overriding sense now is of a meaningless, futile bloodbath in the mud of Flanders -- of young men whose lives were cut off in their prime for no evident purpose. But by reducing the conflict to personal tragedies, however moving, we have lost the big picture: the history has been distilled into poetry. In The Long Shadow, critically acclaimed author David Reynolds seeks to redress the balance by exploring the true impact of 1914-18 on the 20th century. Some of the Great War's legacies were negative and pernicious but others proved transformative in a positive sense. Exploring big themes such as democracy and empire, nationalism and capitalism and re-examining the differing impacts of the War on Britain, Ireland and the United States, The Long Shadow throws light on the whole of the last century and demonstrates that 1914-18 is a conflict that Britain, more than any other nation, is still struggling to comprehend. Stunningly broad in its historical perspective, The Long Shadow is a magisterial and seismic re-presentation of the Great War.
Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648

Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648

Mark Greengrass

$59.99

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Mark Greengrass' gripping, major, original account of Europe in an era of tumultuous change. This latest addition to the landmark Penguin History of Europe series is a fascinating study of 16th and 17th century Europe and the fundamental changes which led to the collapse of Christendom and established the geographical and political frameworks of Western Europe as we know it.

From peasants to princes, no one was untouched by the spiritual and intellectual upheaval of this era. Martin Luther's challenge to church authority forced Christians to examine their beliefs in ways that shook the foundations of their religion. The subsequent divisions, fed by dynastic rivalries and military changes, fundamentally altered the relations between ruler and ruled. Geographical and scientific discoveries challenged the unity of Christendom as a belief-community.

Europe, with all its divisions, emerged instead as a geographical projection. It was reflected in the mirror of America, and refracted by the eclipse of Crusade in ambiguous relationships with the Ottomans and Orthodox Christianity.

Chronicling these dramatic changes, Thomas More, Shakespeare, Montaigne and Cervantes created works which continue to resonate with us. Christendom Destroyed is a rich tapestry that fosters a deeper understanding of Europe's identity today.

'The Penguin History of Europe series ...is one of contemporary publishing's great projects.' New Statesman
Sydney Now and Then

Sydney Now and Then

C Mackaness

$29.99

Sydney is graced with natural beauty - a waterscape of beaches, rivers, bays and harbours. This revised and updated, beautifully photographed volume captures the evolution of the city in its remarkable setting through the last century, highlighting both the dramatic growth and the resolute consistency of landmark locations. 

Many of the "then" images were photographed at the turn of the 20th century, when Sydney overtook Melbourne as Australia's most populated city. The photos of today's Sydney are a continuation of that story - a city still booming, the foundations still there, but now congested with skyscrapers and transport connections. 

Featuring classic Sydney locations such as Circular Quay, Town Hall, Parramatta River and the Queen Victoria Building, as well as world-famous beaches and harbour scenes, this book both showcases Sydney's finest and highlights its development over the past hundred years.
Melbourne Then and Now

Melbourne Then and Now

Heather Chapman

$29.99

Part of Melbourne's charm is down to the preservation of grand buildings from its days as Australia's most populous and prosperous city. Victoria's gold rush in the 1850s led to a rapid expansion and allowed the city to build magnificent institutional structures such as Customs House, the City Baths, Treasury Building and Her Majesty's Theatre. 

Melbourne: Then and Now, shows both the historical and current images of these fabulous landmarks, giving a fascinating insight into Melbourne's development from its Victorian roots through to the 21st Century city of towering skyscrapers. Updated with stunning new photography, this classic book features a wide range of the city's best locations, from the great Flinders Street Station, to Albert Park and St Kilda and is the perfect gift for Melbournites and travelers alike.
The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World

The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World

Adrienne Mayor

$53.95

Amazons--fierce warrior women dwelling on the fringes of the known world--were the mythic archenemies of the ancient Greeks. Heracles and Achilles displayed their valor in duels with Amazon queens, and the Athenians reveled in their victory over a powerful Amazon army. In historical times, Cyrus of Persia, Alexander the Great, and the Roman general Pompey tangled with Amazons. But just who were these bold barbarian archers on horseback who gloried in fighting, hunting, and sexual freedom? Were Amazons real? In this deeply researched, wide-ranging, and lavishly illustrated book, National Book Award finalist Adrienne Mayor presents the Amazons as they have never been seen before. This is the first comprehensive account of warrior women in myth and history across the ancient world, from the Mediterranean Sea to the Great Wall of China. Mayor tells how amazing new archaeological discoveries of battle-scarred female skeletons buried with their weapons prove that women warriors were not merely figments of the Greek imagination. Combining classical myth and art, nomad traditions, and scientific archaeology, she reveals intimate, surprising details and original insights about the lives and legends of the women known as Amazons. Provocatively arguing that a timeless search for a balance between the sexes explains the allure of the Amazons, Mayor reminds us that there were as many Amazon love stories as there were war stories. The Greeks were not the only people enchanted by Amazons--Mayor shows that warlike women of nomadic cultures inspired exciting tales in ancient Egypt, Persia, India, Central Asia, and China. Driven by a detective's curiosity, Mayor unearths long-buried evidence and sifts fact from fiction to show how flesh-and-blood women of the Eurasian steppes were mythologized as Amazons, the equals of men. The result is likely to become a classic.
Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code and the Uncovering of a Lost Civilisation

Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code and the Uncovering of a Lost Civilisation

Margalit Fox

$22.99

For the first time, the full story of the race to decipher the world's greatest puzzle.

The decoding of Linear B is one of the world's greatest stories: from the discovery of a cache of ancient tablets recording a lost prehistoric language to the dramatic solution of the riddle nearly seventy years later, it exerts a mesmerizing pull on the imagination. 

But, captivating as it is, this story is missing a crucial piece. Two men have dominated Linear B in popular history: Arthur Evans, the intrepid Victorian archaeologist who unearthed Linear B at Knossos and Michael Ventris, the dashing young amateur who produced a solution. But there was a third figure: Alice Kober, without whose painstaking work, recorded on pieces of paper clipped from hymn-sheets and magazines and stored in cigarette boxes in her Brooklyn loft, Linear B might still remain a mystery.

Drawing on Kober's own papers - only made available recently - Margalit Fox provides the final piece of the enigma, and along the way reveals how you decipher a language when you know neither its grammar nor its alphabet as well as the stories behind other ancient languages, like the dancing-man Rongorongo of Easter Island.
The Great Archaeologists

The Great Archaeologists

Brian Fagan

$49.99

Organized into six thematic sections, The Great Archaeologists gives short, vivid biographies and fresh assessments of the achievements of 70 of the worlds greatest practitioners, written by a 40-strong team of contributors, themselves all eminent archaeologists and authors. All these archaeologists very different individuals, and often in deep disagreement with one another have established the subject as a scientific discipline and vastly broadened and deepened our knowledge of the human past. Authoritative and entertaining, this is a book for anyone fascinated by the human past and its discovery.
From Antiquarian to Archaeologist: The History and Philosophy of Archaeology

From Antiquarian to Archaeologist: The History and Philosophy of Archaeology

Tim Murray

$59.99

This volume forms a collection of papers tracking the emergence of the history of archaeology from a subject of marginal status in the 1980s to the mainstream subject which it is today. Professor Timothy Murray's essays have been widely cited and track over 20 years in the development of the subject. The papers are accompanied by a new introduction which surveys the development of the subject over the last 25 years as well as a reflection of what this means for the philosophy of archaeology and theoretical archaeology. This volume spans Tim's successful career as an academic at the forefront of the study of the history of archaeology, both in Australia and internationally. During his career he has held posts in Britain and Europe as well as Australia, most notably at the University of Cambridge, The Institute of Archaeology at UCL, Leiden University and the University of Paris. He now edits The Bulletin of the History of Archaeology.
The Knights Templar

The Knights Templar

Sean Martin

$17.99

The Templars have exerted a unique influence over European history: orthodox historians see them as nothing more than soldier-monks whose arrogance was their ultimate undoing, while others see them as occultists of the first order, the founders of Freemasonry, possessors of the Holy Grail and creators of the Turin Shroud. Sean Martin considers both the orthodox and conspiratorial version of events, and includes the latest revelations from the Vatican Library.
The King in the North: The Life and Times of Oswald of Northumbria

The King in the North: The Life and Times of Oswald of Northumbria

Max Adams

$24.99

A charismatic leader, a warrior whose prowess in battle earned him the epithet Whiteblade, an exiled prince who returned to claim his birthright, the inspiration for Tolkein's Aragorn. Oswald of Northumbria was the first great English monarch, yet today this legendary figure is all but forgotten. In this panoramic protrait of Dark Age Britain, archaeologist and biographer Max Adams returns the king in the North to his rightful place in history.
The Age of the Vikings

The Age of the Vikings

Anders Winroth

$49.95

The Vikings maintain their grip on our imagination, but their image is too often distorted by medieval and modern myth. It is true that they pillaged, looted, and enslaved. But they also settled peacefully and developed a vast trading network. They traveled far from their homelands in swift and sturdy ships, not only to raid, but also to explore. Despite their fearsome reputation, the Vikings didn't wear horned helmets, and even the infamous berserkers were far from invincible. By dismantling the myths, The Age of the Vikings allows the full story of this period in medieval history to be told. By exploring every major facet of this exciting age, Anders Winroth captures the innovation and pure daring of the Vikings without glossing over their destructive heritage. He not only explains the Viking attacks, but also looks at Viking endeavors in commerce, politics, discovery, and colonization, and reveals how Viking arts, literature, and religious thought evolved in ways unequaled in the rest of Europe. He shows how the Vikings seized on the boundless opportunities made possible by the invention of the longship, using it to venture to Europe for plunder, to open new trade routes, and to settle in lands as distant as Russia, Greenland, and the Byzantine Empire. Challenging the image of the Vikings that comes so easily to mind, Winroth argues that Viking chieftains were no more violent than men like Charlemagne, who committed atrocities on a far greater scale than the northern raiders. Drawing on a wealth of written, visual, and archaeological evidence, The Age of the Vikings sheds new light on the complex society and culture of these legendary seafarers.
Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt

Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt

Jan Assmann ,  David Lorton

$57.95

Human beings, the acclaimed Egyptologist Jan Assmann writes, are the animals that have to live with the knowledge of their death, and culture is the world they create so they can live with that knowledge. In his new book, Assmann explores images of death and of death rites in ancient Egypt to provide startling new insights into the particular character of the civilization as a whole. Drawing on the unfamiliar genre of the death liturgy, he arrives at a remarkably comprehensive view of the religion of death in ancient Egypt. Assmann describes in detail nine different images of death: death as the body being torn apart, as social isolation, the notion of the court of the dead, the dead body, the mummy, the soul and ancestral spirit of the dead, death as separation and transition, as homecoming, and as secret. Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt also includes a fascinating discussion of rites that reflect beliefs about death through language and ritual.
Edward IV: From Contemporary Chronicles, Letters and Records

