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Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble

Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble

Antony Beevor

$49.99

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ABBEY'S CHOICE JUNE 2015 ----- This is from the bestselling author of Stalingrad, Berlin and D-Day, Antony Beevor's Ardennes 1944: Hitler's Last Gamble tells the story of the German's ill-fated final stand.

On 16 December, 1944, Hitler launched his 'last gamble' in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes. He believed he could split the Allies by driving all the way to Antwerp, then force the Canadians and the British out of the war. Although his generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east. Many were exultant at the prospect of striking back.

The Ardennes offensive, with more than a million men involved, became the greatest battle of the war in western Europe. American troops, taken by surprise, found themselves fighting two panzer armies. Belgian civilians fled, justifiably afraid of German revenge. Panic spread even to Paris. While many American soldiers fled or surrendered, others held on heroically, creating breakwaters which slowed the German advance. The harsh winter conditions and the savagery of the battle became comparable to the eastern front. 

And after massacres by the Waffen-SS, even American generals approved when their men shot down surrendering Germans. The Ardennes was the battle which finally broke the back of the Wehrmacht.  
Australia's Boldest Experiment: War and Reconstruction in the 1940s

Australia's Boldest Experiment: War and Reconstruction in the 1940s

Stuart Macintyre

$34.99

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In this landmark book, Stuart Macintyre explains how a country traumatised by World War I, hammered by the Depression and overstretched by World War II became a prosperous, successful and growing society by the 1950s.

An extraordinary group of individuals, notably John Curtin, Ben Chifley, Nugget Coombs, John Dedman and Robert Menzies, re-made the country, planning its reconstruction against a background of wartime sacrifice and austerity. The other part of this triumphant story shows Australia on the world stage, seeking to fashion a new world order that would bring peace and prosperity.

This book shows the 1940s to be a pivotal decade in Australia. At the height of his powers, Macintyre reminds us that key components of the society we take for granted - work, welfare, health, education, immigration, housing - are not the result of military endeavour but policy, planning, politics and popular resolve.
Joh for Canberra: The Inside Story

Joh for Canberra: The Inside Story

Paul Davey

$29.99

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Unfolding like a political thriller, Joh for PM reveals for the first time the details of the campaign that rocked Australian politics.

In 1987 the Queensland Premier, Joh Bjelke-Petersen, launched an audacious bid to break the federal Opposition Coalition, replace Ian Sinclair as National Party leader, and become Prime Minister himself. Trench warfare waged between the Sinclair and Joh forces during one of the most bizarre and divisive periods in Australian politics.

In Joh for PM National Party insider Paul Davey reveals what went on behind closed doors in top-level internal meetings and the strategies aimed at thwarting the Joh campaign and reuniting the party at state and federal levels.
The Making of Australia: From a Tiny Struggling Convict Settlement to the Remarkable Nation it is Today

The Making of Australia: From a Tiny Struggling Convict Settlement to the Remarkable Nation it is Today

David Hill

$22.99

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This is the story of how a struggling convict settlement grew into six dynamic colonies and then the remarkable nation of Australia. Told through the key figures who helped build it into the thriving nation it is today, David Hill once again offers up Australian history at its most entertaining and accessible.

In his latest book, David Hill traces the story of our nation from its European beginnings to Federation. When James Cook landed on the east coast of Australia, the rest of the world had some idea of how empty, vast and wild this continent was, but so little was known of it that in 1788 most people thought it was two lands. In the subsequent years, its coastline was charted, its interior opened up, and its cities, laws and economy developed. 

In this riveting, wide-ranging history, David Hill traces how this happened through the key figures who built this country into the thriving nation it is today: from its prescient and fair-minded first governor, Arthur Phillip, to the unpopular William Bligh, the victim of the country's first and only military coup; from the visionary builder and law-maker Lachlan Macquarie to William Wentworth, the son of a convict who secured Australia's first elected parliament; from Henry Parkes, the grand old man of politics who started the fraught process of Federation, to the first prime minister, Edmund Barton. It was Barton who formed the first Australian government just in time for the inaugural celebrations on 1 January 1900, when the nation of Australia was born!

David Hill is one of our most popular writers of Australian history. His previous books, The Forgotten Children, 1788, The Gold Rush and The Great Race have all been bestsellers.
Black Widow: The True Story of Australia's First Female Serial Killer

Black Widow: The True Story of Australia's First Female Serial Killer

Carol Baxter

$29.99

Two inquests, four trials, three hung juries and the executioner...but was Louisa Collins really a husband killer? Was she the callous adulteress, drunkard and liar known as the Botany Bay Murderess and the Lucrezia Borgia of Botany Bay? Or was this mother of seven a spirited and defiant woman who was punished for breaching society's expectations of womanly behaviour?

Compelling, freshly told and richly detailed, Black Widow uncovers the truth of a story that challenged the morality, the politics and the notion of law in an Australia on the edge of nationhood.
The Centenary of the Con: A History of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music 1915 - 2015

The Centenary of the Con: A History of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music 1915 - 2015

Peter McCallum ,  Julie Simonds

$79.99

It's been at the heart of Sydney's cultural life, home to leading musicians and the first full-time orchestra in the country. Perched on the shore above the harbour, its distinctive turrets have welcomed generations of music lovers arriving at dusk for a concert.

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music celebrates its centenary in 2015. This lavishly illustrated history records its story, from its humble beginnings in the old Government House stables, to its current accommodation in facilities that are, by any measure, outstanding.Peter McCallum recounts the stories of renowned performances as well as the many colourful characters who have worked at the Con: Henri Verbrugghen, Eugene Goossens and Rex Hobcroft, innovative directors who shaped the institution; great musicians Florence Austral, Roger Woodward, Joan Sutherland, Richard Bonynge, Charles Mackerras, Malcolm Williamson, Peter Sculthorpe and Don Burrows; the teachers and the students.

Behind the scenes, there was always the need to accommodate changes in musical style, secure funding and navigate relationships with government, the University of Sydney and the other musical institutions.
Gallipoli 100 Years: A Comprehensive Study and Guide to Visiting

Gallipoli 100 Years: A Comprehensive Study and Guide to Visiting

Michael John Mathew

$39.99

Much of the content has been distilled by the author from personally visiting and walking the battlefields and the surrounds over many years. A work of love and all profits accrued by the author are to be donated to Legacy.

This is a book for those wanting to have a thorough understanding of the campaign and for those who may be contemplating or planning a visit. A fully indexed high quality 535 page production printed on 80gm paper and 150gm paper for the maps, diagrams and photographs.

The never before published full page low level aerial colour photographs of the battlefields go a long way in making the what can be complex topography easy to understand.

The book covers when to visit, how to get there; where to stay, being there, tours and guides, and for those with transport, or those walking a measured sequential guide on how to cover all the memorials and cemeteries at the three battlefield theatres Anzac, Helles and Suvla.
The Lost World of the Old Ones

The Lost World of the Old Ones

David Roberts

$35.95

For more than 5,000 years the Ancestral Puebloans-Native Americans who flourished long before the first contact with Europeans-occupied the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. Just before AD 1300, they abandoned their homeland in a migration that remains one of prehistory's greatest puzzles.

Northern and southern neighbors of the Ancestral Puebloans, the Fremont and Mogollon likewise flourished for millennia before migrating or disappearing. Fortunately, the Old Ones, as some of their present-day descendants call them, left behind awe-inspiring ruins, dazzling rock art, and sophisticated artifacts ranging from painted pots to woven baskets. Some of their sites and relics had been seen by no one during the 700 years before David Roberts and his companions rediscovered them.

In The Lost World of the Old Ones, Roberts continues the hunt for answers begun in his classic book, In Search of the Old Ones. His new findings paint a different, fuller portrait of these enigmatic ancients-thanks to the breakthroughs of recent archaeologists. Roberts also recounts his last twenty years of far-flung exploits in the backcountry with the verve of a seasoned travel writer. 

His adventures range across Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado, illuminating the mysteries of the Old Ones as well as of the more recent Navajo and Comanche. Roberts calls on his climbing and exploratory expertise to reach remote sanctuaries of the ancients hidden within nearly vertical cliffs, many of which are unknown to archaeologists and park rangers.

This ongoing quest combines the shock of new discovery with a deeply felt connection to the landscape, and it will change the way readers experience, and imagine, the American Southwest.
Attila the Hun

Attila the Hun

Nic Fields ,  Steve Noon

$29.99

One of the most powerful men in late antiquity, Attila's peerless Hunnic Empire stretched from the Ural Mountains to the Rhine river. In a series of epic campaigns dating from the AD 430s until his death in AD 453, he ravaged first the Eastern and later the Western Roman Empire, invading Italy in AD 452 and threatening Rome itself. Lavishly illustrated, this new analysis of his military achievements examines how Attila was able to sweep across Europe, the tactics and innovations he employed and the major battles he faced, including one of his few major setbacks, the defeat at the battle of the Catalaunian Fields in AD 451.
Confucius: And the World He Created

Confucius: And the World He Created

Michael Schuman

$36.99

Confucius is perhaps the most important philosopher in history. Today, his teachings shape the daily lives of more than 1.6 billion people. Throughout East Asia, Confucius's influence can be seen in everything from business practices and family relationships to educational standards and government policies. Even as western ideas from Christianity to Communism have bombarded the region, Confucius's doctrine has endured as the foundation of East Asian culture. It is impossible to understand East Asia, journalist Michael Schuman demonstrates, without first engaging with Confucius and his vast legacy. 

Confucius created a worldview that is in many respects distinct from, and in conflict with, Western culture. As Schuman shows, the way that East Asian companies are managed, how family members interact with each other, and how governments see their role in society all differ from the norm in the West due to Confucius's lasting impact. Confucius has been credited with giving East Asia an advantage in today's world, by instilling its people with a devotion to learning, and propelling the region's economic progress. Still, the sage has also been highly controversial. 

For the past 100 years, East Asians have questioned if the region can become truly modern while Confucius remains so entrenched in society. He has been criticized for causing the inequality of women, promoting authoritarian regimes, and suppressing human rights.  Despite these debates, East Asians today are turning to Confucius to help them solve the ills of modern life more than they have in a century. As a wealthy and increasingly powerful Asia rises on the world stage, Confucius, too, will command a more prominent place in global culture. 

Touching on philosophy, history, and current affairs, Confucius tells the vivid, dramatic story of the enigmatic philosopher whose ideas remain at the heart of East Asian civilization.
Shaky Ground: Context, Connoisseurship and the History of Roman Art

Shaky Ground: Context, Connoisseurship and the History of Roman Art

Elizabeth Marlowe

$32.99

The recent crisis in the world of antiquities collecting has prompted scholars and the general public to pay more attention than ever before to the archaeological findspots and collecting histories of ancient artworks. This new scrutiny is applied to works currently on the market as well as to those acquired since (and despite) the 1970 UNESCO Convention, which aimed to prevent the trafficking in cultural property. When it comes to famous works that have been in major museums for many generations, however, the matter of their origins is rarely considered. Canonical pieces like the Barberini Togatus or the Fonseca bust of a Flavian lady appear in many scholarly studies and virtually every textbook on Roman art. But we have no more certainty about these works' archaeological contexts than we do about those that surface on the market today. This book argues that the current legal and ethical debates over looting, ownership and cultural property have distracted us from the epistemological problems inherent in all (ostensibly) ancient artworks lacking a known findspot, problems that should be of great concern to those who seek to understand the past through its material remains.
The Cambridge Old English Reader

The Cambridge Old English Reader

Richard Marsden

$54.95

This reader remains the only major new reader of Old English prose and verse in the past forty years. The second edition is extensively revised throughout, with the addition of a new 'Beginning Old English' section for newcomers to the Old English language, along with a new extract from Beowulf. The fifty-seven individual texts include established favourites such as The Battle of Maldon and Wulfstan's Sermon of the Wolf, as well as others not otherwise readily available, such as an extract from Apollonius of Tyre. Modern English glosses for every prose-passage and poem are provided on the same page as the text, along with extensive notes. A succinct reference grammar is appended, along with guides to pronunciation and to grammatical terminology. A comprehensive glossary lists and analyses all the Old English words that occur in the book. Headnotes to each of the six text sections, and to every individual text, establish their literary and historical contexts, and illustrate the rich cultural variety of Anglo-Saxon England. This second edition is an accessible and scholarly introduction to Old English.
The Greeks in Asia

The Greeks in Asia

John Boardman

$65.00

This book, by Britains most distinguished historian of ancient Greek art, recounts the influence of Greek communities and their culture through Central Asia, India and Western China, from the Bronze Age through to the rise of Islam.

