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History
Germany: Memories of a Nation

Germany: Memories of a Nation

Neil MacGregor

$49.99

ABBEY'S CHOICE DECEMBER 2014 ----- From Neil MacGregor, the author of A History of the World in 100 Objects, this is a view of Germany like no other. For the past 140 years, Germany has been the central power in continental Europe. Twenty-five years ago a new German state came into being. How much do we really understand this new Germany, and how do its people now understand themselves?

Neil MacGregor argues that uniquely for any European country, no coherent, over-arching narrative of Germany's history can be constructed, for in Germany both geography and history have always been unstable. Its frontiers have constantly floated. Konigsberg, home to the greatest German philosopher, Immanuel Kant, is now Kaliningrad, Russia; Strasbourg, in whose cathedral Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Germany's greatest writer, discovered the distinctiveness of his country's art and history, now lies within the borders of France.

For most of the five hundred years covered by this book Germany has been composed of many separate political units, each with a distinct history. And any comfortable national story Germans might have told themselves before 1914 was destroyed by the events of the following thirty years.

German history may be inherently fragmented, but it contains a large number of widely shared memories, awarenesses and experiences; examining some of these is the purpose of this book. Beginning with the fifteenth-century invention of modern printing by Gutenberg, MacGregor chooses objects and ideas, people and places which still resonate in the new Germany - porcelain from Dresden and rubble from its ruins, Bauhaus design and the German sausage, the crown of Charlemagne and the gates of Buchenwald - to show us something of its collective imagination. There has never been a book about Germany quite like it.

Neil MacGregor has been Director of the British Museum since August 2002. He was Director of the National Gallery in London from 1987 to 2002. His previous books include A History of the World in 100 Objects and Shakespeare's Restless World, now between them translated into more than a dozen languages.
Australia 1901-2001: A Narrative History

Australia 1901-2001: A Narrative History

Andrew Tink

$34.99

'So tightly packed were the crowds lining Sydney's streets on 1 January 1901 that they resembled a dense well-tended hedge. Early morning showers had followed a thunderstorm the previous evening and many carried umbrellas as they waited for the procession. Planning for this New Year's Day had been going on in earnest for about three and a half months, after Queen Victoria had declared it to be the day upon which the Commonwealth of Australia would come into being.'

Andrew Tink's superb book tells the story of Australia in the 20th century, from Federation to the Sydney 2000 Olympics. It was a century marked by the trauma of war and the despair of the depression, balanced by extraordinary achievements in sport, science and the arts. 

Tink's story is driven by people, whether they be prime ministers, soldiers, shopkeepers, singers, footballers or farmers; men or women, Australian born, immigrant or Aborigine. He brings the decades to life, writing with empathy, humour and insight to create a narrative that is as entertaining as it is illuminating.
Horses in Australia: An Illustrated History

Horses in Australia: An Illustrated History

Nicolas Brasch

$49.99

This beautifully illustrated book celebrates the horse in Australia past and present. From Cobb & Co to Black Caviar, from the Walers of World War I to The Man from Snowy River, it showcases our best historical and contemporary images.

The horse has been an integral part of Australian history since the First Fleet brought the first horse to our shores. From the resilient workhorses of colonial Australia and the determined stockhorses rounding up cattle, to the thoroughbreds that capture the country's imagination at every Melbourne Cup, horses have contributed to many of the great human feats in our history.

Here, alongside 180 stunning images, Nicolas Brasch shows why we love horses - and how they have been captured so strikingly by our photographers and artists.
Quartley Essay #56: Guy Rundle on Clive Palmer

Quartley Essay #56: Guy Rundle on Clive Palmer

Guy Rundle

$19.99

Who is Clive Palmer, and what does his ascent say about Australia's creaking political system? In Clivosaurus, Guy Rundle observes Palmer close up, examining his rise to prominence, his beliefs, his deals and his politics - not to mention his poetry. Rundle shows that neither the government nor the media have been able to take Palmer's measure. Convinced they face a self-interested clown, they have failed to recognise both his tactical flexibility and the consistency of his centre-right politics. This is a story about the Gold Coast, money in politics, Canberra's detached political caste and the meaning of Palmer's motley crew. Above all, it is a brilliantly entertaining portrait of 'the man at the centre of a perfect storm for Australian democracy, a captain steering his vessel artfully in the whirlpool.' 'In the first half of the year we saw Tony Abbott treated with deference to his values and beliefs, as his chaotic and lying government slid from one side of the ring to the other, while Clive Palmer, ploughing a steady course on a range of key issues, was treated as the inconstant one. No wonder no one could tell what he was going to do next - they weren't even bothering to look at where he had come from.' Guy Rundle, Clivosaurus
Eureka!: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Ancient Greeks but Were Afraid to Ask

Eureka!: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Ancient Greeks but Were Afraid to Ask

Peter Jones

$35.00

The ancient Greeks continue to fascinate us - they gave us our alphabet and much of our scientific, medical and cultural language; they invented democracy, atomic theory, and the rules of logic and geometry; established artistic and architectural canons visible to this day on all our high streets; laid the foundations of philosophy, history, tragedy and comedy; and debated everything from the good life and the role of women, to making sense of foreigners and the best form of government, all in the most sophisticated terms.

In Eureka!, Peter Jones tells their epic story as he expertly guides the reader through the key historical events - from the Trojan War through the wars against the Persians, to the Athenian Empire, the conflict with Sparta, and on through the Byzantine Empire. Along the way he introduces the major figures of the age, including Homer, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Euclid and Archimedes, explores the Greek myths, provides a glimpse of everyday life in ancient times and shows us the very foundations of Western culture.

It is a compelling tale unmatchable in its vividness, scope and variety.
Australia Under Surveillance

Australia Under Surveillance

Frank Moorhouse

$32.99

ASIO has kept a file on Frank Moorhouse since he was seventeen. Now Frank has decided it is time to report on ASIO.

This year ASIO has extended its surveillance powers, made the issuing of warrants easier and limited the freedom of journalists. At a time when the government has raised the terrorist alert level to 'high' we are facing the question of what degree of terrorist threat we are prepared to endure so as to retain freedoms of expression and what might loosely be called the 'traditional privacies'.

The paradox is an old one: is a secret agency needed for our safety as a democracy? If so, how does a democracy manage a secret agency without losing control of it? What constitutes an offence against national security? And what are we to make of WikiLeaks and socially conscious hackers and whistleblowers? Do we need a renewal of the bargain between the citizen and the secret agencies, as unreliable as it may be, as we all go into the glare and the maze of controlled and uncontrollable data collection and its consequences?

We are entering a new era, where nothing can be assumed to be private, especially at the governmental level.  More than ever before, our future is unforeseeable, but if in the unforeseeable we see a glimmer of dangerous things, perhaps we should remember that positive things can also be unforeseeable.
Napoleon the Great

Napoleon the Great

Andrew Roberts

$59.99

From Andrew Roberts, author of the Sunday Times bestseller The Storm of War, this is the definitive modern biography of Napoleon.

It has become all too common for Bonaparte's biographers to approach him as a figure to be reviled, bent on world domination, practically a proto-Hitler. Here, after years of study, extending even to visits paid to St Helena and 53 of Napoleon's 56 battlefields, Andrew Roberts has created a true portrait of the mind, the life and the military and political genius of a fundamentally constructive ruler.

This is the Napoleon, Roberts reminds us, whose peacetime activity produced countless indispensable civic innovations and whose Napoleonic Code provided the blueprint for civil law systems still in use around the world today. It is one of the greatest lives in world history and here has found its ideal biographer. The sheer enjoyment which this book will give anyone who loves history is enormous.

Andrew Roberts is a biographer and historian of international renown, whose books include Salisbury: Victorian Titan (winner, the Wolfson Prize for History); Masters and Commanders; and The Storm of War, which reached No. 2 on the Sunday Times bestseller list. Roberts is a Fellow of the Royal Societies of Literature and Arts. He appears regularly on British television and radio and writes for the Sunday Telegraph, Spectator, Literary Review, Mail on Sunday and Daily Telegraph.
The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia

The Bush: Travels in the Heart of Australia

Don Watson

$45.00

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Most Australians live in cities and cling to the coastal fringe, yet our sense of what an Australian is - or should be - is drawn from the vast and varied inland called the bush. But what do we mean by 'the bush', and how has it shaped us? 

Starting with his forebears' battle to drive back nature and eke a living from the land, Don Watson explores the bush as it was and as it now is: the triumphs and the ruination, the commonplace and the bizarre, the stories we like to tell about ourselves and the national character, and those we don't. Via mountain ash and mallee, the birds and the beasts, slaughter, fire, flood and drought, swagmen, sheep and their shepherds, the strange and the familiar, the tragedies and the follies, the crimes and the myths and the hope - here is a journey that only our leading writer of non-fiction could take us on.

At once magisterial in scope and alive with telling, wry detail, The Bush lets us see our landscape and its inhabitants afresh, examining what we have made, what we have destroyed, and what we have become in the process. No one who reads it will look at this country the same way again.

'The grand Australian bush - the nurse and tutor of eccentric minds, the home of the weird, and of much that is different from things in other lands.' - Henry Lawson
The Making of Australia: From a Tiny Struggling Convict Settlement to the Remarkable Nation it is Today

The Making of Australia: From a Tiny Struggling Convict Settlement to the Remarkable Nation it is Today

David Hill

$34.99

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This is the story of how a struggling convict settlement grew into six dynamic colonies and then the remarkable nation of Australia. Told through the key figures who helped build it into the thriving nation it is today, David Hill once again offers up Australian history at its most entertaining and accessible.

In his latest book, David Hill traces the story of our nation from its European beginnings to Federation. When James Cook landed on the east coast of Australia, the rest of the world had some idea of how empty, vast and wild this continent was, but so little was known of it that in 1788 most people thought it was two lands. In the subsequent years, its coastline was charted, its interior opened up, and its cities, laws and economy developed.

In this riveting, wide-ranging history, David Hill traces how this happened through the key figures who built this country into the thriving nation it is today: from its prescient and fair-minded first governor, Arthur Phillip, to the unpopular William Bligh, the victim of the country's first and only military coup; from the visionary builder and law-maker Lachlan Macquarie to William Wentworth, the son of a convict who secured Australia's first elected parliament; from Henry Parkes, the grand old man of politics who started the fraught process of Federation, to the first prime minister, Edmund Barton. It was Barton who formed the first Australian government just in time for the inaugural celebrations on 1 January 1901, when the nation of Australia was born!

David Hill is one of our most popular writers of Australian history. His previous books, The Forgotten Children, 1788, The Gold Rush and The Great Race have all been bestsellers.

The Making of Australia by David Hill at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
Crime, Punishment and Redemption: A Convict's Story

Crime, Punishment and Redemption: A Convict's Story

June Slee

$44.99

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John Ward, writing whilst incarcerated on Norfolk Island, tells a story of thwarted love that led him to a life of crime: including theft, sexual assault and more. In telling the candid story of his downfall he exposes his own ruthlessness and lack of empathy.

