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Emporium: Selling the Dream in Colonial Australia

Emporium: Selling the Dream in Colonial Australia

Edwin Barnard

$49.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE MARCH 2015 ----- A new wonder cure... the latest fashion... a revolutionary gadget... few can resist the siren song of advertising, and our colonial  ancestors were as susceptible as we are. Perhaps that electric hair brush  really could help to cure baldness, and wouldn't it be wonderful if those  strange new cannabis cigarettes did relieve asthma?

Advertisements appeared in  the first issue of Australia's first newspaper in 1803, as unscrupulous  manufacturers and retailers vied with each other in making more and more  outrageous claims. Emporium explores the highways and byways of this neglected aspect of nineteenth-century life in  a book that takes readers on a fascinating journey into the hearts and homes of  colonial Australians. 

Advertisements for  condoms? It was just a matter of knowing what to look for. Humorous, quirky, fascinating - you will find this book compulsive!
King John: England, Magna Carta and the Making of a Tyrant

King John: England, Magna Carta and the Making of a Tyrant

Stephen D. Church

$55.00

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ABBEY'S CHOICE MARCH 2015 ----- No English king has suffered a worse press than King John: but how to disentangle legend and reality? 

The youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, the empire builders of the Angevin dynasty, John had small hope of securing any significant inheritance.  Then, in 1199, on the death of his older brother Richard, John took possession of the vast Angevin lands in England and on the continent. But by his death in 1216, he had lost almost all that he inherited, and had come perilously close to losing his English kingdom, too.

Drawing on thousands of contemporary sources, Stephen Church tells John's story - from boyhood and the succession crises of his early adulthood, to accession, rebellion and civil war.  In doing so, he reveals exactly why John's reign went so disastrously wrong and how John's failure led to the great cornerstone of Britain's constitution: Magna Carta. Vivid and authoritative, this is history at its visceral best.
Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe

Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe

George Friedman

$29.99

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Europe is ready to explode. Where will the explosion take place and what will the damage be? This major new book from the bestselling author and geopolitical forecaster George Friedman presents a bold and provocative thesis about the likeliest locations for the coming eruptions.

George Friedman forecasted coming global trends in The Next 100 Years and The Next Decade. Now, in Flashpoints, he zooms in on Europe and examines the dry tinder of the region: culture. Walking the faultlines that have existed here for centuries, Friedman inspects all the dormant social and political fissures still smouldering just beneath the continent's surface, and identifies those likely to erupt first. The book begins with a fascinating history of the events leading up to the horrific wars that nearly tore apart Western civilisation, and shows how modern efforts to overcome Europe's geopolitical tensions - including the formation of the European Union - have largely failed. Homing in on half a dozen pivotal locations, George Friedman gauges what the future holds, both in terms of conflict and also opportunity. 

Flashpoints details how events in Europe will affect the rest of the world - from USA to Russia, from China to Latin America - and reveals a new yet familiar political landscape in what is at once a gripping history lesson and a terrifying forecast of the potential devastation ahead.
Classical Civilisation: A History in Ten Chapters

Classical Civilisation: A History in Ten Chapters

Nigel Spivey

$34.99

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A concise and accessible study of the foundations, development and enduring legacy of the cultures of Greece and Rome, centred on ten locations of seminal importance in the development of Classical civilisation.

Starting with Troy, where history, myth and cosmology fuse to form the origins of Classical civilisation, Nigel Spivey explores the contrasting politics of Athens and Sparta, the diffusion of classical ideals across the Mediterranean world, Classical science and philosophy, the eastward export of Greek culture with the conquests of Alexander the Great, the power and spread of the Roman imperium, and the long Byzantine twilight of Antiquity. A secure grasp of the nature of our Greek and Roman heritage is absolutely fundamental to a true understanding of contemporary European society and culture.

Nigel Spivey outlines and explains that heritage with supreme passion, rigour and clarity.
Magna Carta: The Making and Legacy of the Great Charter

Magna Carta: The Making and Legacy of the Great Charter

Dan Jones

$29.99

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On a summer's day in 1215 a beleaguered English monarch met a group of disgruntled barons in a meadow by the river Thames named Runnymede. Beset by foreign crisis and domestic rebellion, King John was fast running out of options.

On 15 June he reluctantly agreed to fix his regal seal to a document that would change the world. A milestone in the development of constitutional politics and the rule of law, the 'Great Charter' established an Englishman's right to Habeas Corpus and set limits to the exercise of royal power. For the first time a group of subjects had forced an English king to agree to a document that limited his powers by law and protected their rights.

Dan Jones's elegant and authoritative narrative of the making and legacy of Magna Carta is amplified by profiles of the barons who secured it and a full text of the charter in both Latin and English.
A Brief History of Magna Carta: The Origins of Liberty from Runnymede to Washington

A Brief History of Magna Carta: The Origins of Liberty from Runnymede to Washington

Geoffrey Hindley

$14.99

2015 marks the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta, the influence of which is still felt today around the world. In 1215 the barons of England forced King John to sign a revolutionary document which would change the political landscape not only of thirteenth-century Britain, but of the modern world. Magna Carta was the forerunner of the constitution that limited the powers of the crown and its echoes can be found in the seventeenth-century Civil Wars, the struggles for American Independence, the work of Thomas Paine and in the bedrock constitutional legislation of just about every democratic country today. As civil Liberties and the rule of law are increasingly brought into question throughout the world, leading medieval historian Geoffrey Hindley breathes vivid life into the story behind the signing of Magna Carta, and reveals the undiminished significance of this ancient document in today's world.
The Magna Carta: The Foundation of Freedom 1215-2015

The Magna Carta: The Foundation of Freedom 1215-2015

Nicholas Vincent

$95.00

Eight hundred years ago King John of England was forced to seal a document of historic importance. As the first charter to grant individual liberties under the rule of law, protecting the people against tyranny, Magna Carta is the most influential and far-reaching legal text the world has ever known. For this book, published with the official support of the UK Magna Carta Trust and marking the eight hundredth anniversary of the charter's first issue, Professor Nicholas Vincent is joined by a range of experts on Magna Carta from across the world to reflect on the circumstances of its genesis and its enduring significance. Magna Carta was serially reinterpreted by later generations, becoming a totem in fierce political debates on the liberties of the people - it became a sacred text for English puritans of the Civil War, for the American patriots of the War of Independence, and for all those in the English-speaking world who have striven to build democratic rights and freedoms in the post-colonial age.
Cuneiform

Cuneiform

Irving L. Finkel ,  Jonathan Taylor

$19.99

Cuneiform script on tablets of clay is, as far as we know, the oldest form of writing in the world. The choice of clay as writing medium in ancient Mesopotamia meant that records of all kinds could survive down to modern times, preserving fascinating documents from ancient civilization, written by a variety of people and societies. From reading these tablets we can understand not only the history and economics of the time but also the beliefs, ideas and superstitions.

This new book will bring the world in which the cuneiform was written to life for the non-expert reader, revealing how ancient inscriptions can lead to a new way of thinking about the past. It will explain how this pre-alphabetic writing really worked and how it was possible to use cuneiform signs to record so many different languages so long ago.

Richly illustrated with a wealth of fresh examples ranging from elementary school exercises to revealing private letters or beautifully calligraphic literature for the royal library, we will meet people that arent so very different from ourselves. We will read the work of many scribes from mundane record keepers to state fortune tellers, using tricks from puns to cryptography.

For the first time cuneiform tablets and their messages are not remote and inaccessible, but wonderfully human documents that resonate today.
Van Diemen's Land: An Aboriginal History

Van Diemen's Land: An Aboriginal History

Murray Johnson ,  Ian McFarlane

$39.99

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The history of Aborigines in Van Diemen's Land is long. The first Tasmanians lived in isolation for as many as 300 generations after the flooding of Bass Strait. Their struggle against almost insurmountable odds is one worthy of respect and admiration, not to mention serious attention.

This broad-ranging book is a comprehensive and critical account of that epic survival up to the present day. Starting from antiquity, the book examines the devastating arrival of Europeans and subsequent colonisation, warfare and exile. It emphasises the regionalism and separateness, a consistent feature of Aboriginal life since time immemorial that has led to the distinct identities we see in the present, including the unique place of the islanders of Bass Strait.

Carefully researched, using the findings of archaeologists and extensive documentary evidence, some only recently uncovered, this important book fills a long-time gap in Tasmanian history.
The Story of Australia's People: The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia

The Story of Australia's People: The Rise and Fall of Ancient Australia

Geoffrey Blainey

$49.99

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The vast, ancient land of Australia was settled in two main streams, far apart in time and origin. The first stream of immigrants came ashore some 50,000 years ago when the islands of Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea were one. The second began to arrive from Europe at the end of the eighteenth century. Each had to come to terms with the land they found, and each had to make sense of the other. It was not - and is still not - an easy relationship, and the story of Australia's people is as complex as it is rich.

The long Aboriginal occupation of Australia witnessed spectacular changes. The rising of the seas isolated the continent and preserved a nomadic way of life as agriculture revolutionised other parts of the world. Over millennia, the Aboriginal people mastered the land's climates, seasons and reserves. Traditional Aboriginal life came under threat the moment Europeans crossed the world to plant a new society in an unknown land. Australia was to be a land that rewarded, tricked, tantalised and often defeated the new arrivals. The meeting of the two cultures is one of the most difficult meetings in history. 

In The Story of Australia's People, Professor Geoffrey Blainey returns to the subject of his most celebrated works on Australian history, Triumph of the Nomads (1975) and A Land Half Won (1980), retelling the story of our history up until 1850 in light of the latest research and archaeological findings. Some of those findings have led him to change his mind about vital aspects of Aboriginal history, examined more fully here than in any other popular history of Australia yet published.

Compelling, groundbreaking and brilliantly readable, The Story of Australia's People is the first installment of an ambitious two-part work, and the culmination of the life work of Australia's most respected historian.
Between the Dances: World War Two Women Tell Their Stories

Between the Dances: World War Two Women Tell Their Stories

Jacqueline Dinan

$32.95

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The start of World War 2 changed womens lives and their place in Australian society forever. Thousands of women ventured where few had gone before into the services and workplaces previously considered the sole preserve of men.