Boardman examines a wealth of art and artifacts as well as literary sources to reveal the remarkable influence of Greek culture upon peoples Anatolians, Levantines, Persians, Asiatics, Indians, Chinese whose settled civilizations were far older, with their own strong traditions in life, government and the arts.

The Greeks were not empire-builders. They did not seek to conquer or rule. However, they were highly literate and adept at trade; they spread a monetary economy through Eurasia; their religion was easily adapted to that of others; their art developed a form of narrative that was to be dominant for centuries to come; and their poets and philosophers were widely respected outside their homeland.

As Boardman notes, They are an odd phenomenon in world history. Through their travels they came to leave a very distinctive imprint on the lives and arts of many distant peoples, and over centuries, some to the present day'.
The Third Horseman: A Story of Weather, War and the Famine History Forgot

The Third Horseman: A Story of Weather, War and the Famine History Forgot

William Rosen

$27.99

How a seven-year cycle of rain, cold, disease, and warfare created the worst famine in European history.
 
In May 1315, it started to rain. It didn't stop anywhere in north Europe until August. Next came the four coldest winters in a millennium. Two separate animal epidemics killed nearly 80 percent of northern Europe's livestock. Wars between Scotland and England, France and Flanders, and two rival claimants to the Holy Roman Empire destroyed all remaining farmland. After seven years, the combination of lost harvests, warfare, and pestilence would claim six million lives - one eighth of Europe's total population.
 
William Rosen draws on a wide array of disciplines, from military history to feudal law to agricultural economics and climatology, to trace the succession of traumas that caused the Great Famine. With dramatic appearances by Scotland's William Wallace, and the luckless Edward II and his treacherous Queen Isabella, history's best documented episode of catastrophic climate change comes alive, with powerful implications for future calamities.
Gothic: Architecture, Sculpture, Painting

Gothic: Architecture, Sculpture, Painting

Rolf Toman ,  Achim Bednorz

$39.99

The Gothic period is one of the first epochs in art history from which artworks of all kinds have been preserved: from cathedrals, castles, and palaces to masterful paintings and the most filigree works of goldsmiths, this volume displays the breadth and richness of a unique craftsmanship. Specific contributions delve into the development of Gothic architecture in France, as well as the national characteristics it took on from Spain and Portugal to northern and eastern Europe. Entire chapters are devoted to the Papal Palace of Avignon and the splendor of Gothic glass painting. This volume provides an overview of the artistic diversity of the Gothic - in no small part through the richness of the illustrations - that could scarcely be more vivid.
SPQR: A Roman Miscellany

SPQR: A Roman Miscellany

Anthony Everitt

$19.99

SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus. A moreishly entertaining and richly informative miscellany of facts about Rome and the Roman world. Do you know to what use the Romans put the excrement of the kingfisher? Or why a dinner party invitation from the emperor Domitian was such a terrifying prospect? Or why Roman women smelt so odd? The answers to these questions can be found in SPQR, a compendium of extraordinary facts and anecdotes about ancient Rome and its Empire. Its 500-odd entries range across every area of Roman life and society, from the Empress Livia's cure for tonsillitis to the most reliable Roman methods of contraception.
How to Manage Your Slaves by Marcus Sidonius Falx

How to Manage Your Slaves by Marcus Sidonius Falx

Jerry Toner ,  Mary Beard

$21.99

At last, a clear manual for managing slaves the Roman way.

In How to Manage Your Slaves, Marcus Sidonius Falx offers practical advice, showing where and how to buy slaves and how to get the best out of them. He explains how to tell good slaves from bad, offers guidance on the punishment of miscreants, and reveals the secrets of command and authority. He covers the delicate subjects of when you should let your slaves have sex and whether to engage in sex with them yourself - and considers when to set them free. Armed with this guide you will be master in your own home: your household will be a comfort to your family, its running the envy of your neighbours. 

Slavery was a core institution in the Roman world for all its long existence. As they conquered, the Romans enslaved millions and then bred from this stock to maintain their numbers in times of peace. It almost never occurred to anyone that slavery might be dispensed with and to no one at all that it was morally reprehensible. 

Up to now ancient slavery may have been difficult to fathom: this Roman's-eye view takes us to the heart of the matter and, based on a wealth of original sources, lets us understand just why slaves meant so much to the Romans.
The Defeat of Rome: Crassus, Carrhae and the Invasion of the East

The Defeat of Rome: Crassus, Carrhae and the Invasion of the East

Gareth C. Sampson

$44.99

In 53BC the Proconsul Marcus Crassus and 36,000 of his legionaries were crushed by the Parthians at Carrhae in what is now eastern Turkey. Crassus' defeat and death and the 20,000 casualties his army suffered were an extraordinary disaster for Rome. The event intensified the bitter, destructive struggle for power in the Roman republic, curtailed the empire's eastward expansion and had a lasting impact on the history of the Mediterranean and the Middle East. It was also the first clash between two of the greatest civilizations of the ancient world. Yet this critical episode has often been neglected by writers on the period who have concentrated on the civil war between Pompey and Caesar. Gareth Sampson, in this challenging and original study, reconstructs the Carrhae campaign in fine detail, reconsiders the policy of imperial expansion and gives a fascinating insight into the opponents the Romans confronted in the East - the Parthians.
The Emperor Commodus: God and Gladiator

The Emperor Commodus: God and Gladiator

John S. McHugh

$75.00

Commodus is synonymous with debauchery and megalomania, best remembered for fighting as a gladiator. Ridiculed and maligned by historians since his own time, modern popular culture knows him as the patricidal villain in Ridley Scott's Gladiator. Much of his infamy is clearly based on fact, but is this the full story? John McHugh reviews the ancient evidence to present the first full-length biography of Commodus in English. His twelve-year reign is set in its historical context, showing that the 'kingdom of gold' he supposedly inherited was actually an empire devastated by plague and war. Openly autocratic, Commodus compromised the privileges and vested interests of the senatorial clique, who therefore plotted to murder him. Surviving repeated conspiracies only convinced Commodus that he was under divine protection, increasingly identifying himself as Hercules reincarnate. This and his antics in the arena allowed his senatorial enemies to present Commodus as a mad tyrant to justify his murder, which they finally succeeded in arranging by having him strangled by a wrestler.
The Roman Barbarian Wars: The Era of Roman Conquest

The Roman Barbarian Wars: The Era of Roman Conquest

Ludwig Dyck

$59.99

The history of the 'barbarian' peoples of Europe is filled with dramatic wars and migrations along with charismatic and often farsighted leaders. Inevitably, their greatest challenge was their struggle with the renowned military might of Rome. Even when outnumbered and faced by better equipped and trained Roman legions, the barbarians could inflict devastating defeats upon Rome. Though sometimes fickle in battle, the barbarian warrior was capable of reckless bravery. The Romans themselves admired the size and strength of the barbarians, which, combined with a life of hardship and intertribal warfare, made them dangerous opponents This book, however, is as much about Rome as it is about its tribal foes. Ludwig Dyck begins with the foundation of the city of Rome and follows her growth into a martial empire, complete with its pageantry and glory, its genius, its brutality and its arrogance. All this is told in a fast-paced, accessible narrative style.
Roman Britain: A Very Short Introduction

Roman Britain: A Very Short Introduction

Peter Salway

$15.95

For four centuries Britain was an integral part of the Roman Empire, a political system stretching from Turkey to Portugal and from the Red Sea to the Tyne and beyond. Its involvement with Rome started long before the Conquest launched by the Emperor Claudius in 43 AD, and it continued to be a part of the Roman world for some time after the final break with Roman rule. Bringing together archaeological investigation and historical scholarship, Peter Salway explores some of the key issues arising from this period in Britain's history, discussing the question of identity at this time and analysing the importance of widespread literacy in Roman Britain. Covering the period from Julius Caesar's first forays into Britain and Claudius' subsequent conquest, as well as Britain under the later Roman Empire, Salway outlines the key events of this time period, providing a focus on society in Roman Britain, and offering a thoughtful consideration of the aftermath of Roman rule.  In the new edition of this Very Short Introduction, Peter Salway makes a number of essential updates in light of recent research in the area.  He looks at issues of ethnicity, 'Britishness', and post-colonialism, provides alternative theories to the end of the Roman period in Britain, and draws parallels between the history of Roman Britain and a wide range of other periods, territories, and themes, including the modern experience of empires and national stereotypes.

ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Catiline

Catiline

Barbara Levick

$29.99

Like Guy Fawkes in early 17th-century Britain, L. Sergius Catilina was a threat to the constitution imposed on Rome by Sulla in the mid-1st century BC. His aim at first was to reach the consulship, the summit of power at Rome, by conventional means, but he lacked the money and support to win his way to the top, unlike two contemporaries of greater means and talent: the orator Cicero and the military man Pompey the Great. Defeated for the third time, Catiline took to revolution with a substantial following: destitute farmers, impoverished landowners, discontented Italians and debtors of all kinds. But they could not stand up to the forces of law and order and the rebellion was quashed.

For the controversy that still surrounds it, the personalities involved, the distinction of the writers such as Cicero and Sallust, who are our main sources of information for it, this episode remains one of the most significant in late Republican history. This volume gives an energetic and appealing overview of the events, their sources, and the arguments of modern historians looking back at this controversial period.  Accessible for students, but useful also for more experienced scholars, this is the perfect introduction not only to a specific historical episode, but also to the problems of tackling ancient sources as evidence.
No Small Change: The Road to Recognition for Indigenous Australia

No Small Change: The Road to Recognition for Indigenous Australia

Frank Brennan

$32.95

In 1967, Australians voted overwhelmingly in favour of altering two aspects of the Constitution that related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Although these seemed like small amendments, they provided an impetus for real change - from terra nullius to land rights, and from assimilation to self-determination.

Nearly 50 years later, there is a groundswell of support for our indigenous heritage to be formally recognised in the Constitution. As we await the new referendum, Frank Brennan considers how far we've come, and yet how much work lies ahead. With fresh, detailed research, he examines the work of the Council of Aboriginal Affairs, the pivotal Gove land rights case, and the attitudes of successive governments towards recognising traditional ownership. He also reminds us of the significance of constitutional change, assessing how the coming referendum might lead governments and indigenous Australians to negotiate better outcomes.