This book is an insight into the criminal mind, ably examined by author June Slee. It is a glimpse into 19th-century aristocratic life - dress, food, pastimes and prejudices - from a servant's perspective. And it is a unique record, perhaps the only extant diary ever written during the Australian penal era whilst its convict writer was imprisoned. Plus, Ward records a particular moment in our history: not only life aboard prison hulks which he describes in detail but also the timing of his arrival in Sydney when convicts were no longer being accepted; he was sent straight to Norfolk Island where we get a fascinating insight into the rule of Captain Alexander Maconochie. Moconochie believed in a system of improvement for convicts based on a marks system for good behaviour rather than humiliating punishment. In this way, Ward gained access to writing materials for his diary.

Crime, Punishment and Redemption by June Slee at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
Sydney Beaches: A History

Sydney Beaches: A History

Caroline Ford

$39.99

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Shark attacks and sewage slicks, lifesavers and surfers, amusement parks and beach camps - the beach is Sydney's most iconic landscape feature. From Palm Beach in the north to Cronulla in the south, Sydney's coastline teems with life.

People from around the city escape to the beaches to swim, surf, play, and lie in the sun. Sydney Beaches tells the story of how Sydneysiders developed their love of the beach, from 19th-century picnickers to the surfing and sun-baking pioneers a century later. But Sydney's beaches have another lesser-known, intriguing history. Our world-famous beach culture only exists because the first beachgoers demanded important rights. This book is also the story of these battles for the beach.

Accompanied by vibrant images of Sydney's seashore, this expansive and delightful book is the story of how a city developed a relationship with its ocean coast, and how a nation created a culture.
Australia on Horseback: The Story of the Horse and the Making of a Nation

Australia on Horseback: The Story of the Horse and the Making of a Nation

Cameron Forbes

$44.99

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The first horse set foot in Australia on 30 January 1788, one of seven aboard the First Fleet's Lady Penrhyn, which also carried a cargo of female convicts.

From then on, horses carried explorers who opened up the country to settlement. They carried Aboriginal mounted police, trained as ruthless killers of their own people. Horses, often fine stolen animals, carried bushrangers who ruled the roads and bailed up townships: 'gentleman' Matthew Brady, 'brave' Ben Hall and the towering, controversial Ned Kelly.

Horses carried men to war. Some 120,000 horses were sent to World War I battlefields: only one was brought home. Horses helped build the nation, marshalling the great flocks and herds, helping to create its myths. As they have since the early days of the colony, they carry our bets and, like the mighty Phar Lap in the Depression days, they have the power to lift our spirits. Cameron Forbes, author of the acclaimed Hellfire and The Korean War, uses the motif of the horse to tell the wider Australian story of settlement, exploration, dispossession and warfare.

Australia on Horseback is a masterful achievement, a comprehensively researched and beautifully told history of a developing nation and a powerful tribute to the horse - bearer of men, hopes, fears and dreams.
How the World Was Won: The Americanization of Everywhere

How the World Was Won: The Americanization of Everywhere

Peter Conrad

$39.99

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In this dazzling new book, cultural critic and historian Peter Conrad tells the story of the spectacular rise and subsequent waning of American influence across the world since 1945.

Politics, war and commerce form the inevitable backdrop to his tale, but Conrad also treats us to a kaleidoscopic presentation of Americas unstoppable creativity: its output of great, good and enjoyably bad art, of jeans and jazz, fast food and fridges, space travel, comic books and motorbikes, technologies and therapies, along with the heroic, erotic or violent cinematic visions that have Americanized even our dreams.
Old Law, New Law: A Second Australian Legal Miscellany

Old Law, New Law: A Second Australian Legal Miscellany

Keith Mason

$59.95

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Old Law, New Law follows the author's Lawyers Then and Now in offering a miscellany of genuine legal stories drawn from Australian legal history as well as its modern law.

If there is any change of focus, this work looks at the people of the law through the prism of established or changing legal doctrines and processes. The chapter headings will show that quirky humanity intrudes into the most doctrinaire of fields (such as statutory interpretation and tort law) and that law intrudes into every facet of human life (including food, drink and sex).

As in the former work, there is much comparing of attitudes past and present, while observing the underlying constancy of human values and biases within every corner of the law. Readers will discover: the constitutional distinction between financial and moral bankruptcy the New South Wales judge who responded to a submission on behalf of the Queensland Commissioner for Railways by stating "You don't think we are going to let you banana-benders get away with that, do you?"

Chief Justices who entered dodgy marriages, committed contempts of court or were described as sexy by litigants they encountered judges who upheld appeals from their own judgments strange aspects of matrimonial law and lore, including wife sales and strange outcomes of the biblical one flesh concept some (rare) sightings of appellate judges abusing each other several instances of cannibalism and the law.

Old Law, New Law: A Second Australian Legal Miscellany by Keith Mason at Abbey's Bookshop 131 York Street, Sydney
Twelve Voices from Greece and Rome: Ancient Ideas for Modern Times

Twelve Voices from Greece and Rome: Ancient Ideas for Modern Times

Christopher Pelling ,  Maria Wyke

$38.95

Twelve Voices from Greece and Rome is a book for all readers who want to know more about the literature that underpins Western civilization. Chistopher Pelling and Maria Wyke provide a vibrant and distinctive introduction to twelve of the greatest authors from ancient Greece and Rome, writers whose voices still resonate strongly across the centuries: Homer, Sappho, Herodotus, Euripides, Thucydides, Plato, Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, Horace, Juvenal and Tacitus. To what vital ideas do these authors give voice? And why are we so often drawn to what they say even in modern times? Twelve Voices investigates these tantalizing questions, showing how these great figures from classical antiquity still address some of our most fundamental concerns in the world today (of war and courage, dictatorship and democracy, empire, immigration, city life, art, madness, irrationality, and religious commitment), and express some of our most personal sentiments (about family and friendship, desire and separation, grief and happiness). These twelve classical voices can sound both compellingly familiar and startlingly alien to the twenty-first century reader. Yet they remain suggestive and inspiring, despite being rooted in their own times and places, and have profoundly affected the lives of those prepared to listen to them right up to the present day.
The Retreat: How the West Ignored Pakistan and Lost Afghanistan

The Retreat: How the West Ignored Pakistan and Lost Afghanistan

Christina Lamb

$29.99

Published to mark the final retreat of Western troops from Afghanistan, this book asks just how the might of NATO, with 48 countries and 140,000 troops on the ground, not managed to defeat a group of religious students and farmers? How did it go so wrong? 'War Not Peace' tells how the West turned success into defeat in the longest war fought by the United States in its history and by Britain since the Hundred Years War. It is the story of well-intentioned men and women going into a place they did not understand at all. And how, what had once been the right thing to do had become a conflict that everyone wanted to exit. It has been a fiasco which has left Afghanistan still one of the poorest and most dangerous nations on earth. The leading journalist on the region with unparalleled access to all key decision makers, Christina Lamb is the best-selling author of 'The Africa House' and 'I Am Malala', co-authored with Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai. This revelatory and personal account is her final analysis of the realities of Afghanistan, told unlike anyone before.
The Longest Afternoon: The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo

The Longest Afternoon: The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo

Brendan Simms

$29.99

The true story, told minute by minute, of the soldiers who defeated Napoleon - from Brendan Simms, acclaimed author of Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy. Europe had been at war for over twenty years. After a short respite in exile, Napoleon had returned to France and threatened another generation of fighting across the devastated and exhausted continent. At the small Belgian village of Waterloo two large, hastily mobilized armies faced each other to decide the future of Europe. Unknown either to Napoleon or Wellington the battle would be decided by a small, ordinary group of British and German troops given the task of defending the farmhouse of La Haye Sainte. This book tells their extraordinary story, brilliantly recapturing the fear, chaos and chanciness of battle and using previously untapped eye-witness reports. Through determination, cunning and fighting spirit, some four hundred soldiers held off many thousands of French and changed the course of history.
Severed: A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found

Severed: A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found

Frances Larson

$39.99

The human head is exceptional. It accommodates four of our five senses, encases the brain and boasts the most expressive set of muscles in the body. It is our most distinctive attribute and it connects our inner selves to the outer world more evocatively than any other part of the body. Yet there is a dark side to the head's pre-eminence. Over the centuries, human heads have decorated our churches, festooned our city walls and filled our museums. Long regarded as objects of fascination and repulsion, they have been props for artists and specimens for laboratory scientists, trophies for soldiers and items of barter. Today, as videos of decapitations circulate online and scientists promise the wealthy among us that our heads may one day live on without our bodies, the severed head is as contentious and compelling as ever. From the western colonialists whose demand for shrunken heads spurred brutal massacres to the troops in the Second World War who sent the remains of Japanese soldiers home to their girlfriends; from the memento mori in Romantic portraits to Damien Hirst's With Dead Head; from grave-robbing phrenologists to enterprising cryonicists, Larson explores the bizarre, often gruesome and confounding history of the severed head. Its story is our story.
Cusco: Urbanism and Archaeology in the Inka World

Cusco: Urbanism and Archaeology in the Inka World

Ian Farrington

$55.00

The Inka capital of Cusco is the oldest existing city in the Americas. Known as the  navel of the world  during the Inka Empire, it was a fascinating and complex urban landscape that grew and evolved over 3,000 years of continuous human habitation. Ian Farrington has spent decades investigating Cusco and its surroundings, gathering an impressive mass of ethnohistorical and archaeological data. 

In this volume, Farrington explores building plans, architectural forms, and urban planning techniques utilized at Cusco. He examines how each element impacted the development of various sectors of the ancient city and demonstrates how the Inka organized urban space within the contexts of their cultural norms and practices. These findings include analysis of major ceremonies and their association with Inka urban architecture.

This valuable study conceptualizes Cusco as a system including the urban core, the heartland, and the imperial provinces from northwest Argentina to southern Colombia. Its unique approach and expansive findings reveal the sophisticated nature of Inka planning.
Beyond the Blue Horizon: How the Earliest Mariners Unlocked the Secrets of the Oceans

Beyond the Blue Horizon: How the Earliest Mariners Unlocked the Secrets of the Oceans

Brian Fagan

$19.99

In Beyond the Blue Horizon, archaeologist and historian Brian Fagan tackles his richest topic yet: the enduring quest to master the oceans, the planet's most mysterious terrain. We know the tales of Columbus and Captain Cook, yet much earlier mariners made equally bold and world-changing voyages. From the moment when ancient Polynesians first dared to sail beyond the horizon, Fagan vividly explains how our mastery of the oceans changed the course of human history. What drove humans to risk their lives on open water? How did early sailors unlock the secrets of winds, tides, and the stars they steered by? What were the earliest ocean crossings like? With compelling detail, Fagan reveals how seafaring evolved so that the forbidding realms of the sea gods were transformed from barriers into a nexus of commerce and cultural exchange. From bamboo rafts in the Java Sea to triremes in the Aegean, from Norse longboats to sealskin kayaks in Alaska, Fagan crafts a captivating narrative of humanity's urge to challenge the unknown and seek out distant shores. Beyond the Blue Horizon will enthrall readers who enjoyed Dava Sobel's Longitude, Simon Winchester's Atlantic, and Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel.
Home: A Time Traveller's Tales from Britain's Prehistory