Edward IV: From Contemporary Chronicles, Letters and Records

Keith Dockray

$39.99

Edward IV (king from 1461-83), so often overshadowed by his younger brother and eventual successor Richard III is a controversial figure in his own right. Was he a lazy and licentious lightweight who much preferred his mistresses to his minsters and had little taste for the arduous day-to-day business of government? Or was he, rather, a wise and successful monarch who laid the foundations for over a century of Tudor rule? This documentary study by the co-author of Richard III in the same series, presents contemporary and near-contemporary sources for Edward IV and his reign, enabling the reader to appreciate why the king's reputation has fluctuated so remarkedly, and provides and indispensible compendium for all who wish to enter the political world of Yorkist England.
A Great and Glorious Adventure: A Military History of the Hundred Years War

A Great and Glorious Adventure: A Military History of the Hundred Years War

Gordon Corrigan

$29.99

The Hundred Years War was fought between 1337 and 1453 over English claims to both the throne of France by right of inheritance and large parts of the country that had been at one time Norman or, later, English. The fighting ebbed and flowed, but despite their superior tactics and great victories at Crecy, Poitiers and Agincourt, the English could never hope to secure their claims in perpetuity: France was wealthier and far more populous, and while the English won the battles, they could not hope to hold forever the lands they conquered. The real and abiding significance of the war lies in the fact that, at its end, the English had become English, as opposed to Anglo-French, and France too had set out on the road to nationhood. (Both countries would subsequently become the very best of enemies.) The war also sparked a real revolution in the English way of waging war, with increasing professionalism and the use of technology to make up for lack of numbers - factors which remain relevant throughout the subsequent history of the English, and then the British, army and which are still critical to it today. Military historian Gordon Corrigan's new history of these epochal events is brisk, combative and refreshingly straightforward, and the great kings, men and battles of the period receive the full attention and reassessment they deserve.
A Short History of the Normans

A Short History of the Normans

Leonie V. Hicks

$31.95

The Battle of Hastings in 1066 is the one date forever seared on the British national psyche. It enabled the Norman Conquest that marked the end of Anglo-Saxon England. But there was much more to the Normans than the invading army Duke William shipped over from Normandy to the shores of Sussex. How a band of marauding warriors established some of the most powerful kingdoms in Europe - in Sicily and France, as well as England - is an improbably romantic idea. In exploring Norman culture in all its regions, Leonie V Hicks places the Normans in the context of early medieval society. Her comparative perspective enables the Norman story to be told in full, so that the societies of Rollo, William, Robert and Roger Guiscard are given the focused attention they deserve. From Hastings to the martial exploits of Bohemond and Tancred on the First Crusade; from castles and keeps to Romanesque cathedrals; and from the founding of the Kingdom of Sicily (1130) to cross-cultural encounters with Byzantines and Muslims, this is a fresh and lively survey of one of the most popular topics in European history.
Cuneiform

Cuneiform

Irving L. Finkel ,  Jonathan Taylor

$19.99

Cuneiform script on tablets of clay is, as far as we know, the oldest form of writing in the world. The choice of clay as writing medium in ancient Mesopotamia meant that records of all kinds could survive down to modern times, preserving fascinating documents from ancient civilization, written by a variety of people and societies. From reading these tablets we can understand not only the history and economics of the time but also the beliefs, ideas and superstitions. This new book will bring the world in which the cuneiform was written to life for the non-expert reader, revealing how ancient inscriptions can lead to a new way of thinking about the past. It will explain how this pre-alphabetic writing really worked and how it was possible to use cuneiform signs to record so many different languages so long ago. Richly illustrated with a wealth of fresh examples ranging from elementary school exercises to revealing private letters or beautifully calligraphic literature for the royal library, we will meet people that arent so very different from ourselves. We will read the work of many scribes from mundane record keepers to state fortune tellers, using tricks from puns to cryptography. For the first time cuneiform tablets and their messages are not remote and inaccessible, but wonderfully human documents that resonate today.
The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World

The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World

Michael Peachin

$60.95

The study of Roman society and social relations blossomed in the 1970s. By now, we possess a very large literature on the individuals and groups that constituted the Roman community, and the various ways in which members of that community interacted. There simply is, however, no overview that takes into account the multifarious progress that has been made in the past thirty-odd years. The purpose of this handbook is twofold. On the one hand, it synthesizes what has heretofore been accomplished in this field. On the other hand, it attempts to configure the examination of Roman social relations in some new ways, and thereby indicates directions in which the discipline might now proceed. The book opens with a substantial general introduction that portrays the current state of the field, indicates some avenues for further study, and provides the background necessary for the following chapters. It lays out what is now known about the historical development of Roman society and the essential structures of that community. In a second introductory article, Clifford Ando explains the chronological parameters of the handbook. The main body of the book is divided into the following six sections: 1) Mechanisms of Socialization (primary education, rhetorical education, family, law), 2) Mechanisms of Communication and Interaction, 3) Communal Contexts for Social Interaction, 4) Modes of Interpersonal Relations (friendship, patronage, hospitality, dining, funerals, benefactions, honor), 5) Societies Within the Roman Community (collegia, cults, Judaism, Christianity, the army), and 6) Marginalized Persons (slaves, women, children, prostitutes, actors and gladiators, bandits). The result is a unique, up-to-date, and comprehensive survey of ancient Roman society.
The Secret History of the Roman Roads of Britain

The Secret History of the Roman Roads of Britain

M. C. Bishop

$75.00

There have been many books on Britain's Roman roads, but none have considered in any depth their long-term strategic impact. Mike Bishop shows how the road network was vital not only in the Roman strategy of conquest and occupation, but influenced the course of British military history during subsequent ages. The author starts with the pre-Roman origins of the network (many Roman roads being built over prehistoric routes) before describing how the Roman army built, developed, maintained and used it. Then, uniquely, he moves on to the post-Roman history of the roads. He shows how they were crucial to medieval military history (try to find a medieval battle that is not near one) and the governance of the realm, fixing the itinerary of the royal progresses. Their legacy is still clear in the building of 18th century military roads and even in the development of the modern road network. Why have some parts of the network remained in use throughout? The text is supported with clear maps and photographs. Most books on Roman roads are concerned with cataloguing or tracing them, or just dealing with aspects like surveying. This one makes them part of military landscape archaeology.
The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire

The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire

Shadi Bartsch

$43.95

People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone - or oneself - was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an crotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self, Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces this complex notion of self from Plato's Greece to Seneca's Rome as she unveils divided selves, moral hypocrisy, and lustful Stoics - and offers fresh insights about seminal works. At once sexy and philosophical, The Mirror of the Self will be required reading for classicists, philosophers, and anthropologists alike.
The Boer War 1899-1902: Ladysmith, Magersfontein, Spion Kop, Kimberley and Mafeking

The Boer War 1899-1902: Ladysmith, Magersfontein, Spion Kop, Kimberley and Mafeking

John Grehan ,  Martin Mace

$59.99

Fought between the British Empire and the two independent Boer republics, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal Republic, the First Boer War (1880-1881) was a rebellion by the Boers (farmers) against British rule in the Transvaal that re-established their independence. The engagements that it involved, such as they were, were small and involved few casualties. More commonly referred to as just the Boer War, the Second Boer War (1899-1902), by contrast, was a lengthy conflict involving large numbers of troops from many British possessions (up to as many as 500,000 men), which ended with the conversion of the Boer republics into British colonies. The British defeated the Transvaal and the Orange Free State, first in open warfare and then in a long and bitter guerrilla campaign. British losses were high due to both disease and combat. It was also the war conflict which saw Winston Churchill first achieve household fame. The war had a lasting effect on the region and on British domestic politics. For Britain, the Boer War was the longest, the most expensive (GBP200 million), and the bloodiest conflict between 1815 and 1914, lasting three months longer and resulting in higher British casualties than the Crimean War. This unique collection of original documents will prove to be an invaluable resource for historians, students and all those interested in what was one of the most significant periods in British military history.
Australians Awarded: A Comprehensive Reference for Military and Civilian Awards, Decorations and Medals to Australians Since 1772

Australians Awarded: A Comprehensive Reference for Military and Civilian Awards, Decorations and Medals to Australians Since 1772

Clive Johnson

$85.00

This second edition is without question the most comprehensive reference of honors, decorations, awards, medals and official forms of recognition to Australians ever produced. Australians Awarded has been compiled over 15 years to create 800 pages of in-depth detail on Honors, Medals and Decorations bestowed upon Australians from 1770 to 2013. This edition includes comprehensive ribbon charts incorporating historical and current awards; detailed tables for types of awards; numbers issued, values, font types, medal types, ribbons, clasps, official badges, plaques, scrolls, certificates and detail for entitlement. Australians Awarded also includes the only comprehensive listing of foreign orders and decorations to Australians between 1850 and 2013, as well as the never before published state-by-state multi-jurisdictional internal forms of recognition and awards. All of this is studied and explained, with 1000's of images and extensive historical text. This book is for anyone with a passion for Australian military history, the enthusiast or specialist, the professional, the amateur, the collector, the dealer or simply anyone who has ever been, an Australian Awarded.
The Search for HMAS Sydney: An Australian Story

The Search for HMAS Sydney: An Australian Story

Ted Graham ,  Bob King ,  Bob Trotter ,  Kim Kirsner

$69.99

The incredible story of how Australia's greatest maritime mystery was solved. In November 1941 HMAS Sydney, the pride of Australia's wartime fleet, and its crew of 645 disappeared off the Western Australian coast. All that was known was Sydney had come under fire from the German raider HSK Kormoran, which also sank. After numerous searches, in March 2008 both wrecks were finally discovered. The Search for HMAS Sydney pieces together the story of Sydney, its crew, the families left behind and the innovative procedures used to locate the wrecks.
30 Days on Australia's Railways: Our Diary of September Journeys

30 Days on Australia's Railways: Our Diary of September Journeys

David Burke ,  Phil Belbin

$24.95

Our diary of September journeys explores moments in the history of Australias biggest railway and, beyond State borders, tells of its influence on tracks, trains and travel. Standard gauge figures as the common thread. Starting with Federations great achievement, the gauge of New South Wales is chosen for the Trans-Australian Railway, while NSWGR designs are adopted for its first locomotives. A hesitant beginning to the unification plan later allows the Brisbane Express to travel on the same set of wheels from Sydney into south-east Queensland where, ironically, many years before New South Wales politicians had resisted having their railway cross the border at Tweed Heads. Bill Wentworths plan for a national standard gauge network finally unlocks Federal money to permit freight and passenger trains from Sydney and beyond to reach Melbourne, Adelaide and beyond eventually to Perth and Darwin. As if to remind observers of the big railways long arm of influence, the magnificent 3801, a product of New South Wales workshops, steams across the continent. All these events have a connection with the days of September, the month when railway history seems to happen. Read of Ben Chifley, the locomotive driver who became Prime Minister of Australia, of Dr John Job Crew Bradfield, the visionary engineer responsible for the Sydney Harbour Bridge and trains to the city underground; of James Fraser, the first Australian-born Chief Commissioner who presided over a remaking of the New South Wales railway system and harsh confrontation in the 1917 strike; of Harold Young, the man from Scotland who designed big engines, especially the C38 and also the sleek Silver City Comet; of William Randle, builder of the 1855 line to Parramatta, who ran the colonys first trains; of Orlando Brain and a youthful ADJ Forster, assistant commissioner engineers in an exciting age of railway electrification and sharp political knives; of the forgotten Northern Line guard whose failure to find a simple metal pin led to a night of death and destruction at Murulla. Their names reside in those 30 eventful days when railways and history intertwine. Yes, September's to remember along the iron way.
Anzacs 100 Years On In Story and Song

Anzacs 100 Years On In Story and Song

Ted Egan

$39.95

This publication is a unique and highly readable contribution to the commemoration of the centenary of the Anzacs in World War 1. Ted Egan presents an historical documentation of the Anzacs and the ordinary men, women and children of the two young nations of Australia and New Zealand, forever affected by this tragic episode in world history.