Written by one of our most respected commentators on legal and human-rights issues, No Small Change is a vital contribution to our understanding of indigenous affairs.  It will generate crucial debate on how we should acknowledge our country's history, and how this can make a difference to indigenous Australians today.
Modelling Modern South African Armour: Modelling Techniques, Walk-Arounds, Colours and Markings

Modelling Modern South African Armour: Modelling Techniques, Walk-Arounds, Colours and Markings

William Marshall

$65.00

The first in this all new series 'Conflict 100: A Century of Warfare Remembered through Military Modelling', exclusively published by GG Books and Helion & Company, showcases modern South African Armour. Through a series of step-by-step builds by leading modellers, which are accompanied by detailed walk-arounds, a selection of vehicles and weapon systems are explored by serving South African Army Officer William Marshall, for military modellers and students of military history alike.
Kings of the Grail: Tracing the Historic Journey of the Holy Grail from Jerusalem to Spain

Kings of the Grail: Tracing the Historic Journey of the Holy Grail from Jerusalem to Spain

Margarita Torres Sevilla ,  Jose Miguel Ortega del Rio ,  Rosie Marteau

$34.95

Recently discovered parchments in the Egyptian University of Al-Azhar have finally made it possible to identify the current location of the Holy Grail. This extraordinary discovery led Margarita Torres Sevilla and Jose Miguel Ortega del Rio on a three-year investigation as they traced the Grail's journey across the globe to its final resting place in the Basilica of San Isidoro in Leon, Spain. Having been kept in Jerusalem until the eleventh century, the chalice was given to the Muslim prince of Denia (in Spain) by the caliph of the Fatimid dynasty (rulers of an empire that spanned the Middle East and North Africa). In turn, he presented it to Ferdinand I of Leon and Castile, as a gesture of respect and appeasement. It is still there today, in Leon's Basilica of San Isidoro. Newly translated by Rosie Marteau, and including a 16 page full-colour plate section, this is the definitive book on one of history's most sought-after treasures, the object of both Arthurian myth and Christian legend, and has made headlines worldwide. Kings of the Grail presents the new historical and scientific facts that have come to light, supported by meticulously researched information on the history of Judaism and early Christianity, the significance of the Last Supper, and the other cups that have previously been identified as the Holy Grail.
Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore

Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore

Julie Peakman

$29.99

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'Of picking, washing and cleaning my pretty little toes, which he took great delight in, and in which pleasurable, innocent, and inoffensive pastime he as often spent hours; 'twas the greatest gratification to him on earth, nor did he (said she) indulge in any other in all the time we spent together, he never was even rude enough to give me a kiss.'

So emerged the first expose of foot fetishism in the eighteenth century. Revelations and racy anecdotes about the lives of the rich and famous of Dublin and London abound within Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore. From a violent domestic background, Peg blitzed her way through balls and masquerades creating scandals and gossip wherever she went, leaving dukes, barristers and lieutenants stranded in her wake. She was the first madame ever to write her memoirs, thereby setting the template for the whore's memoir. She wrote not merely to reveal herself but to expose the shoddy behaviour of others and her account of her life.

In Peg Plunkett: Memoirs of a Whore, Julie Peakman brings her subject and the world through which she moved to glorious, bawdy life.
Princes at War: The British Royal Family's Private Battle in the Second World War

Princes at War: The British Royal Family's Private Battle in the Second World War

Deborah Cadbury

$29.99

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King George V predicted that his eldest son, Edward VIII, would destroy himself within a year of succeeding to the throne. In December 1936 he was proved right, and the world's press broke their Great Silence: King Edward VIII was abandoning his throne to marry Wallis Simpson, a divorced American socialite.

A life spent in the shadow of his charismatic elder brother left the new king, George VI, magnificently unprepared for the demands of ruling the kingdom and empire; this would be a baptism of fire. Hitler's Third Reich was tearing up the old Kingdoms of Europe one by one, and the familiar contours of London were being transformed by sandbags. As Great Britain braced herself for war, the faltering new king struggled to manage internal divisions within the royal family and feared betrayal as intelligence mounted of the Duke and Duchess of Windsors' suspected treachery during the worst days of the war.

Drawing on personal accounts from the royal archives and other new sources, Deborah Cadbury goes behind palace doors to uncover the very private conflict between George VI and his too charming older brother; a conflict so bitter it was unresolvable while they were both alive. 

Cadbury's intimate and gripping account of familial tensions amongst kings and princes, provides a unique look at one of the most turbulent periods in British history. Overcoming his stammer was only the beginning, and Cadbury goes on to reveal just what it took for George VI to rise to the challenge of leading his country during its time of greatest peril - and at what price.
Wellington: Waterloo and the Fortunes of Peace 1814-1852

Wellington: Waterloo and the Fortunes of Peace 1814-1852

Rory Muir

$65.95

Wellington's momentous victory over Napoleon was the culminating point of a brilliant military career. Yet Wellington's achievements were far from over: he commanded the allied army of occupation in France to the end of 1818, returned home to a seat in Lord Liverpool's cabinet, and became prime minister in 1828. He later served as a senior minister in Peel's government and remained Commander-in-Chief of the Army for a decade until his death in 1852.

In this richly detailed work, the second and concluding volume of Rory Muir's definitive biography, the author offers a substantial reassessment of Wellington's significance as a politician and a nuanced view of the private man behind the legend of the selfless hero. Muir presents new insights into Wellington's determination to keep peace at home and abroad, achieved by maintaining good relations with the Continental powers and resisting radical agitation while granting political equality to the Catholics in Ireland rather than risk civil war. 

And countering one-dimensional pictures of Wellington as a national hero, Muir paints a portrait of a well-rounded man whose austere demeanor on the public stage belied his entertaining, gossipy, generous, and unpretentious private self.
Churchill and the King: The Wartime Alliance of Winston Churchill and George VI

Churchill and the King: The Wartime Alliance of Winston Churchill and George VI

Kenneth Weisbrode

$26.99

King George VI and Winston Churchill were not destined to be partners, let alone allies. Yet together, as foils, confidants, conspirators and comrades, the unlikely duo guided Britain through war while inspiring renewed hope in the monarchy, Parliament, and the nation itself. In Churchill and the King, Kenneth Weisbrode explores the delicate fashioning of this important, though largely overlooked, relationship. Despite their differences, the trust and loyalty they eventually shared helped Britain navigate the most trying time in its history.
Henry II: A Prince Among Princes

Henry II: A Prince Among Princes

Richard Barber

$19.99

Henry II (1154-89) through a series of astonishing dynastic coups became the ruler of an enormous European empire. One of the most dynamic, restless and clever men ever to rule England, he was brought down both by his catastrophic relationship with his archbishop Thomas Becket and his debilitating arguments with his sons, most importantly the future Richard I and King John. His empire may have ultimately collapsed, but in Richard Barber's vivid and sympathetic account the reader can see why Henry II left such a compelling impression on his contemporaries.
Henry V: From Playboy Prince to Warrior King

Henry V: From Playboy Prince to Warrior King

Anne Curry

$19.99

Foremost medieval historian Anne Curry offers a new reinterpretation of Henry V and the battle that defined his kingship: Agincourt. Henry V's invasion of France, in August 1415, represented a huge gamble. As heir to the throne, he had been a failure, cast into the political wilderness amid rumours that he planned to depose his father. Despite a complete change of character as king - founding monasteries, persecuting heretics, and enforcing the law to its extremes - little had gone right since. He was insecure in his kingdom, his reputation low. On the eve of his departure for France, he uncovered a plot by some of his closest associates to remove him from power. Agincourt was a battle that Henry should not have won - but he did, and the rest is history. Within five years, he was heir to the throne of France. In this vivid new interpretation, Anne Curry explores how Henry's hyperactive efforts to expunge his past failures, and his experience of crisis - which threatened to ruin everything he had struggled to achieve - defined his kingship, and how his astonishing success at Agincourt transformed his standing in the eyes of his contemporaries, and of all generations to come.
James II: The Last Catholic King

James II: The Last Catholic King

David Womersley

$19.99

The short, action-packed reign of James II (1685-88) is generally seen as one of the most catastrophic in British history. James managed, despite having access to tremendous reserves of good will and deference, to so alienate his supporters that he had to flee for his life. And yet, most of that life was spent not as king but first as heir to Charles II, as Duke of York (after whom New York is named) and then in the last part of his life as the first Jacobite 'Pretender', starting a problem that would haunt Britain's rulers for generations.
Victoria: Queen, Matriarch, Empress

Victoria: Queen, Matriarch, Empress

Jane Ridley

$19.99

Queen Victoria inherited the throne at 18 and went on to become the longest-reigning female monarch in history, in a time of intense industrial, cultural, political, scientific and military change within the United Kingdom and great imperial expansion outside of it (she was made Empress of India in 1876). Overturning the established picture of the dour old lady, this is a fresh and engaging portrait from one of our most talented royal biographers.
William III & Mary II: Partners in Revolution

William III & Mary II: Partners in Revolution

Jonathan Keates

$19.99

William III (1689-1702) & Mary II (1689-94) (Britain's only ever 'joint monarchs') changed the course of the entire country's history, coming to power through a coup (which involved Mary betraying her own father), reestablishing parliament on a new footing and, through commiting Britain to fighting France, initiating an immensely long period of warfare and colonial expansion. Jonathan Keates' wonderful book makes both monarchs vivid, the cold, shrewd 'Dutch' William and the shortlived Mary, whose life and death inspired Purcell to write some of his greatest music.
Shakespeare and the Countess: The Battle That Gave Birth to the Globe

Shakespeare and the Countess: The Battle That Gave Birth to the Globe

Chris Laoutaris

$22.99

In November 1596 a woman signed a document which would nearly destroy the career of William Shakespeare... Who was the woman who played such an instrumental, yet little known, role in Shakespeare's life? Never far from controversy when she was alive - she sparked numerous riots and indulged in acts of bribery, breaking-and-entering, and kidnapping - Elizabeth Russell has been edited out of public memory, yet the chain of events she set in motion would be the making of Shakespeare as we all know him today. Providing new pieces to the puzzle, Chris Laoutaris' thrilling biography reveals for the first time the life of this extraordinary woman, and why she decided to wage her battle against Shakespeare.
The Chamberlains: Joseph, Austen and Neville, 1836-1940

The Chamberlains: Joseph, Austen and Neville, 1836-1940

Roger Ward

$49.99

The Chamberlains were a unique urban dynasty. The locus of their power was the Midlands industrial city of Birmingham. For 64 unbroken years, never losing an election, they represented Birmingham in Parliament. A family belonging to the Nonconformist elite which dominated the city socially and commercially, the foundations of their power were laid by the charismatic Joseph, a successful entrepreneur who as Mayor was credited with transforming the city. Entering Parliament as a Radical in 1876, then years later he was active in defeating Irish Home Rule and creating the Liberal Unionist party. From 1895 to 1903 he was Colonial Secretary and an aggressive imperialist, eventually splitting his party over tariff reform. His elder son Austen spent his career at the apex of the Conservative party, twice Chancellor of the Exchequer, a distinguished Foreign Secretary and several times passing up opportunities leading to the premiership. Neville followed closely in his father's footsteps.Entering Parliament late he became a key figure in inter-war politics. A reforming Minister of Health and a successful Chancellor in the wake of the Great Depression, as Prime Minister from 1937-1940 he tragically fell foul of the dictators, his policy of Appeasement blighting his reputation.
The Housekeeper's Tale: The Women Who Really Ran the English Country House

The Housekeeper's Tale: The Women Who Really Ran the English Country House

Tessa Boase

$22.99

Working as a housekeeper was one of the most prestigious jobs a nineteenth and early twentieth century woman could want - and also one of the toughest. A far cry from the Downton Abbey fiction, the real life Mrs Hughes was up against capricious mistresses, low pay, no job security and gruelling physical labour. Until now, her story has never been told.

The Housekeeper's Tale reveals the personal sacrifices, bitter disputes and driving ambition that shaped these women's careers. Delving into secret diaries, unpublished letters and the neglected service archives of our stately homes, Tessa Boase tells the extraordinary stories of five working women who ran some of Britain's most prominent households.