Home: A Time Traveller's Tales from Britain's Prehistory

Francis Pryor

$45.00

In Home Francis Pryor, author of The Making of the British Landscape, archaeologist and broadcaster, takes us on his lifetime's quest: to discover the origins of family life in prehistoric Britain. Francis Pryor's search for the origins of our island story has been the quest of a lifetime. In Home, the Time Team expert explores the first nine thousand years of life in Britain, from the retreat of the glaciers to the Romans' departure. Tracing the settlement of domestic communities, he shows how archaeology enables us to reconstruct the evolution of habits, traditions and customs. But this, too, is Francis Pryor's own story: of his passion for unearthing our past, from Yorkshire to the west country, Lincolnshire to Wales, digging in freezing winters, arid summers, mud and hurricanes, through frustrated journeys and euphoric discoveries. Evocative and intimate, Home shows how, in going about their daily existence, our prehistoric ancestors created the institution that remains at the heart of the way we live now: the family. Under his gaze, the land starts to fill with tribes and clans wandering this way and that, leaving traces that can still be seen today...Pryor feels the land rather than simply knowing it . (Guardian). Former president of the Council for British Archaeology, Dr Francis Pryor has spent over thirty years studying our prehistory. He has excavated sites as diverse as Bronze Age farms, field systems and entire Iron Age villages. He appears frequently on TV's Time Team and is the author of The Making of the British Landscape, Seahenge, as well as Britain BC and Britain AD, both of which he adapted and presented as Channel 4 series.
Secrets of the Knights Templar: The Hidden History of the World's Most Powerful Order

Secrets of the Knights Templar: The Hidden History of the World's Most Powerful Order

S. J. Hodge

$22.99

The Knights Templar are one of the most mysterious and powerful religious orders in history. Highly trained, and adhering to a strict chivalric code, their success on the battlefield brought them both extraordinary wealth and political influence. It also ensured they would be entrusted to guard Christendom's greatest secrets. Our enduring fascination with the Templars is matched only by the swirling myths that surround and sometimes obscure the order's history. Secrets of the Knights Templar examines each of these mysteries in turn to reveal the truth about the Knights' secret practices, rituals and codes, as well as the continued influence of the Templars today. From the true location of the Holy Grail to the Templars' involvement in the Battle of Bannockburn, and from the sudden downfall of the order to the claims of those who believe they're descended from its Grand Masters, S. J. Hodge's thrilling and authoritative narrative uncovers the hidden links behind the stories and separates historical fact from fiction.
The Greeks: An Introduction to Their Culture

The Greeks: An Introduction to Their Culture

Robin Sowerby

$54.99

The Greeks has provided a concise yet wide-ranging introduction to the culture of ancient Greece. In this new and expanded third edition the best-selling volume offers a lucid survey that covers all the key elements of ancient Greek civilization from the age of Homer to the Hellenistic period. It provides detailed discussions of the main trends in literature and drama, philosophy, art and architecture, with generous reference to original sources, and places ancient Greek culture firmly in its political, social and historical context. The new edition has expanded coverage of the post-Classical period with major expansions in the areas of Hellenistic history, literature and philosophy. More emphasis is placed on the Greek world as a whole, especially on Sparta, and the focus on social history has been increased. The Greeks is an indispensable introduction for all students of Classics, and an invaluable guide for students of other disciplines who require grounding in Greek civilization.
Antigonus The One-Eyed: Greatest of the Successors

Antigonus The One-Eyed: Greatest of the Successors

Jeff Champion

$59.99

Plutarch described Antigonus the One Eyed (382-301 BC) 'as 'the oldest and greatest of Alexander's successors,' Antigonus loyally served both Philip II and Alexander the Great as they converted his native Macedonia into an empire stretching from India to Greece. After Alexander's death, Antigonus, then governor of the obscure province of Phrygia, seemed one of the least likely of his commanders to seize the dead king's inheritance. Yet within eight years of the king's passing, through a combination of military skill and political shrewdness, he had conquered the Asian portion of the empire. His success caused those who controlled the European and Egyptian parts of the empire to unite against him. For another fourteen years he would wage war against a coalition of the other Successors, Ptolemy, Lysimachus, Seleucus and Cassander. In 301 he would meet defeat and death in the Battle of Ipsus. The ancient writers saw Antigonus' life as a cautionary tale about the dangers of hubris and vaulting ambition. Despite his apparent defeat, his descendants would continue to rule as kings and create a dynasty that would rule Macedonia for over a century. Jeff Champion narrates the career of this titanic figure with the focus squarely on the military aspects.
In God's Path: The Arab Conquests and the Creation of an Islamic Empire

In God's Path: The Arab Conquests and the Creation of an Islamic Empire

Robert G. Hoyland

$35.95

In just over a hundred years-from the death of Muhammad in 632 to the beginning of the Abbasid Caliphate in 750-the followers of the Prophet swept across the whole of the Middle East, North Africa, and Spain. Their armies threatened states as far afield as the Franks in Western Europe and the Tang Empire in China. The conquered territory was larger than the Roman Empire at its greatest expansion, and it was claimed for the Arabs in roughly half the time. How this collection of Arabian tribes was able to engulf so many empires, states, and armies in such a short period of time is a question that has perplexed historians for centuries. Most recent popular accounts have been based almost solely on the early Muslim sources, which were composed centuries later for the purpose of demonstrating that God had chosen the Arabs as his vehicle for spreading Islam throughout the world. In this ground-breaking new history, distinguished Middle East expert Robert G. Hoyland assimilates not only the rich biographical and geographical information of the early Muslim sources but also the many non-Arabic sources, contemporaneous or near-contemporaneous with the conquests. The story of the conquests traditionally begins with the revelation of Islam to Muhammad. In God's Path, however, begins with a broad picture of the Late Antique world prior to the Prophet's arrival, a world dominated by the two superpowers of Byzantium and Sasanian Persia, the two eyes of the world. In between these empires, in western (Saudi) Arabia, emerged a distinct Arab identity, which helped weld its members into a formidable fighting force. The Arabs are the principal actors in this drama yet, as Hoyland shows, the peoples along the edges of Byzantium and Persia-the Khazars, Bulgars, Avars, and Turks-also played important roles in the remaking of the old world order. The new faith propagated by Muhammad and his successors made it possible for many of the conquered peoples to join the Arabs in creating the first Islamic Empire. Well-paced and accessible, In God's Path presents a pioneering new narrative of one the great transformational periods in all of history.
Medieval Rome: Stability and Crisis of a City, 900-1150

Medieval Rome: Stability and Crisis of a City, 900-1150

Chris Wickham

$71.95

Medieval Rome analyses the history of the city of Rome between 900 and 1150, a period of major change in the city. This volume doesn't merely seek to tell the story of the city from the traditional Church standpoint; instead, it engages in studies of the city's processions, material culture, legal transformations, and sense of the past, seeking to unravel the complexities of Roman cultural identity, including its urban economy, social history as seen across the different strata of society, and the articulation between the city's regions. This new approach serves to underpin a major reinterpretation of Rome's political history in the era of the 'reform papacy', one of the greatest crises in Rome's history, which had a resonance across the entire continent. Medieval Rome is the most systematic analysis ever made of two and a half centuries of Rome's history, one which saw centuries of stability undermined by external crisis and the long period of reconstruction which followed.
The Queen of Four Kingdoms

The Queen of Four Kingdoms

HRH Princess Michael , of Kent

$19.99

At the age of nineteen, Yolande of Aragon is sent away from her family, her friends, and everything she knows, to marry the young Duke of Anjou, King Charles VI's first cousin. Their marriage has been arranged to form an alliance between the previously warring kingdoms of Aragon and Anjou, and is politically fraught in a time of great danger and unrest. Yet the union between Yolande and Louis becomes not only a great love story, but also sets in motion events which will change the course of history. As Louis spends more and more time and money fighting in Italy for his claim to the Kingdom of Naples, Yolande is left alone with their six children to govern their lands. But through her charm, fierce intelligence and the clever use of her spies, she becomes the saviour of not just her kingdoms but also of France. Her Royal Highness Princess Michael of Kent unveils this seldom told story, enriched by her own insider's perspective of royal life. The Queen of Four Kingdoms is the epic true story of a rich and riveting period of French and English history, all witnessed by the captivating and complex heroine Yolande.
The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean: The Ancient World Economy and the Kingdoms of Africa, Arabia and India

The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean: The Ancient World Economy and the Kingdoms of Africa, Arabia and India

Raoul McLaughlin

$75.00

The ancient evidence suggests that international commerce supplied Roman government with up to a third of the revenues that sustained their empire. In ancient times large fleets of Roman merchant ships set sail from Egypt on voyages across the Indian Ocean. They sailed from Roman ports on the Red Sea to distant kingdoms on the east coast of Africa and the seaboard off southern Arabia. Many continued their voyages across the ocean to trade with the rich kingdoms of ancient India. Freighters from the Roman Empire left with bullion and returned with cargo holds filled with valuable trade goods, including exotic African products, Arabian incense and eastern spices. This book examines Roman commerce with Indian kingdoms from the Indus region to the Tamil lands. It investigates contacts between the Roman Empire and powerful African kingdoms, including the Nilotic regime that ruled Meroe and the rising Axumite Realm. Further chapters explore Roman dealings with the Arab kingdoms of south Arabia, including the Saba-Himyarites and the Hadramaut Regime, which sent caravans along the incense trail to the ancient rock-carved city of Petra. The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean is the first book to bring these subjects together in a single comprehensive study that reveals Rome's impact on the ancient world and explains how international trade funded the Legions that maintained imperial rule. It offers a new international perspective on the Roman Empire and its legacy for modern society.
Encounters with Indigeneities: Writing About Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

Encounters with Indigeneities: Writing About Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

Jeremy Beckett

$39.99

In this valuable collection renowned Australian scholar, Professor Jeremy Beckett, draws together some of his best writing from the 1970s to the present. The collection distils 50 years of history, blending cultural analysis with narrative in two regions of Australia. One of the regions covered, the Torres Strait, was catapulted from obscurity to the centre of Australian attention by the Mabo case. Beckett remains one of the country's most authoritative expert witnesses and is still consulted for his expertise. As a series of discrete studies, the material of the book evokes Indigenous agency on a number of fronts: cultural, political, economic, religious. The breadth of content reflects the changing conditions in which Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders have been living and the changing perspectives of anthropologists, and the wider scholarly world more generally.
Dangerous Allies

Dangerous Allies

Malcolm Fraser  ,  Cain Roberts

$34.99

Australia has always been reliant on 'great and powerful friends' for its sense of national security and for direction on its foreign policy - first on the British Empire and now on the United States. Australia has actively pursued a policy of strategic dependence, believing that making a grand bargain with a powerful ally was the best policy to ensure its security and prosperity. Dangerous Allies examines Australia's history of strategic dependence and questions the continuation of this position. It argues that international circumstances, in the world and in the Western Pacific especially, now make such a policy highly questionable. Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the United States has also changed dramatically, making it less relevant to Australia and a less appropriate ally on which Australia should rely. Malcolm Fraser argues that Australia should adopt a much greater degree of independence in foreign policy, and that we should no longer merely follow other nations into wars of no direct interest to Australia or Australia's security. He argues for an end to strategic dependence and for the timely establishment of a truly independent Australia.
The State vs. Nelson Mandela: The Trial That Changed South Africa