Set against the political background of the day, succinctly revealed, Egan brings a clarity and immediacy to this period by his interweaving of personal stories, deeply moving songs, a collection of public and personal photos and an historical narrative that speaks directly to the reader, engaging our hearts as well as our heads.
 
It is a story of the loss of innocence of two young nations, for a generation and beyond. Amusing anecdotes and stories of great courage and ingenuity leaven, to some extent, the brutal truth behind the personal stories.
Australian Prisoners of War

Australian Prisoners of War

Patsy Adam-Smith

$39.95

Patsy Adam-Smith wrote this classic work after interviews and journeys with dozens of former prisoners from World War I, World War II and the Korean War. She said these 'were not men and women cowed and humiliated by adversity, but brave people who were captured as they fought in the front line'. Stories of the courage, endurance and pain of these resourceful people are at the heart of this most important book, written by one of Australia's best-loved authors and republished for the people for whom Patsy wrote - the generations to come. Australian Prisoners of War is a tribute to ordinary Australian men and women caught in extraordinary times.
Hell's Gates: The True Australian Story of the Escaped Convict Who Turned to Cannibalism to Survive

Hell's Gates: The True Australian Story of the Escaped Convict Who Turned to Cannibalism to Survive

Paul Collins

$29.95

Alexander Pearce and seven of his fellow convicts escaped from gaol in 1822 into one of the most unique and beautiful places on earth - the Tasmanian wilderness. This classic Australian story details the men's attempt to free themselves from the most isolated of penal settlements in the world, only to find themselves facing hostile natives, impenetrable landscape, and a harrowing fate of violence, murder and cannibalism. Paul Collins' riveting narrative of hardship and desperation, vividly reconstructs this amazing story with a keen eye for the follies of human nature.
Narrative of the Wreck of HMS Porpoise

Narrative of the Wreck of HMS Porpoise

Robert Purdie ,  Matthew Fishburn

$35.00

Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of the July 1814 publication of Matthew Flinders' Voyage to Terra Australis, Hordern House is publishing a lively yet hitherto almost unknown account of sailing with Matthew Flinders, written by a young surgeon in the Royal Navy who survived the wreck of HMS Porpoise off the Queensland coast in 1803. The anonymous Narrative is now for the first time shown to have been written by Surgeon's Mate Robert Purdie, a junior officer on board Flinders' ship, HMS Investigator.
Georgian London: Into the Streets

Georgian London: Into the Streets

Lucy Inglis

$22.99

In Georgian London: Into the Streets, Lucy Inglis takes readers on a tour of London's most formative age - the age of love, sex, intellect, art, great ambition and fantastic ruin. Travel back to the Georgian years, a time that changed expectations of what life could be. Peek into the gilded drawing rooms of the aristocracy, walk down the quiet avenues of the new middle class, and crouch in the damp doorways of the poor. But watch your wallet - tourists make perfect prey for the thriving community of hawkers, prostitutes and scavengers. Visit the madhouses of Hackney, the workshops of Soho and the mean streets of Cheapside. Have a coffee in the city, check the stock exchange, and pop into St Paul's to see progress on the new dome. This book is about the Georgians who called London their home, from dukes and artists to rent boys and hot air balloonists meeting dog-nappers and life-models along the way. It investigates the legacies they left us in architecture and art, science and society, and shows the making of the capital millions know and love today. Read and be amazed by a city you thought you knew . (Jonathan Foyle, World Monuments Fund). Jam-packed with unusual insights and facts. A great read from a talented new historian . (Independent). Pacy, superbly researched. The real sparkle lies in its relentless cavalcade of insightful anecdotes...There's much to treasure here . (Londonist). Inglis has a good ear for the outlandish, the farcical, the bizarre and the macabre. A wonderful popular history of Hanoverian London . (London Historians). In 2009 Lucy Inglis began blogging on the lesser-known aspects of London during the Eighteenth Century - including food, immigration and sex - at website. She lives in London with her husband. Georgian London is her first book.
Operation Sealion: How Britain Crushed the German War Machine's Dreams of Invasion in 1940

Operation Sealion: How Britain Crushed the German War Machine's Dreams of Invasion in 1940

Leo McKinstry

$32.99

In the summer of 1940, the Nazi war machine was at its zenith. France, Denmark, Norway and the Low Countries were all under occupation after a series of lightning military campaigns. Only Britain stood in the way of the complete triumph of Nazi tyranny. But for the first time in the war, Hitler did not prevail. The traditional narrative of 1940 holds that Britain was only saved from German conquest by the pluck of RAF Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain. The image of Dad's Army recruits training with broomsticks is a classic symbol of the nation's supposed desperation in the face of the threat from Operation Sealion, as the German plan for invasion was code-named. Yet as Leo McKinstry details, the British were far more ruthless and proficient than is usually recognised. The brilliance of the RAF was not an exception but part of a pattern of magnificent organisation. In almost every sphere of action, such as the destruction of the French naval fleet or the capture of German spies, Britain's approach reflected an uncompromising spirit of purpose and resolution. Using a wealth of primary materials from both British and German archives, Leo McKinstry provides a ground-breaking new assessment of the six fateful months in mid-1940, beginning with Winston Churchill's accession to power in May and culminating in Germany's abandonment of Operation Sealion.
Blazing Star: The Life and Times of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester

Blazing Star: The Life and Times of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester

Alexander Larman

$44.99

He was 'THE WICKEDEST MAN ALIVE'. He went to Oxford University at the age of 12 He slept with his first prostitute at 13 He was an alcoholic by 14 He was imprisoned in the Tower at 18 He was acclaimed a war hero at 19 He died of syphilis at the age of 33 He was English history's first celebrity. He was John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester: Poet, dandy and libertine. BLAZING STAR is a compelling portrait of a remarkable and complex man, and of a cultural golden age that often spilled over into depravity.
Divorced, Beheaded, Sold: Ending an English Marriage 1500-1847

Divorced, Beheaded, Sold: Ending an English Marriage 1500-1847

Maria Nicolaou

$39.99

A fresh perspective on the seamy side of history. Maria Nicolaou has done considerable research into the largely unexplored area of divorce and marital separation from the Tudor period to the early Victorian era. Divorced, Beheaded, Sold is full of scandalous, little-known stories of wife sale, marital discord and audacious escapades of errant spouses, this is an interesting, as well as informative read in the same vein as Maureen Waller's The English Marriage and Kate Summerscale's Mrs Robinson's Disgrace. Maria Nicolaou reveals how people ended their marriages in the days before divorce was readily available - from committing bigamy to selling a wife at market. Her book is full of colourful characters and warring spouses, like Con Philips, who fought off her husband with a gun filled with firework powder; the Duke of Grafton, who hired an army of detectives to spy on his wife and obtain proof of her adultery; and Marion Jones, who recruited a gang to take back her property from her husband.
A Strange Business: Making Art and Money in Nineteenth-Century Britain

A Strange Business: Making Art and Money in Nineteenth-Century Britain

James Hamilton

$49.99

Britain in the nineteenth century saw a series of technological and social changes which continue to influence and direct us today. Its reactants were human genius, money and influence, its crucibles the streets and institutions, its catalyst time, its control the market. In this rich and fascinating book, James Hamilton investigates the vibrant exchange between culture and business in nineteenth-century Britain, which became a centre for world commerce following the industrial revolution. He explores how art was made and paid for, the turns of fashion, and the new demands of a growing middle-class, prominent among whom were the artists themselves. While leading figures such as Turner, Constable, Landseer, Coleridge, Wordsworth and Dickens are players here, so too are the patrons, financiers, collectors and industrialists; lawyers, publishers, entrepreneurs and journalists; artists' suppliers, engravers, dealers and curators; hostesses, shopkeepers and brothel keepers; quacks, charlatans and auctioneers. Hamilton brings them all vividly to life in this kaleidoscopic portrait of the business of culture in nineteenth-century Britain, and provides thrilling and original insights into the working lives of some of our most celebrated artists.
The Victorian Guide to Sex: Desire and Deviance in the 19th Century

The Victorian Guide to Sex: Desire and Deviance in the 19th Century

Fern Riddell

$39.99

An exciting factual romp through sexual desire, practises and deviance in the Victorian era. The Victorian Guide to Sex will reveal advice and ideas on sexuality from the Victorian period. Drawing on both satirical and real life events from the period, it explores every facet of sexuality that the Victorians encountered. Reproducing original advertisements and letters, with extracts taken from memoirs, legal cases, newspaper advice columns, and collections held in the Museum of London and the British Museum, this book lifts the veil from historical sexual attitudes.
Jasper Tudor: Dynasty Maker

Jasper Tudor: Dynasty Maker

Terry Breverton

$49.95

The Wars of the Roses were a bitter and bloody dispute between the rival Plantagenet Houses of York and Lancaster. Only one man, Jasper Tudor, the Lancastrian half-brother to Henry VI, fought from the first battle at St Albans in 1455 to the last at Stoke Field in 1487 and lived to forge a new dynasty - the Tudors. Fighting the Yorkists, rallying the Lancastrians and spending years in exile with his nephew, the future first Tudor monarch, Henry VII, Jasper was the mainspring for continued Lancastrian defiance. Jasper was twenty-four years old in his first battle, and fifty-three when he won at Bosworth Field in 1485. Now he could style himself 'the high and mighty prince, Jasper, brother and uncle of kings, duke of Bedford and earl of Pembroke'. Without the heroic Jasper Tudor there could have been no Tudor dynasty. This is the first biography of the real 'kingmaker' of British history.
Chinese Posters: The IISH-Landsberger Collections

Chinese Posters: The IISH-Landsberger Collections

Stefan R. Landsberger ,  Marien van der Heijden ,  Kuiyi Shen

$29.99

A country's propaganda posters are a valuable record of it's challenges and fears as well as a reflection of its cultural mores. Opening with a brief introduction to the history of graphic arts propaganda in China, this volume presents the posters chronologically, allowing readers to witness changes in style as the subject matter follows seismic changes in Chinese history, such as the building of the People's Republic, the Korean War, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution and its iconic leaders, the growing acceptance of modernization and economic reforms, and China's current status as one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world. The book's posters are drawn from the renowned International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam and the Landsberger Collection, which combine to make arguably one of the Western world's largest and best collections of Chinese posters. Boldly colourful full-page illustrations allow for a true appreciation of the design skills and artistry that makes the propaganda poster a legitimate and fascinating aspect of China's artistic history.
The Emperor Far Away: Travels at the Edge of China