In preparation for her book Between the Dances, Jacqueline Dinan, interviewed over three hundred women around Australia to collect the last first hand stories from World War Two. Revealing poignant and personal conversations, photographs and letters, Between the Dances is a testament to real life during World War 2.

From Malta to Australia, New Zealand to the UK, the challenges and adventures faced by these women were unprecedented. Their passion, courage, resilience and commitment during wartime were all a precursor to the astonishing changes brought about by this incredible generation.

For the first time, women were doing their bit as nurses in war zones, members of the services, farmhands, factory workers or volunteers in community service. The last tradition left was the weekly dance, which ceremoniously brought these courageous women and men together for a quickstep, fox trot and brief respite from the rigours of wartime.
Gallipoli 1915

Gallipoli 1915

Alan Moorehead

$35.00

A century has now gone by, yet the Gallipoli campaign of 1915-16 is still infamous as arguably the most ill conceived, badly led and pointless campaign of the entire First World War.

The brainchild of Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, following Turkey's entry into the war on the German side, its ultimate objective was to capture the Gallipoli peninsula in western Turkey, thus allowing the Allies to take control of the eastern Mediterranean and increase pressure on the Central Powers to drain manpower from the vital Western Front.

From the very beginning of the first landings, however, the campaign went awry, and countless casualties. The Allied commanders were ignorant of the terrain, and seriously underestimated the Turkish army which had been bolstered by their German allies. Thus the Allies found their campaign staled from the off and their troops hopelessly entrenched on the hillsides for long agonising months, through the burning summer and bitter winter, in appalling, dysentery-ridden conditions.

By January 1916, the death toll stood at 21,000 British troops, 11,000 Australian and New Zealand, and 87,000 Turkish and the decision was made to withdraw, which in itself, ironically, was deemed to be a success.
Lancaster Men: The Aussie Heroes of Bomber Command

Lancaster Men: The Aussie Heroes of Bomber Command

Peter Rees

$24.99

More than 10,000 Australians served with Bomber Command, a highly trained band of elite flyers who undertook some of the most dangerous operations of World War II. They flew raid after raid over France and Germany knowing that the odds were against them. Stretched to breaking point, nearly 3500 died in the air. Their bravery in extreme circumstances has barely been recognised.

Peter Rees traces the extraordinary achievements of these young aviators. He tells their hair-raising stories of battle action and life on the ground. And he recounts how, when they returned to Australia, they were greeted as Jap dodgers and accused of 'hiding in England while we were doing it tough'.

Exciting, compelling and full of life, Lancaster Men is a powerful tribute to these forgotten Australian heroes of World War II.
1815: Regency Britain in the Year of Waterloo

1815: Regency Britain in the Year of Waterloo

Stephen Bates

$34.99

1815 was the year of Waterloo, the British victory that ended Napoleon's European ambitions and ushered in a century largely of peace for Britain. But what sort of country were Wellington's troops fighting for? And what kind of society did they return to?

Stephen Bates paints a vivid portrait of every aspect of Britain in 1815. Overseas, the bounds of Empire were expanding; while at home the population endured the chill of economic recession. As Jane Austen busied herself with the writing of Emma, John Nash designed Regent Street, Humphrey Davy patented his safety lamp for miners and Lord's cricket ground held its first match in St John's Wood, and a nervous government infiltrated dissident political movements and resorted to repressive legislation to curb free speech.

The Year In series gets to the heart of social and cultural life in the UK at key points in its history.
The Debs of Bletchley Park and Other Stories

The Debs of Bletchley Park and Other Stories

Michael Smith

$39.99

For Winston Churchill the men and women at Bletchley Park were 'the geese the laid the golden eggs', providing important intelligence that led to the Allied victory in the Second World War.

At the peak of Bletchley's success, a total of twelve thousand people worked there of whom more than eight thousand were women. These included a former ballerina who helped to crack the Enigma Code; a debutante working for the Admiralty with a direct line to Churchill; the convent girl who operated the Bombes, the top secret machines that tested Enigma settings; and the German literature student whose codebreaking saved countless lives at D-Day. All these women were essential cogs in a very large machine, yet their stories have been kept secret.

In The Debs of Bletchley Park and Other Stories author Michael Smith, trustee of Bletchley Park and chair of the Trust's Historical Advisory Committee, tells their tale. Through interviews with the women themselves and unique access to the Bletchley Park archives, Smith reveals how they came to be there, the lives they gave up to do 'their bit' for the war effort, and the part they played in the vital work of 'Station X'. 

They are an incredible set of women, and this is their story.
The French Intifada: The Long War Between France and its Arabs

The French Intifada: The Long War Between France and its Arabs

Andrew Hussey

$24.99

Beyond the affluent centre of Paris and other French cities, in the deprived banlieues, a war is going on. This is the French Intifada, a guerrilla war between the French state and the former subjects of its Empire, for whom the mantra of 'liberty, equality, fraternity' conceals a bitter history of domination, oppression, and brutality.

This war began in the early 1800s, with Napoleon's lust for martial adventure, strategic power and imperial preeminence, and led to the armed colonization of Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, and decades of bloody conflict, all in the name of 'civilization'.

Here, against the backdrop of the Arab Spring, Andrew Hussey walks the front lines of this war - from the Gare du Nord in Paris to the souks of Marrakesh and the mosques of Tangier - to tell the strange and complex story of the relationship between secular, republican France and the Muslim world of North Africa. The result is a completely new portrait of an old nation. 

Combining a fascinating and compulsively readable mix of history, politics and literature with Hussey's years of personal experience travelling across the Arab World, The French Intifada reveals the role played by the countries of the Maghreb in shaping French history, and explores the challenge being mounted by today's dispossessed heirs to the colonial project: a challenge that is angrily and violently staking a claim on France's future.
The Truth About French Women

The Truth About French Women

Marie-Morgane Le Moel

$32.99

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The Truth About French Women shows us that French women really are fascinating, but not for the reasons you think. French women have a mystique about them. They have, throughout the ages, been considered by some as a species apart - apparently flawless women, for whom sex and sensuality are central to their identity. But are French women really a model of elegance, always perfectly dressed with designer clothes as the stereotype would have us believe? Are they all intellectual, classy creatures with a perfect waistline, even if they eat croissants au beurre all day long? Are they all sexually liberated, wearing kinky lingerie and bedding other women's husbands (seducing them with a bottle of champagne kept near the bed, of course)?

The Truth About French Women focuses on who French women really are, and why they're more interesting than the cliches. It calls on women throughout French history who have defied societal norms and created their own destiny. 

French women who include heroines such as Jeanne d'Arc, the teenage girl who led the French army to success; the legendary sans culottes, who were instrumental during the French Revolution and Coco Chanel, who not only built a fashion empire, but also liberated women from the constraints of the corset, allowing an unprecedented amount of physical freedom for the fairer sex.

It's also a study into the realities of everyday life for the contemporary French woman, and how she interprets love, art and politics.
The Hotel on Place Vendaome: Life, Death, and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris

The Hotel on Place Vendaome: Life, Death, and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris

Tilar J Mazzeo

$22.99

Established in 1898 in the heart of Paris on the Place Vendome, the Hotel Ritz instantly became an icon of the city frequented by film stars and celebrity writers, American heiresses and risque flappers, politicians, playboys, and princes.

In June 1940, when France fell to the Germans, orders from Berlin specified that the Hotel Ritz would be the only luxury hotel of its kind in occupied Paris. Tilar J. Mazzeo traces the history of this cultural landmark from its opening in fin-de-siecle Paris to the modern era. The Hotel on Place Vendome chronicles life at the Ritz during wartime, when the hotel simultaneously served as headquarters to the highest-ranking German officers, such as Reichsmarschall Hermann Goring, and home to wealthy patrons (and the spies among them) who stayed on in Paris.

Mazzeo takes us into the grand palace's suites, bars, dining rooms, and wine cellars, revealing a hotbed of illicit affairs and deadly intrigue, as well as stunning acts of defiance and treachery, in which refugees were hidden in secret rooms, a Jewish bartender passed coded messages for the German resistance, and Wehrmacht officers plotted to assassinate the Fuhrer.

The result is the story of The Hotel on Place Vendome - a singular season at the world-class hotel, an intimate and riveting portrait of the last days of the Second World War.
Berlin Now: The Rise of the City and the Fall of the Wall

Berlin Now: The Rise of the City and the Fall of the Wall

Peter Schneider

$22.99

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In Berlin Now, and on the 25th Anniversary of the fall of the Wall, a legendary Berliner tells the inside story of the city. Over the last five decades, no other city has changed more than Berlin.

Divided in 1961, reunited in 1989, it has morphed over the last twenty-five years into Europe's most vibrant melting-pot of artists, immigrants and entrepreneurs. Pieces of the wall are collected around the world.

Blending memoir, history, anecdote and reportage, this legendary Berliner takes us behind the scenes - from wrenching stories of life under the Stasi, to the difference between East and West Berliners' sex-lives, to a present-day investigation of its arts scene, night-life, tumultuous politics and hidden quirks - revealing what makes Berlin the uniquely fascinating place it is.
One of Us: The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway

One of Us: The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway

Asne Seierstad ,  Sarah Death

$35.00

On 22 July 2011 Anders Behring Breivik killed 77 of his fellow Norwegians in a terrorist atrocity that shocked the world. Many were teenagers, just beginning their adult lives. In the devastating aftermath, the inevitable questions began. How could this happen? Why did it happen? And who was Anders Breivik?

Asne Seierstad was uniquely placed to explore these questions. An award-winning foreign correspondent, she had spent years writing about people caught up in violent conflict. Now, for the first time, she was being asked to write about her home country. Based on extensive testimonies and interviews, One of Us is the definitive account of the massacres and the subsequent trial. But more than that, it is the compelling story of Anders Breivik and a select group of his victims. A picture emerges of a killer - isolated, awkward, with a strange and troubled childhood. And on the other side, we come to know fascinating, dazzling young people such as Simon Saebo and Bano Rashid, eager to contribute to their society. As we follow the path to their inevitable collision, it becomes clear just what was lost in that one day. 