The State vs. Nelson Mandela: The Trial That Changed South Africa

Joel Joffe ,  Denis Goldberg ,  Nelson Mandela

$22.99

The only account of this seminal trial, written by Mandela's defence lawyer and with a new foreword by Denis Goldberg, accused alongside Mandela and sentenced to life imprisonment. On 11 July 1963, police raided Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia near Johannesburg, arresting alleged members of the high command of the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Together with the already imprisoned Nelson Mandela, they were put on trial and charged with conspiring to overthrow the apartheid government by violent revolution. Their expected punishment was death. In this compelling book, their defence attorney, Joel Joffe, gives a blow-by-blow account of the most important trial in South Africa's history, vividly portraying the characters of those involved, and exposing the astonishing bigotry and rampant discrimination faced by the accused, as well as showing their incredible courage under fire.
Adelaide: Remember When

Adelaide: Remember When

Bob Byrne

$34.99

Remember childhood visits to the Adelaide Zoo with a ride in the elephant cart? School lunches and a glass bottle of sun-warmed milk? Spending Saturday night at Downtown or Tilt to play arcade games or go rollerskating? Rides at Magic Mountain or Dazzleland, dances at local clubs with local bands, early TV shows and sleeping on the lawn on a hot Adelaide summer night? Adelaide - Remember When is the city we remember, in pictures and words. The best of Bob Byrne's hit Facebook page and much more, Adelaide - Remember When is a bumper book that shows us bits of Adelaide we've forgotten, local identities and landmarks we loved and reminds us that the best parts of the city haven't changed.
Albert Hall: The Heart of Canberra

Albert Hall: The Heart of Canberra

Lenore Coltheart

$49.99

Joan Sutherland's debut, the notorious Petrov Commission, a rumoured ghost and rowdy public meetings give Canberra's Albert Hall a history like no other. Albert Hall - the simple, elegant building at the heart of our national capital - was Canberra's only performing arts centre for its first 40 years. The venue for weekly dances, art exhibitions, and tours by the Royal Ballet and the Australian Ballet, Albert Hall has also hosted citizenship ceremonies and important national occasions. This beautifully illustrated book shares the history of this Canberra landmark for the first time.
Gallipoli: The Landing

Gallipoli: The Landing

Hugh Dolan ,  Mal Gardiner

$19.99

The truth about the assault on Gallipoli is finally being told - panel by panel. Gallipoli: The Landing takes the events of 25 April 1915 and presents them in a full-colour comic that's action-packed but historically accurate. Rather than a botched attack planned by indifferent British generals, the Gallipoli campaign was carefully thought out, and included an amphibious attack on the beach by Anzac officers. Hugh Dolan and Mal Gardiner bring the real story to life, describing the lead-up and the attack on Gallipoli in detail - from both sides of the fighting. 'Loved this. You will too!' - Peter Fitzsimons Teacher's Guide also available
The Melbourne Tram Book

The Melbourne Tram Book

Dale Budd ,  Randall Wilson

$24.99

Melbourne's trams are more than a mode of transport. They are a symbol of the city. This fully updated new edition of The Melbourne Tram Book is a colourful and compact tribute to Melbourne's famous trams, one of the city's most enduring symbols. More than 200 photographs and illustrations show trams in the streetscapes of today and yesterday, with detailed commentary from tram experts Randall Wilson and Dale Budd.
Empire of the Deep: The Rise and Fall of the British Navy

Empire of the Deep: The Rise and Fall of the British Navy

Ben Wilson

$24.99

The story of our navy is nothing less than the story of Britain, our culture and our empire. Much more than a parade of admirals and their battles, this is the story of how an insignificant island nation conquered the world's oceans to become its greatest trading empire. Yet, as Ben Wilson shows, there was nothing inevitable about this rise to maritime domination, nor was it ever an easy path. EMPIRE OF THE DEEP: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE BRITISH NAVY also reveals how our naval history has shaped us in more subtle and surprising ways - our language, culture, politics and national character all owe a great debt to this conquest of the seas. This is a gripping, fresh take on our national story.
Merchant Adventurers: The Voyage of Discovery That Transformed Tudor England

Merchant Adventurers: The Voyage of Discovery That Transformed Tudor England

James Evans

$22.99

In the spring of 1553 three ships sailed north-east from London into uncharted waters. The scale of their ambition was breathtaking. Drawing on the latest navigational science and the new spirit of enterprise and discovery sweeping the Tudor capital, they sought a northern passage to Asia and its riches. The success of the expedition depended on its two leaders: Sir Hugh Willoughby, a brave gentleman soldier, and Richard Chancellor, a brilliant young scientist and practical man of the sea. When their ships became separated in a storm, each had to fend for himself. Their fates were sharply divided. One returned to England, to recount extraordinary tales of the imperial court of Tsar Ivan the Terrible. The tragic, mysterious story of the other two ships has to be pieced together through the surviving captain's log book, after he and his crew became lost and trapped by the advancing Arctic winter. This long-neglected endeavour was one of the boldest in British history, and its impact was profound. Although the 'merchant adventurers' failed to reach China as they had hoped, their achievements would lay the foundations for England's expansion on a global stage. As James Evans' vivid account shows, their voyage also makes for a gripping story of daring, discovery, tragedy and adventure.
Common People: The History of an English Family

Common People: The History of an English Family

Alison Light

$39.99

This book was shortlisted for the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize. A remarkable achievement...should become a classic. (Margaret Drabble). Light writes beautifully...Common People is part memoir, part thrilling social history of the England of the Industrial Revolution, but above all a work of quiet poetry and insight into human behaviour. It is full of wisdom. (The Times Book of the Week). Family history is a massive phenomenon of our times but what are we after when we go in search of our ancestors? Beginning with her grandparents, Alison Light moves between the present and the past, in an extraordinary series of journeys over two centuries, across Britain and beyond. Epic in scope and deep in feeling, Common People is a family history but also a new kind of public history, following the lives of the migrants who travelled the country looking for work. Original and eloquent, it is a timely rethinking of who the English were - but ultimately it reflects on history itself, and on our constant need to know who went before us and what we owe them.
Londonopolis: A Curious and Quirky History of London

Londonopolis: A Curious and Quirky History of London

Martin Latham ,  Joe McLaren

$24.99

This curious history of London whisks you down the rabbit hole and into the warren of backstreets, landmarks, cemeteries, palaces, markets, museums and secret gardens of the great metropolis. Meet the cockneys, politicians, fairies, philosophers, gangsters and royalty that populate the city, their stories becoming curiouser and curiouser as layers of time and history are peeled back. Find out which tube station once housed the Elgin Marbles and what lies behind a Piccadilly doorway that helped Darwin launch his theory of evolution and caused the Swedes to wage war against Britain. Do you believe in fairies? Do you know which Leadenhall site became a Nag's Head tavern, morphing into the mighty East India Company, before taking flight as the futuristic Lloyds Building? Who named the Natural History Museum's long-tailed dinosaur Mr Whippy? Spanning above and below ground, from the outer suburbs to the inner city, and from the medieval period to the modern day, Londonopolis is a celebration of the weird and the wonderful that makes the mysterious city of London so magical.
Fire and Movement: The British Expeditionary Force and the Campaign of 1914

Fire and Movement: The British Expeditionary Force and the Campaign of 1914

Peter Hart

$46.95

The dramatic opening weeks of the Great War passed into legend long before the conflict ended. The British Expeditionary Force fought a mesmerizing campaign, outnumbered and outflanked but courageous and skillful, holding the line against impossible odds, sacrificing themselves to stop the last great German offensive of 1914. A remarkable story of high hopes and crushing disappointment, the campaign contains moments of sheer horror and nerve-shattering excitement; pathos and comic relief; occasional cowardice and much selfless courage-all culminating in the climax of the First Battle of Ypres. And yet, as Peter Hart shows in this gripping and revisionary look at the war's first year, for too long the British part in the 1914 campaigns has been veiled in layers of self-congratulatory myth: a tale of poor unprepared Britain, reliant on the peerless class of her regular soldiers to bolster the rabble of the unreliable French Army and defeat the teeming hordes of German troops. But the reality of those early months is in fact far more complex-and ultimately, Hart argues, far more powerful than the standard triumphalist narrative. Fire and Movement places the British role in 1914 into a proper historical context, incorporating the personal experiences of the men who were present on the front lines. The British regulars were indeed skillful soldiers, but as Hart reveals, they also lacked practice in many of the required disciplines of modern warfare, and the inexperience of officers led to severe mistakes. Hart also provides a more accurate portrait of the German Army they faced-not the caricature of hordes of automatons, but the reality of a well-trained and superlatively equipped force that outfought the BEF in the early battles-and allows readers to come to a full appreciation of the role of the French Army, without whom the Marne never would have been won. Ultimately Fire and Movement shows the story of the 1914 campaigns to be an epic tale, and one which needs no embellishment. Through the voices and recollections of the soldiers who were there, Hart strips away the myth to offer a clear-eyed account of the remarkable early days of the Great War.
Bradshaws Enlarged Handbook: 1861 Railway Handbook of Great Britain and Ireland

Bradshaws Enlarged Handbook: 1861 Railway Handbook of Great Britain and Ireland

George Bradshaw

$44.99

An enlarged facsimile edition of Bradshaw's descriptive railway handbook of Great Britain and Ireland of 1861. Bradshaw's original tourist guide to rail travel is the star of the BBC's television series 'Great British Railway Journeys'. The original book was produced in 1861, at the time that the railways became essential for tourism as well as infrastructure. This new facsimile edition gives you the chance to explore what is now common through the eyes of a nation for whom rail travel was still a novelty of the age, and provides a fascinating view of railway travel in the nineteenth century.
Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons

Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons

Antoinette Burton ,  Isabel Hofmeyr

$39.95

Combining insights from imperial studies and transnational book history, this provocative collection opens new vistas on both fields through ten accessible essays, each devoted to a single book. Contributors revisit well-known works associated with the British empire, including Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Thomas Macaulay's History of England, Charles Pearson's National Life and Character, and Robert Baden-Powell's Scouting for Boys. They explore anticolonial texts in which authors such as C. L. R. James and Mohandas K. Gandhi chipped away at the foundations of imperial authority, and they introduce books that may be less familiar to students of empire. Taken together, the essays reveal the dynamics of what the editors call an imperial commons, a lively, empire-wide print culture. They show that neither empire nor book were stable, self-evident constructs. Each helped to legitimize the other. Contributors. Tony Ballantyne, Elleke Boehmer, Catherine Hall, Isabel Hofmeyr, Aaron Kamugisha, Marilyn Lake, Charlotte Macdonald, Derek Peterson, Mrinalini Sinha, Tridip Suhrud, Andre du Toit
Chinese Rules: Mao's Dog, Deng's Cat, and Five Timeless Lessons for Understanding China

Chinese Rules: Mao's Dog, Deng's Cat, and Five Timeless Lessons for Understanding China