The Emperor Far Away: Travels at the Edge of China

David Eimer

$29.99

Far from the glittering cities of Beijing and Shaghai, China's borderlands are populated by around one hundred million people who are not Han Chinese. For many of these restive minorities, the old Chinese adage 'the mountains are high and the Emperor far away', meaning Beijing's grip on power is tenuous and its influence unwelcome, continues to resonate. Travelling through China's most distant and unknown reaches, David Eimer explores the increasingly tense relationship between the Han Chinese and the ethnic minorities. Deconstructing the myths represented by Beijing, Eimer reveals a shocking and fascinating picture of a China that is more of an empire than a country.
Storming the Eagle's Nest: Hitler's War in The Alps

Storming the Eagle's Nest: Hitler's War in The Alps

Jim Ring

$22.99

From the Fall of France in June 1940 to Hitler's suicide in April 1945, the swastika flew from the peaks of the High Savoy in the western Alps to the passes above Ljubljana in the east. The Alps as much as Berlin were the heart of the Third Reich. 'Yes,' Hitler declared of his headquarters in the Bavarian Alps, 'I have a close link to this mountain. Much was done there, came about and ended there; those were the best times of my life...My great plans were forged there.' With great authority and verve, Jim Ring tells the story of how the war was conceived and directed from the Fuhrer's mountain retreat, how all the Alps bar Switzerland fell to Fascism, and how Switzerland herself became the Nazi's banker and Europe's spy centre. How the Alps in France, Italy and Yugoslavia became cradles of resistance, how the range proved both a sanctuary and a death-trap for Europe's Jews - and how the whole war culminated in the Allies' descent on what was rumoured to be Hitler's Alpine Redoubt, a Bavarian mountain fortress.
Hermann Goering in the First World War: The Personal Photograph Albums of Hermann Goering

Hermann Goering in the First World War: The Personal Photograph Albums of Hermann Goering

Blaine Taylor

$59.99

When modern readers think of Hermann Goring, what probably comes to mind is the overweight drug addict and convicted war criminal who cheated the hangman's noose at Nuremberg by committing suicide just hours before he was due to be hanged. Or perhaps there is the image of his powerful German air force in the Second World War---the Luftwaffe---bombing defenceless European cities and towns in the early part of the war, until it was defeated by the British Royal Air Force in the epic Battle of Britain in 1940. Perhaps the reader might think of Goring the debauched art collector who pirated captured collections all over Nazi Europe during the Occupation years. All of these images are correct, but here we see another Hermann Goring: the slim, dashing fighter pilot and combat ace of an earlier struggle, the Great War, or World War I of 1914-18, which he began as an infantry officer fighting the French Army in the 1914 Battle of the Frontiers. During a hospitalization, his friend Bruno Lorzer convinced him to become an aerial observer-photographer, photographing the mighty French fortress of Verdun. He did, and began these never-before-seen personal photo albums of men and aircraft at war: up close.
The Accidental Prime Minister: The Making and Unmaking of Manmohan Singh

The Accidental Prime Minister: The Making and Unmaking of Manmohan Singh

Sanjaya Baru

$29.99

In 2004 Sanjaya Baru left a successful career as chief editor of the Financial Express to join Prime Minister Manmohan Singh as his media adviser in UPA 1. Singh offered him the job with the words, 'Sitting here, I know I will be isolated from the outside world. I want you to be my eyes and ears. Tell me what you think I should know, without fear or favour.'

The Accidental Prime Minister is Baru's account of what it was like to 'manage' public opinion for Singh while giving us a riveting look at Indian politics as it happened behind the scenes. As Singh's spin doctor and trusted aide for four years, Baru observed up close Singh's often troubled relations with his ministers, his cautious equation with Sonia Gandhi and how he handled the big crises from managing the Left to pushing through the nuclear deal. In this book he tells all and draws for the first time a revelatory picture of what it was like for Singh to work in a government that had two centres of power.

Insightful, acute and packed with political gossip, The Accidental Prime Minister is one of the great insider accounts of Indian political life and a superb portrait of the Manmohan Singh era.

'You see, you must understand one thing. I have come to terms with this. There cannot be two Centres of power.' Manmohan Singh
Scottish History For Dummies

Scottish History For Dummies

William Knox

$33.95

Explore the fascinating history of Scotland in an easy-to-read guide Want to discover how a small country on the edge of Northern Europe packs an almighty historical punch? Scottish History For Dummies is your guide to the story of Scotland and its place within the historical narratives of Britain, Europe and the rest of the world. You'll find out how Scotland rose from the ashes to forge its own destiny, understand the impact of Scottish historical figures such as William Wallace, Robert the Bruce and David Hume and be introduced to the wonderful world of Celtic religion, architecture and monuments. History can help us make connections with people and events, and it gives us an understanding of why the world is like it is today. Scottish History For Dummies pulls back the curtain on how the story of Scotland has shaped the world far beyond its borders. From its turbulent past to the present day, this informative guide sheds a new and timely light on the story of Scotland and its people. Dig into a wealth of fascinating facts on the Stone, Bronze and Iron ages Get to know how Scotland was built into an industrial economy by inventors, explorers and missionaries Discover the impact of the world wars on Scotland and how the country has responded to challenges created by them Find up-to-the-minute information on Scotland's referendum on independence If you're a lifelong learner looking for a fun, factual exploration of the grand scope of Scotland or a traveler wanting to make the most of your trip to this captivating country, Scottish History For Dummies has you covered.
Why the Japanese Lost: The Red Sun's Setting

Why the Japanese Lost: The Red Sun's Setting

Bryan Perrett

$59.99

This book tells the story of a war unlike any other in history, fought between a nation that believed itself to be invincible, even when its strength was being systematically destroyed by the greatest industrial power in the world. Prior to the middle of the nineteenth century, the Empire of Japan was content to remain in medieval isolation and, apart from very limited trading concessions, was unwilling to extend her contacts with the western world. This was all to change however, as Japan hurtled forwards into the twentieth century, armed and determined to carve out a new identity characterised by a dominating spirit. Dejected by the Great Depression of the early 1930s, they were a nation grown from moderate to militant. Following the pivotal and devastating attack on Pearl Harbour in 1941, the Japanese Army were emboldened. Hong Kong, Malaya, Singapore, Burma, the Philippines and the Dutch East Indies were all overrun with deceptive ease, leading the army to become dangerously confident in their ability. Subsequently named 'The Victory Disease', the author argues that it was this arrogant complacency that led to the army's ultimate downfall. Each episode of note in the history of the Japanese military forces is relayed, as the author dissects, analyses and endeavours to explain the root causes and pivotal decisions that led to defeat.
Japanese Secret Projects: Experimental Aircraft of the IJA and IJN 1922-1945

Japanese Secret Projects: Experimental Aircraft of the IJA and IJN 1922-1945

Edwin M. Dyer

$49.95

This is the second volume in the Japanese Secret Project series, compiled by popular demand after the great success of the first volume. This popularity reveals that Secret and X-Plane aircraft projects remain highly popular with historians, enthusiasts, modellers and the flight sim community. Surprisingly, secret Japanese planes of World War 2 remain an area which has not been extensively covered due to scarcity of information. They do, however, have a large base of interest as unlike the majority of secret Luftwaffe programs that were resigned to the drawing board, the vast number of aircraft featured within this book actually flew or were in development. As with the first volume, the book is divided into two sections dedicated to the two air forces of the IJA and IJN, with over 40 aircraft examined, each with its history, variants, performance, and any combat records laid out in an easy to read fashion. This is beautifully complimented by stunning colour renditions of the aircraft in combat and colour profiles of genuine markings and camouflage. The majority of the book is dedicated to aircraft that were under development or in service during the war years, but there are examples of pre-war experimental aircraft, and a selection of missile projects. Sample aircraft projects include: Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Tachikawa Ki-104 fighter Kawasaki Ki-48-II Kai and Ki-174 suicide light bomber Nakajima Ki-117 high altitude fighter Kawasaki Ki-119 light bomber Imperial Japanese Navy Air Force Hitachi 'He-Type' heavy bomber Aichi S1A Denko night fighter Mitsubishi Q2M1 ASW bomber Kawanishi K-60 flying boat Yokosuka D5Y1 Myojo Kai suicide aircraft
Photography in Japan 1853-1912

Photography in Japan 1853-1912

Terry Bennett

$44.99

In a world where digital cameras and camera phones have become ubiquitous, looking back at a time period when this wasn't the case offers a distinctive insight. Photography in Japan 1853-1912 is a fascinating book that offers a unique visual record of Japan and its metamorphosis from feudal society to a modern, industrial nation at a time when the art of photography was still in its infancy. This comprehensive and authoritative book begins with the opening of Japan to foreigners in 1853 when Commodore Matthew Perry compelled the reclusive nation to sign a treaty allowing access to Japan for the first time in over 250 years. Reluctantly at first, and then enthusiastically, Japan opened its doors to people and ideas, modernizing at a rate that was, and remains, unprecedented in human society. All of this was captured on camera. The 350 old and rare images in this book, many of them published here for the first time, not only chronicle the introduction of photography in Japan, but also demonstrate that early photographic images of Japan are vital in helping to understand the dramatic changes that occurred in mid-nineteenth century Japan. Taken between 1853 and 1912 by the most important local and foreign photographers working in Japan, the photographic images, whether sensational or everyday, intimate or panoramic, document a nation about to abandon its traditional ways and enter the modern age.
Bolivar: The Epic Life of the Man Who Liberated South America

Bolivar: The Epic Life of the Man Who Liberated South America

Marie Arana

$24.99

Simon Bolivar's life makes for one of history's most dramatic canvases, a colossal narrative filled with adventure and disaster, victory and defeat. This is the story not just of an extraordinary man but of the liberation of a continent. A larger-than-life figure from a tumultuous age, Bolivar ignited a revolution, liberated six countries from Spanish rule and is revered as the great hero of South American history. In a sweeping narrative worthy of a Hollywood epic, BOLIVAR colourfully portrays this extraordinarily dramatic life. From his glorious battlefield victories to his legendary love affairs, Bolivar emerges as a man of many facets: fearless and inspiring general, consummate diplomat, passionate abolitionist and gifted writer.
Princess: More Tears to Cry