A gripping, shattering and vital book, One of Us is the story of a massacre and a study of evil. But it is also a story about community versus isolation, hope versus rejection, love versus bigotry - and a powerful memorial to those who lost their lives.
Congo

Congo

David van Reybrouck

$19.99

David van Reybrouck's 'Congo' traces the fate of one of the world's most critical, failed nation-states, second only to war-torn Somalia: the Democratic Republic of Congo.

This extraordinary book is already an international bestseller, recipient of the prestigious Prix Medicis essai 2012 and the AKO Literature Prize, and is widely regarded as a modern masterpiece. Van Reybrouck takes us through several hundred years of history, bringing some of the most dramatic episodes in Congolese history. 

Here are the people and events that have impinged the Congo's development - from the slave trade to the ivory and rubber booms; from the arrival of Henry Morton Stanley to the tragic regime of King Leopold II; from global indignation to Belgian colonialism; from the struggle for independence to Mobutu's brutal rule; and from the world famous Rumble in the Jungle to the civil war over natural resources that began in 1996 and still rages today.

Van Reybrouck interweaves his own family's history with the voices of a diverse range of individuals - charismatic dictators, feuding warlords, child-soldiers, the elderly, female merchant smugglers, and many in the African diaspora of Europe and China - to offer a deeply humane approach to political history, focusing squarely on the Congolese perspective and returning a nation's history to its people.
A Kim Jong-Il Production: The Incredible True Story of North Korea and the Most Audacious Kidnapping in History

A Kim Jong-Il Production: The Incredible True Story of North Korea and the Most Audacious Kidnapping in History

Paul Fischer

$29.99

This is a Kim Jong-Il Production by Paul Fischer - love, films and kidnapping in North Korea, the world's wildest regime.

Before becoming the world's most notorious dictator, Kim Jong-Il ran North Korea's film industry. He directed every film made in the country but knew they were nothing compared to Hollywood. Then he hit on the perfect solution: order the kidnapping of South Korea's most famous actress and her ex-husband, the country's most acclaimed director.

In a jaw-dropping mission the couple were kidnapped, held hostage and then 'employed' to make films for the Dear Leader, including a remake of Godzilla. They gained Kim's trust - but could they escape?

A non-fiction thriller with a plot so jaw-dropping even Hollywood couldn't make it up, this extraordinary book will be enjoyed by fans of Argo and Nothing to Envy.
The Mammoth Book of the Vietnam War

The Mammoth Book of the Vietnam War

Jon E. Lewis

$19.99

By 1969, following the French defeat at Dien Bien Phu, over 500,000 US troops were 'in country' in Vietnam. Before America's longest war had ended with the fall of Saigon in 1975, 450,000 Vietnamese had died, along with 36,000 Americans. The Vietnam War was the first rock 'n' roll war, the first helicopter war with its doctrine of 'airmobility', and the first television war; it made napalm and the defoliant Agent Orange infamous, and gave us the New Journalism of Michael Herr and others. It also saw the establishment of the Navy SEALs and Delta Force. At home, America fractured, with the peace movement protesting against the war; at Kent State University, Ohio National Guardsmen fired on unarmed students, killing four and injuring nine.
 
Lewis's compelling selection of the best writing to come out of a war covered by some truly outstanding writers, both journalists and combatants, includes an eyewitness account of the first major battle between the US Army and the People's Army of Vietnam at Ia Drang; a selection of letters home; Nicholas Tomalin's famous 'The General Goes Zapping Charlie Cong'; Robert Mason's 'R&R', Studs Terkel's account of the police breaking up an anti-war protest; John Kifner on the shootings at Kent State; Ron Kovic's 'Born on the Fourth of July'; John T. Wheeler's 'Khe Sanh: Live in the V Ring'; Pulitzer Prize-winner Seymour Hersh on the massacre at My Lai; Michael Herr's 'It Made You Feel Omni'; Viet Cong Truong Nhu Tang's memoir; naval nurse Maureen Walsh's memoir, 'Burning Flesh'; John Pilger on the fall of Saigon; and Tim O'Brien's 'If I Die in a Combat Zone'.
The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi's Campaign to Transform India

The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi's Campaign to Transform India

Lance Price

$32.99

How did a 'chai wallah' who sold tea on trains as a boy become Prime Minister of India?

On May 16, 2014, Narendra Modi was declared the winner of the largest election ever conducted anywhere in the world, having fought a campaign unlike any before. Political parties in Britain, Australia and North America pride themselves on the sophistication of their election strategies, but Modi's campaign was a master-class in modern electioneering. His team created an election machine that broke new ground in the use of social media, the Internet, mobile phones and digital technologies. Modi took part in thousands of public events, but in such a vast country it was impossible to visit every town and village.

The solution?  A 'virtual Modi' - a life-size 3D hologram - beamed to parts he could not reach in person. These pioneering techniques brought millions of young people to the ballot box - the holy grail of election strategists everywhere - as Modi trounced the governing Congress Party led by the Gandhi dynasty.

Former BBC correspondent and Downing Street communications expert Lance Price has been granted exclusive access to Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his team of advisers.  With complete freedom to tell it as he finds it, he details Modi's rise to power, the extraordinary election victory and its aftermath.

The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi's campaign to transform India lifts the lid on a whole new box of tricks, where message-management and IT wizardry combined to create a vote-winning colossus of awesome potency.
Lebanon: A History, 600 - 2011

Lebanon: A History, 600 - 2011

William Harris

$35.95

In this impressive synthesis, William Harris narrates the history of the sectarian communities of Mount Lebanon and its vicinity. He offers a fresh perspective on the antecedents of modern multi-communal Lebanon, tracing the consolidation of Lebanon's Christian, Muslim, and Islamic derived sects from their origins between the sixth and eleventh centuries.

The identities of Maronite Christians, Twelver Shia Muslims, and Druze, the mountain communities, developed alongside assertions of local chiefs under external powers from the Umayyads to the Ottomans. The chiefs began interacting in a common arena when Druze lord Fakhr al-Din Ma'n achieved domination of the mountain within the Ottoman imperial framework in the early seventeenth century. Harris knits together the subsequent interplay of the elite under the Sunni Muslim Shihab relatives of the Ma'ns after 1697 with demographic instability as Maronites overtook Shia as the largest community and expanded into Druze districts. By the 1840s many Maronites conceived the common arena as their patrimony. Maronite/Druze conflict ensued. 

Modern Lebanon arose out of European and Ottoman intervention in the 1860s to secure sectarian peace in a special province. In 1920, after the Ottoman collapse, France and the Maronites enlarged the province into the modern country, with a pluralism of communal minorities headed by Maronite Christians and Sunni Muslims. The book considers the flowering of this pluralism in the mid-twentieth century, and the strains of new demographic shifts and of social resentment in an open economy. External intrusions after the 1967 Arab-Israeli war rendered Lebanon's contradictions unmanageable and the country fell apart. Harris contends that Lebanon has not found a new equilibrium and has not transcended its sects.

In the early twenty-first century there is an uneasy duality: Shia have largely recovered the weight they possessed in the sixteenth century, but Christians, Sunnis, and Druze are two-thirds of the country. This book offers readers a clear understanding of how modern Lebanon acquired its precarious social intricacy and its singular political character.
Went the Day Well: Witnessing Waterloo

Went the Day Well: Witnessing Waterloo

David Crane

$49.99

A sweeping political, social, military and cultural overview of United Kingdom on the eve, and then the day, of the greatest battle fought by British arms.

Midnight, Sunday, 17 June 1815. There was no town in England that had not sent its soldiers, hardly a household that was not holding its breath, not a family, as Byron put it, that would escape 'havoc's tender mercies' at Waterloo, and yet at the same time life inevitably went on as normal. As Wellington's rain-sodden army retreated for the final, decisive battle, men and women in England were still going to the theatre and science lectures, still working in the fields and the factories, still reading and writing books and sermons, still painting their pictures and sitting in front of Lord Elgin's marbles as if almost five thousand did not already lie dead.

After ten hours of savage fighting, Waterloo would be littered with the bodies of something like 47,000 dead and wounded. Meanwhile, as the day unfolded, a whole nation, countryside and town, artisan and aristocrat, was brought together by war.

From Samuel Johnson Prize shortlisted author David Crane, Went the Day Well is a breathtaking portrait of Britain in those moments. Moving from England to the battle and back again this vivid, stunning freeze-frame of a country on the single most celebrated day in its modern history shows Crane's full range in tracing the endless, overlapping connections between people's lives. From private tragedies, disappointed political hopes, and public discontents to grandiloquent public celebrations and monuments, it answers Wellington's call as he rallied his troops to 'Think what England is thinking of us now'.
The Romanovs: The Final Chapter

The Romanovs: The Final Chapter

Robert K. Massie ,  Lorant Deutsch

$29.99

The compelling quest to solve a great mystery of the twentieth century: the ultimate fate of Russia's last tsar and his family.

In July 1991, nine skeletons were exhumed from a shallow grave near Ekaterinburg, Siberia, a few miles from the infamous cellar where the last tsar and his family had been murdered seventy-three years before. Were these the bones of the Romanovs? If so, why were the bones of the two younger Romanovs missing? Was Anna Anderson, celebrated in newspapers, books, and film, really Grand Duchess Anastasia? This book unearths the truth.

Pulitzer Prize winner Robert K. Massie presents a colourful panorama of contemporary characters, illuminating the major scientific dispute between Russian experts and a team of Americans, whose findings - along with those of DNA scientists from Russia, America, and the UK - all contributed to solving one of history's most intriguing mysteries.
The Great War: Ten Contested Questions

The Great War: Ten Contested Questions

Hazel Flynn ,  Geraldine Doogue

$27.99

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As we mark the centenary of the Great War, critical questions remain in contention; how the conflict really began, what roles the generals played in the carnage, what happened to the conscientious objectors and how the medical profession rose to the challenge of so many wounded.