Tim Clissold

$32.99

From the author of the acclaimed 'Mr. China' comes another rollicking adventure story - part memoir, part history, part business imbroglio - that offers valuable lessons to help Westerners win in China. In the twenty-first century, the world has tilted eastwards in its orbit; China grows confident while the West seems mired in doubt. Having lived and worked in China for more than two decades, Tim Clissold explains the secrets that Westerners can use to navigate through its cultural and political maze. Picking up where he left off in the international bestseller 'Mr. China', 'Chinese Rules' chronicles his most recent exploits, with assorted Chinese bureaucrats, factory owners, and local characters building a climate change business in China. Of course, all does not go as planned as he finds himself caught between the world's largest carbon emitter and the world's richest man. Clissold offers entertaining and enlightening anecdotes of the absurdities, gaffes, and mysteries he encountered along the way. Sprinkled amid surreal scenes of cultural confusion and near misses are smart myth-busting insights and practical lessons Westerns can use to succeed in China. Exploring key episodes in that nation's long political, military, and cultural history, Clissold outlines five Chinese rules, which anyone can deploy in on-the-ground situations with modern Chinese counterparts. These Chinese rules will enable foreigners not only to co-operate with China but also to compete with it on its own terms.
Hitler's Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields

Hitler's Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields

Wendy Lower

$19.99

History has it that the role of women in Nazi Germany was to be the perfect Hausfrau, produce the next Aryan generation and be a loyal cheerleader for the Fuhrer. The few women tried and convicted after the war were simply the evil aberrations. However, Wendy Lower's research into the very ordinary women who went out to the Nazi Eastern Front reveals an altogether different story. Over half a million of them set off for these new lands, where most of the worst crimes of the Reich would occur. Through the interwoven biographies of thirteen women, the reader follows the transformation of young nurses, teachers, secretaries and wives who start out in Weimar and Nazi Germany as ambitious idealists and end up as witnesses, accomplices and perpetrators of genocide. Hitler's Furies is indelible proof that we have not known what we need to know about the role of women in the Nazi killing fields - or about how it could have been hidden for seventy years. It shows that genocide is women's business as well as men's and that, in ignoring women's culpability, we have ignored the reality of the Holocaust.
German Colonialism in a Global Age

German Colonialism in a Global Age

Bradley Naranch ,  Geoff Eley

$46.95

This collection provides a comprehensive treatment of the German colonial empire and its significance. Leading scholars show not only how the colonies influenced metropolitan life and the character of German politics during the Bismarckian and Wilhelmine eras (1871-1918), but also how colonial mentalities and practices shaped later histories during the Nazi era. In introductory essays, editors Geoff Eley and Bradley Naranch survey the historiography and broad developments in the imperial imaginary of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Contributors then examine diverse particular aspects, from science and the colonial state to the disciplinary constructions of Africans as colonial subjects for German administrative control. They consider the influence of imperialism on German society and culture via the mass-marketing of imperial imagery; conceptions of racial superiority in German pedagogy; and the influence of colonialism on German anti-Semitism. The collection concludes with several essays that address geopolitics and the broader impact of the German imperial experience. Contributors. Dirk Bonker, Jeff Bowersox, David Ciarlo, Sebastian Conrad, Christian S. Davis, Geoff Eley, Jennifer Jenkins, Birthe Kundus, Klaus Muhlhahn, Bradley Naranch, Deborah Neill, Heike Schmidt, J. P. Short, George Steinmetz, Dennis Sweeney, Brett M. Van Hoesen, Andrew Zimmerman
Swansong 1945: A Collective Diary from Hitler's Last Birthday to VE Day

Swansong 1945: A Collective Diary from Hitler's Last Birthday to VE Day

Walter Kempowski ,  Shaun Whiteside

$49.99

Swansong 1945 brings together hundreds of letters, diary extracts and autobiographical accounts to chronicle four days in 1945: 20th April, Hitler's last birthday, 25th April, when American and Soviet troops first met at the Elbe, 30th April, the day Hitler committed suicide, and 8th May, the day of the German surrender. Side by side in these pages, we encounter civilians fleeing on foot to the west, British and American POWs dreaming of home, concentration camp survivors, loyal soldiers from both sides of the conflict as well as national leaders including Churchill. These first-hand accounts, which Walter Kempowski painstakingly collected, organised and shaped for publication over twenty years, provide the raw material of history unmediated by a historian's narrative. The voices of individuals speak for themselves, and through their many experiences, perspectives and situations, the condition of Europe during the zero hour of war is viscerally recreated. A modern classic, this vital work brings to life a time whose repercussions are still felt today.
Gandhi Before India

Gandhi Before India

Ramachandra Guha

$24.99

The definitive life of one of the most remarkable figures of the 20th century. In this fascinating new biography Ramachandra Guha allows us to understand the personality and politics of Mohandas Gandhi as never before. Showing that Gandhi's ideas were fundamentally shaped before his return to India in 1915, Gandhi Before India is an extraordinarily vivid portrait of the formative years he spent in England and South Africa, where he developed the techniques that would undermine and ultimately destroy the British Empire. Drawing on many new sources located in archives across four continents, Guha sensitively explores the many facets of Gandhi's life and struggles. This is the biography of the year.
Vivid Faces: The Revolutionary Generation in Ireland, 1890-1923

Vivid Faces: The Revolutionary Generation in Ireland, 1890-1923

R. F. Foster

$45.00

This book presents a searing cultural history of the remarkable generation who transformed Ireland, from R. F. Foster Times Literary Supplement Books of The Year 2014. Vivid Faces surveys the lives and beliefs of the people who made the Irish Revolution: linked together by youth, radicalism, subversive activities, enthusiasm and love. Determined to reconstruct the world and defining themselves against their parents, they were in several senses a revolutionary generation. The Ireland that eventually emerged bore little relation to the brave new world they had conjured up in student societies, agit-prop theatre groups, vegetarian restaurants, feminist collectives, volunteer militias, Irish-language summer schools, and radical newspaper offices. Roy Foster's book investigates that world, and the extraordinary people who occupied it. Looking back from old age, one of the most magnetic members of the revolutionary generation reflected that 'the phoenix of our youth has fluttered to earth a miserable old hen', but he also wondered 'how many people nowadays get so much fun as we did'. Working from a rich trawl of contemporary diaries, letters and reflections, Vivid Faces re-creates the argumentative, exciting, subversive and original lives of people who made a revolution, as well as the disillusionment in which it ended.
Japan: the Basics

Japan: the Basics

Christopher P. Hood

$29.99

Japan: The Basics, is an engaging introduction to the culture, society and the global positioning of Japan. Taking a fresh look at stereotypes associated with Japan, it provides a well-rounded introduction to a constantly evolving country. It addresses such questions as: * How do we go about studying Japan? * What are the connections between popular culture and wider Japanese society? * How are core values about identity formed and what are their implications? * How does Japan react to natural and manmade disasters? * How does nature influence Japanese attitudes to the environment? With exercises and discussion points throughout and suggestions for further reading, Japan: The Basics is an ideal starting point for all those studying Japan in its global, cultural context.
The Eternal Nazi: From Mauthausen to Cairo, the Relentless Pursuit of SS Doctor Aribet Heim

The Eternal Nazi: From Mauthausen to Cairo, the Relentless Pursuit of SS Doctor Aribet Heim

Nicholas Kulish ,  Souad Mekhennet

$29.95

The tall foreigner living on Port Said Street in a Cairo hotel lived a simple life, reading books and writing letters, known as Uncle Tarek to neighborhood children. They did not know that he was actually Aribert Heim--the concentration camp doctor and fugitive from justice who became the most wanted Nazi war criminal in the world. Dr. Aribert Heim worked at the Mauthausen concentration camp for only a few months in 1941 but left a horrifying mark on the memories of survivors. In the chaos of the postwar period, Heim was able to slip away from his dark past. But certain rare individuals in Germany were unwilling to let Nazi war criminals go unpunished. Among them was a police investigator named Alfred Aedtner, whose quest took him across Europe and across decades, and into a close alliance with legendary Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal. This is the incredible story of how Aribert Heim evaded capture, living in a working-class neighborhood of the Egyptian capital, praying in Arabic, beloved by an adopted Muslim family, while inspiring a manhunt that outlived him by many years. He became the Eternal Nazi, a symbol of Germany's evolving attitude toward the sins of its past, which finally crested in a desire to see justice done at almost any cost.
The Jews and the Bible

The Jews and the Bible

Jean-Christophe Attias

$38.95

Despite its deceptively simple title, this book ponders the thorny issue of the place of the Bible in Jewish religion and culture. By thoroughly examining the complex link that the Jews have formed with the Bible, Jewish scholar Jean-Christopher Attias raises the uncomfortable question of whether it is still relevant for them. Jews and the Bible reveals how the Jews define themselves in various times and places with the Bible, without the Bible, and against the Bible. Is it divine revelation or national myth? Literature or legislative code? One book or a disparate library? Text or object? For the Jews, over the past two thousand years or more, the Bible has been all that and much more. In fact, Attias argues that the Bible is nothing in and of itself. Like the Koran, the Bible has never been anything other than what its readers make of it. But what they've made of it tells a fascinating story and raises provocative philosophical and ethical questions. The Bible is indeed an elusive book, and so Attias explores the fundamental discrepancy between what we think the Bible tells us about Judaism and what Judaism actually tells us about the Bible. With passion and intellect, Attias informs and enlightens the reader, never shying away from the difficult questions, ultimately asking: In our post-genocide and post-Zionist culture, can the Bible be saved?
Rivers of Gold, Lives of Bondage: Governing Through Slavery in Colonial Quito

Rivers of Gold, Lives of Bondage: Governing Through Slavery in Colonial Quito

Sherwin K Bryant

$54.95

In this pioneering study of slavery in colonial Ecuador and southern Colombia--Spain's Kingdom of Quito--Sherwin Bryant argues that the most fundamental dimension of slavery was governance and the extension of imperial power. Bryant shows that enslaved black captives were foundational to sixteenth-century royal claims on the Americas and elemental to the process of Spanish colonization. Following enslaved Africans from their arrival at the Caribbean port of Cartagena through their journey to Quito, Bryant explores how they lived during their captivity, formed kinships and communal affinities, and pressed for justice within a slave-based Catholic sovereign community.In Cartagena, officials branded African captives with the royal insignia and gave them a Catholic baptism, marking slaves as projections of royal authority and majesty. By licensing and governing Quito's slave trade, the crown claimed sovereignty over slavery, new territories, natural resources, and markets. By adjudicating slavery, royal authorities claimed to govern not only slaves but other colonial subjects as well. Expanding the diaspora paradigm beyond the Atlantic, Bryant's history of the Afro-Andes in the early modern world suggests new answers to the question, what is a slave?
Iran: A Very Short Introduction

Iran: A Very Short Introduction

Ali Ansari

$15.95

Iran has rarely been out of the headlines. Yet media interest and extensive coverage has tended to hinder rather than help our understanding of Iran as an idea, an identity, and a people, leading to a superficial understanding of what is a complex and nuanced political culture and civilization. This Very Short Introduction presents a radical reinterpretation of Iranian history and politics, placing the Islamic Revolution in the context of a century of political change and social transformation. By considering the various factors that have contributed towards the construction of the idea of Iran and the complex identity of Iranians themselves, Ali Ansari steers a clear path towards a more realistic understanding for us all. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648

Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648

Mark Greengrass (University of Sheffield)