Princess: More Tears to Cry

Jean Sasson

$35.00

When Jean Sasson's book Princess: Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia was published, it became an immediate international bestseller. It sold to 43 countries and spent 13 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. Now, in this long-awaited, compelling new book, Sasson and the Princess 'Sultana' return to tell the world what it means to be a Saudi woman today. Through advances in education and with access to work, Saudi women are breaking through the barriers; they are becoming doctors, social workers, business owners and are even managing to push at the boundaries of public life. Major steps forward have, undoubtedly, been made. But this is not the whole story. Sadly, despite changes in the law, all too often legal loopholes leave women exposed to terrible suppression, abuse and crimes of psychological and physical violence. For many, the struggle for basic human rights continues. This fascinating insight will include personal stories of triumph and heartbreak, as told to Princess 'Sultana', her eldest daughter, and author Jean Sasson. Each of these stories will offer the reader a glimpse into different aspects of Saudi society, including the lives of the Princess, her daughter and other members of the Al-Saud Royal family.
The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring

The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring

Paul Danahar

$19.99

In 2011 the Arab revolts changed the Middle East forever. The toppling of a generation of dictators left the region in turmoil. Has the promise of the Arab Spring been lost? What does the rise of religious extremism on Europe's doorstep mean for the West and its allies? Is America giving up on the region and, if so, who will lead the new Middle East? Drawing on compelling first-hand reporting, a deep knowledge of the region's history and access to many of the key players, BBC Bureau Chief Paul Danahar lays bare the forces that are shaping the region.
Path of Blood

Path of Blood

Jonathan Hacker ,  Thomas Small

$32.99

Path of Blood tells the gripping and horrifying true story of the underground army which Osama Bin Laden created in order to attack his number one target: his home country, Saudi Arabia. His aim was to conquer the land of the Two Holy Mosques, the land from where Islam had first originated and, from there, to re-establish a Muslim Empire that could take on the West and win. With the West unpopular with many Saudis at the time of the Iraq and Afghan wars, the Al Qaeda leadership lured impressionable recruits to the organisation with a mix of religious and political rhetoric as well as the promise of glory and heavenly riches. Many joined, and a murderous and highly visible campaign of kidnapping, shootings and bombings was launched across the country. And yet, a far cry from the image they promoted of themselves as single-minded guerrilla tacticians, authors Jonathan Small and Thomas Hacker's new insider evidence reveals the Al Qaeda infighting, the fooling around, and the training sessions which sometimes descended into farce. Yet the threat they posed was unquestionable. Ill-disciplined or not, these were men who killed with impunity, and who tried to acquire a nuclear bomb. Drawing on unprecedented access to Saudi government archives, interviews with top intelligence officials both in the Middle East and in the West, as well as with captured Al Qaeda militants, and with access to exclusive captured video footage from Al Qaeda cells, Path of Blood tells the full story of the terrorist campaign and the desperate and determined attempt by Saudi Arabia's internal security services to put a stop to it.
Captain Swing

Captain Swing

E. J. Hobsbawm ,  George Rude

$32.99

The classic social history of the Great English Agricultural Uprising of 1839 by two of the greatest historians of our age. In our increasingly mechanized age, the Swing revolts are a timely record of the relationship between technological advance, labour and poverty.With the onset of the Industrial Revolution, capitalism swept from the cities into the countryside, and tensions mounted between agricultural workers and employers. From 1830 on, a series of revolts, known as the 'Swing' shook England to its core. Landowners wanting to make their land more profitable started to use machinery to harvest crops, causing widespread misery among rural communities. Captain Swing reveals the background to that upheaval, from its rise to its fall, and shines a light on the people who tried to change the world and save their livelihoods.
Montcalm's Crushing Blow - French and Indian RAIDs Along New York's Oswego River 1756

Montcalm's Crushing Blow - French and Indian RAIDs Along New York's Oswego River 1756

Rene Chartrand ,  Peter Dennis ,  Mark Stacey

$24.99

The year 1755 saw the rivalry between Britain and France in North America escalate into open warfare as both sides sought to overcome the other's forts and trading posts. Lord Loudoun and the Marquis de Montcalm were sent out to lead their forces and Montcalm was soon tasked with capturing the formidable Anglo-American post at Oswego. Montcalm's 3,000-strong force surrounded the forts at Oswego and soon forced the defenders to surrender - an outstanding French success. Featuring specially commissioned full colour artwork, expert analysis, and lively narrative, this engaging study casts light on a daring feat of arms at the height of the French and Indian War.
The Prussian Army of the Lower Rhine 1815

The Prussian Army of the Lower Rhine 1815

Peter Hofschroer ,  Gerry Embleton

$19.99

The Prussian Army of the Lower Rhine, led by Blucher in 1815, played a crucial part in the Allied victory at Waterloo, and was involved in intense fighting at Wavre and Ligny. Delving into original sources, including eyewitness accounts and regimental histories known only to German scholars, this book tells the story of the soldiers on the ground: how they were organised and drilled, their previous service; their march to the battlefield; and what they did when they got there. Also ideal for all those interested in the actual appearance of the Prussian soldiers in 1815, this colourful study combines the latest findings and expert analysis to cast new light on the fateful Waterloo campaign.
A Short History of the Crimean War

A Short History of the Crimean War

Trudi Tate

$31.95

A new survey of the titanic struggle between the great powers of the nineteenth century.

The Crimean War (1853–1856) was the first modern war. A vicious struggle between imperial Russia and an alliance of the British, French and Ottoman Empires, it was the first conflict to be reported first-hand in newspapers, painted by official war artists, recorded by telegraph and photographed by camera. In her new short history, Trudi Tate discusses the ways in which this novel representation itself became part of the modern ‘war machine’. She tells forgotten stories about the war experience of individual soldiers and civilians, including journalists, nurses, doctors, war tourists and other witnesses. At the same time, the war was a retrograde one, fought with the mentality, and some of the equipment, of Napoleonic times. Tate argues that the Crimean War was both modern and old-fashioned, looking backwards and forwards, and generating optimism and despair among those who lived through it. She explores this paradox while giving full coverage to the bloody battles (Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman), the siege of Sebastopol, the much-derided strategies of the commanders, conditions in the field and the political impact of the anti-Russian alliance.

Trudi Tate is Affiliated Lecturer in English in the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Clare Hall. She has written and broadcast about Crimea and the Charge of the Light Brigade and is the author of Modernism, History and the First World War (1998).
West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776

West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776

Claudio Saunt

$33.95

Claudio Saunt tells a story of an immense and restless continent connected in surprising ways. In 1776, the Spanish landed in San Francisco, Creek emissaries sailed to Cuba and the Sioux discovered the Black Hills. Decisions made across the Atlantic affected Indian trade routes on the Mississippi, set off an environmental revolution in Canada and reconfigured the political balance in the American Southwest.
The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps

The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps

Michael Blanding

$32.99

Once considered a respectable rare-map dealer, E. Forbes Smiley made millions and was highly esteemed for his knowledge; until he was arrested for slipping maps out of books in the Yale University library. Though pieces of the story have been told before, Blanding is the first reporter to gain access to Smiley himself after he'd gone silent. Although Smiley swears he has admitted to all of the maps he stole, libraries claim he stole hundreds more, and offer evidence to prove it. Now, through a series of exclusive interviews, Blanding teases out the whole story.
Command and Control

Command and Control

Eric Schlosser

$24.99

Command and Control interweaves the minute-by-minute story of an accident at a missile silo in rural Arkansas, where a single crew struggled to prevent the explosion of the most powerful nuclear warhead ever built by the United States, with a historical narrative that spans more than fifty years. It depicts the urgent effort to ensure that nuclear weapons can't be stolen, sabotaged, used without permission, or detonated inadvertently. Schlosser also looks at the Cold War from a new perspective, offering history from the ground up, telling the stories of bomber pilots, missile commanders, maintenance crews, and other ordinary servicemen who risked their lives to avert a nuclear holocaust. Drawing on recently declassified documents and interviews with men who designed and routinely handled nuclear weapons, Command and Control takes readers into a terrifying but fascinating world that, until now, has been largely hidden from view.
Give Me a Fast Ship: The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea

Give Me a Fast Ship: The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea

Tim McGrath

$32.99

Five ships against hundreds--the fledgling American Navy versus the greatest naval force the world had ever seen... America in 1775 was on the verge of revolution--or, more likely, disastrous defeat. After the bloodshed at Lexington and Concord, England's King George sent hundreds of ships westward to bottle up American harbors and prey on American shipping. Colonists had no force to defend their coastline and waterways until John Adams of Massachusetts proposed a bold solution: The Continental Congress should raise a navy. The idea was mad. The Royal Navy was the mightiest floating arsenal in history, with a seemingly endless supply of vessels. More than a hundred of these were massive ships of the line, bristling with up to a hundred high-powered cannon that could level a city. The British were confident that His Majesty's warships would quickly bring the rebellious colonials to their knees. They were wrong. Beginning with five converted merchantmen, America's sailors became formidable warriors, matching their wits, skills, and courage against the best of the British fleet. Victories off American shores gave the patriots hope--victories led by captains such as John Barry, the fiery Irish-born giant; fearless Nicholas Biddle, who stared down an armed mutineer; and James Nicholson, the underachiever who finally redeemed himself with an inspiring display of coolness and bravery. Meanwhile, along the British coastline, daring raids by handsome, cocksure John Paul Jones and the Dunkirk Pirate, Gustavus Conyngham--who was captured and sentenced to hang but tunneled under his cell and escaped to fight again--sent fear throughout England. The adventures of these men and others on both sides of the struggle rival anything from Horatio Hornblower or Lucky Jack Aubrey. In the end, these rebel sailors, from the quarterdeck to the forecastle, contributed greatly to American independence. Meticulously researched and masterfully told, Give Me a Fast Ship is a rousing, epic tale of war on the high seas--and the definitive history of the American Navy during the Revolutionary War. INCLUDES NINE MAPS AND SIXTEEN PAGES OF FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS
The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind--And Changed the History of Free Speech in America

The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind--And Changed the History of Free Speech in America

Thomas Healy

$33.95

No right seems more fundamental to American life than freedom of speech. Yet well into the twentieth century that freedom was still an unfulfilled promise, with Americans regularly imprisoned merely for speaking out against government policies. Indeed, free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one's political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States. Why did Holmes change his mind? That question has puzzled historians for almost a century. Now, with the aid of newly discovered letters and confidential memos, Thomas Healy reconstructs in vivid detail Holmes's journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking--and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends. Beautifully written and exhaustively researched, The Great Dissent is intellectual history at its best, revealing how free debate can alter the life of a man and the legal landscape of an entire nation.
Never Wars: The US War Plans to Invade the World

Never Wars: The US War Plans to Invade the World

Blaine Lee Pardoe

$44.99

Every major government's military makes plans for waging wars, hoping that they never have to be employed. In the early part of the last century the US government prepared a number of war contingency plans for invading a number of nations - both hostile and friendly. These color-coded plans were designed for various political and military events, some of which actually unfolded in WWII. NeverWars explores and provides details on a number of these key military invasion plans, their triggers, units involved, etc. Some of these plans, if executed, would have altered the globe or changed the events of the 20th century and beyond.Included with this was the naval war in the Pacific against Japan in the 1930's, the US plans to land forces in France in the event that it fell during WWI, the US planned invasion of Ireland, Canada, Iceland, Mexico, and even China! The book cover plans such as: War Plan Orange: The war against Japan in the 1930s War Plan Red and Crimson: The planned attacks against the UK and Canada War Plan Garnet: The planned invasion of Ireland War Plan Black: The worst case scenario for the Great War - attacking Germany after France collapses War Plan Green: The 1910 war plans for invading Mexico War Plan Brown: Attacking the Philippines War Plan Gold: War with France War Plan Yellow: The US planned attack and invasion of China War Plan Indigo: The US attack on Iceland War Plan Purple: Attacks against several South American nations The Rainbow Plans: The post-First World War plans for facing several global alliances Never Wars: The US Plans to Invade the World is a must for any military historian or fan of alternate history.
Rose Kennedy: The Life and Times of a Political Matriarch