There is Dorothy Doar, Regency housekeeper for the obscenely wealthy 1st Duke and Duchess of Sutherland at Trentham Hall, Staffordshire. There is Sarah Wells, a deaf and elderly Victorian in charge of Uppark, West Sussex. Ellen Penketh is Edwardian cook-housekeeper at the sociable but impecunious Erddig Hall in the Welsh borders. Hannah Mackenzie runs Wrest Park in Bedfordshire - Britain's first country-house war hospital, bankrolled by playwright J. M. Barrie.  And there is Grace Higgens, cook-housekeeper to the Bloomsbury set at Charleston farmhouse in East Sussex for half a century - an era defined by the Second World War.

Revelatory, gripping and unexpectedly poignant, The Housekeeper's Tale champions the invisible women who ran the English country house.
Mini Retro London

Mini Retro London

Lucinda Gosling

$24.99

Take a walk back in time with this collection of fascinating and evocative photographs of one of the world's great cities. For those who love to reminisce or are fascinated by the changing times in which we live Retro London depicts the development of the city and the life of its people from the start of the 20th century to the Swinging Sixties. Beautifully presented in hardcover format with more than 300 unique images, Retro London takes a look at different aspects of life through the century that witnessed so much change. From the war years, sporting history and changing fashions, this book details it all.
Anglican Enlightenment: Orientalism, Religion and Politics in England and its Empire, 1648-1715

Anglican Enlightenment: Orientalism, Religion and Politics in England and its Empire, 1648-1715

William Bulman

$145.00

An original interpretation of the early European Enlightenment and the religious conflicts that rocked England and its empire under the later Stuarts. In a series of vignettes that move between Europe and North Africa, William Bulman shows that this period witnessed not a struggle for and against new ideas and greater freedoms, but a battle between several novel schemes for civil peace. Bulman considers anew the most apparently conservative force in post-Civil War English history: the conformist leadership of the Church of England. He demonstrates that the Church's historical scholarship, social science, pastoral care, and political practice amounted not to a culturally backward spectacle of intolerance, but to a campaign for stability drawn from the frontiers of erudition and globalisation. In seeking to sever the link between zeal and chaos, the church and its enemies were thus united in an Enlightenment project, but bitterly divided over what it meant in practice.
Cavalier Capital: Oxford in the English Civil War 1642 - 1646

Cavalier Capital: Oxford in the English Civil War 1642 - 1646

John Barrett

$56.95

Cavalier Capital , the first detailed account of Oxford's role as Royalist capital to appear for almost three-quarters of a century, examines all aspects of Oxford's experience in the English Civil War. As well as the effects on the town and university, special emphasis is placed on the various aspects of the Royalist occupation, including its role as a major manufacturing centre of munitions and armoury. The King's court and the operation of Royalist government and administration are examined, as are the organisation and life of the soldiers of the garrison. Leading personalities are described, as well as the military campaigns which were focused on Oxford during the war. The final siege leading to the fall of Oxford is also described. The book makes full use of both contemporary and modern accounts, and research, and is copiously illustrated with contemporary and modern illustrations.
Our Land at War: A Portrait of Rural Britain 1939-45

Our Land at War: A Portrait of Rural Britain 1939-45

Duff Hart-Davis

$44.99

A rich account of the impact of the Second World War on the lives of people living in the farms and villages of Britain. On the outbreak of war, the countryside was invaded by service personnel and evacuee children by the thousand; land was taken arbitrarily for airfields, training grounds and firing ranges, and whole communities were evicted. Prisoner-of-war camps brought captured enemy soldiers to close quarters, and as horses gave way to tractors and combines farmers were burdened with aggressive new restrictions on what they could and could not grow. Land Girls and Lumber Jills worked in fields and forests. Food - or the lack of it - was a major preoccupation and rationing strictly enforced. And although rabbits were poached, apples scrumped and mushrooms gathered, there was still not enough to eat. Drawing from diaries, letters, books, official records and interviews, Duff Hart Davis revisits rural Britain to describe how ordinary people survived the war years. He tells of houses turned over to military use such as Bletchley and RAF Medmenham as well as those that became schools, notably Chatsworth in Derbyshire. Combining both hardship and farce, the book examines the profound changes war brought to Britain's countryside: from the Home Guard, struggling with the provision of ludicrous equipment, to the role of the XII Corps Observation Unit. whose task was to enlarge rabbit warrens and badger setts into bunkers for harassing the enemy in the event of a German invasion; to the unexpected tenderness shown by many to German and Italian prisoners-of-war at work on the land. Fascinating, sad and at times hilarious, this warm-hearted book tells great stories - and casts new light on Britain during the war.
Princely Education in Early Modern Britain

Princely Education in Early Modern Britain

Aysha Pollnitz

$150.00

In the sixteenth century, Erasmus of Rotterdam led a humanist campaign to deter European princes from vainglorious warfare by giving them liberal educations. His prescriptions for the study of classical authors and scripture transformed the upbringing of Tudor and Stuart royal children. Rather than emphasising the sword, the educations of Henry VIII, James VI and I, and their successors prioritised the pen. In a period of succession crises, female sovereignty, and minority rulers, liberal education played a hitherto unappreciated role in reshaping the political and religious thought and culture of early modern Britain. This book explores how a humanist curriculum gave princes the rhetorical skills, biblical knowledge, and political impetus to assert the royal supremacy over their subjects' souls. Liberal education was meant to prevent over-mighty monarchy but in practice it taught kings and queens how to extend their authority over church and state.
Royal Ceremony: The Pageantry Explained

Royal Ceremony: The Pageantry Explained

Christopher Lee

$30.95

A concise, authoritative guide to the meaning behind the ritualized pageantry of the British royal family - for the fascinated, bewildered, or amused.

From Elgar to Elton John, the British have always had a penchant for pageantry. Royalty is perhaps the best example of their flair for ceremony, yet rarely do they apply the magnifying glass and question why the Queen and those around her do what they do. This comprehensive new handbook explains the history and reason behind it all. It explains the characters involved, from the Queen's Piper to the Master of Horse; the dress and costume; the principles of coronation; the royal funeral and royal wedding; and the presentation of the monarch in relation to his or her state functions.

The author's experience as a long standing royal commentator and correspondent makes him the perfect guide through the labyrinth of costume and ritual, both in England and around the world.
The Street of Wonderful Possibilities: Whistler, Wilde and Sargent in Tite Street

The Street of Wonderful Possibilities: Whistler, Wilde and Sargent in Tite Street

Devon Cox

$45.00

A beautifully illustrated art history and cultural biography, The Street of Wonderful Possibilities focuses on one of the most influential artistic quarters in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries - London's Tite Street, where a staggering amount of talent thrived, including James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde and John Singer Sargent. For Wilde, the street was full of 'wonderful possibilities', while for Whistler it was 'the birthplace of art', where a new brand of aestheticism was nurtured in his controversial White House. Modern masterpieces in art and literature flowed from the studios and houses of Tite Street, but this bohemian enclave had a dark side as well. Here Whistler was bankrupted, Frank Miles was sent to an asylum, Wilde was imprisoned, and Peter Warlock was gassed to death. Throughout its turbulent existence, Tite Street mirrored the world around it. From the Aesthetic movement and its challenge to Victorian values, through the Edwardian struggle for women's suffrage, to the bombs of the Blitz in the 1940s, it remained home to innumerable artists and writers, socialites and suffragettes, musicians and madmen. The Street of Wonderful Possibilities reveals this complex history, tying together private and professional lives to form a colourful tapestry of art and intrigue, illuminating their relationships to each other, to Tite Street and to a rapidly modernising London at the fin de siecle.
Your Country Needs You: Volunteering to Fight in the Great War

Your Country Needs You: Volunteering to Fight in the Great War

$19.99

When war came in August 1914, Lord Kitchener, the Secretary of State for War, realised that Britain needed a bigger army. He did this by creating a new volunteer army, which became known as 'Kitchener's Army'. He made a direct and personal appeal to the men of Britain. Posters were printed showing him pointing his finger at passersby with the words 'Your Country Needs You'. Men felt proud at the prospect of fighting for their country and queued outside recruitment offices all over Britain to join the army. In the first weekend of the war in 1914, 100 men an hour (3,000 a day) signed up to join the armed forces. 54 million posters were issued, 8 million personal letters were sent, 12,000 meetings were held, and 20,000 speeches were delivered by military spokesmen. By the end of 1914 1,186,337 men had enlisted. Soldiers had be at least 18 years old to join the army, and 19 before they could be sent abroad to fight, but lots of younger teenagers tried to 'join up' too. They wanted to be treated like men and thought war would be exciting. They lied about their age, hoping the recruitment officer would believe them. Often they succeeded, and some boys as young as 13 or 14 went to war. Over one million volunteers were recruited by the end of 1914, but more were needed. Not everyone could enlist. Only men could go, and they had to be aged between 18 and 41 (the age limit was increased to 51 in April 1918). Priests and ministers were also exempt. Some failed the medical test and others had 'reserved occupations'. This meant they did important jobs like drive trains, work in the coal mines, shipyards and munitions factories or were farmers, and had to stay in Britain. This bookazine tells their story.
Ministers at War: Winston Churchill and His War Cabinet

Ministers at War: Winston Churchill and His War Cabinet

Jonathan Schneer

$35.00

After the defeat of France in May 1940, only one nation stood between Nazi Germany and total domination of Europe - Britain. This is the gripping story of Winston Churchill's wartime government, an emergency coalition of Conservatives, Labour, Liberals and men of no party, assembled to see Britain through the war. A chronicle not only of their successful efforts to work together but also of quarrels, power plays, unexpected alliances and intrigue, it is an account of the most important political narrative of our time. With a cast of characters featuring some of the most famous names in twentieth-century British history, including Bevin, Attlee, Chamberlain, Beaverbrook, Morrison, Eden, Cripps - and of course Winston Churchill - this magisterial work provides a unique view of the inner machinations of Britain's wartime cabinet. Dispelling that the War Cabinet constituted an unbreakable 'band of brothers', award-winning historian Jonathan Schneer reveals that this ensemble of political titans were in fact a 'team of rivals' that included four Prime Ministers - past, present and future. Both illuminating and engrossing, Ministers at War is the first work to draw upon original research to present a previously unseen perspective of British politics during and after World War II. Schneer shows us that just as the war had kept them together, the prospect of peace saw this supposedly unbreakable band fall apart, thus providing a fascinating insight into the birth of the Welfare State.
The People's Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited

The People's Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited

Louisa Lim

$20.95

One of the best analyses of the impact of Tiananmen throughout China in the years since 1989. -The New York Times Book Review On June 4, 1989, People's Liberation Army soldiers opened fire on unarmed civilians in Beijing, killing untold hundreds of people. A quarter-century later, this defining event remains buried in China's modern history, successfully expunged from collective memory. In The People's Republic of Amnesia, NPR correspondent Louisa Lim offers a much-needed response to the silence surrounding the events of June 4th, charting how deeply they affected China at the time and in the 25 years since.
Party and State in Post-Mao China

Party and State in Post-Mao China

Teresa Wright

$33.95

In recent decades, China has become a quasi-capitalist economic powerhouse. Yet it continues to be ruled by the same Communist Party-dominated government that has been in power since 1949. But how has China's political system achieved such longevity? And what does its stability tell us about the future of authoritarian versus liberal democratic governance?

In this detailed analysis of the deeply intertwined relationship between the ruling Communist Party and governing state, noted China expert Teresa Wright provides insightful answers to these important questions.  Though many believe that the Chinese party-state has maintained its power despite its communist and authoritarian features, Wright argues that the key to its sustained success lies in its careful safeguarding of some key communist and authoritarian characteristics, while simultaneously becoming more open and responsive to public participation.  She contends that China's post-Mao party-state compares well to different forms of political rule, including liberal democratic government. 