$69.00

A remarkable new volume in the critically acclaimed Penguin History of Europe series From peasants to princes, no one was untouched by the spiritual and intellectual upheaval of the sixteenth century. Martin Luther's challenge to church authority forced Christians to examine their beliefs in ways that shook the foundations of their religion. The subsequent divisions, fed by dynastic rivalries and military changes, fundamentally altered the relations between ruler and ruled. Geographical and scientific discoveries challenged the unity of Christendom as a belief community. Europe, with all its divisions, emerged instead as a geographical projection. Chronicling these dramatic changes, Thomas More, Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Cervantes created works that continue to resonate with us. Spanning the years 1517 to 1648, Christendom Destroyed is Mark Greengrass's magnum opus: a rich tapestry that fosters a deeper understanding of Europe's identity today.
The Hundred Years War: A People's History

The Hundred Years War: A People's History

David Green

$57.95

The Hundred Years War (1337--1453) dominated life in England and France for well over a century. It became the defining feature of existence for generations. This sweeping book is the first to tell the human story of the longest military conflict in history. Historian David Green focuses on the ways the war affected different groups, among them knights, clerics, women, peasants, soldiers, peacemakers, and kings. He also explores how the long war altered governance in England and France and reshaped peoples' perceptions of themselves and of their national character. Using the events of the war as a narrative thread, Green illuminates the realities of battle and the conditions of those compelled to live in occupied territory; the roles played by clergy and their shifting loyalties to king and pope; and the influence of the war on developing notions of government, literacy, and education. Peopled with vivid and well-known characters--Henry V, Joan of Arc, Philippe the Good of Burgundy, Edward the Black Prince, John the Blind of Bohemia, and many others--as well as a host of ordinary individuals who were drawn into the struggle, this absorbing book reveals for the first time not only the Hundred Years War's impact on warfare, institutions, and nations, but also its true human cost.
Napoleon and Berlin: The Franco-Prussian War in North Germany, 1813

Napoleon and Berlin: The Franco-Prussian War in North Germany, 1813

Michael V Leggiere (Louisiana State University, Shreveport)

$33.95

At a time when Napoleon needed all his forces to reassert French dominance in Central Europe, why did he fixate on the Prussian capital of Berlin? Instead of concentrating his forces for a decisive showdown with the enemy, he repeatedly detached large numbers of troops, under ineffective commanders, toward the capture of Berlin. In Napoleon and Berlin, Michael V. Leggiere explores Napoleon's almost obsessive desire to capture Berlin and how this strategy ultimately lost him all of Germany.Napoleon's motives have remained a subject of controversy from his own day until ours. He may have hoped to deliver a tremendous blow to Prussia's war-making capacity and morale. Ironically, the heavy losses and strategic reverses sustained by the French left Napoleon's Grande Armee vulnerable to an Allied coalition that eventually drove Napoleon from Central Europe forever.
Give Me Liberty - Speakers and Speeches That Have Shaped America

Give Me Liberty - Speakers and Speeches That Have Shaped America

Christopher L. Webber

$36.95

Give me liberty, demanded Patrick Henry, or give me death! Henry's words continue to echo in American history and that quote, and the speech it comes from, remains one of the two or three known to almost every American. The other speeches that have become part of our American collective consciousness all have one theme in common: liberty. These feats of oration seem to trace the evolution of America's definition of liberty, and who it applies to. But what exact is liberty? It is a term open to a broad range of opinion, and questions about freedom arise daily in the news and in everyday life. Perhaps uniquely among the nations of the world, the United States traces its origins to groups and individuals who specifically wanted create something new. Webber's insightful Give Me Liberty looks at these great speeches and provides the historical context, focusing attention on particular individuals who summed up the issues of their own day in words that have never been forgotten. Webber gleans lessons from the past centuries that will allow us to continue to strive for the ideals of liberty in the 21st century.
By Order of the President: The Use and Abuse of Executive Direct Action

By Order of the President: The Use and Abuse of Executive Direct Action

Phillip J. Cooper

$43.95

Scholars and citizens alike have endlessly debated the proper limits of presidential action within our democracy. In this revised and expanded edition, noted scholar Phillip Cooper offers a cogent guide to these powers and shows how presidents from George Washington to Barack Obama have used and abused them in trying to realize their visions for the nation. As Cooper reveals, there has been virtually no significant policy area or level of government left untouched by the application of these presidential power tools. Whether seeking to regulate the economy, committing troops to battle without a congressional declaration of war, or blocking commercial access to federal lands, presidents have wielded these powers to achieve their goals, often in ways that seem to fly in the face of true representative government. Cooper defines the different forms these powers take--executive orders, presidential memoranda, proclamations, national security directives, and signing statements--demonstrates their uses, critiques their strengths and dangers, and shows how they have changed over time. Cooper calls on events in American history with which we are all familiar but whose implications may have escaped us. Examples of executive action include, Washington's Neutrality Proclamation ; Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation; the more than 1,700 executive orders issued by Woodrow Wilson in World War I; FDR also issued the order to incarcerate Japanese Americans during World War II; Truman's orders to desegregate the military; Eisenhower's numerous national security directives. JFK's order to control racial violence in Alabama. As Cooper demonstrates in his balanced treatment of these and subsequent presidencies, each successive administration finds new ways of using these tools to achieve policy goals--especially those goals they know they are unlikely to accomplish with the help of Congress. A key feature of the second edition are case studies on the post-9/11 evolution of presidential direct action in ways that have drawn little public attention. It clarifies the factors that make these policy tools so attractive to presidents and the consequences that can flow from their use and abuse in a post-9/11 environment. There is an important new chapter on executive agreements which, though they are not treaties within the meaning of the U.S. Constitution and not subject to Senate ratification, appear in many respects to be rapidly replacing treaties as instruments of foreign policy.
Camelots Court: Inside the Kennedy White House

Camelots Court: Inside the Kennedy White House

Robert Dallek

$27.99

A riveting, authoritative portrait of JFK and his inner circle of advisers - their rivalries, their personality clashes, their political battles - by one of our most distinguished presidential historians The author of An Unfinished Life, the critically acclaimed bestselling biography of JFK, takes an insider's look at the brain trust that influenced the crucial and lasting policy decisions of Kennedy's years in office.

Robert Dallek focuses on a tight circle of Kennedy advisers, including Attorney General Robert Kennedy; Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara; Secretary of State Dean Rusk; national security adviser McGeorge Bundy; and trusted aides Ted Sorensen and Arthur Schlesinger.

The president's circle was hardly a peaceful one; fiery debate and personal rivalry often raged behind closed doors. But the contributions of these men to the successes and failures of the JFK administration - the Bay of Pigs, civil rights, the Cuban Missile crisis, and Vietnam, to name a few - were indelible. As he pulls back the curtain on heated White House discussions, Dallek reveals a president determined to surround himself with the best and the brightest - and often finding himself disappointed with their recommendations. The result is a striking portrait of a leader whose wise resistance to advice, particularly on foreign affairs, may be seen as a cautionary tale for our own time.

Meticulously researched and masterfully written, Camelot's Court is an intimate tour of a tumultuous White House and a new portrait of the men whose influence would powerfully shape the Kennedy legacy.
Five Days in November

Five Days in November

Clint Hill ,  Lisa McCubbin

$19.99

Don't miss the New York Times bestseller Five Days in November, where Secret Service agent Clint Hill tells the stories behind the iconic images of those five infamous, tragic days surrounding JFK's assassination, published for the 50th anniversary of his death. On November 22, 1963, three shots were fired in Dallas, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, and the world stopped for four days. For an entire generation, it was the end of an age of innocence. That evening, a photo ran on the front pages of newspapers across the world, showing a Secret Service agent jumping on the back of the presidential limousine in a desperate attempt to protect the President and Mrs. Kennedy. That agent was Clint Hill. Now Secret Service Agent Clint Hill commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the tragedy with this stunning book containing more than 150 photos, each accompanied by Hill's incomparable insider account of those terrible days. With poignant narration accompanying rarely seen images, we witness three-year-old John Kennedy Jr.'s pleas to come to Texas with his parents and the rapturous crowds of mixed ages and races that greeted the Kennedys at every stop in Texas. We stand beside a shaken Lyndon Johnson as he is hurriedly sworn in as the new president. We experience the first lady's steely courage when she insists on walking through the streets of Washington, DC, in her husband's funeral procession. A story that has taken Clint Hill fifty years to tell, this is a work of personal and historical scope. Besides the unbearable grief of a nation and the monumental consequences of the event, the death of JFK was a personal blow to a man sworn to protect the first family, and who knew, from the moment the shots rang out in Dallas, that nothing would ever be the same.
The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory a Lincoln Forum Book

The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory a Lincoln Forum Book

Harold Holzer ,  Craig L. Symonds ,  Frank J. Williams

$39.95

The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln remains one of the most prominent events in U.S. history. It continues to attract enormous and intense interest from scholars, writers, and armchair historians alike, ranging from painstaking new research to wild-eyed speculation. At the end of the Lincoln bicentennial year, and the onset of the Civil War sesquicentennial, the leading scholars of Lincoln and his murder offer in one volume their latest studies and arguments about the assassination, its aftermath, the extraordinary public reaction (which was more complex than has been previously believed), and the iconography that Lincoln's murder and deification inspired. Contributors also offer the most up-to-date accounts of the parallel legal event of the summer of 1865-the relentless pursuit, prosecution, and punishment of the conspirators. Everything from graphic tributes to religious sermons, to spontaneous outbursts on the streets of the nation's cities, to emotional mass-mourning at carefully organized funerals, as well as the imposition of military jurisprudence to try the conspirators, is examined in the light of fresh evidence and insightful analysis. The contributors are among the finest scholars who are studying Lincoln's assassination. All have earned well-deserved reputations for the quality of their research, their thoroughness, their originality, and their writing. In addition to the editors, contributors include Thomas R. Turner, Edward Steers Jr., Michael W. Kauffman, Thomas P. Lowry, Richard E. Sloan, Elizabeth D. Leonard, and Richard Nelson Current.
The Stranger: Barack Obama in the White House

The Stranger: Barack Obama in the White House

Chuck Todd

$45.00

Barack Obama won the presidency in 2008 partly because he was a Washington outsider. But when he got to 1600, that distinction turned out to be double-bladed. As president, Obama hoped to mount a second campaign, one for the heart of the Democratic Party and, he hoped, America, a new idology of progressive liberalism in sharp contrast to George W. Bush's aggressive conservativism and Bill Clinton's centrism. But while he'd been a brilliant campaign politician, working inside the system turned out to be much more of a challenge than Obama had ever imagined. Now, Chuck Todd takes us deep inside the White House for a gripping behind-the-scenes account of Obama's tumultous first term and campaign to win another. Drawing upon his unprecendented inner circle sources, Todd puts takes us behind closed White House and Camp David doors, on to Air Force One, through the hallways of Congress, and on the campaign trail. And not only does he give us the most intense, exciting and revealing portrait possible of this fascinating president and his struggles, Todd also seeks to define what Obamism really is, what the president stands for and how his decisions have changed--and will change--American politics for generations.
American General: The Life and Times of William Tecumseh Sherman