Rose Kennedy: The Life and Times of a Political Matriarch

Barbara A. Perry

$21.95

Training her eye on traits that other biographers have neglected and mining newly released diaries and letters, Barbara Perry captures Rose Kennedy's genuine contributions to her family's political dynasty. Rose's perfectionism created a family image that resonated in the political arena and new twentieth-century media. A socialite at her husband's side in pre-war London, she became an effective campaigner at home, reaching voters that Jack, Bobby and Teddy could not. For the first time, we see a complete portrait of Rose that adds depth and dimension to her legend. A stoic, devout presence in public, Rose sought solace from personal tragedies in compulsive shopping, travel and self-medication. Rose Kennedy is an unequalled book about a remarkable woman who nurtured an image that masked her family's inconvenient truths.
Mr. and Mrs. Madison's War: America's First Couple and the War of 1812

Mr. and Mrs. Madison's War: America's First Couple and the War of 1812

Hugh Howard

$29.99

Now marking its bicentennial, the War of 1812 remains the least understood of America's wars. Neither side gained a clear triumph, but in truth it was our second war of independence, settling once and for all that America would never again submit to Britain. It featured humiliating disasters-Washington was attacked, the White House burned-and stirring successes, like the Battle of Lake Erie, one of the greatest naval victory in American history. Here Hugh Howard, acclaimed for his vivid historical narratives, brings a forgotten conflict alive, and offers a vivid portrait of two key figures at its center, President James Madison and his charismatic, courageous first lady Dolley.
Why America is Not a New Rome

Why America is Not a New Rome

Vaclav Smil

$29.95

America's post--Cold War strategic dominance and its pre-recession affluence inspired pundits to make celebratory comparisons to ancient Rome at its most powerful. Now, with America no longer perceived as invulnerable, engaged in protracted fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, and suffering the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, comparisons are to the bloated, decadent, ineffectual later Empire. In Why America Is Not a New Rome, Vaclav Smil looks at these comparisons in detail, going deeper than the facile analogy-making of talk shows and glossy magazine articles. He finds profound differences. Smil, a scientist and a lifelong student of Roman history, focuses on several fundamental concerns: the very meaning of empire; the actual extent and nature of Roman and American power; the role of knowledge and innovation; and demographic and economic basics--population dynamics, illness, death, wealth, and misery. America is not a latter-day Rome, Smil finds, and we need to understand this in order to look ahead without the burden of counterproductive analogies. Superficial similarities do not imply long-term political, demographic, or economic outcomes identical to Rome's.
Shenandoah 1864: Sheridan's Valley Campaign

Shenandoah 1864: Sheridan's Valley Campaign

Mark Lardas ,  Adam Hook

$34.99

For three years of war the Union and the Confederacy had battled over the picturesque Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Nestled between the Blue Ridge Mountains to the east and the Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians to the west, the valley served as the granary for the Army of Northern Virginia. It provided bread and beef to feed this shield of the Confederacy and remounts for its cavalry. This beautifully illustrated study explores one of the major campaigns of the Civil War in 1864, which saw a decisive victory for the Union forces under Sheridan and featured some of the most famous commanders of the war, including Philip Sheridan, Jubal Early, George Armstrong Custer, John B. Gordon and George Crook.
Atua: Sacred Gods from Polynesia

Atua: Sacred Gods from Polynesia

Michael Gunn

$49.95

The Polynesian concept of atuaaEURO of gods, figurative objects and associated beliefsaEURO developed over thousands of years and spread throughout the region. The superb examples of sculpture illustrated in this volume provide an island-by-island insight into this rich and intriguing heritage.
Mutiny on Board HMS Bounty

Mutiny on Board HMS Bounty

William Bligh

$19.99

On 28th April 1789 a small and unremarkable merchant vessel became one of the most famous ships in maritime history. HMS Bounty was under the command of 34-year-old Lieutenant William Bligh, an inexperienced commander who lacked the respect of a crew attracted to the promise of an easy life in a Tahitian paradise. Fletcher Christian led half the crew in mutiny against Bligh and after overpowering all resistance, they cast their deposed captain adrift along with those still loyal to him. Luckily for Bligh, his skills as a navigator were better than his skills as a captain and he managed to sail the 23ft boat 3,618 nautical miles to Timor in the Dutch East Indies with no chart or compass, and only a quadrant and a pocket watch for navigation. On returning to England he reported what had happened, and the Royal Navy hunted down and captured most of the mutineers. However, this is only half the story - William Bligh's version. The captured mutineers went on trial and their testimonies give a much less heroic portrait of their former captain, accusing him of unduly harsh treatment. Fletcher Christian's older brother Edward, a judge, oversaw a more balanced account of the mutiny. Of the mutineers who returned to England, only three were hanged; four were acquitted and three pardoned. This book gives the fullest version of the mutiny, allowing Bligh's account to sit alongside those of his detractors. The discrepancies are fascinating, and allow us to make up our own minds about this infamous mutiny. Also includes an exclusive Foreword by former World Sailor of the Year Pete Goss, who offers a unique perspective on the trials and tribulations of the Bounty's crew, whether castaway or mutineer.
War Trophies or Curios?: The War Museum Collection from German New Guinea 1915-1920

War Trophies or Curios?: The War Museum Collection from German New Guinea 1915-1920

Barry Craig ,  Ron Vanderwal ,  Christine Winter (Geography Teacher, Sheffield)

$80.00

Showcases a unique and rarely seen collection of cultural objects from New Guinea. Referred to as 'war trophies' during the German possesion of New Guinea, before the takeover by Australian military forces in 1914. The Australian War Museum received the collection from the Department of Defence and later, donated it to the Melbourne Museum when they were also acknowledged as cultural objects and objects of traditional use, rather than 'war trophies' or'curios'.A description of each piece includes where it was made, its usage and cultural importance. Information about how the collection was accumulated is included along with a brief account of the WW1 German possession of New Guinea.
Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed

Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed

Nick Mortimer ,  Hamish Campbell

$55.00

Imagine a typical continent with seemingly endless land in all directions, diverse landscapes with broad valleys and uplands, and wide-open vistas across undulating plains, with upstanding mountain ranges far in the distance. There may be prominent features that command attention and draw the eye, like odd-shaped hills, peaks, pinnacles, mesas and volcanoes. And there may be canyons, valleys, gorges, large depressions and basins. Now imagine this same continent under the sea, and largely drowned. Welcome to Zealandia. Continents are some of Planet Earth's most striking geographic and geological features. To have a continental identity is to be important, significant, recognised. This book makes a compelling claim for Zealandia to take its place alongside Eurasia, Africa, North America, South America, Australia and Antarctica. Zealandia is a continent almost entirely submerged. With New Zealand as its largest inhabited land mass, it stretches north to incorporate New Caledonia, south beyond Auckland and Campbell islands, west beyond Australia's Lord Howe Island and east past the Chathams. Its ancestry reaches back more than half a billion years - a long, complex and dramatic story of growth, stretching, breakup, submergence, immersion and collision. Equally, the story of its cargo of life - human and otherwise - is one of extinction, adaption and migration. A big book full of big ideas, and brought to you by renowned GNS scientists Hamish Campbell (co-author of In Search of Ancient New Zealand) and Nick Mortimer, Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed is in every respect a landmark publication - thought-provoking, visually stunning and eminently readable.
Comradely Greetings: The Prison Letters of Nadya and Slavoj

Comradely Greetings: The Prison Letters of Nadya and Slavoj

Slavoj Zizek (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia Institute of Sociology, Ljubljana Institute of Sociology, Ljubljana Institute of Sociology, Ljubljana Institute of Sociology, Ljubljana) ,  Nadezhda Tololonnikova

$12.99

We count ourselves among the rebels who court storms, who hold that the only truth lies in perpetual search. - Nadezhda Tolokonnikova I cannot tell you how proud I am to be in contact with you - You show all of us the way to combine these right insights with simple courage. - Slavoj Zizek In an extraordinary exchange of letters, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, imprisoned for taking part in Pussy Riot's anti-Putin performance, and Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Zizek discuss artistic subversion, political activism, and the future of democracy via the ideas of Hegel, Deleuze, Nietzsche, and even Laurie Anderson. Two radicals, one in a Russian forced labor camp, the other writing to her from far outside its walls, show passionately - across linguistic and generational divides - that there is still a common cause worth fighting for. Touching, erudite, and worldly, their correspondence unfolds with poetic urgency.
Attrition: Fighting the First World War

Attrition: Fighting the First World War

William Philpott

$32.99

The First World War was too big to be grasped by its participants. In the retelling of their war in the competing memories of leaders and commanders, and the anguished fiction of its combatants, any sense of order and purpose, effort and achievement, was missing. Drawing on the experience of front line soldiers, munitions workers, politicians and those managing the vast economy of industrialised warfare, War of Attrition explains for the first time why and how this new type of conflict born out of industrial society was fought as it was. It was the first mass war in which the resources of the fully-mobilised societies strained every sinew in a conflict over ideals - and the humblest and highest were all caught up in the national enterprise. In a stunning narrative, this brilliant and necessary reassessment of the whole war cuts behind the myth-making to reveal the determination, organization and ambition on all sides.
Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned the Tide in the Second World War

Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned the Tide in the Second World War

Paul Kennedy

$22.99

From Paul Kennedy, author of The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, one of the most acclaimed history books of recent decades, Engineers of Victory is a new account of how the tide was turned against the Nazis by the Allies in the Second World War. In January 1943 Churchill and Roosevelt met in Casablanca to review the Allies' war aims. To achieve unconditional surrender they had to overcome some formidable hurdles, from winning air command to 'hopping' across the Pacific islands. Eighteen months later, they had done what seemed impossible. Here Paul Kennedy reveals the role of the problem-solvers and middle-men who made it happen - like Major-General Perry Hobart, who invented the 'funny tanks' which flattened the D-Day beaches; or Captain 'Johnny' Walker, who worked out how to sink U-boats with a 'creeping barrage'. This book shows the conflict in an entirely new light. Consistently original...An important contribution to our understanding . (Michael Beschloss, The New York Times Book Review). [Kennedy's] refreshing study ...asks the right questions, disposes of cliches and gives a rich account of neglected topics . (David Edgerton, Financial Times). Colourfully and convincingly illustrates the ingenuity and persistence of a few people who made all the difference . (Washington Post). Paul Kennedy is one of the world's best-selling and most influential historians. He is the author or editor of nineteen books, including The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, which has been translated into over twenty languages, Preparing for the Twenty-First Century, The Parliament of Man and the now classic Rise and Fall of British Naval Mastery.
England's Yellow Peril: Sinophobia and the Great War: How the First World War Affected the Perception of the Chinese and Spawned the Limehouse Genre