It has fulfilled the necessary functions of a stable governing regime: satisfying key demographic groups and responding to public grievances; maintaining economic stability and growth; and delivering public services - without any real reduction in CCP power and influence. Questioning current understandings of the nature, strengths, and weaknesses of democracy and authoritarianism, this thought-provoking book will be essential reading for all students and scholars of Chinese politics and international relations.
Napoleon the Great

Napoleon the Great

Andrew Roberts

$29.99

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Napoleon Bonaparte lived one of the most extraordinary of all human lives. In the space of just twenty years, from October 1795 when as a young artillery captain he cleared the streets of Paris of insurrectionists, to his final defeat at the (horribly mismanaged) battle of Waterloo in June 1815, Napoleon transformed France and Europe.

After seizing power in a coup d'etat he ended the corruption and incompetence into which the Revolution had descended. In a series of dazzling battles he reinvented the art of warfare; in peace, he completely remade the laws of France, modernized her systems of education and administration, and presided over a flourishing of the beautiful 'Empire style' in the arts. The impossibility of defeating his most persistent enemy, Great Britain, led him to make draining and ultimately fatal expeditions into Spain and Russia, where half a million Frenchmen died and his Empire began to unravel. 

More than any other modern biographer, Andrew Roberts conveys Napoleon's tremendous energy, both physical and intellectual, and the attractiveness of his personality, even to his enemies. He has walked 53 of Napoleon's 60 battlefields, and has absorbed the gigantic new French edition of Napoleon's letters, which allows a complete re-evaluation of this exceptional man. He overturns many received opinions, including the myth of a great romance with Josephine: she took a lover immediately after their marriage, and, as Roberts shows, he had three times as many mistresses as he acknowledged.
Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc

Helen Castor

$22.99

We all know the story of Joan of Arc. A peasant girl who hears voices from God. A warrior leading an army to victory, in an age that believes women cannot fight. The Maid of Orleans, and the saviour of France. Burned at the stake as a heretic at the age of just nineteen. Five hundred years later, a saint.

Her case was heard in court twice over. One trial, in 1431, condemned her; the other, twenty-five years after her death, cleared her name. In the transcripts, we hear first-hand testimony from Joan, her family and her friends: a rare survival from the medieval world. What could be more revealing? But all is not as simple as it seems, because this is a life told backwards, in hindsight - a story already shaped by the knowledge of what Joan would become.

In Joan of Arc: A History, Helen Castor tells this gripping story afresh: forwards, not backwards, setting this extraordinary girl within her extraordinary world where no one - not Joan herself, nor the people around her, princes, bishops, soldiers or peasants - knew what would happen next.
A History of France

A History of France

Joseph Bergin

$42.95

Few modern countries can boast of such a lengthy history as France, a staple of European maps for the last millennium. This engaging narrative analyses French political, social and cultural history since 987, in a single volume. Through revolution, war and peace, it explores how the Frankland of 1000AD has grown into the France we know today.
Napoleon: On War

Napoleon: On War

Bruno Colson

$57.95

This is the book on war that Napoleon never had the time or the will to complete. In exile on the island of Saint-Helena, the deposed Emperor of the French mused about a great treatise on the art of war, but in the end changed his mind and ordered the destruction of the materials he had collected for the volume. Thus was lost what would have been one of the most interesting and important books on the art of war ever written, by one of the most famous and successful military leaders of all time. In the two centuries since, several attempts have been made to gather together some of Napoleon's 'military maxims', with varying degrees of success. But not until now has there been a systematic attempt to put Napoleon's thinking on war and strategy into a single authoritative volume, reflecting both the full spectrum of his thinking on these matters as well as the almost unparalleled range of his military experience, from heavy cavalry charges in the plains of Russia or Saxony to counter-insurgency operations in Egypt or Spain.
Himmler's Favourite: The Combat History of III (Germanic) SS Panzerkorps

Himmler's Favourite: The Combat History of III (Germanic) SS Panzerkorps

Lennart Westberg ,  Martin Mansson ,  Geir Brenden

$145.00

These two photographic volumes depict Himmler's favourite unit in the Waffen-SS: the III 'Germanic' SS Panzerkorps, for it fulfilled Himmler's long-time political plans of recruiting 'Germanic' volunteers for the creation of a greater Germanic Reich in the future. As such, it consisted in part of SS volunteers from western and northern European countries.

Although largely forgotten today, this elite SS unit fought on a variety of battlefields ranging from Croatia and Ingermanland's snow-covered forests near Leningrad to the historic Estonian city of Narva, where it defended the Baltic countries of Estonia and Latvia against the Red Army in 1944-45. The remnants of the Panzerkorps ended up in both the hopeless defence of Pomerania and the final apocalypse at the battle for Brandenburg and Berlin in April-May 1945, when the Third Reich went down in a storm of fire and steel.
Swansong 1945: A Collective Diary from Hitler's Last Birthday to Ve Day

Swansong 1945: A Collective Diary from Hitler's Last Birthday to Ve Day

Walter Kempowski ,  Shaun Whiteside

$24.99

Swansong 1945 chronicles four significant days in the last three weeks of WWII: 20 April, Hitler's last birthday; 25 April, when American and Soviet troops first met at the Elbe; 30 April, the day Hitler committed suicide; and 8 May, the day of the German surrender. Side by side in these pages, we encounter the voices of civilians fleeing on foot to the west, British and American POWs dreaming of home, concentration camp survivors, loyal soldiers from both sides of the conflict and national leaders including Churchill, Hitler and Mussolini. A monumental account of survival, suffering, hope and despair, Swansong 1945 brings vividly to life a conflict whose repercussions are felt today.
Feasts and Fasts: A History of Food in India

Feasts and Fasts: A History of Food in India

Colleen Taylor Sen

$59.99

The second most populous country in the world after China and the seventh largest in area, India is unique among nations in its diversity of climates, languages, religions, tribes, customs and, of course, cuisines. Yet what is it that makes Indian food so recognizably Indian, and how did it get that way? India is at the centre of a vast network of land and sea trade routes - conduits for plants, ingredients, dishes and cooking techniques to and from the rest of the world. Foreign visitors have long marvelled at India's agricultural bounty, including its ancient indigenous plants such as lentils, aubergines, turmeric and pepper, all of which have been central to the Indian diet for thousands of years. Feasts and Fasts: A History of Indian Food is an exploration of Indian cuisine in the context of the country's religious, moral, social and philosophical development. It addresses topics such as dietary prescriptions and proscriptions, the origins of vegetarianism, culinary borrowings and innovations, the use of spices and the inseparable links between diet, health and medicine.This lavishly illustrated book gives a mouth-watering tour of India's regional cuisines, containing numerous recipes to interest and excite readers.
Bitter Freedom: Ireland in a Revolutionary World, 1918-1923

Bitter Freedom: Ireland in a Revolutionary World, 1918-1923

Maurice Walsh

$35.00

The Irish Revolution - the war between the British authorities and the newly-formed IRA - was the first successful revolt anywhere against the British Empire. This is a vividly-written, compelling narrative placing events in Ireland in the wider context of a world in turmoil after the ending of a global war: one that saw the collapse of empires and the rise of fascist Italy and communist Russia. Walsh shows how developments in Europe and America had a profound effect on Ireland, influencing the attitudes and expectations of combatants and civilians. Walsh also brings to life what Irish people who were not fully involved in the fighting were doing - the plays they went to, the exciting films they watched in the new cinemas, the books they read and the work they did. The freedom from Britain that most of them wanted was, when it came, a bitter disappointment to a generation aware of the promise of modernity.
In Search of Japan's Hidden Christians: A Story of Suppression, Secrecy and Survival

In Search of Japan's Hidden Christians: A Story of Suppression, Secrecy and Survival

John Dougill

$17.99

The story of Japan's hidden Christians is the subject of a major motion picture by director Martin Scorsese, based on Shusaku Endo's famous novel, Silence. From the time the first Christian missionary arrived in Japan in 1549 to when a nationwide ban was issued in 1614, over 300,000 Japanese were converted to Christianity. A vicious campaign of persecution forced the faithful to go underground. For seven generations, Hidden Christians - or Kirishitan - preserved a faith that was strictly forbidden on pain of death. Illiterate peasants handed down the Catholicism that had been taught to their ancestors despite having no Bible or contact with the outside world. Just as remarkably, descendants of the Hidden Christians continue to this day to practice their own religion, refusing to rejoin the Catholic Church. Why? And what is it about Christianity that is so antagonistic to Japanese culture? In Search of Japan's Hidden Christians is an attempt to answer these questions. A journey in both space and time, In Search of Japan's Hidden Christians recounts a clash of civilizations - of East and West - that resonates to this day, and offers insights about the tenacity of belief and unchanging aspects of Japanese culture.
On Palestine

On Palestine

Noam Chomsky ,  Ilan Pappe

$14.99

On Palestine is Noam Chomsky and Ilan Pappe's indispensable update on a suffering region. What is the future of the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement directed at Israel? Which is more viable, the binational or one state solution?

Ilan Pappe and Noam Chomsky, two leading voices in the struggle to liberate Palestine, discuss these critical questions and more in this urgent and timely book, a sequel to their acclaimed Gaza in Crisis.  

Noam Chomsky is the author of numerous bestselling and influential political books, including Hegemony or Survival, Failed States, Interventions, Hopes and Prospects, Gaza in Crisis, Making the Future and Occupy. Ilan Pappe is the author of the bestselling The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, A History of Modern Palestine, and The Israel/Palestine Question.
Syrian Notebooks: Inside the Homs Uprising

Syrian Notebooks: Inside the Homs Uprising

Jonathan Littell

$29.99

In 2012, Jonathan Littell went to the heart of the Syrian conflict, embedding himself with the Free Syria-Army in the historic city of Homs. He watched from the front line as the city was ruthlessly pummelled by Assad's forces before it finally surrendered. His urgent notebooks of what he saw on the ground speak directly of the horrors of the civil war that continues today. Out of the chaos, Littell bears witness to the lives and the hopes of freedom fighters. Syrian Notebooks is the most close-up account of the war, and will be seen as a classic account of war reportage.
ISIS Exposed: Beheadings, Slavery, and the Hellish Reality of Radical Islam

ISIS Exposed: Beheadings, Slavery, and the Hellish Reality of Radical Islam

Erick Stakelbeck

$39.99

The terror masters of ISIS are determined to get America's attention. They've humiliated the Iraqi Army we trained and seized territory in Iraq that we had secured at the cost of so many American lives. They've beheaded American journalists on camera in a direct challenge to the power and resolve of the United States. And now ISIS is calling for city wolves across the United States to act on their dedication to the Islamic State's blood-drenched ideology and murder innocent American citizens at random. Who is ISIS? Where did it come from, and what is driving its successful campaign of murder and conquest? Our government and our media alike seemed to be blindsided by the Islamic State's blitzkrieg-like advance, which forced American troops back into Iraq. ISIS has conquered a territory roughly the size of the state of Indiana, rules over eight million terrorized souls, and has even revived the practice of legal slavery. And yet the true motivations, inner workings, and future plans of this terror state and its mysterious caliph seem almost as obscure as when ISIS first burst onto the world scene. In ISIS Exposed, veteran investigative reporter Erick Stakelbeck gets inside the story of the new caliphate and reveals just how clear and present a threat it is.
Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles

Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles

Bernard Cornwell

$19.99

'Some battles change nothing. Waterloo changed almost everything.' On the 18th June, 1815 the armies of France, Britain and Prussia descended upon a quiet valley south of Brussels. In the previous three days the French army had beaten the British at Quatre-Bras and the Prussians at Ligny. The Allies were in retreat. The blood-soaked battle of Waterloo would become a landmark in European history, to be examined over and again, not least because until the evening of the 18th, the French army was close to prevailing on the battlefield.