This book, based on Radio National's weekend long broadcast, draws on the work of the world's leading thinkers and historians to challenge and extend our understanding of the war that profoundly changed the world.

Featuring the views of historian and journalist Paul Ham, Margaret MacMillan from the University of Oxford, Peter Stanley from UNSW, journalist and author Peter Hitchens and many others, this is a fresh and immensely readable view of the war and its continuing impact through the 20th century to the present day.
After Hitler: The Last Days of World War Two in Europe

After Hitler: The Last Days of World War Two in Europe

Michael Jones

$32.99

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On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler committed suicide. The following day, his propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels also killed himself and the crumbling Third Reich passed to Admiral Karl Donitz. The Nazis' position seemed hopeless. Yet remarkably, the war in the rest of Europe went on for another ten days.

After Hitler looks at these days as a narrative day-by-day countdown but also as a broader global history of a European war that had seen some of the most savage battles in history. Relations between the 'Big Three' - the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union - suddenly plunged to near breaking point. This book reveals that tumultuous story.

After Hitler also looks at the wider canvas of the war and the terrible humanitarian catastrophe uncovered in Europe. It describes those who felt the joy of freedom, but also those who faced a highly uncertain future. As Red Army soldiers joined forces with their British and American allies, Stalin's East finally came face to face with Churchill's and Truman's West. 

After Hitler tells of their growing mistrust, but also of moments of remarkable goodwill and co-operation - the brief but poignant hope that these great nations could together fashion a new and safer future. This is a fascinating exploration of the brief but crucial period that shaped the emerging post-war world.
Defending Gallipoli: The Turkish Story

Defending Gallipoli: The Turkish Story

Harvey Broadbent

$32.99

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Based on exclusive access to Turkish archives, Defending Gallipoli reveals how the Turks reacted and defended Gallipoli.

Author and Turkish language expert Harvey Broadbent spent five years translating everything from official records to soldiers' personal diaries and letters to unearth the Turkish story. It is chilling and revealing to see this famous battle in Australian history through the 'enemy' lens. The book commences with a jihad, which sees the soldiers fighting for country and God together.

But it also humanises the Turkish soldiers, naming them, revealing their emotions, and ultimately shows how the Allies totally misunderstood and underestimated them Defending Gallipoli fills a huge gap in the history of the Gallipoli campaign.
The Grand Deception: Churchill and the Dardanelles

The Grand Deception: Churchill and the Dardanelles

Tom Curran

$34.99

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The century that has elapsed since the 1915 Dardanelles campaign has done little to quell the debate that rages over its inglorious end. The origins of the campaign are likewise the subject of ongoing scrutiny, particularly the role of the First Sea Lord Winston Churchill, with whom the ill-fated campaign has been closely identified. Tom Curran's The Grand Deception: Churchill and the Dardanelles presents a detailed examination of Churchill's role in the decision-making process that led to the Gallipoli landings. Using unpublished British archival sources and a range of additional material, both contemporary and modern, Curran's meticulous research casts new light on the lead-up to a campaign that would profoundly affect Australian military history.
A Higher Form of Killing: Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare

A Higher Form of Killing: Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare

Diana Preston

$32.99

In six weeks during April and May 1915, as World War I escalated, Germany forever altered the way war would be fought.

On April 22, at Ypres, German canisters spewed poison gas at French and Canadian soldiers in their trenches; on May 7, the German submarine U-20, without warning, torpedoed the passenger liner  Lusitania,  killing 1,198 civilians; and on May 31, a German Zeppelin began the first aerial bombardment of London and its inhabitants. Each of these actions violated rules of war carefully agreed at the Hague Conventions of 1898 and 1907. Though Germany's attempts to quickly win the war failed, the psychological damage caused by these attacks far outweighed the casualties. The era of weapons of mass destruction had dawned.
 
While each of these momentous events has been chronicled in histories of the war, celebrated historian Diana Preston links them for the first time, revealing the dramatic stories behind each through the eyes of those who were there, whether making the decisions or experiencing their effect. She places the attacks in the context of the centuries-old debate over what constitutes  just war,  and shows how, in their aftermath, the other combatants felt the necessity to develop extreme weapons of their own.

In our current time of terror, when weapons of mass destruction - imagined or real - are once again vilified, the story of their birth is of great relevance.
Worlds of Labour

Worlds of Labour

Eric Hobsbawm

$22.99

World of Labour is a series of studies that considers the formation and evolution of working classes in the period between the late eighteenth century and the mid-twentieth, scrutinising their 'consciousness', ways of life and the movements they generated. The emphasis throughout the study is on the way labour organisations, policies and ideas were rooted in the everyday reality of working class life. In the process, leading Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm reveals the daily struggles of working class militants, many of whom are still unknown to the modern world. The result is a book that is expansive in scope, but fluent and clear in detail. It will serve as a valuable source of reference to those with an academic interest in the subject, and as an inspiration to those who simply wish to discover the development of working class movements.
The Archaeological Excavation Dictionary

The Archaeological Excavation Dictionary

Anna Kieburg

$39.99

This dictionary translates over 2,000 words and terms associated with archaeological excavations into eight languages - English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Turkish and Arabic - making it an essential tool for anyone digging abroad. It contains all necessary terms for the archaeological excavation and survey of sites of any period.
Early Ships and Seafaring: Water Transport Within Europe

Early Ships and Seafaring: Water Transport Within Europe

Sean McGrail

$59.99

'Early Ships and Seafaring: Water Transport Within Europe' builds on Professor Sean McGrail's 2006 volume 'Ancient Boats and Ships' by delving deeper into the construction and use of boats and ships between the stone age and AD1500 in order to provide up to date information. Regions covered will include the Mediterranean and Atlantic Europe. This interesting volume is easily accessible to those with little t no knowledge of the building and ises of boats, whether ancient or modern. Sean McGrail introduces the reader to this relatively new discipline through the theory and techniques used in the study of early boats as well as the many different types of evidence available to us, including archaeological, documentary, iconographic, experimental and ethnographic, and the natural, physical laws.
In Search of Kings and Conquerors: Gertrude Bell and the Archaeology of the Middle East

In Search of Kings and Conquerors: Gertrude Bell and the Archaeology of the Middle East

Lisa Cooper

$54.95

At the height of her career, Bell journeyed into the heart of the Middle East retracing the steps of the ancient rulers who left tangible markers of their presence in the form of castles, palaces, mosques, tombs and temples. Among the many sites she visited were Ephesus, Binbirkilise and Carchemish in modern-day Turkey as well as Ukhaidir, Babylon and Najaf within the borders of modern Iraq. Lisa Cooper here explores Bell's achievements, emphasizing the tenacious, inquisitive side of her extraordinary personality, the breadth of her knowledge and her overall contribution to the archaeology of the Middle East. Featuring many of Bell's own photographs, this is a unique portrait of a remarkable life.
Sparta: Unfit for Empire

Sparta: Unfit for Empire

Godfrey Hutchinson

$75.00

The end of the Peloponnesian War saw Sparta emerge as the dominant power in the Greek world. Had she used this position wisely her hegemony might have been secure. As it was, she embarked on actions that her former allies, Thebes and Korinth, refused to support. The rise of Thebes as a threatening power to Sparta's control of Greece was largely the result of the brilliant exploits of Epaminondas and Pelopidas whose obvious examination of Spartan tactics allowed them to provide counters to them. While noting the political issues, Godfrey Hutchinson's focus is upon the strategic and tactical elements of warfare in a period almost wholly coinciding with the reign of the brilliant commander, Agesilaos, one of the joint kings of Sparta, who, astonishingly, campaigned successfully into his eighties.
Eagles in the Dust: The Roman Defeat at Adrianopolis AD 378

Eagles in the Dust: The Roman Defeat at Adrianopolis AD 378

Adrian Coombs-Hoar

$59.99

In AD376 large groups of Goths, seeking refuge from the Huns, sought admittance to the Eastern Roman Empire. Emperor Valens took the strategic decision to grant them entry, hoping to utilize them as a source of manpower for his campaigns against Persia. The Goths had been providing good warriors to Roman armies for decades. However, mistreatment of the refugees by Roman officials led them to take up arms against their hosts. The resultant battle near Adrianopolis in AD378, in which Valens lost his life, is regarded as one of the most significant defeats ever suffered by Roman arms. The Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus called it the worst massacre since Cannae, nearly six hundred years previously. Modern historians have accorded it great significance both at a tactical level, due to the success of Gothic cavalry over the vaunted Roman infantry, and in strategic terms, often citing it as the beginning of the end for the Empire. Adrian Coombs-Hoar untangles the debate that still surrounds many aspects such claims with an insightful account that draws on the latest research.
Pagans: The End of Traditional Religion and the Rise of Christianity

Pagans: The End of Traditional Religion and the Rise of Christianity

$43.95

A provocative and contrarian religious history that charts the rise of Christianity from the point of view of traditional  religion from the religious scholar and critically acclaimed author of Augustine.

Pagans explores the rise of Christianity from a surprising and unique viewpoint: that of the people who witnessed their ways of life destroyed by what seemed then a powerful religious cult. These  pagans  were actually pious Greeks, Romans, Syrians, and Gauls who observed the traditions of their ancestors. To these devout polytheists, Christians who worshipped only one deity were immoral atheists who believed that a splash of water on the deathbed could erase a lifetime of sin.

Religious scholar James J. O'Donnell takes us on a lively tour of the Ancient Roman world through the fourth century CE, when Romans of every nationality, social class, and religious preference found their world suddenly constrained by rulers who preferred a strange new god. Some joined this new cult, while others denied its power, erroneously believing it was little more than a passing fad.