England's Yellow Peril: Sinophobia and the Great War: How the First World War Affected the Perception of the Chinese and Spawned the Limehouse Genre

Anne Veronica Witchard

$9.99

The Great War changed the ways that China and the UK's Chinese population were perceived and represented in the British press, popular fiction and on the stage. The period spawned the Thomas Burke's Limehouse novels and Sax Rohmer's notorious Dr. Fu Manchu. The sinophobic portrayal of the Chinese diaspora, then centralised in the Limehouse Chinatown, came just as China was trying desperately to assert its image globally as a modern nation.
The Last Battle: When U.S. and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe

The Last Battle: When U.S. and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe

Stephen Harding

$19.99

May, 1945. Hitler is dead, the Third Reich is little more than smoking rubble, and no GI wants to be the last man killed in action against the Nazis. The Last Battle tells the nearly unbelievable story of the unlikeliest battle of the war, when a small group of American tankers, led by Captain Lee, joined forces with German soldiers to fight off fanatical SS troops seeking to capture Castle Itter and execute the stronghold's VIP prisoners. It is a tale of unlikely allies, startling bravery, jittery suspense, and desperate combat between implacable enemies.
Mi5 in the Great War

Mi5 in the Great War

Nigel West

$49.99

In 1921, MI5 commissioned a comprehensive, top-secret review of the organisation's operations during the First World War. Never intended for circulation outside of the government, all seven volumes of this fascinating and unique document remained locked away in MI5's registry - until now. Recently declassified and published here for the first time, MI5 in the Great War is filled with detailed, and previously undisclosed, accounts centring on the Security Service's activities during the conflict. The main narrative examines MI5's various attempts to both manage and detect double agents; the detection and execution of enemy spies; its study of German pre-war espionage; and the Kaiser's personal network of spies seeking to infiltrate British intelligence. Coinciding with the centenary of the start of the Great War, this historically significant document has been edited and brought up to date by bestselling writer and historian Nigel West, providing an extraordinary insight into the early years of MI5 and its first counterintelligence operations.
The Secret Agent's Pocket Manual: 1939-1945

The Secret Agent's Pocket Manual: 1939-1945

Stephen Bull

$16.99

Most wars have had some element of espionage and subterfuge, but few have included as much as the Second World War, where the all-embracing nature of the conflict, new technology, and the battle of ideologies conspired to make almost everywhere a war zone. The occupation of much of Europe in particular left huge areas that could be exploited. Partisans, spies and saboteurs risked everything in a limbo where the normal rules of war were usually suspended. Concealment of oneself, one's weapons and equipment, was vital, and so were the new methods and hardware which were constantly evolving in a bid to stay ahead of the Gestapo and security services. Silent killing, disguise, covert communications and the arts of guerrilla warfare were all advanced as the war progressed. With the embodiment and expansion of organisations such as the British SOE and the American OSS, and the supply of special forces units which operated behind enemy lines, clandestine warfare became a permanent part of the modern military and political scene. Perhaps surprisingly many of these hitherto secret techniques and pieces of equipment were put into print at the time and many examples are now becoming available. This manual brings together a selection of these dark arts and extraordinary objects and techniques in their original form, under one cover to build up an authentic picture of the Allied spy. Previous Hardback ISBN 9781844861033
Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David

Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David

Lawrence Wright

$43.95

A gripping day-by-day account of the 1978 Camp David conference, when President Jimmy Carter persuaded Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat to sign the first peace treaty in the modern Middle East, one which endures to this day. With his hallmark insight into the forces at play in the Middle East and his acclaimed journalistic skill, Lawrence Wright takes us through each of the thirteen days of the Camp David conference, illuminating the issues that have made the problems of the region so intractable, as well as exploring the scriptural narratives that continue to frame the conflict. In addition to his in-depth accounts of the lives of the three leaders, Wright draws vivid portraits of other fiery personalities who were present at Camp David--including Moshe Dayan, Osama el-Baz, and Zbigniew Brzezinski--as they work furiously behind the scenes. Wright also explores the significant role played by Rosalynn Carter. What emerges is a riveting view of the making of this unexpected and so far unprecedented peace. Wright exhibits the full extent of Carter's persistence in pushing an agreement forward, the extraordinary way in which the participants at the conference--many of them lifelong enemies--attained it, and the profound difficulties inherent in the process and its outcome, not the least of which has been the still unsettled struggle between the Israelis and the Palestinians. In Thirteen Days in September, Wright gives us a resonant work of history and reportage that provides both a timely revisiting of this important diplomatic triumph and an inside look at how peace is made.
Anzac - Sari Bair

Anzac - Sari Bair

Stephen Chambers, RA

$44.99

The August Offensive was born out of the failures of the Gallipoli landings and the subsequent battles of late spring and early summer 1915. General Sir Ian Hamilton, Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, chose to play all his remaining cards in this daring and ingenious gamble that he hoped would finally turn the tide in the allies favour and bring his army up onto the heights overlooking the elusive Dardanelles. However the plan's same ingenuity became its eventual undoing. It required complex manoeuvring in tortuous terrain; whilst many of the attacking soldiers were already weakened by the hardships of four months of enduring very poor conditions on the Peninsula. What played out was heartbreakingly tragic; command failed the bravery and sacrifice of the fighting soldier. This Anzac offensive, fought by a combined force of British, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops, made infamous places such as Lone Pine, The Nek, Sari Bair, Chunuk Bair, Hill Q, The Farm, Hill 971 and Hill 60. Although tantalisingly close to success, the offensive fell short of its objectives and the attack was ground down to a stalemate - not least the consequence of the inspiring leadership of Mustafa Kemal. Hamilton's gamble had failed. This is the story, told using a rich mix of letters, diaries, photographs and maps, of Gallipoli's last battles; the forlorn hope for a decisive victory.
Gallipoli and the Dardanelles 1915-1916: Despatches from the Front

Gallipoli and the Dardanelles 1915-1916: Despatches from the Front

John Grehan ,  Martin Mace

$59.99

The fighting in the Gallipoli or Dardanelles campaign began in 1915 as a purely naval affair undertaken partly at the instigation of Winston Churchill, who, as First Lord of the Admiralty, had entertained plans of capturing the Dardanelles as early as September 1914. It was the Royal Navy that bore the brunt of the initial action, supported by the French and with minor contributions from, the Russian and Australian fleets. On 3 November 1914, Churchill ordered the first British attack on the Dardanelles following the opening of hostilities between Ottoman and Russian empires. The British attack was carried out by battle cruisers of Carden's Mediterranean Squadron, HMS Indomitable and HMS Indefatigable, as well as two French battleships. This attack actually took place before a formal declaration of war had been made by Britain against the Ottoman Empire. Royal Navy submarines had already been operating in the region. When the naval operations failed, a full invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula was launched. The bitter fighting that followed resonated profoundly among all nations involved. The campaign was the first major battle undertaken by the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC), and is often considered to mark the birth of national consciousness in both of these countries. For the Turkish forces it would prove a major victory.
Death's Men: Soldiers of The Great War

Death's Men: Soldiers of The Great War

Denis Winter

$22.99

Death's Men is the classic bestselling story of the First World War as told by the soldiers themselves - reissued for the 2014 Centenary. Millions of British men were involved in the Great War of 1914-1918. But, both during and after the war, the individual voices of the soldiers were lost in the collective picture. Men drew arrows on maps and talked of battles and campaigns, but what it felt like to be in the front line or in a base hospital they did not know. Civilians did not ask and soldiers did not write. Death's Men portrays the humble men who were called on to face the appalling fears and discomforts of the fighting zone. It shows the reality of the First World War through the voices of the men who fought. A raw, haunting read that puts you directly into the shoes of the men who rushed to volunteer at the start of the war . (Guardian). An engrossing view of what it was like to live in the trenches, go on leave, get wounded, et cetera, and features voice after voice from the ranks . (Telegraph Denis). Winter was born in 1940 and read history at Pembroke College, Cambridge. Death's Men was first published in 1978, to critical and popular acclaim. This was followed by his book. The First of the Few: Fighter Pilots of the First World War.
The Life of the Automobile: A New History of the Motor Car

The Life of the Automobile: A New History of the Motor Car

Steven Parissien

$24.99

In this book Steven Parissien examines the impact, development and significance of the automobile over its turbulent and colourful 130-year history. He tells the story of the auto, and of its creators, from its earliest appearance in the 1880s - as little more than a powered quadricycle - via the early pioneer carmakers, the advances of the interwar era, the 'Golden Age' of the 1950s and the iconic years of the 1960s to the decades of doubt and uncertainty following the oil crisis of 1973, which culminated in the global mergers of the 1990s and the bailouts of the early twenty-first century. This is not just a story of horsepower and performance. The Life of the Automobile is a tale of people: of flamboyant entrepreneurs, shrewd businessmen and gifted engineers; of outstanding success and abject failure. It is a chronicle of innovation, and a testimony to the value of good design. Above all, The Life of the Automobile demonstrates how the epic story of the car mirrors the history of the modern era, from the brave hopes and soaring ambitions of the early twentieth century to the cynicism and ecological concerns of a century later.
Survivors of Stalingrad: Eyewitness Accounts from the 6th Army, 1942-1943

Survivors of Stalingrad: Eyewitness Accounts from the 6th Army, 1942-1943

Reinhold Busch

$75.00

In November 1942 - in a devastating counter-attack from outside the city - Soviet forces smashed the German siege and encircled Stalingrad, trapping some 290,000 soldiers of the 6th Army inside. For almost three months, during the harshest part of the Russian winter, the German troops endured atrocious conditions. Freezing cold and reliant on dwindling food supplies from Luftwaffe air drops, thousands died from starvation, frostbite or infection if not from the fighting itself. This important work reconstructs the grim fate of the 6th Army in full for the first time by examining the little-known story of the field hospitals and central dressing stations. The author has trawled through hundreds of previously unpublished reports, interviews, diaries and newspaper accounts to reveal the experiences of soldiers of all ranks, from simple soldiers to generals. The book includes first-hand accounts of soldiers who were wounded or fell ill and were flown out of the encirclement; as well as those who fought to the bitter end and were taken prisoner by the Soviets. They reflect on the severity of the fighting, and reveal the slowly ebbing hopes for survival. Together they provide an illuminating and tragic portrait of the appalling events at Stalingrad.
The British Army 1914-1918