Now, brought to life by the celebrated novelist Bernard Cornwell, this is the chronicle of the four days leading up to the actual battle and a thrilling hour-by-hour account of that fateful day. In his first work of non-fiction, Cornwell combines his storytelling skills with a meticulously researched history to give a riveting account of every dramatic moment, from Napoleon's escape from Elba to the smoke and gore of the battlefields. Through letters and diaries he also sheds new light on the private thoughts of Napoleon and the Duke of Wellington, as well as the ordinary officers and soldiers. 

Published to coincide with the bicentenary in 2015, Waterloo is a tense and gripping story of heroism and tragedy - and of the final battle that determined the fate of Europe.
How the French Won Waterloo (Or Think They Did)

How the French Won Waterloo (Or Think They Did)

Stephen Clarke

$35.00

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Published in the 200th Anniversary year of the Battle of Waterloo a witty look at how the French still think they won, by Stephen Clarke, author of 1000 Years of Annoying the French and A Year in the Merde.

Two centuries after the Battle of Waterloo, the French are still in denial. If Napoleon lost on 18 June 1815 (and that's a big 'if'), then whoever rules the universe got it wrong. As soon as the cannons stopped firing, French historians began re-writing history. The Duke of Wellington was beaten, they say, and then the Prussians jumped into the boxing ring, breaking all the rules of battle. In essence, the French cannot bear the idea that Napoleon, their greatest-ever national hero, was in any way a loser. Especially not against the traditional enemy - les Anglais.

Stephen Clarke has studied the French version of Waterloo, as told by battle veterans, novelists, historians - right up to today's politicians, and he has uncovered a story of pain, patriotism and sheer perversion...
The Longest Afternoon: The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo

The Longest Afternoon: The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo

Brendan Simms

$22.99

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Europe had been at war for over twenty years. After a short respite in exile, Napoleon had returned to France and threatened another generation of fighting across the devastated and exhausted continent. At the small Belgian village of Waterloo two large, hastily mobilized armies faced each other to decide the future of Europe. Unknown either to Napoleon or Wellington the battle would be decided by a small, ordinary group of British and German troops given the task of defending the farmhouse of La Haye Sainte.

This book tells their extraordinary story, brilliantly recapturing the fear, chaos and chanciness of battle and using previously untapped eye-witness reports. Through determination, cunning and fighting spirit, some four hundred soldiers held off many thousands of French and changed the course of history.
The World the Railways Made: Christian Wolmar's Railway Library

The World the Railways Made: Christian Wolmar's Railway Library

Nicholas Faith

$19.99

Across American praries, through Siberian tundra, over Argentinian pampas and deep into the heart of Africa, the modern world began with the arrival of the railway. The shock was both sudden and universal: railways transformed the world, carrying empire, capitalism and industrialization to every corner of the planet. For some, the 'Iron Road' symbolized the brute horrors of modernity; for others the way toward a brighter future. From 1825, when the first passenger service linked Stockton and Darlington to the outbreak of World War I, Nicholas Faith's book presents a compelling journey through the first century of rail, introducing visionaries, engineers, surveyors, speculators, financiers and navvies - the heroes and the rogues of the mechanical revolution that turned the world upside down.
Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing

Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing

Laura J. Snyder

$49.99

By the early 17th century the Scientific Revolution was well under way. Philosophers and scientists were throwing off the yoke of ancient authority to peer at nature and the cosmos through microscopes and telescopes. In October 1632, in the small town of Delft in the Dutch Republic, two geniuses were born who would bring about a seismic shift in the idea of what it meant to see the world. One was Johannes Vermeer, whose experiments with lenses and a camera obscura taught him how we see under different conditions of light and helped him create the most luminous works of art ever beheld. The other was Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, whose work with microscopes revealed a previously unimagined realm of minuscule creatures. By intertwining the biographies of these two men, Laura Snyder tells the story of a historical moment in both art and science that revolutionized how we see the world today.
The News from Waterloo: The Race to Tell Britain of Wellington's Victory

The News from Waterloo: The Race to Tell Britain of Wellington's Victory

Brian Cathcart

$35.00

The Duke of Wellington's victory over Napoleon in 1815 at Waterloo ensured British dominance for the rest of the nineteenth century. It took three days and two hours for word to travel from Belgium in a form that people could rely upon. This is a tragi-comic midsummer's tale that begins amidst terrible carnage and weaves through a world of politics and military convention, enterprise and roguery, frustration, doubt and jealousy, to end spectacularly in the heart of Regency society at a grand soiree in St James' Square after feverish journeys by coach and horseback, a Channel crossing delayed by falling tides and a flat calm, and a final dash by coach and four from Dover to London. At least five men were involved in bringing the news or parts of it to London, and their stories are fascinating. Brian Cathcart, a brilliant storyteller and historian, has visited the battlefield, travelled the messengers' routes, and traced untapped British, French and Belgian records. This is a strikingly original perspective on a key moment in British history.
The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How They Made the Modern World

The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How They Made the Modern World

Scott L. Montgomery ,  Daniel Chirot

$57.95

This panoramic book tells the story of how revolutionary ideas from the Enlightenment about freedom, equality, evolution, and democracy have reverberated through modern history and shaped the world as we know it today. 

A testament to the enduring power of ideas, The Shape of the New offers unforgettable portraits of Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, Charles Darwin, and Karl Marx-heirs of the Enlightenment who embodied its highest ideals about progress-and shows how their thoughts, over time and in the hands of their followers and opponents, transformed the very nature of our beliefs, institutions, economies, and politics. Yet these ideas also hold contradictions. They have been used in the service of brutal systems such as slavery and colonialism, been appropriated and twisted by monsters like Stalin and Hitler, and provoked reactions against the Enlightenment's legacy by Islamic Salafists and the Christian Religious Right. 

The Shape of the New argues that it is impossible to understand the ideological and political conflicts of our own time without familiarizing ourselves with the history and internal tensions of these world-changing ideas. 

With passion and conviction, it exhorts us to recognize the central importance of these ideas as historical forces and pillars of the Western humanistic tradition. It makes the case that to read the works of the great thinkers is to gain invaluable insights into the ideas that have shaped how we think and what we believe.
The Arts of Living: Europe 1600-1815

The Arts of Living: Europe 1600-1815

Elizabeth Miller ,  Hilary Young

$50.00

Published to accompany the landmark opening of the V&A's new Europe 1600 - 1800 galleries, The Arts of Living explores the breadth, depth and beauty of the V&A's seventeenth- and eighteenth-century collections. Written by a team of experts, this book provides an overview of more than two centuries of cultural development and artistic endeavour. Masterpieces such as the Serilly Cabinet and Gian Lorenzo Bernini's terracotta for his funeral monument the Blessed Ludovica Albertoni are contextualized alongside discussions of Louis XIV's patronage and the seventeenth-century Dutch interior. Many works are shown for the first time, including Count Bruhl's Meissen fountain and actor David Garrick's tea service.
Early Modern Systems of Command: Queen Anne's Generals, Staff Officers and the Direction of Allied Warfare in the Low Countries and Germany, 1702-1711

Early Modern Systems of Command: Queen Anne's Generals, Staff Officers and the Direction of Allied Warfare in the Low Countries and Germany, 1702-1711

Stewart Stansfield

$69.95

The Anglophone history of the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-14) in the Low Countries is dominated by military biographies of John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722), and studies of the battles he fought. Yet while Marlborough exercised a profound influence as a statesman and general, throughout the conflict, Marlborough was variously aided, abetted and disrupted by a number of general and staff officers. These officers provided the mechanism by which supra-regimental command was effected. Drawing upon a wealth of primary material, this book examines topics as diverse as corruption, logistics, military justice and intelligence-gathering. Investigating not only the degree to which all actors, from the commander-in-chief down to his subordinate officers, were active in the decision-making processes of the campaign, but also the extent to which they contributed to the ongoing process of British and European military development.
Marlborough's Other Army: The British Army and the Campaigns of the First Peninsula War, 1702 - 1712

Marlborough's Other Army: The British Army and the Campaigns of the First Peninsula War, 1702 - 1712

Nick Dorrell

$56.95

An often neglected aspect of Marlborough's war is its crucial campaign in Spain and Portugal also known as the First Peninsula War of 1702 - 1712. Whilst this campaign was critical to the outcome of the war, relatively little information is available about it or the army that fought it. This work not only provides a detailed look at the army that fought the Spanish and Portuguese campaigns of Marlborough's war, but it also offers an insight into the course of the war in Iberia. It aims to provide more detail and understanding of a relatively little known part of a war that helped to shape and strengthened Britain's position amongst the main European players.
The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution

The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution

Anna Plassart

$145.00

Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the eighteenth century. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of nineteenth-century political thought.
Napoleon and the Struggle for Germany: The Franco-Prussian War of 1813

Napoleon and the Struggle for Germany: The Franco-Prussian War of 1813

Michael V. Leggiere

$68.95

This is the first comprehensive history of the campaign that determined control of Germany following Napoleon's catastrophic defeat in Russia. Michael V. Leggiere reveals how, in the spring of 1813, Prussia, the weakest of the great powers, led the struggle against Napoleon as a war of national liberation. Using German, French, British, Russian, Austrian and Swedish sources, he provides a panoramic history that covers the full sweep of the battle for Germany from the mobilization of the belligerents, strategy, and operations to coalition warfare, diplomacy, and civil-military relations. He shows how Russian war weariness conflicted with Prussian impetuosity, resulting in the crisis that almost ended the Sixth Coalition in early June. In a single campaign, Napoleon drove the Russo-Prussian army from the banks of the Saale to the banks of the Oder. The Russo-Prussian alliance was perilously close to imploding, only to be saved at the eleventh-hour by an armistice.
Napoleon and the Struggle for Germany: The Franco-Prussian War of 1813

Napoleon and the Struggle for Germany: The Franco-Prussian War of 1813

Michael V. Leggiere

$65.95

The first comprehensive history of the decisive Fall Campaign of 1813 that determined control of Central Europe following Napoleon's catastrophic defeat in Russia the previous year. Using German, French, British, Russian, Austrian and Swedish sources, Michael Leggiere provides a panoramic history which covers the full sweep of the struggle in Germany. He shows how Prussia, the weakest of the Great Powers, led the struggle against Napoleon and his empire. By reconstructing the principal campaigns and operations in Germany, the book reveals how the defeat of Napoleon in Germany was made possible by Prussian victories. In particular, it features detailed analysis of the strategy, military operations and battles in Germany that culminated with the epic four-day Battle of Nations at Leipzig and Napoleon's retreat to France. This study not only highlights the breakdown of Napoleon's strategy in 1813, but constitutes a fascinating study in coalition warfare, international relations, and civil-military relations.
Gun Baby Gun: A Bloody Journey into the World of the Gun

Gun Baby Gun: A Bloody Journey into the World of the Gun

Iain Overton

$29.99

In some places, it's easier to get a gun than a clean glass of water. In some places, you are allowed to carry concealed firearms into schools. In some places, there are more guns than people to shoot them.

There are almost one billion guns across the globe today - more than ever before. There are 12 billion bullets produced every year - almost two bullets for every person on this earth. And as many as 500,000 people are killed by them ever year worldwide. The gun's impact is long-reaching and often hidden. And it doesn't just involve the dead, the wounded, the suicidal and the mourning. It involves us all. 

The pain caused by a gunshot does not end with the pulling of the trigger. That is just the beginning. Gun Baby Gun takes the award-winning investigative journalist Iain Overton on a shocking and eye-opening journey to over 25 countries, from South Africa to Iceland, Honduras to Cambodia. 