In Pagans, O'Donnell brings to life various pagan rites and essential features of Roman religion and life, offers fresh portraits of iconic historical figures, including Constantine, Julian, and Augustine, and explores important themes - Rome versus the east, civilization versus barbarism, plurality versus unity, rich versus poor, and tradition versus innovation - in this startling account.
The Roman Barbarian Wars: The Era of Roman Conquest

The Roman Barbarian Wars: The Era of Roman Conquest

Ludwig Dyck

$59.99

The history of the 'barbarian' peoples of Europe is filled with dramatic wars and migrations along with charismatic and often farsighted leaders. Inevitably, their greatest challenge was their struggle with the renowned military might of Rome. Even when outnumbered and faced by better equipped and trained Roman legions, the barbarians could inflict devastating defeats upon Rome. Though sometimes fickle in battle, the barbarian warrior was capable of reckless bravery. The Romans themselves admired the size and strength of the barbarians, which, combined with a life of hardship and intertribal warfare, made them dangerous opponents This book, however, is as much about Rome as it is about its tribal foes. Ludwig Dyck begins with the foundation of the city of Rome and follows her growth into a martial empire, complete with its pageantry and glory, its genius, its brutality and its arrogance. All this is told in a fast-paced, accessible narrative style.
Rome Versus Carthage: The War at Sea

Rome Versus Carthage: The War at Sea

Christa Steinby

$75.00

The epic struggle between Carthage and Rome, two of the superpowers of the ancient world, is most famous for land battles in Italy, on the Iberian peninsula and in North Africa. But warfare at sea, which played a vital role in the First and Second Punic Wars, rarely receives the attention it deserves. And it is the monumental clashes of the Carthaginian and Roman fleets in the Mediterranean that are the focus of Christa Steinby's absorbing study. She exploits new evidence, including the latest archaeological discoveries, and she looks afresh at the ancient sources and quotes extensively from them. In particular she shows how the Romans' seafaring tradition and their skill, determination and resourcefulness eventually gave them a decisive advantage. In doing so, she overturns the myths and misunderstandings that have tend to distort our understanding of Roman naval warfare.
The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong: The Untold Story of My Secret Struggle for Tibet and My Brother the Dalai Lama

The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong: The Untold Story of My Secret Struggle for Tibet and My Brother the Dalai Lama

Gyalo Thondup ,  Anne F. Thurston

$35.00

For over half a century, noodlemaker Gyalo Thondup has been a familiar figure in the Himalayan hill town of Kalimpong. But it was not until 2010 that the townsfolk discovered his true identity: Gyalo Thondup is none other than the older brother of the Dalai Lama and his special envoy, a trusted interlocutor between Tibet and foreign leaders from Chiang Kai-shek to Jawaharlal Nehru, Zhou Enlai to Deng Xiaoping. Indeed, only the Dalai Lama himself has played a more important role in the political history of modern, tragedy-ridden Tibet. Now, for the first time, Gyalo Thondup is prepared to tell his story. His remarkable account offers an intimate, personal look at the Dalai Lama and his immediate family, as well as an insider's view of the vicious and sometimes deadly struggles within the Potala Palace - the seat of power in Tibet. His is a story of the 'real' Tibet - a country that is secular as well as sacred, where the source of conflict is not just with China but between Tibetans themselves. Candid and insightful, this long-awaited account reveals Gyalo Thondup to have been a key figure in the great game played out by China, India, Russia and the United States over the strategically important Tibetan plateau.
This Divided Island: Stories from the Sri Lankan War

This Divided Island: Stories from the Sri Lankan War

Samanth Subramanian

$29.99

In the summer of 2009, the leader of the dreaded Tamil Tiger guerrillas was killed, bringing to a bloody end the stubborn and complicated civil war in Sri Lanka. For nearly thirty years, the war's fingers had reached everywhere: into the bustle of Colombo, the Buddhist monasteries scattered across the island, the soft hills of central Sri Lanka, the curves of the eastern coast near Batticaloa and Trincomalee, and the stark, hot north. With its genius for brutality, the war left few places, and fewer people, untouched. What happens to the texture of life in a country that endures such bitter conflict? What happens to the country's soul? Samanth Subramanian gives us an extraordinary account of the Sri Lankan war and the lives it changed. Taking us to the ghosts of summers past, and to other battles from other times, he draws out the story of Sri Lanka today - an exhausted, disturbed society, still hot from the embers of the war. Through travels and conversations, he examines how people reconcile themselves to violence, how religion and state conspire, how the powerful become cruel, and how victory can be put to the task of reshaping memory and burying histories. This Divided Island is a harrowing and humane investigation of a country still inflamed.
Australia in the Great War

Australia in the Great War

Philip Payton

$45.00

Australia in the Great War is a compelling history of Australia and its people during the global conflict of 1914-1918. It charts the experiences of ordinary men and women against a backdrop of momentous events on the international stage, and shows how war helped shape an emerging Australian national identity. It spans the heady days of August 1914, when Australia responded enthusiastically to the mother country's call for help, through the baptisms of fire at Gallipoli and on the Somme, to the dark days of Passchendaele and the remarkable battlefield performances of 1918 when the Australians were acknowledged as 'the shock troops of the British Empire'. Interweaving stories from the home front and the battle front, Australia in the Great War examines the lives (and deaths) of those who fought on European soil. But it also explores the lives of those left half-a-world behind: the civilians at home who watched from afar. Mothers, wives and girlfriends waited anxiously for news 'from the front', and local newspapers published extended commentaries on the happenings overseas. Young men were encouraged to join the colours but there was also a fierce debate on whether conscription to the armed forces should be introduced in Australia. Eventually, in 1919, Australian troops were repatriated, but they found their country much changed, and many had difficulty readjusting to civilian life. This is their story: a tale of sacrifice and bravery in a place far from home.
Kinglake-350

Kinglake-350

Adrian Hyland

$23.99

On 7 February 2009 Sergeant Roger Wood found himself at the epicentre of the worst bushfire disaster in Australia's history. Black Saturday. Wood, who's a country cop with twenty years experience and also a raucous, meditating, horse-riding vegan was the only officer on duty in the small community of Kinglake. As the firestorm approached he was called out to numerous incidents including multi-fatality car accidents. He led a group of fifty people from a store west of Kinglake four kilometres to safety through burning bush. Minutes before it was completely destroyed. Then, as the fire raged around him, he phoned his family ten kilometres away to warn them what was coming. When his wife answered, she screamed that the fire had already hit their property. Then the line went dead. Black Saturday was a many-headed monster in whose wake stories of grief, heroism and desolation erupted all over the state of Victoria. This book is about the monster and the heroism of those who confronted it.
Wellington: The Path to Victory, 1769-1814

Wellington: The Path to Victory, 1769-1814

Rory Muir

$44.95

The Duke of Wellington was not just Britain's greatest soldier, although his seismic struggles as leader of the Allied forces against Napoleon in the Peninsular War deservedly became the stuff of British national legend. Wellington was much more: a man of vision beyond purely military matters, a politically astute thinker, and a canny diplomat as well as lover, husband, and friend. Rory Muir's masterful new biography, the first of a two-volume set, is the fruit of a lifetime's research and discovery into Wellington and his times. The author brings Wellington into much sharper focus than ever before, addressing his masterstrokes and mistakes in equal measure. Muir looks at all aspects of Wellington's career, from his unpromising youth through his remarkable successes in India and his role as junior minister in charge of Ireland, to his controversial military campaigns. With dramatic descriptions of major battles and how they might have turned out differently, the author underscores the magnitude of Wellington's achievements. The biography is the first to address the major significance of Wellington's political connections and shrewdness, and to set his career within the wider history of British politics and the war against Napoleon. The volume also revises Wellington's reputation for being cold and aloof, showing instead a man of far more complex and interesting character.
A Brief Guide to British Battlefields: From the Roman Occupation to Culloden

A Brief Guide to British Battlefields: From the Roman Occupation to Culloden

David Clark

$24.99

A very readable work of reference offering a survey in chronological order, from AD 84 to 1746, of the major battles which have taken place on British soil, from the Roman occupation to Culloden, the last battle fought on British soil. In this way, the book can be read as a continuous narrative, while each entry also stands alone as a self-contained guide. The battles are grouped into relevant sections (such as the Wars of the Roses, the English Civil Wars and the Jacobite Rebellions), within broader historical periods. Each period is prefaced by a presentation of the nature of warfare and is enhanced by a feature article of specialist interest. Every entry includes a narrative of events leading up to the battle, a vivid description of the battle itself and an assessment of the long and short-term, consequences. In addition, there is useful information for visits, including precise identification of the location, details of access to and features of each site. The book is illustrated throughout with maps and a plate section.
Henry VIII: Routledge Historical Biographies (Second Edition)

Henry VIII: Routledge Historical Biographies (Second Edition)

Lucy Wooding

$58.99

This new edition of Lucy Wooding's Henry VIII is fully revised and updated to provide an insightful and original portrait of one of England's most unforgettable monarchs and the many paradoxes of his character and reign. Henry was a Renaissance prince whose Court dazzled with artistic display, yet he was also a savage adversary, who ruthlessly crushed all those who opposed him. Five centuries after his reign, he continues to fascinate, always evading easy characterization. Wooding locates Henry VIII firmly in the context of the English Renaissance and the fierce currents of religious change that characterized the early Reformation, as well as exploring the historiographical debates that have surrounded him and his reign. This new edition takes into account significant advances in recent research, particularly following the five hundredth anniversary of his accession in 2009, to put forward a distinctive interpretation of Henry's personality and remarkable style of kingship. It gives a fresh portrayal of Henry VIII, cutting away the misleading mythology that surrounds him in order to provide a vivid account of this passionate, wilful, intelligent and destructive king. This compelling biography will be essential reading for all early modern students.
The Birth of Britain: A History of the English Speaking Peoples, Volume I

The Birth of Britain: A History of the English Speaking Peoples, Volume I

Winston Churchill, Sir ,  Christian Rodska

$17.90  $15.75

The first volume in Churchill's epic history of English-speaking peoples The English-speaking peoples comprise perhaps the greatest number of human beings sharing a common language in the world today. These people also share a common heritage. For his four-volume work, Sir Winston Churchill took as his subject these great elements in world history. Volume 1 commences in 55 BC, when Julius Caesar famously turned his gaze upon Britain and concludes with the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. This work is part of Brilliance Audio's extensive Classic Collection, bringing you timeless masterpieces that you and your family are sure to love.
The Age of Revolution: A History of the English Speaking Peoples, Volume III