The British Army 1914-1918

Andrew Rawson

$39.99

An indispensable guide to the British Army during the First World War covers the men who fought for Britain: from the 'Old Contemptibles' - the professionals who stemmed the German advance at the beginning of the war - to the Territorials, the 'Derby Men', Kitchener's 'New Army' and the conscripts who eventually defeated the Kaiser's armies four years later. Andrew Rawson examines the impressive contributions made by the Dominions and the Empire and explores aspects of doctrine, training, communications, strategy and tactics, together with divisional organisations, histories and the roles of the different Arms and Services. He reviews all aspects of the soldier's everyday life - uniforms, equipment, rations, trench life, leave and military discipline - and profiles the commanders and the legacy of the war in art, as well as providing information on cemeteries and places of interest. It is all here, in one book.
Xavier: A British Secret Agent with the French Resistance

Xavier: A British Secret Agent with the French Resistance

Richard Heslop

$19.99

The best collection of military, espionage, and adventure stories ever told. The Dialogue Espionage Classics series began in 2010 with the purpose of bringing back classic out-of-print spying and espionage tales. From WWI and WWII to the Cold War, D-Day to the SOE, Bletchley Park to the Comet Line this fascinating spy history series brings you the best stories that should never be forgotten. Colonel Richard Heslop, alias Xavier, was one of Britain's Greatest Special Operations agents in France. Ingeniously orchestrating resistance groups and ruthlessly sabotaging German operations, Xavier played a crucial role in Allied espionage during the war, from late 1942 right through to D-Day. Sent to France in the middle of the conflict, he delicately balanced clandestine missions and dangerous wartime operations on a daily basis, yet his name barely gets a mention in the accounts of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), making this insight all the more fascinating. It is clear that Xavier's role was like no other. it was a job that involved frequent encounters with the terrifying possibilities of capture, torture and death; it was a job where a careless whisper could deliver a man into the hands of the Gestapo; and it was a job that involved acts of sabotage, espionage, theft, and sometimes even murder. ..Xavier is a dramatic and compelling account of courage and endurance in the face of a merciless enemy − the true story of one of Britain's greatest secret agents.
Great Scientists Wage the Great War

Great Scientists Wage the Great War

William Van der Kloot

$59.99

Six men made major scientific breakthroughs during the First World War and in doing so altered its course. Lawrence Bragg pinpointed the position of enemy artillery pieces with sound ranging, which enabled British tanks to break through in late 1917 and 1918. His father worked with the French to develop high frequency echolocation; if the war had gone on longer sonar would have curbed the U-boats. Ernest Starling led a group that discovered the cause of wound shock and saved shocked men with artificial plasma. He utilized what was known about metabolism to ration food fairly in Britain while improving the poor s nutrition. Germans starved. Otto Hahn worked on poisons for gas warfare and devised and tested filters to trap the poisons. He also became an expert on tactics for breaking through enemy lines with gas. Chaim Weizmann and other chemists produced molecules essential for making high explosives; German chemists enabled their side to keep in the war. Antiaircraft defense was developed by the physiologist A. V. Hill who led more than 100 scientists and mathematicians, who learned how to aim supersonic shells to explode near fast-moving targets. Now these threads are brought together for general readers, telling how some of the foremost scientists of all time used their remarkable talents for significant war research. The information comes from their memoirs, letters, reports in the archives, and from coworkers recollections. Four of these brilliant and diverting men were Nobel laureates and one became the president of Israel. The work of two outstanding women is described in the narrative.
Naval Battles of the First World War

Naval Battles of the First World War

Geoffrey Bennett

$44.99

With the Call to action stations in August 1914, the Royal Navy faced its greatest test since the time of Nelson. This classic history of the Great War at sea combines graphic and stirring accounts of all the principal naval engagements - battles overseas, in home waters and, for the first time, under the sea - with analysis of the strategy and tactics of both sides. Geoffrey Bennett brings these sea battles dramatically to life, and confirms the Allied navies' vital contribution to victory. 'Strongly recommended' RUSI Journal 'Excellent balanced accounts and judgements' Richard Hough
Behind Soviet Lines - Hitler's Brandenburgers Capture the Maikop Oil Fields 1942

Behind Soviet Lines - Hitler's Brandenburgers Capture the Maikop Oil Fields 1942

David R. Higgins ,  Johnny Shumate ,  Mark Stacey

$24.99

In the summer of 1942, following the invasion of Russia the previous year, Hitler's 'Brandenburger' commando units undertook a daring operation deep inside Soviet-held territory. Disguised as members of Stalin's NKVD, the secret police dreaded by most Soviet citizens and soldiers, the Brandenburgers passed unsuspected past the Red Army's checkpoints, before launching their surprise operation to seize the vital Soviet oil facilities around Maikop - delivering them intact into Nazi hands. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork, this expert assessment of the Maikop operation casts new light on German special-forces operations on the Eastern Front.
A History of the First World War

A History of the First World War

Sir Basil Henry Liddell Hart

$22.99

Liddell Hart's History of the First World War first appeared in 1930 and is widely regarded as one of the greatest, most cogent accounts of the conflict ever published. A leading military strategist and historian who fought on the Western Front, Liddell Hart combines astute tactical analysis with compassion for those who lost their lives on the battlefield. He provides a vivid and fascinating picture of all the major campaigns, balancing documentary evidence with the testimony of personal witnesses to expose the mistakes that were made and why. From the political and cultural origins of war to the twists and turns of battle, to the critical decisions that resulted in such devastating losses and to the impact on modern nations, this magnificent history covers four brutal years in one volume and is a true military classic.
A History of the Second World War

A History of the Second World War

B. H. Liddell Hart

$22.99

First published in 1970, the year after his death, Liddell Hart's History of the Second World War is a highly acclaimed account by one of the greatest military writers of the twentieth century. Providing searing insights and drawing on an unparalleled knowledge of tactics and strategy, it is the culmination of a lifetime's analysis and study. Condensing six bloody years into one volume, Liddell Hart examines the moral and strategic choices made by those in power and the way these decisions affected ordinary soldiers on the ground. With meticulous attention to detail and epic scope, his work is a true classic and indispensable for those seeking to understand this most devastating of conflicts.
The History of the War in the Air 1914-1918

The History of the War in the Air 1914-1918

Sir Walter Raleigh

$75.00

This magnificent and comprehensive volume was written in 1922 by Professor Walter Raleigh. Originally entitled The History of the War in the Air (Being the story of the part played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force) this all embracing and vital work features the most important account of the aerial battles, the men and the machines. Raleigh was Professor of English Literature at Glasgow University and Chair of English Literature at Oxford University. On the outbreak of the Great War he turned to the war as his primary subject. His finest book on the subject is this, the first volume of The War in the Air, which was an instant publishing success. Unfortunately the projected second volume was never completed as Raleigh died from typhoid (which he contracted during a visit to the Near East) in 1922. Nonetheless, Professor Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh has attained classic status as a result of this mighty work and this legendary volume ensures his status as a military author par excellence.
Ramillies 1706: Marlborough's Tactical Masterpiece

Ramillies 1706: Marlborough's Tactical Masterpiece

Michael McNally ,  Sean O'Brogain

$34.99

This is the story of one of the great battles which forged the reputation of the Duke of Marlborough as one of history's greatest captains. His tactical intuition on the field of Ramillies led to perhaps his finest battlefield performance and paved the way for a campaign that would see much of Flanders, including vital cities such as Bruges, Brussels, Antwerp and Louvain, come under Allied control. This title, with vivid illustrations and detailed consideration of the disposition, strength and plans of the opposing forces, examines the context and consequences of the battle. It also illuminates the intense fighting at the height of the engagement, including two enormous cavalry melees in which Marlborough was unhorsed and very nearly killed.
World War II US Navy Special Warfare Units

World War II US Navy Special Warfare Units

Eugene Liptak ,  Johnny Shumate

$24.99

With the need for large-scale amphibious landings to decide the outcome of World War II the US Navy developed several types of specialized unit to reconnoitre potential landing areas, degrade the enemy's ability to resist, and assist the landing forces on to the beaches. The Scouts and Raiders were the forerunners of the SEALs, Beach Jumpers made elaborate simulated landings to distract the enemy, the Naval Combat Demolition Units and Underwater Demolition Teams cleared obstacles to amphibious landings and Naval Group China fought alongside Chinese guerrillas behind Japanese lines. This book uncovers the fascinating history of these units, the unique gear they went into theatre with and the vital roles they carried out throughout the war.
The Dog Book: Dogs of Historical Distinction

The Dog Book: Dogs of Historical Distinction

Kathleen Walker-Meikle

$17.99

The perfect gift for any dog lover, this is the story of man's best friend from the canine gods of Ancient Egypt to the heroic mascots of the Second World War. Over the millennia dogs have been hailed as gods, demons, saints, military heroes, even reigning kings - and all the while have been the keen hunters, loyal guards and beloved pets we know today. They feature in Egyptian myth, classical astronomy, medieval romances and early modern portraiture; they took part in the court-life of Imperial China, in early Hollywood film studios and in intrepid expeditions to the North Pole. Featuring the pampered pets of Queen Victoria and Pablo Picasso, popular medieval dog names, regimental mascots of the Napoleonic Wars and tales of canine loyalty through the ages, this beautifully illustrated volume shows how dogs have for millennia been the beloved companions of peasants and princes alike.
Fifty Weapons That Changed the Course of History

Fifty Weapons That Changed the Course of History

Joel Levy

$35.00

The saga of human civilization has been formed and scarred by conflict. At each stage of our history there have been defining episodes of violence, sometimes long and simmering, at other times sudden and cataclysmic. And each stage has produced new forms of weaponry. Some of these weapons of war have been decisive, such as the terrifying war elephants deployed by Hannibal at the battle of Cannae in 216 B.C. Others have become iconic in our culture. Chief among these is the AK-47 - symbol of communism, and now of terrorism, and the most widely found firearm in the world. Some weapons have been definitive in their simplicity, such as the bayonet; in other cases, such as the Tomahawk cruise missile, the sheer complexity is dazzling. Fifty Weapons That Changed the Course of History tells the story of the last 3,500 years through the weapons that have shaped it. The technical specifications, startlingly illustrated, are given context and meaning by explaining their part in human conflict and their long-term legacy. More than a manual of material, this is the story of the weapons that formed our world.
Masterpieces of the British Museum

Masterpieces of the British Museum

J. D. Hill

$39.99

The British Museum's collection is one of the worlds finest and broadest, ranging from prehistoric times to the present in ancient and modern cultures around the globe. This new and updated edition includes many recent acquisitions and new discoveries, such as Picasso's stunning Vollard Suite and the intriguing Vale of York Viking hoard, and showcases a selection of more than 250 of the most beautiful and important objects drawn from across the Museum. Each object is presented with its own fascinating story and is strikingly illustrated in full colour. From the Warren Cup to Durers Rhinoceros, the Lewis Chessmen to the Aztec turquoise serpent and the Gayer-Anderson Cat, the iconic objects of the British Museum are here presented in an exciting and accessible new way, highlighting the superb craftsmanship and ingenuity of those who created each of these splendid pieces. Grouped into sections based on cross-cultural themes, such as rulers, mythical beasts, dress and the human form, the resulting juxtapositions offer intriguing new insights into these widely varied masterpieces. Introduced by Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, this is a stunning overview of artistic and cultural achievement around the world.
           
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