Meeting people affected by guns from all walks of life - porn starlets who appear as snipers in XXX films, Zionist anti-terror gun trainers, El Salvadoran gangland killers, South African doctors soaked in the blood of gunshot victims - he unearths some hard truths about the terrible realities of war and gun crime.

Harrowing and sobering, it's a riveting expose that anyone with even the smallest interest in how the world really works will want to read.
All the Wild That Remains

All the Wild That Remains

David Gessner

$33.95

ABBEY'S BOOKSELLER PICK ----- Part bio, part travelogue and part meditation on the changing landscape of the American West. Gessner tells the story of a part of America that has iconic status worldwide by using two writers as his guide. Edward Abbey (not Albee) who comes across as Hunter S Thompson meets Henry Thoreau and Wallace Stegner a more stoic reserved type. Gessner discusses both their life and their work and how these writers influenced him as a writer and as a person. We see a landscape that faces huge problems and both of them sound very familiar to Australian readers-mining and climate change. An entertaining and informative read. Greg

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Archetypal wild man Edward Abbey and proper, dedicated Wallace Stegner left their footprints all over the western landscape. Now, award-winning nature writer David Gessner follows the ghosts of these two remarkable writer-environmentalists from Stegner's birthplace in Saskatchewan to the site of Abbey's pilgrimages to Arches National Park in Utah, braiding their stories and asking how they speak to the lives of all those who care about the West.

These two great westerners had very different ideas about what it meant to love the land and try to care for it, and they did so in distinctly different styles. Boozy, lustful, and irascible, Abbey was best known as the author of the novel The Monkey Wrench Gang (and also of the classic nature memoir Desert Solitaire), famous for spawning the idea of guerrilla actions-known to admirers as monkeywrenching and to law enforcement as domestic terrorism-to disrupt commercial exploitation of western lands. By contrast, Stegner, a buttoned-down, disciplined, faithful family man and devoted professor of creative writing, dedicated himself to working through the system to protect western sites such as Dinosaur National Monument in Colorado.

In a region beset by droughts and fires, by fracking and drilling, and by an ever-growing population that seems to be in the process of loving the West to death, Gessner asks: how might these two farseeing environmental thinkers have responded to the crisis?

Gessner takes us on an inspiring, entertaining journey as he renews his own commitment to cultivating a meaningful relationship with the wild, confronting American overconsumption, and fighting environmental injustice-all while reawakening the thrill of the words of his two great heroes.
A Fighting Chance

A Fighting Chance

Warren Elizabeth

$32.99

An unlikely political star tells the inspiring story of the two-decade journey that taught her how Washington really works - and really doesn't. As a child in small-town Oklahoma, Elizabeth Warren yearned to go to college and then become an elementary school teacher - an ambitious goal, given her family's modest means. Early marriage and motherhood seemed to put even that dream out of reach, but fifteen years later she was a distinguished law professor with a deep understanding of why people go bankrupt. Then came the phone call that changed her life: could she come to Washington DC to help advise Congress on rewriting the bankruptcy laws? Thus began an impolite education into the bare-knuckled, often dysfunctional ways of Washington. She fought for better bankruptcy laws for ten years and lost. She tried to hold the federal government accountable during the financial crisis but became a target of the big banks. She came up with the idea for a new agency designed to protect consumers from predatory bankers and was denied the opportunity to run it. Finally, at age 62, she decided to run for elective office and won the most competitive - and watched - Senate race in the country. In this passionate, funny, rabble-rousing book, Warren shows why she has chosen to fight tooth and nail for the middle class - and why she has become a hero to all those who believe that America's government can and must do better for working families.
The Wright Brothers

The Wright Brothers

David McCullough

$32.99

On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe what had happened: the age of flight had begun, with the first heavier-than-air, powered machine carrying a pilot. Who were these men and how was it that they achieved what they did?

David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, tells the surprising, profoundly human story of Wilbur and Orville Wright. Far more than a couple of unschooled Dayton bicycle mechanics who happened to hit on success, they were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity, much of which they attributed to their upbringing. The house they lived in had no electricity or indoor plumbing, but there were books aplenty, supplied mainly by their preacher father, who encouraged their studying. As individuals they had differing skill sets and passions but as a team they excelled in any given task . That they had no more than a public high school education, little money and no patron to open doors to their desires, never stopped them in their goal to take to the air. 

Nothing did, not even the self-evident reality that every time they took off in one of their contrivances, they risked being killed, or, at the very least, maimed. In this thrilling book, master historian David McCullough draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including private diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence to tell the human side of the Wright Brothers' story, including the little-known contributions of their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them.
Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence

Bryan Burrough

$45.00

The Weathermen. The Symbionese Liberation Army. The FALN. The Black Liberation Army. The names seem quaint now, when not forgotten altogether. But there was a stretch of time in America, during the 1970s, when bombings by domestic underground groups were a daily occurrence. The FBI combated these groups and others as nodes in a single revolutionary underground, dedicated to the violent overthrow of the American government.

The FBI's response to the leftist revolutionary counterculture has not been treated kindly by history, and in hindsight many of its efforts seem almost comically ineffectual, if not criminal in themselves. But part of the extraordinary accomplishment of Bryan Burrough's Days of Rage is to temper those easy judgments with an understanding of just how deranged these times were, how charged with menace.

Burrough re-creates an atmosphere that seems almost unbelievable just forty years later, conjuring a time of native-born radicals, most of them  nice middle-class kids,  smuggling bombs into skyscrapers and detonating them inside the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol, at a Boston courthouse and a Wall Street restaurant packed with lunchtime diners - radicals robbing dozens of banks and assassinating policemen in New York, San Francisco, Atlanta.

The FBI, encouraged to do everything possible to undermine the radical underground, itself broke many laws in its attempts to bring the revolutionaries to justice - often with disastrous consequences. Benefiting from the extraordinary number of people from the underground and the FBI who speak about their experiences for the first time,  Days of Rage  is filled with revelations and fresh details about the major revolutionaries and their connections and about the FBI and its desperate efforts to make the bombings stop.

The result is a mesmerizing book that takes us into the hearts and minds of homegrown terrorists and federal agents alike and weaves their stories into a spellbinding secret history of the 1970s.
Independence: The Tangled Roots of the American Revolution

Independence: The Tangled Roots of the American Revolution

Thomas Slaughter

$29.95

"What do we mean by the Revolution?" John Adams asked Thomas Jefferson in 1815. "The war? That was no part of the Revolution. It was only an effect and consequence of it."

As the distinguished historian Thomas P. Slaughter shows in this landmark book, the long process of revolution reached back more than a century before 1776, and it touched on virtually every aspect of the colonies' laws, commerce, social structures, religious sentiments, family ties, and political interests. And Slaughter's comprehensive work makes clear that the British who chose to go to North America chafed under imperial rule from the start, vigorously disputing many of the colonies' founding charters.

When the British said the Americans were typically "independent," they meant to disparage them as lawless and disloyal. But the Americans insisted on their moral courage and political principles, and regarded their independence as a great virtue, as they regarded their love of freedom and their loyalty to local institutions. Over the years, their struggles to define this independence took many forms, and Slaughter's compelling narrative takes us from New England and Nova Scotia to New York and Pennsylvania, and south to the Carolinas, as colonists resisted unsympathetic royal governors, smuggled to evade British duties on imported goods (tea was only one of many), and, eventually, began to organize for armed uprisings.

Britain, especially after its victories over France in the 1750s, was eager to crush these rebellions, but the Americans' opposition only intensified, as did dark conspiracy theories about their enemies - whether British, Native American, or French.

In Independence, Slaughter resets and clarifies the terms in which we may understand this remarkable evolution, showing how and why a critical mass of colonists determined that they could not be both independent and subject to the British Crown. By 1775-76, they had become revolutionaries - going to war only reluctantly, as a last-ditch means to preserve the independence that they cherished as a birthright.
Our Lost Constitution: The Willful Subversion of America's Founding Document

Our Lost Constitution: The Willful Subversion of America's Founding Document

Mike Lee

$39.99

The dramatic stories behind the most neglected parts of the Constitution, from Alexander Hamilton to Barack Obama Nearly everyone in Washington is a self-proclaimed defender of the Constitution, yet many either don't understand or have consciously disregarded the document they've sworn to defend. Even many conservatives have been willing to overlook provisions that were designed to protect our fundamental liberties from an overreaching federal government. Now Senator Mike Lee tells the dramatic, little known stories behind key parts of the Constitution. He shows how every abuse of federal power today is rooted in neglect of the Constitution - and most of those abuses were predicted by the Founders. For example: - The Origination Clause says that all bills to raise taxes must originate in the House. It was gutted in 1892, leading eventually to Obamacare.- The Fourth Amendment protects us against unreasonable search and seizure, but the NSA now collects our data without a warrant.- The Legislative Powers Clause means that only Congress can pass laws, but unelected agencies now produce the vast majority of binding rules. Senator Lee also explores the Ninth and Tenth Amendments, the Establishment Clause, among others, and makes a strong case for restoring our lost constitution.
Retro New York

Retro New York

Alan Whiticker

$45.00

Retro New York is a book of historical images from the Mary Evans Photo Library depicting the development of the city and the life of its people from the start of the 20th Century to the 1970s.
Patriot Militiaman in the American Revolution 1775-82

Patriot Militiaman in the American Revolution 1775-82

Ed Gilbert ,  Catherine Gilbert ,  Steve Noon

$24.99

The American Revolution was a decisive conflict, which saw the birth of a new nation. Continental Army regulars fought in massive and famous battles from New England to Virginia, but in the South a different kind of warfare was afoot. Local militia, sometimes stiffened by a small core of the Continental Line, played a pivotal role. This lesser-known war ultimately decided the fate of the Revolution by thwarting the British Southern strategy . In this title, the authors provide a unique and personal focus on the history of their own ancestors, who fought for the South Carolina Militia, to show just how effective the irregular forces were in a complex war of raids, ambushes, and pitched battles. The book explores the tactics, equipment, leadership and performance of the opposing Patriot and Rebel forces, shining new light on the vicious struggle in the South.
The Hopkins Touch: Harry Hopkins and the Forging of the Alliance to Defeat Hitler

The Hopkins Touch: Harry Hopkins and the Forging of the Alliance to Defeat Hitler

David L. Roll

$23.95

The Hopkins Touch offers the first portrait in over two decades of the most powerful man in Roosevelt's administration. In this impressive biography, David Roll shows how Harry Hopkins, an Iowa-born social worker who had been an integral part of the New Deal's implementation, became the linchpin in FDR's-and America's-relationships with Churchill and Stalin, and spoke with an authority second only to the president's. Hopkins could take the political risks his boss could not, and proved crucial to maintaining personal relations among the Big Three. Beloved by some-such as Churchill, who believed that Hopkins always went to the root of the matter -and trusted by most-including the paranoid Stalin-there were nevertheless those who resented the influence of the White House Rasputin. Based on newly available sources, The Hopkins Touch is an absorbing, substantial work that offers a fresh perspective on the World War II era and the Allied leaders, through the life of the man who kept them on point until the war was won.
Gettysburg, 1863

Gettysburg, 1863

Brooks D. Simpson

$43.00  $38.70

Gettysburg, 1863 offers readers an account of the great battle, as well as a succinct discussion of Gen. Robert E. Lee's offensive in June 1863 and the battle's aftermath as the Confederates made their way across the Potomac River some ten days later. Brooks D. Simpson outlines the decisions that the commanders on the field made and details how the action unfolded. He explores many aspects of the battle: the weaponry, the medical care administered, the terrain, the tactics, the art of command, and the experiences of civilians. His description of the preparations for the Confederate cannonade preceding the July 3 assault against the Union center also highlights the artillery and ammunition involved. More than a traditional military history chronicle, Gettysburg, 1863 serves as a broader overview of the Battle of Gettysburg, examining its importance both in history and memory. Simpson's clear, concise retelling of this key event in American history will appeal to both lovers of history and those who are new to the study of the Civil War.
Clouds of Glory: The Life and Legend of Robert E. Lee