The Age of Revolution: A History of the English Speaking Peoples, Volume III

Winston Churchill, Sir ,  Christian Rodska

$17.90  $15.75

The third volume in Churchill's famous account A History of English Speaking Peoples In this next installment to Churchill's ambitious historical account, the political lion delves into the years between 1688 and 1815. During this long period, three revolutions took place, and all led to war between the British and the French. This work is part of Brilliance Audio's extensive Classic Collection, bringing you timeless masterpieces that you and your family are sure to love.
XI Jinping: The Governance of China

XI Jinping: The Governance of China

Xi Jinping

$19.99

The first published work by a sitting Chinese President, Xi Jinping: The Governance of China offers a unique look inside the Communist Party of China and its vision for the future. The book presents excerpts and summaries of 79 speeches, talks, interviews, instructions and correspondences in 18 chapters. Each item is accompanied by relevant notes about China's social system, history and culture. The book includes 45 photos taken at various stages of Xi's life, which provide readers with more information about his career and personal life. Topics include: The Chinese Dream Economic Development The Rule of Law Ecological Progress National Defense One Country, Two Systems New Model of Major-Country Relations Combating Corruption The CPC Leadership Under the leadership of Xi Jinping the Communist Party of China has set off in a new direction of reform and modernization. The Governance of China It will contribute greatly to the concepts and principles of governance within the CPC leadership, China's future path of development, and the nations domestic and foreign policies as well as responses to international concerns about China. It is essential reading for anyone interested in knowing how China, and more specifically, how its President views the world and China's place within it.
Napoleon: Soldier of Destiny

Napoleon: Soldier of Destiny

Michael Broers

$24.99

Napoleon Bonaparte: a man of intense emotion, iron self-discipline, acute intelligence and immeasurable energy. Michael Broers brings this remarkable man to life, from his dangerous Corsican roots to the epic battles of Austerlitz, Jena and Friedland. Here is the incredible story of how one man's sheer determination, ruthlessness and careful calculation drove France to conquer Europe. This is the first volume of a revelatory new biography of the great ruler told with energy, style and brand new research. Here is the first life in which Napoleon speaks in his own uncensored voice - but not always as he wanted the world to hear him.
The End of Empire: Napoleon's 1814 Campaign

The End of Empire: Napoleon's 1814 Campaign

George F. Nafziger

$85.00

The End of Empire is a continuation of Nafziger's definitive military studies of the Napoleonic era beginning with the 1812 campaign and progressing through the 1813 campaign. Having suffered a massive reversal of fortunes in Russia Napoleon found himself confronted, in Germany, by the combined forces of Russia, Prussia, and Austria. After the disaster of Leipzig Napoleon's German allies fell away and he was forced to fall back, beyond the borders of France.Offered a negotiated peace on the basis of a return to the pre-1792 borders, Napoleon chose to continue to fight, trusting in his star. He was, however, desperate for troops and short of horses and cash. Cornered and threatened by three armies invading from the north, northeast, and east, every chance to stop the Allies had to be taken and there was desperate battle after desperate battle. Of all his campaigns, Napoleon's 1814 campaign was one of his most brilliant. Eventually, after several terrible defeats, the Allies refused to engage him in battle when he confronted them. Instead they pushed their other two armies forward, slowly driving him back as he rushed to block the advance of the other armies on Paris. This strategy proved successful and eventually Napoleon was obliged to abdicate when his marshals refused to fight further. The End of Empire includes a detailed text, specially commissioned maps and the author's trademark extensive orders of battle.
Hitler's Warrior: The Life and Wars of SS Colonel Jochen Peiper

Hitler's Warrior: The Life and Wars of SS Colonel Jochen Peiper

Danny S. Parker

$39.99

Handsome, intelligent, impetuous, and dedicated to the Nazi cause, SS Colonel Jochen Peiper (1915--1976) was one of the most controversial figures of World War II. After volunteering for the Waffen-SS at an early age, Peiper quickly rose to prominence as Heinrich Himmler's ever-present personal adjutant in the early years of the war. Sent later to the fighting front with the fearsome 1st SS Panzer Division, Peiper became a legend for his flamboyant and brutal style of warfare. As one of Hitler's favorites, he was chosen to spearhead the Ardennes Offensive, later known as the Battle of the Bulge. After the war, Peiper became the central subject in the bitterly disputed Malmedy war crimes trial. Convicted but later released, he moved to eastern France. There, he and his past were discovered, and he died in a fiery gun battle by killers unknown even today. In Hitler's Warrior, historian Danny Parker describes Peiper both on and off the battlefield and explores his complex personality. The rich narrative is supported by years of research that has uncovered previously unpublished archival material and is enhanced with information drawn from extensive interviews with Peiper's contemporaries, including German veterans. This major new historical work is both a definitive biography of Hitler's most enigmatic warrior and a unique study of the morally inverted world of the Third Reich.
Reformation, Dissent and Diversity: The Story of Scotland's Churches, 1560 - 1960

Reformation, Dissent and Diversity: The Story of Scotland's Churches, 1560 - 1960

Andrew T. N. Muirhead

$29.99

This book examines and describes for the general reader the life and characteristics of the churches which flourished in Scotland between the Reformation and the mid-20th century. It will help both amateur and professional historians to understand the different denominations, and provides background to, and context for, their own research. Church influence on society has been particularly strong in Scotland and church records are a major source of pre-1844 information, but no recent book deals adequately with the church background. Here, the author explores how churches developed in, and interacted with, society. An overview of the churches of Scotland from the Reformation to 1960 is followed by a brief examination of each denomination including doctrinal issues, worship, organization, social and demographic factors, and mapping to show the geographical strengths of particular groups.
Japanese Secret Projects: Experimental Aircraft of the IJA and IJN 1922-1945

Japanese Secret Projects: Experimental Aircraft of the IJA and IJN 1922-1945

Edwin M. Dyer

$59.95

This is the second volume in the Japanese Secret Project series, compiled by popular demand after the great success of the first volume. This popularity reveals that Secret and X-Plane aircraft projects remain highly popular with historians, enthusiasts, modellers and the flight sim community. Surprisingly, secret Japanese planes of World War 2 remain an area which has not been extensively covered due to scarcity of information. They do, however, have a large base of interest as unlike the majority of secret Luftwaffe programs that were resigned to the drawing board, the vast number of aircraft featured within this book actually flew or were in development. As with the first volume, the book is divided into two sections dedicated to the two air forces of the IJA and IJN, with over 40 aircraft examined, each with its history, variants, performance, and any combat records laid out in an easy to read fashion. This is beautifully complimented by stunning colour renditions of the aircraft in combat and colour profiles of genuine markings and camouflage. The majority of the book is dedicated to aircraft that were under development or in service during the war years, but there are examples of pre-war experimental aircraft, and a selection of missile projects. Sample aircraft projects include: Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Tachikawa Ki-104 fighter Kawasaki Ki-48-II Kai and Ki-174 suicide light bomber Nakajima Ki-117 high altitude fighter Kawasaki Ki-119 light bomber Imperial Japanese Navy Air Force Hitachi 'He-Type' heavy bomber Aichi S1A Denko night fighter Mitsubishi Q2M1 ASW bomber Kawanishi K-60 flying boat Yokosuka D5Y1 Myojo Kai suicide aircraft
Armies of the War of the Triple Alliance 1864-70: Paraguay, Brazil, Uruguay & Argentina

Armies of the War of the Triple Alliance 1864-70: Paraguay, Brazil, Uruguay & Argentina

Gabriele Esposito ,  Giuseppe Rava

$24.99

The War of the Triple Alliance is the largest single conflict in the history of South America. Drawing Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Paraguay into conflict the war was characterized by extraordinarily high casualty rates, and was to shape the future of an entire continent - depopulating Paraguay and establishing Brazil as the predominant military power. Despite the importance of the war, little information is available in English about the armies that fought it. This book analyzes the combatants of the four nations caught up in the war, telling the story of the men who fought on each side, illustrated with contemporary paintings, prints, and early photographs.
The Nile: Downriver Through Egypt's Past and Present

The Nile: Downriver Through Egypt's Past and Present

Toby Wilkinson

$19.99

From Herodotus's day to the present political upheavals, the steady flow of the Nile has been Egypt's heartbeat. It has shaped its geography, controlled its economy and moulded its civilisation. The same stretch of water which conveyed Pharaonic battleships, Ptolemaic grain ships, Roman troop-carriers and Victorian steamers today carries modern-day tourists past bankside settlements in which rural life - fishing, farming, flooding - continues much as it has for millennia. At this most critical juncture in the country's history, foremost Egyptologist Toby Wilkinson takes us on a journey up the Nile, north from Lake Victoria, from Cataract to Cataract, past the Aswan Dam, to the delta. The country is a palimpsest, every age has left its trace: as we pass the Nilometer on the island of Elephantine which since the days of the Pharaohs has measured the height of Nile floodwaters to predict the following season's agricultural yield and set the parameters for the entire Egyptian economy, the wonders of Giza which bear the scars of assault by nineteenth-century archaeologists and the modern-day unbridled urban expansion of Cairo - and in Egypt's earliest art (prehistoric images of fish-traps carved into cliffs) and the Arab Spring (fought on the bridges of Cairo) - the Nile is our guide to understanding the past and present of this unique, chaotic, vital, conservative yet rapidly changing land.
Iznik: The Artistry of Ottoman Ceramics

Iznik: The Artistry of Ottoman Ceramics

Walter B. Denny

$70.00

Covering both Iznik pieces de forme and the famous Iznik tiles that decorate Ottoman imperial monuments, Iznik integrates the entire spectrum of Iznik production, both tiles and wares, and the broader artistic tradition in which it originated. Walter B. Denny begins with a description of the particular nature of Islamic art under the Ottoman empire, as well as the methods of the craftsmen who worked under the imperial auspices. He then examines the links between the court style of Istanbul and the ceramic ateliers in Iznik itself, and the crucial role of the dominant styles of the golden age of Iznik ceramics and their most famous creators, Shah Kulu and Kara Memi. The book showcases the array of motifs floral, vegetal and figurative used on Iznik wares, looks at the relationship between non-Muslim communities and the Ottoman empire, and closes with an examination of the rich stylistic heritage that Iznik ceramics have given to Western art. Lavishly illustrated in full colour throughout, this is a panoramic overview of a spectacular and refined artform.
Bonaparte and the British: Prints and Propaganda in the Age of Napoleon