American General: The Life and Times of William Tecumseh Sherman

John S. D. Eisenhower

$29.99

A century and a half after the Civil War, Sherman remains one of its most controversial figures-the soldier who brought the fight not only to the Confederate Army, but to Confederate civilians as well. Yet Eisenhower, a West Point graduate and a retired brigadier general (Army Reserves), finds in Sherman a man of startling contrasts, not at all defined by the implications of 'total war.' His scruffy, disheveled appearance belied an unconventional and unyielding intellect. Intensely loyal to superior officers, especially Ulysses S. Grant, he was also a stalwart individualist.
The Early Morning of War: Bull Run, 1861

The Early Morning of War: Bull Run, 1861

Edward G Longacre

$46.95

When Union and Confederate forces squared off along Bull Run on July 21, 1861, the Federals expected this first major military campaign would bring an early end to the Civil War. But when Confederate troops launched a strong counterattack, both sides realized the war would be longer and costlier than anticipated. First Bull Run, or First Manassas, set the stage for four years of bloody conflict that forever changed the political, social, and economic fabric of the nation. It also introduced the commanders, tactics, and weaponry that would define the American way of war through the turn of the twentieth century. This crucial campaign receives its most complete and comprehensive treatment in Edward G. Longacre's The Early Morning of War. A magisterial work by a veteran historian, The Early Morning of War blends narrative and analysis to convey the full scope of the campaign of First Bull Run--its drama and suspense as well as its practical and tactical underpinnings and ramifications. Also woven throughout are biographical sketches detailing the backgrounds and personalities of the leading commanders and other actors in the unfolding conflict. Longacre has combed previously unpublished primary sources, including correspondence, diaries, and memoirs of more than four hundred participants and observers, from ranking commanders to common soldiers and civilians affected by the fighting. In weighing all the evidence, Longacre finds correctives to long-held theories about campaign strategy and battle tactics and questions sacrosanct beliefs--such as whether the Manassas Gap Railroad was essential to the Confederate victory. Longacre shears away the myths and persuasively examines the long-term repercussions of the Union's defeat at Bull Run, while analyzing whether the Confederates really had a chance of ending the war in July 1861 by seizing Washington, D.C. Brilliant moves, avoidable blunders, accidents, historical forces, personal foibles: all are within Longacre's compass in this deftly written work that is sure to become the standard history of the first, critical campaign of the Civil War.
Beyond the Palm Trees

Beyond the Palm Trees

Robyn Harbour

$14.99

Beyond the Palm Trees is a book of real, short stories from the South Pacific. These easy to read stories will take you into the heart of remote villages and far flung islands, where custom and culture is so different from what we experience in the western world. These stories are a mixture of sadness and joy; cultural conflicts and more.
Misha: Saakashvili, Georgia and the Inside Story of the War That Shook the Post-Soviet World

Misha: Saakashvili, Georgia and the Inside Story of the War That Shook the Post-Soviet World

Alexandros Petersen ,  Richard Cashman

$39.99

Released to mark the anniversary of Russia's invasion of Georgia in August 2006. Russia's stance in Ukraine is not the first example of its post-Soviet aggressive foreign policy towards neighbouring countries. This is the turbulent history of near-neighbour Georgia's past decade, through the prism of its most consequential citizen, President Misha Saakashvili. It tells how he engineered Georgia's peaceful Rose Revolution, reluctantly went to war with Russia, flirted with autocracy and secured the country's democratic future by conceding defeat in 2012 elections. The story of the transformation of an authoritarian, corruption-ridden post-Soviet basket case into what the United States called a beacon of liberty widely feted for its sweeping reforms, economic transparency and ambitions to join NATO and the European Union. Based on hours of discussion with Saakashvili and interviews with his advisors and fellow travellers, and with interviews with recently retired American and Georgian officials, the story of Georgia and its leader, Mikhail Misha Saakashvili, holds lessons for nations in transition across the globe.
Russia's Wars in Chechnya 1994-2009

Russia's Wars in Chechnya 1994-2009

Mark Galeotti

$29.99

In this fully illustrated book an expert on the conflicts traces the progress of the wars in Chechnya, from the initial Russian advance through to urban battles such as Grozny, and the prolonged guerrilla warfare in the mountainous regions. He assesses how the wars have torn apart the fabric of Chechen society and their impact on Russia itself. Featuring specially drawn full-colour mapping and drawing upon a wide range of sources, this succinct account explains the origins, history and consequences of Russia's wars in Chechnya, shedding new light on the history - and prospects - of the troubled region.
The SAS Pocket-Book: 1941-1945

The SAS Pocket-Book: 1941-1945

Christopher Westhorp

$19.99

An incredible insight into the origins, training and earliest operations of the special service volunteer soldiers who formed the original units of the world's most famous military force The Special Air Service was the brainchild of Scots Guards' officer Lieutenant David Stirling, serving with No.8 Commando. He advocated a specially organised, specially equipped and specially trained unit dedicated to the unrelenting pursuit of excellence that could act covertly and be infiltrated to operate behind enemy lines and gain intelligence, destroy enemy aircraft and attack their supply and reinforcement routes. The 1st SAS Regiment was officially designated after successful raids against enemy airfields in the Middle East in 1941-1942. In May 1943 a 2nd SAS Regiment was raised in Algeria and would also serve in Sicily and Italy. SAS troopers were at the forefront of the action on D-day, serving behind the enemy lines, assisting the French Resistance in diversionary attacks and in support of Allied armies. The SAS served with great distinction through 42 significant actions in Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany until the end of the war in Europe. This new addition to the bestselling Conway pocket-book series is compiled from wartime and post-war memorandums, manuals, documents, including unit after-action reports and lecture notes from the centres used to train special services soldiers, gathered from the Liddell Hart Military Archive, National Archives, wartime periodicals and post-war memoirs. The SAS Pocket-book covers training methods, weapons handling, fieldcraft, sabotage training and operations in North Africa and the Middle East (1941-1942), Sicily and Italy (1943) and France (1944-1945, including excellent material from Major Cary-Elwes who ran SAS units in France).
Special Operations Executive Manual: How to be an Agent in Occupied Europe

Special Operations Executive Manual: How to be an Agent in Occupied Europe

Special Operations Executive

$14.99

The actual course given to all secret agents in SOE before working behind enemy lines. It includes everything you needed to know to go undercover - from documents, cover stories and how to live off the land to how to get through an interrogation. The Special Operations Executive (SOE) was a secret British World War II organisation formed in 1940 to conduct espionage, sabotage and reconnaissance in occupied Europe against the Axis powers, and to aid local resistance movements. In late 1942, SOE was asked to increase the number of agents to aid the invasion of mainland Europe. Part of agent training was 'tradecraft' - the practical details on how to be a clandestine agent behind enemy lines - which every agent had to attend at various bases centred around Beaulie in Hampshire. The course was a set of lectures and this book contains the actual text of those lectures which were discovered in the National Archives this year. It is not only a fascinating insight into the workings of one of the Second World Wars most famous and secretive organisations, but is also a reminder of the huge danger anyone being dropped behind enemy lines had to face. SYLLABUS Introduction to Course. Individual Security. Informant Service. Cover. Interrogations. Operational Orders. Know your Enemy. Surveillance. Internal Communications. Premises. Security and Premises for W/T Operator. W/T Operator. External Communications. Organisation. Cell System. Security of Organisation. Recruiting. Discipline and Morale. Burglary. Lock-picking. Selection of Dropping Points and Reception Arrangements. To be given on instructions from London.). Handcuffs. Pigeons. German Counter Espionage. German Uniformed Police. National Police - e.g. of France, Belgium etc. (Given according to student's destination.). The Nazi Party and its Formations in Occupied Territory. Recognition of German Troops by weapons and equipment. Recognition of German Troops by uniforms. Military Intelligence Reports. Handling of German Light Weapons. Morale Warfare. Methods of Morale Warfare. Subversion of enemy troops. Instructions for Foreign Workers in Germany. Passive Resistance in Occupied Countries. Current German Propaganda to Europe. Tasks Preparatory to Allied arrival.
Churchill's Bomb: A Hidden History of Britain's First Nuclear Weapons Programme

Churchill's Bomb: A Hidden History of Britain's First Nuclear Weapons Programme

Graham Farmelo

$23.99

Churchill's Bomb reveals a new aspect of the great Prime Minister's life, so far completely neglected by historians: his relations with his nuclear scientists, and his management of Britain's policy on atomic weapons. Churchill was far more interested in science than he appeared. He made brave efforts to understand the exciting and sinister new world opened up by quantum physics in the 1920s and 30s, and wrote repeatedly about the coming of unimaginably dangerous new explosives. Britain then was the world leader in nuclear research. But when the awful possibility of actually building an atomic bomb raised its head, Churchill made crucial errors that ensured Britain's exclusion from the American-led project to build the bomb. In this original and controversial book, award-winning biographer Graham Farmelo shows a new and less flattering side to the great war leader.
Mapping the Second World War: The Key Battles of the European Theatre from Above

Mapping the Second World War: The Key Battles of the European Theatre from Above

Michael Swift ,  Michael Sharpe

$45.00

The Second World War was a watershed in world history: the seizing of power by Hitler and the Nazis, the slowly building crescendo of annexations that led to Blitzkrieg, the conquest of Europe, the U-boat war, the strategic bombing campaign, the invasion of Russia, Stalingrad and D-Day, and the long German retreat to unconditional surrender. Mapping the Second World War does not try to retell every point in the story of the war in Europe, rather it seeks to provide - through contemporary documents - a different view of the war and suggest avenues for further research. Presenting over 100 maps it looks both at the broad sweep of events - such as the invasion of Europe in June 1944 - and at details - the two-man X-craft attack on the battleship Tirpitz - to provide a fascinating sample of how events during the war were mapped out. Charts and maps were vital to the conduct of the war: before each military event there was planning, the reconnaissance, the conjecture as to enemy dispositions: after the event there would be debriefing, analysis of success and failure, and a redrawing of maps to show new troop positions and boundaries. Many of the maps selected have been used in actual combat and are marked up accordingly. Such battlefield annotations add to this fascinating overview of some of the key events in the Second World War and are referenced in the extended accompanying map captions. The volume is complete with a detailed narrative introduction to the progress of the war.
Holocaust versus Wehrmacht: How Hitler's  Final Solution  Undermined the German War Effort

Holocaust versus Wehrmacht: How Hitler's Final Solution Undermined the German War Effort