Bonaparte and the British: Prints and Propaganda in the Age of Napoleon

Tim Clayton ,  Sheila O'Connell

$55.00

Not only was Waterloo one of the most decisive battles ever fought, was also a crucial event in European political and social history, ending over 20 years of conflict and bringing to his knees one of Europe's most extraordinary and challenging figures Napoleon Bonaparte. This intriguing book shows through contemporary prints how Bonaparte was seen from across the English Channel where hostile propaganda was tempered by admiration for his military and administrative talents. Featuring works from the British Museums world - renowned collection of political satires, including examples by the greatest masters of the genre, James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson and George Cruikshank, the authors examine in detail the se fascinating and humorous prints. French satires showing the British in relation to Bonaparte are also included alongside portraits of Bonaparte and his family made for the British market. Attitudes to Bonaparte were coloured by political tensions in Britain as highlighted in satires of Charles James Fox, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Lord Holland and other radicals. French, German, Russian and Spanish copies of British prints demonstrate the wide dissemination of prints and the admiration of continental artists for British satirists. From portraits of the handsome young general to the resplendent Emperor to the cast of his death mask, this book explores crucial events of Bonaparte's career and the period including: Nelsons triumph in the battle of the Nile in 1798; the 14 months of peace after the Treaty of Amiens in March 1802 when British tourists flocked to Paris; the invasion scare of 1803 that generated much bravado in propagandist prints; the death of Nelson at the moment of victory at Trafalgar in 1805; the Russian campaign of 1812 followed by other military defeats during 1813, culminating in Napoleons exile to Elba in 1814; his 100 days in power in 1815, followed by Waterloo and exile to St Helena. Bonaparte and the British reveals the stories behind the prints, explaining how satire was used as propaganda and how the artists worked. With stunning illustrations showing the intricately detailed prints in full colour this book brings to life a key period in European history.
American Epic: Reading the U.S. Constitution

American Epic: Reading the U.S. Constitution

Garrett Epps

$26.95

Americans may venerate the Constitution,  but all too seldom is it read.

In 1987, E.L. Doctorow celebrated the Constitution's bicentennial by reading it.  It is five thousand words long but reads like fifty thousand,  he said. Distinguished legal scholar Garrett Epps-himself an award-winning novelist-disagrees. It's about 7,500 words. And Doctorow  missed a good deal of high rhetoric, many literary tropes, and even a trace of, if not wit, at least irony,  he writes.

In American Epic, Epps takes us through a complete reading of the Constitution-even the  boring  parts-to achieve an appreciation of its power and a holistic understanding of what it says. In this book he seeks not to provide a definitive interpretation, but to listen to the language and ponder its meaning. He draws on four modes of reading: scriptural, legal, lyric, and epic.
American Secret Projects: Fighters and Bombers of World War 2

American Secret Projects: Fighters and Bombers of World War 2

Tony Buttler ,  Alan Griffith

$59.95

This book includes and describes the major fighter and bomber proposals from the American aircraft industry for the period roughly 1937-1945. These embrace various fighter and interceptor concepts, medium, heavy and intercontinental bombers, attack aircraft and anti-submarine aircraft, both for the USAAF and US Navy. Particular emphasis is placed on 'Circular Proposals' - a system of submitting designs against requirements circulated around industry by the Army Air Force in the 1930s and early 1940s. The illustrations show drawings and photographs of unbuilt designs merged with the history and photographs of real aeroplanes. Very little has been published previously about American projects from this time period and much of the material will not have been seen widely before. It will therefore be fascinating reading for all lovers of the previously highly successful 'Secret Projects' series and aviation historians.
The Great Republic: A History of America

The Great Republic: A History of America

Winston Churchill

$35.00

The Great Republic is Sir Winston Churchill's personal vision of American history, from the arrival of the first European settlers to the dawn of the Cold War, edited by his grandson, the historian and journalist Winston S. Churchill. A magnificent re-telling of the American story, the volume testifies to Churchill's skills as a historian and his deep warmth of feeling for America - the Great Republic, as he called it - and its people. The Great Republic lays out America's history, character and destiny with the brilliance that could only come from an author with Churchill's gifts as a narrative historian and experience as a national leader and strategist.
Appomattox 1865: Lee's Last Campaign

Appomattox 1865: Lee's Last Campaign

Ron Field ,  Adam Hook

$34.99

From an internationally renowned expert on US history, this highly illustrated title details the curtain-closing campaign of the American Civil War in the East. Ulysses S Grant's Army of the Potomac and Robert E Lee's Army of Northern Virginia faced up to one another one last time, resulting in Lee conducting a desperate series of withdrawals and retreats down the line of the Richmond and Danville Railroad, hoping to join forces with General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee. This book, with informative full-colour illustrations and maps, tells the full story of the skirmishes and pursuits that led directly to Lee's surrender, as his frantic efforts to extricate his forces from ever more perilous positions became increasingly untenable.
To the Edge of the World: The Story of the Trans-Siberian Railway

To the Edge of the World: The Story of the Trans-Siberian Railway

Christian Wolmar

$24.99

Christian Wolmar expertly tells the story of the Trans-Siberian railway from its conception and construction under Tsar Alexander III, to the northern extension ordered by Brezhnev and its current success as a vital artery. He also explores the crucial role the line played in both the Russian Civil War -Trotsky famously used an armoured carriage as his command post - and the Second World War, during which the railway saved the country from certain defeat. Like the author's previous railway histories, it focuses on the personalities, as well as the political and economic events, that lay behind one of the most extraordinary engineering triumphs of the nineteenth century.
Russia and the New World Disorder

Russia and the New World Disorder

Bobo Lo

$29.99

Led by the ubiquitous Vladimir Putin, Russia has strongly reasserted itself on the international stage. In the worldview of Putin and the Kremlin, the inevitable decline of the West and rise of the rest provides an opportunity for Russia to fulfill its mission as an independent center of global power. What are the origins of this increasingly aggressive stance? What are the geopolitical ramifications? And what will be the likely outcomes? In this timely and accessible work, former diplomat and renowned Russia analyst Bobo Lo examines the interplay between contemporary Russian foreign policy and a global environment that has rarely been more fluid and uncertain. Russia and the New World Disorder delves into Russian policy and geopolitics via three questions: How do Russia's domestic politics and external operating environment influence the Kremlin's foreign policy? How have policymakers in Moscow responded to that environment, and with what ramifications? What are the prospects for change, continuity, or regression in Russian foreign policy over the next decade and beyond? Lo argues that Moscow's approach to regional and global affairs reflects the tension between two very different worlds. The Kremlin's belief in a weakening West and subsequent rise of Russia reaffirms traditional principles of international politics: collective leadership by the major powers, the dominance of hard power, the existence of spheres of influence, and the primacy of national sovereignty. This idealized view, however, is the antithesis of the actual world that Russia faces today. It is defined by a new disorder that challenges many core assumptions. Its principal message is that only those states that embrace change will prosper. In this world, Russia is no longer able to rest on tradition and a sense of entitlement but must instead adapt to fluid international realities and redefine itself as a modern power. Which of these two diametrically opposed worlds will Russia ultimately choose? This book makes clear that the next 10 to 15 years will be critical in determining whether Russia plays a leading role in twenty-first century politics, or ends up as one of the principal casualties of global transformation.
A History of the Urals: Russia's Crucible from Early Empire to the Post-Soviet Era

A History of the Urals: Russia's Crucible from Early Empire to the Post-Soviet Era

Paul Dukes

$39.99

The Urals are best known as the boundary between Europe and Asia. A History of the Urals demonstrates the region's importance in its own right, as a crucible of Russia's defence industry in particular. In the first English-language book to explore the subject fully, Paul Dukes examines the region's contribution to the power of the state in tsarist, Soviet and post-Soviet times, offering a refreshing antidote to Moscow-centric interpretations of Russian history. The book contextualises more recent periods with chapters on the earlier years of the Urals and covers the key environmental as well as economic, political and cultural themes. The book contains illustrations and maps, plus lists of books and websites, as aids to further research and understanding of the subject. A History of the Urals is an important book that provides new and valuable insights for all students of Russian history.
Roosevelt and Stalin: Portrait of a Partnership

Roosevelt and Stalin: Portrait of a Partnership

Susan Butler

$57.95

Stalin were more than allies of convenience during the war. They were partners who shared the same outlook for the postwar world and formed an uneasy but deep friendship. Making use of previously classified materials, Susan Butler reassesses in-depth the relationship between these two men who shaped the world's political stage from World War II to the decades leading up to and into the new century. She tells the story of how the leaders of the capitalist and Communist worlds joined forces to defeat Hitler and illuminates the real alliance the two men forged. She reveals their modus operandi; what they knew and thought about each other; and how, by the time of Roosevelt's death in April, 1945, they had come to a meeting of minds, agreeing on a world organization to prevent war, on the evils of colonialism, on the presumption that Germany had to be dealt with as a future, as well as present, threat that could never again be allowed to menace civilization - and on their respective goal: to fashion a world without war for at least a generation.
Cherbourg 1944: The First Allied Victory in Normandy

Cherbourg 1944: The First Allied Victory in Normandy

Steven J. Zaloga ,  Steve Noon

$34.99

Steven Zaloga offers up a rigorous and absorbing study of the first major Allied operation in Normandy after the D-Day landings - the capture of Cherbourg. Blending expert analysis, specially commissioned artwork and illustrative maps, this book tells the story of the bitter struggle to capture this vital point. Cherbourg was recognized by both the German and Allied High commands as crucial to the Allied foothold in Normandy - it was the nearest major port and was desperately needed by the Allies for major logistical operations to support their forces on long stretches of open beach. Hitler, on the other hand, declared Cherbourg to be a 'Festung' (fortress), a designation everyone knew to mean that its defenders were to fight to the last man. After a grueling struggle that involved several distinct tactical phases to overcome the different elements of Cherbourg's defence, the campaign resulted in a bittersweet Allied victory, the drama and significance of which are explained in full in this work.
Green Leader: Operation Gatling, the Rhodesian Military's Response to the Viscount Tragedy

Green Leader: Operation Gatling, the Rhodesian Military's Response to the Viscount Tragedy

Ian Pringle

$55.00

On 3 September 1978, a Russian-supplied heat-seeking missile shot down an Air Rhodesia Viscount civilian airliner shortly after it took off from the lakeside holiday resort of Kariba in the Zambezi Valley. Miraculously, 18 people, including small children, survived the crash only for most of them to be gunned down in cold blood shortly after the crash by terrorists loyal to the Zimbabwe African People's Union (ZAPU) leader Joshua Nkomo.

Just days before the plane was shot down, the Rhodesian leader, Ian Smith, had met secretly with Nkomo for discussions, brokered by Britain, Zambia and Nigeria. However, this event dramatically changed the political landscape and wrecked a plan by the British government to mould an alliance between Smith and the Ndebele leader Nkomo, and smoothed the path for the Shona leader Robert Mugabe to become the first leader of Zimbabwe.

In this fascinating two-part account, Ian Pringle (author of Dingo Firestorm), describes the Viscount tragedy and the military response.  He uses exclusive interviews with two survivors of the crash and the massacre, and with the first person to arrive at the horrendous crash scene (commanding officer of the Rhodesian SAS Regiment), as well as accounts from other key witnesses, to recreate the tragic event.
Mauser Military Rifles

Mauser Military Rifles

Neil Grant ,  Alan Gilliland ,  Peter Dennis

$29.99

This volume offers an insight into the iconic Mauser family of German bolt-action rifles. Drawing on first-hand accounts of the weapons in combat and primary sources regarding their mechanical performance, this fully illustrated study charts the Mauser's origins, combat record and lasting influence. It explores the full range of Mauser rifles, beginning with the hugely successful Gew 98, which entered service in the time of the Kaiser, provided the basis for the US Springfield M1903 and equipped combatants such as the South African Boers. It also investigates the Kar 98k, which was still in front-line use with Wehrmacht troops in 1945, saw use with Mexican and Yugoslavian forces, and even played a role in the 1990s Balkan conflicts in the hands of snipers. Featuring expert analysis, specially commissioned artwork and gripping first-hand accounts, this volume is ideal for anyone seeking an understanding of these sturdy and accurate rifles' unique place in the history of small-unit tactics in the 20th century.
The Second World War: the Gathering Storm

The Second World War: the Gathering Storm

Winston Churchill

$49.99

Hanging the chronicle and discussion of great military and political events upon the thread of his personal experiences, Sir Winston Churchill provides an immediate and current account of all the tremendous events of the coming of war as they unfolded. The Gathering Storm explores the events of the period between the end of the Great War and the beginning of the Second World War and details Sir Winston Churchill's belief that the latter should never have been allowed to occur. Mankind, he asserts, must learn from the lessons of the past as 'There was never a war more easy to stop than that which has just wrecked what was left of the world from the previous struggle.'
The Second World War: Their Finest Hour

The Second World War: Their Finest Hour

Winston Churchill

$49.99

For eight grim months Great Britain stood alone as the only European power still carrying on the struggle against Nazi Germany. Eight months in which the Luftwaffe tried and failed to drive the RAF from the skies; eight months in which the Nazi fleet tried to starve Britain into submission. Focusing on the period from May 1940 to the end of the year, Their Finest Hour embraces Sir Winston Churchill's first days as Prime Minister, France's defeat, British troops' mass evacuation from Dunkirk and the uneasy summer when the enemy was daily expected upon our shores. However, it also features the first gleams of light as the danger of invasion faded and the year closed with Desert Victory. The descriptions of these times and events, both desperate and hopeful, are drawn from the pen of the man who shaped them and who led his people in resistance to every challenge, bringing the period to a close with the first victorious counter-attack.
World Report 2015: Events of 2014

World Report 2015: Events of 2014

Human Rights Watch

$49.20

The human rights records of more than ninety countries and territories is put into perspective in Human Rights Watch's signature yearly report, which, in the 2014 volume, highlighted the armed conflict in Syria, international drug reform, drones and electronic mass surveillance, and more, and also featured photo essays of child marriage in South Sudan, the cost of the Sochi Winter Olympics in Russia, and religious fighting in Central African Republic.
          
Reflecting extensive investigative work undertaken in 2014 by Human Rights Watch staff, in close partnership with domestic human rights activists, the annual World Report 2015 is an invaluable resource for journalists, diplomats, and citizens, and is a must-read for anyone interested in the fight to protect human rights in every corner of the globe.
A Broken World: Letters, Diaries and Memories of the Great War

A Broken World: Letters, Diaries and Memories of the Great War

Sebastian Faulks ,  Hope Wolf

$35.00

Edited by the bestselling author of Birdsong and Dr Hope Wolf, this is an original and illuminating non-fiction anthology of writing on the First World War. A lieutenant writes of digging through bodies that have the consistency of Camembert cheese; a mother sends flower seeds to her son at the Front, hoping that one day someone may see them grow; a nurse tends a man back to health knowing he will be court-martialled and shot as soon as he is fit. In this extraordinarily powerful and diverse selection of diaries, letters and memories - many of which have never been published before - privates and officers, seamen and airmen, munitions workers and mothers, nurses and pacifists, prisoners-of-war and conscientious objectors appear alongside each other. The war involved people from so many different backgrounds and countries and included here are, among others, British, German, Russian and Indian voices. Alongside testament from the many ordinary people whose lives were transformed by the events of 1914-18, there are extracts from names that have become synonymous with the war, such as Siegfried Sassoon and T.E. Lawrence. What unites them is a desire to express something of the horror, the loss, the confusion and the desire to help - or to protest. A Broken World is an original collection of personal and defining moments that offer an unprecedented insight into the Great War as it was experienced and as it was remembered.
Hundred Days: The End of the Great War

Hundred Days: The End of the Great War

Nick Lloyd

$22.99

Nick Lloyd's Hundred Days: The End of the Great War explores the brutal, heroic and extraordinary final days of the First World War. On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day in November 1918, the guns of the Western Front fell silent. The Armistice, which brought the Great War to an end, marked a seminal moment in modern European and World history. Yet the story of how the war ended remains little-known. In this compelling and ground-breaking new study, Nick Lloyd examines the last days of the war and asks the question: how did it end? Beginning at the heralded turning-point on the Marne in July 1918,Hundred Days traces the epic story of the next four months, which included some of the bloodiest battles of the war. Using unpublished archive material from five countries, this new account reveals how the Allies - British, French, American and Commonwealth - managed to beat the German Army, by now crippled by indiscipline and ravaged by influenza, and force her leaders to seek peace. This is a powerful and moving book by a rising military historian.
Coined: The Rich Life of Money and How its History Has Shaped Us

Coined: The Rich Life of Money and How its History Has Shaped Us

Kabir Sehgal

$32.99

Money isn't just coins, bank notes or clamshells; it is more than a store of value or unit of payment. It's an idea, a transformative player in how we view, cope, and harmonise with the world. Like it or not, money is a measure of status, well-being, and our chances to survive and thrive. Money isn't just what makes the world go around; it is largely what makes each of us go around. In Coined, Kabir Sehgal travels the world while presenting a multidimensional portrait of currency through the ages. He explores the origin of exchange in the Galapagos Islands, searches for hoards of coins from an ancient civilization in Bangladesh, and learns about the art that appears on money from coin collectors in Vietnam. He takes you from the vaults beneath the Federal Reserve in New York to a beehive where pollen can be understood as a natural form of exchange. He details the birth of money, to its place in our culture both past and present, to how the obsession for it can lead to death and destruction, all the while mixing engaging and entertaining stories from the front lines of global currency exchange with extensive, thoughtful research. The story of money is rich and varied because it is our story.
How to Fly A Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery

How to Fly A Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery

Kevin Ashton

$35.00

There is a myth about how something new comes to be; that geniuses have dramatic moments of insight where great things and thoughts are born whole. Poems are written in dreams. Symphonies are composed complete. Science is accomplished with eureka shrieks. Businesses are built by magic touch. The myth is wrong. Anyone can create. Necessity is not the mother of invention. We all are. In How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention and Discovery, acclaimed technology pioneer Kevin Ashton takes us behind the scenes of creation to reveal the true process of discovery. From Archimedes to Apple, from Kandinsky to the Coke can, from the Wright brothers - who set out to 'fly a horse' - to Woody Allen, he exposes the seemingly unremarkable individuals, gradual steps, multiple failures and countless ordinary and often uncredited acts that led to our most astounding breakthroughs. Along the way he explores why innovators meet resistance and how they overcome it, why most organisations stifle creative people, and how the most creative organisations really work. In a passionate and profound narrative, How to Fly a Horse explodes the myths on how 'new' comes to be.
India's Disappearing Railways: A Photographic Journey

India's Disappearing Railways: A Photographic Journey

Angus McDonald

$59.95

India's Disappearing Railways is a vibrant photo-essay by Australian photographer Angus McDonald, capturing for the first time in print the sub-continent's unique narrow-gauge hill railways in all their vivid colour, character and chaos. It is an intimate and humorous portrait of life on the trains, evoking the very soul of India; and with a rare empathy and insight illustrates the lives of those who ride them, who work on them, and who live alongside them. Yet as the nation modernises, these railways - whether in the snow-peaked Himalaya, the terai of Rajasthan or the verdant Nilgiri Hills of Tamil Nadu - are vanishing. India's Disappearing Railyways records a way of life that is slowly disappearing - the Indian government is gradually converting its narrow-gauge lines - and documents the diversity of this vast and multilayered country from a unique standpoint.
           
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