Yaron Pasher

$55.00

In 1941, as Nazi Germany began its disastrous campaign against the Soviet Union, Hitler's other campaign, to exterminate European Jewry, was also commencing in earnest. What began with organized executions carried out by the Einzatsgruppen evolved into systematic genocide, reaching its frenzied final moments just as the Wehrmacht was meeting defeat on the military front. These campaigns--and Germany's failure--were inextricably linked, Yaron Pasher tells us in Holocaust versus Wehrmacht. Pasher argues, in fact, that the major share of the logistical problems faced by the Wehrmacht during World War II stemmed from Hitler's obsession with securing the resources--especially from the Reichsbahn railway--needed to implement the Final Solution. To a degree never fully recognized or understood, Hitler's anti-Semitic ideology was his war's undoing. Through four major Wehrmacht military campaigns--Moscow, Stalingrad, and Kursk in the east and Normandy in the west--Pasher explores this fatal contradiction in Hitler's efforts to dominate the European continent. As Operation Typhoon, the sequel to the German invasion of the Soviet Union, got underway in November 1941, organized train transports began carrying Jews to the East--with the last trains taking Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz just as the Allies invaded Western Europe and moved inexorably to encircle the Third Reich. In these years, this book shows us, the trains transporting Jews could have carried men, machines, and fuel to depleted and trapped divisions in the Caucasus, and later, to the Western Front. As the Germans moved deeper into Soviet territory, they became increasingly dependent on train transport--which entailed converting Soviet railway line to German specifications; and yet, however successfully this conversion was completed, the trains that might run on these rails were working elsewhere in service of the Final Solution, leaving the Wehrmacht's overextended armies without the resources to survive, let alone win, their final battles. In the end, what Hitler called the Jewish problem was his downfall. In documenting the distribution of Germany's resources and operational capabilities through four major campaigns, Holocaust versus Wehrmacht offers a clear picture of the Nazis' military objectives as inseparable from--and finally, fatally susceptible to--Hitler's and his henchmen's other, ideological war to rid Europe of Jews.
Honours and Awards of the Army

Honours and Awards of the Army

Gordon L. Maitland

$35.99

Awards play an essential part in daily life and can range from a simple word of praise to a promotion or a decoration by the nation’s leader. Most, if not all, countries have a system of honours and awards acknowledging those citizens who make a notable contribution to the national good. Profiting from two centuries of experience under the British (Imperial) system, Australia has a sound and comprehensive structure which even extends to honours and awards to citizens of other countries who perform services of great benefit to Australia. The Army’s Honours and Awards provides readers with a detailed history as well as providing images to support the narrative.
The Battles of World War II: Everything You Need to Know

The Battles of World War II: Everything You Need to Know

Christopher Catherwood

$19.95

Respected scholar Catherwood pens this comprehensive book that combines surprising breadth with popular appeal. Including a look at the US entry to the war, in 1941, the turning tide of war, and how victory came at a price.
D-Day: The Story of D-Day Through Maps

D-Day: The Story of D-Day Through Maps

Richard Happer ,  Peter Chasseaud

$55.00

Follow the D-Day landings through a unique collection of historical maps, expert commentary and dramatic photographs. This is a unique insight into the D-Day landings 70 years on. Over 90 maps demonstrate how the D-Day landings unfolded, and are accompanied by detailed descriptions of what happened on that momentous day. The Allied landings in Normandy on 6 June 1944 were the greatest amphibious assault in history, requiring almost two years of meticulous planning and the largest co-ordinated mapping effort the world has ever seen. Key maps include: * Top-secret maps of Normandy with overprints showing the beach defences. * Plans of the Allied deception schemes. * Detailed maps of all five landing beaches, including OMAHA and UTAH. * Chart of the armada's route across the English Channel. * Maps showing the Allied Forces' movements as they pushed across France towards Berlin and VE Day. This collection of incredible maps uncover the events that led up to D-Day, the planning for the assault and the progress of the liberating forces afterwards. Dramatic photographs help to illustrate the key historical events that took place during Operation Overlord.
Children of the Days: A Calendar of Human History

Children of the Days: A Calendar of Human History

Eduardo Galeano

$22.99

From Eduardo Galeano, one of Latin America's greatest living writers, author of the Memory of Fire trilogy, comes Children of the Days, a new kind of history that shows us how to remember and how to live. This book is shaped like a calendar. Each day brings with it a story: a journey, feast or tragedy that really happened on that date, from all possible years and all corners of the world. From Abdul Kassem Ismail, the tenth-century Persian who never went anywhere without his library - all seventeen thousand books of it, on four hundred camels; to the Brazilian city of Sorocaba, which on February 8 1980 responded to the outlawing of public kissing by becoming one huge kissodrome; to July 1 2008, the day the US government decided to remove Nelson Mandela's name from its list of dangerous terrorists, Children of the Days takes aim at the pretensions of official history and illuminates moments and heroes that we have all but forgotten. Through this shimmering historical mosaic runs a common thread, one that joins humanity's darkest hours to its sweetest victories. Children of the Days is the story of our lives.
History of the World in Maps: The Rise and Fall of Empires, Countries and Cities

History of the World in Maps: The Rise and Fall of Empires, Countries and Cities

Times Atlases

$110.00

From Babylonian tablets to Google Maps, the world has evolved rapidly, along with the ways in which we see it. In this time, cartography has not only kept pace with these changes, but has often driven them. In this beautiful book, over 70 maps give a visual representation of the history of the world. Every map tells a story and this book tells the incredible history of our world through maps, and includes many famous examples of cartography, along with some that deserve to be better known. See countries and cities come and go, empires rise and fall, significant geographical discoveries, and key historical events unfold. Key maps shown include: * Babylonian clay tablets, c.2300 BC and c.600 BC - some of the world's oldest surviving maps. * Waldseemuller World Map, 1507 - the first map to use the name 'America' for the New World. * Waghenaer chart, 1584 - a forerunner to modern nautical charts. * Abel Buell map of North America, 1782 - the first map of the newly independent United States that was produced in America by an American. * The Scramble for Africa, 1852/1898 - maps of new colonies being created. * Ypres, 1918 - map of the aftermath of the First World War. * Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962 - map used by President John F. Kennedy during the crisis.
A History of War in 100 Battles

A History of War in 100 Battles

Richard Overy

$39.99

A history of warfare distilled into 100 momentous battles - epic moments that have shaped our world. From the earliest recorded skirmishes of the ancient world to the computerized conflicts of today, renowned military historian Richard Overy dramatically brings to life the sights and sounds of the most significant battles in world history: the flash of steel, the thunder of guns, the shrieks of the dying, and the strange, eerie calm that descends on the bloodstained battlefield when the fighting is done. Each of the 100 battles featured in the book - from the Fall of Troy to Operation Desert Storm - shows how the nature of armed combat has changed as technology, strategy and tactics have evolved over time. Yet, equally strikingly, the outcome of almost all the battles across the ages have been decided by the same mix of leadership, courage, deception, innovation and, time and again, a moment of good fortune. Rather than arranged chronologically, the battles are organized under these different themes to reveal surprising connections across centuries and cultures. In Richard Overy's own words, 'Battle is not a game to plug into a computer but a piece of living history: messy, bloody and real.' Whatever else has changed over the last few millennia, that much remains the same.
White Magic: The Age of Paper

White Magic: The Age of Paper

Lothar Muller

$41.95

Paper is older than the printing press, and even in its unprinted state it was the great network medium behind the emergence of modern civilization. In the shape of bills, banknotes and accounting books it was indispensible to the economy. As forms and files it was essential to bureaucracy. As letters it became the setting for the invention of the modern soul, and as newsprint it became a stage for politics. In this brilliant new book Lothar Muller describes how paper made its way from China through the Arab world to Europe, where it permeated everyday life in a variety of formats from the thirteenth century onwards, and how the paper technology revolution of the nineteenth century paved the way for the creation of the modern daily press. His key witnesses are the works of Rabelais and Grimmelshausen, Balzac and Herman Melville, James Joyce and Paul Valery. Muller writes not only about books, however: he also writes about pamphlets, playing cards, papercutting and legal pads. We think we understand the 'Gutenberg era', but we can understand it better when we explore the world that underpinned it: the paper age.Today, with the proliferation of digital devices, paper may seem to be a residue of the past, but Muller shows that the humble technology of paper is in many ways the most fundamental medium of the modern world.
Exploration: A Very Short Introduction

Exploration: A Very Short Introduction

Stewart Angas Weaver

$15.95

For as long as there have been civilizations, there has been the urge to venture outside of them, either in search of other civilizations or in search of novelty. Exploration: A Very Short Introduction surveys this quintessential human impulse, tracing it from pre-history to the present, from east to west around the globe, and from the depths of volcanoes to the expanses of space. Stewart Weaver arranges the history of world explorations into thematic chapters, each of which isolates the distinctive qualities and characteristics of exploration in a particular era, period, or place. He introduces the reader to the definition of exploration; to the Polynesians crossing vast seas on their canoes and other early explorers; through Columbus and the European discovery of the Americas. James Cook and the place of exploration in the Enlightenment form the subject of a chapter. So too do the natural histories and explorations of Alexander von Humboldt in South America and Lewis and Clark in North America. The book's final chapters chart exploration through imperial expansion and into new frontiers, guiding the reader through exploration in Africa and Central Asia, the race to the North and South Poles, and today's efforts in space and deep sea exploration. But what accounts for this urge? Through this unique survey of the history of exploration, Weaver clearly shows how the impulse to explore is also the foundation of the globalized world we inhabit today. Exploration combines a narration of explorers' daring feats with a wide-lens examination of what it fundamentally means to explore. As Weaver shows us, the act of exploration in the largest possible global context is the natural history of the earth itself. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
History's Most Daring Moments

History's Most Daring Moments

Hazel Flynn

$29.99

The human psyche, when confornted by the all-but-impossible, can produce the most extraordinary reactions - acts of heroism, self-sacrifice, endurance and sheer grit that in many instances remain unbelievable. Whether these are the product of the extreme pressures of warfare, acts of faith or compassion, or examples of utter tenacity and determination against all odds, the outcomes are incredible. Many of the behind- the-scenes stories have remained secret - until now. No other book gathers together so many riveting and heroic tales of rescue and survival in a single volume. Divided into seven chronological sections, History's Most Daring Moments provides revealing insights and explains the significance of each operation, although not all proved to be successful. Detailed maps of each encounter, timelines, diagrams, archival photographs and official documents - some recently declassified and previously unpublished - accompany these gripping stories.
Across a Deadly Field - The War in the East

Across a Deadly Field - The War in the East

John Hill ,  Mark Stacey

$59.99

The War in the East, a supplement for John Hill's Across a Deadly Field, gives players the resources to recreate the battles, great and small, of the Eastern Theater of the Civil War. Step into the shoes of Robert E. Lee and drive towards Washington with the Army of Northern Virginia, or take command of the Army of the Potomac, and attempt to capture Richmond. With scenarios, including an optional mini-campaign for the first day of Gettysburg, and special rules that enhance gameplay, this volume offers players, whether Union or Confederate, a versatility that can accommodate their preferences and miniatures collections without sacrificing either playability or historical accuracy.
Royal Love Stories: The Tales Behind the Real-Life Romances of Europe's Kings & Queens

Royal Love Stories: The Tales Behind the Real-Life Romances of Europe's Kings & Queens

Gill Paul

$24.99

Historically, many royal marriages have represented the unions of dynasties, with true engagements of the heart notable for their rarity. Yet royal couples could fall in love, and this book is full of surprises, from the undying love that the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II, felt for his Tsarina, to the unlikely love that flourished between Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Amongst them, too, are less happy loves of Crown Prince Rudolph for his 17-year-old lover, Countess Mary Vetsera, or, in the 1940s, of the Prince of Sweden, refused consent to marry the girl he loved she only became his princess over 30 years later. Bringing the reader right up to modern times, and touching, absorbing, and tragic by turns, these stories bring the glamour and the contradictions of royalty vividly to life.
           
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