Clouds of Glory: The Life and Legend of Robert E. Lee

Michael Korda

$28.99

Michael Korda s Clouds of Glory is a fresh, contemporary single volume historical biography of General Robert E. Lee perhaps the most famous and least understood legend in American history and one of our most admired heroesMichael Korda, author of Ulysses S. Grant and the bestsellers Ike and Hero, paints a vivid and admiring portrait of Lee as a brilliant general, a devoted family man, and principled gentleman who disliked slavery and disagreed with secession, yet who refused command of the Union Army in 1861 because he could not draw his sword against his beloved Virginia.Well-rounded and realistic, Clouds of Glory analyzes Lee s command during the Civil War and explores his responsibility for the fatal stalemate at Antietam, his defeat at Gettysburg (as well the many troubling controversies still surrounding it), and ultimately, his failed strategy for winning the war. As Korda shows, Lee s dignity, courage, leadership, and modesty made him a hero on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line and a revered American icon who is recognized today as the nation s preeminent military leader.
Confederate Cavalryman vs Union Cavalryman: Eastern Theater 1861-65

Confederate Cavalryman vs Union Cavalryman: Eastern Theater 1861-65

Ron Field ,  Peter Dennis

$24.99

During the intense, sprawling conflict that was the American Civil War, both Union and Confederate forces fielded substantial numbers of cavalry, which carried out the crucial tasks of reconnaissance, raiding, and conveying messages. The perception was that cavalry's effectiveness on the battlefield would be drastically reduced in this age of improved mass infantry firepower. This title, however, demonstrates how cavalry's lethal combination of mobility and dismounted firepower meant it was still very much a force to be reckoned with in battle. It also charts the swing in the qualitative difference of the cavalry forces fielded by the two sides as the war progressed. The enormous initial superiority enjoyed by Confederate cavalry was gradually eroded, through the Union's outstanding improvements in training and tactics, and the bold and enterprising leadership of men such as Philip Sheridan. Featuring full-colour artwork, specially drawn maps, and archive illustrations, this gripping study offers key insights into the tactics, leadership, combat performance, and subsequent reputations of Union and Confederate mounted units fighting in three pivotal cavalry actions of the American Civil War - Second Bull Run/Manassas (1862), Buckland Mills (1863), and Tom's Brook (1864).
Don't Trust, Don't Fear, Don't Beg: The Extraordinary Story of the Arctic Thirty

Don't Trust, Don't Fear, Don't Beg: The Extraordinary Story of the Arctic Thirty

Ben Stewart

$27.99

There is a saying in Russian jails. Never ne boysya ne prosi: don't trust, don't fear, don't beg. Don't trust because life here will always disappoint you. Don't fear because whatever you're scared of, you are powerless to prevent it. And don't beg because nobody ever begged their way out of a Russian prison cell. The plan was to attach a Greenpeace pod to Gazprom's platform and launch a peaceful protest against oil being pumped from the icy waters of the Arctic. However, heavily armed commandos flooded the deck of the Arctic Sunrise and the Arctic Thirty began their ordeal at the hands of Putin's regime. Told in the activists' own words and for the first time, this is a dramatic and inspiring story of incarceration and the ensuing emotional campaign to bring the protestors home.
Once Upon a Time in Russia: The Rise of the Oligarchs and the Greatest Wealth in History

Once Upon a Time in Russia: The Rise of the Oligarchs and the Greatest Wealth in History

Ben Mezrich

$35.00

This is a gripping and shocking insight into the lives of Russia's most famous oligarchs from New York Times bestselling author of The Accidental Billionaires and Bringing Down the House. Once Upon a Time in Russia is the untold true story of the larger-than-life billionaire oligarchs who surfed the waves of privatization to reap riches after the fall of the Soviet regime: Godfather of the Kremlin Boris Berezovsky, a former mathematician whose first entrepreneurial venture was running an automobile reselling business, and Roman Abramovich, his dashing young protege who built a multi-billion-dollar empire of oil and aluminium. Locked in a complex, uniquely Russian partnership, Berezovsky and Abramovich battled their way through the Wild East of Russia with Berezovsky acting as the younger man's krysha- literally, his roof, his protector. Written with the heart-stopping pacing of a thriller -but even more compelling because it is true - this story of amassing obscene wealth and power depicts a rarefied world seldom seen up close. Under Berezovsky's krysha, Abramovich built one of Russia's largest oil companies from the ground up and in exchange made cash deliveries - including 491 million dollars in just one year. But their relationship frayed when Berezovsky attacked President Vladimir Putin in the media - and had to flee to the UK. Abramovich continued to prosper. Dead bodies trailed Berezovsky's footsteps, and threats followed him to London, where an associate of his died painfully and famously of Polonium poisoning. Then Berezovsky himself was later found dead, declared a suicide. Exclusively sourced, capturing a momentous period in recent world history, Once Upon a Time in Russia is at once personal and political, offering an unprecedented look into the wealth, corruption, and power behind what Graydon Carter called 'the story of our age'.
Leon Trotsky

Leon Trotsky

Paul Le Blanc

$26.99

The name 'Leon Trotsky' is a controversial one. For some, he was a betrayer or a totalitarian. For others, he was a revolutionary knight battling an oppressive system. However you view him, Trotsky was a one of the most important figures of twentieth-century Communism. A leader of the 1917 Bolshevik insurrection in Russia, he organized and led the Red Army to victory in the Russian Civil War - but was challenged and eventually defeated by his rival Joseph Stalin. Trotsky lived the rest of his life in exile until Stalin finally had him killed. In Leon Trotsky, Paul Le Blanc delves deep to understand Trotsky's complex character, relationships, actions and ideas. Interweaving dramatic historical events with Trotsky's multi-faceted personality, this book explores his involvement with and opposition to the Soviet bureaucracy, and his efforts to revitalize the revolutionary wing of the labour movement. Revealed here are his urgent warnings of Hitler's rise and the spread of fascism, his penetrating understanding of the French Popular Front and the Spanish Civil War, and his analysis of the ominous beginnings of the Second World War. Throughout, Trotsky remained animated by the early ideals of the Communist tradition. Drawing from a rich array of sources, Le Blanc offers a balanced portrait of Trotsky in a historical context that will be invaluable for students, scholars or anyone with an interest in political history and extraordinary lives.
1946: The Making of the Post-War World

1946: The Making of the Post-War World

Victor Sebestyen

$22.99

With the end of the Second World War, a new world was born. The peace agreements that brought the conflict to an end implemented decisions that not only shaped the second half of the twentieth century, but continue to affect our world today and impact on its future.

In 1946 the Cold War began, the state of Israel was conceived, the independence of India was all but confirmed and Chinese Communists gained a decisive upper hand in their fight for power. It was a pivotal year in modern history in which countries were reborn and created, national and ideological boundaries were redrawn and people across the globe began to rebuild their lives. 

In this remarkable history, the foreign correspondent and historian Victor Sebestyen draws on contemporary documents from around the world - including Stalin's personal notes from the Potsdam peace conference - to examine what lay behind the political decision-making. Sebestyen uses a vast array of archival material and personal testimonies to explore how the lives of generations of people across continents were shaped by the events of 1946. 

Taking readers from Berlin to London, from Paris to Moscow, from Washington to Jerusalem and from Delhi to Shanghai, this is a vivid and wide-ranging account of both powerbrokers and ordinary men and women from an acclaimed author.
The Kamikaze Hunters: Fighting for the Pacific, 1945

The Kamikaze Hunters: Fighting for the Pacific, 1945

Will Iredale

$29.99

In May 1945, with victory in Europe established, the war was all but over. But on the other side of the world, the Allies were still engaged in a bitter struggle to control the Pacific. And it was then that the Japanese unleashed a terrible new form of warfare: the suicide pilots, or Kamikaze. Drawing on meticulous research and unique personal access to the remaining survivors, Will Iredale follows a group of young men from the moment they joined up through their initial training to the terrifying reality of fighting against pilots who, in the cruel last summer of the war, chose death rather than risk their country's dishonourable defeat and deliberately flew their planes into Allied aircraft carriers. A story of courage, valour and dogged determination, The Kamikaze Hunters is a gripping account of how a few brave young men helped to ensure lasting peace.
Kidnap in Crete: The True Story of the Abduction of a Nazi General

Kidnap in Crete: The True Story of the Abduction of a Nazi General

Rick Stroud

$19.99

This is the story of how a small SOE unit led by Patrick Leigh Fermor kidnapped a German general on the Nazi-occupied island of Crete in 1944. For thirty-two days, they were chased across the mountains as they headed for the coast and a rendezvous with a Royal Navy launch waiting to spirit the general to Cairo. Rick Stroud, whose Phantom Army of Alamein won plaudits for its meticulous research and its lightness of touch in the telling, brings these same gifts to bear in this new project. From the adrenalin rush of the kidnapping, to the help provided by the Cretan partisans and people, he explains the overall context of Crete's role in World War II and reveals the devastating consequences of this mission for them all. There have been other accounts, but Kidnap in Crete is the first book to draw on all the sources, notably those in Crete as well as SOE files and the accounts, letters, and private papers of its operatives in London and Edinburgh.
Lords of the Sky: Fighter Pilots and Air Combat, from the Red Baron to the F-16

Lords of the Sky: Fighter Pilots and Air Combat, from the Red Baron to the F-16

Dan Hampton

$19.99

The New York Times bestselling author of Viper Pilot and retired USAF F-16 legend Dan Hampton offers the first comprehensive popular history of combat aviation--a unique, entertaining, and action-packed look at the aces of the air and their machines, from the trailblazing aviators of World War I to today's technologically expert warriors flying supersonic jets.One of the most decorated fighter pilots in history, U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) Dan Hampton goes back 100 years to tell the extraordinary stories of the most famous fighter planes and the brave and daring heroes who made them legend. Told in his acclaimed high-octane style, Lords of the Sky is a fresh and exhilarating look at the development of aviation for history and military buffs alike.
Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century

Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century

Konrad H. Jarausch

$65.95

A sweeping history of twentieth-century Europe, Out of Ashes tells the story of an era of unparalleled violence and barbarity yet also of humanity, prosperity, and promise. 

Konrad Jarausch describes how the European nations emerged from the nineteenth century with high hopes for continued material progress and proud of their imperial command over the globe, only to become embroiled in the bloodshed of World War I, which brought an end to their optimism and gave rise to competing democratic, communist, and fascist ideologies. He shows how the 1920s witnessed renewed hope and a flourishing of modernist art and literature, but how the decade ended in economic collapse and gave rise to a second, more devastating world war and genocide on an unprecedented scale. Jarausch further explores how Western Europe surprisingly recovered due to American help and political integration. Finally, he examines how the Cold War pushed the divided continent to the brink of nuclear annihilation, and how the unforeseen triumph of liberal capitalism came to be threatened by Islamic fundamentalism, global economic crisis, and an uncertain future. 

A stunning achievement, Out of Ashes explores the paradox of the European encounter with modernity in the twentieth century, shedding new light on why it led to cataclysm, inhumanity, and self-destruction, but also social justice, democracy, and peace.
World War Two in Secret: The Hidden Conflict - 1939 to 1945

World War Two in Secret: The Hidden Conflict - 1939 to 1945

Jeremy Harwood ,  Gavin Mortimer

$39.99

World War Two was a conflict of tanks, ships and aircraft, fought across the globe, from the icy waters of the North Atlantic to the steaming jungles of South-east Asia. It was a war that called for that most basic of battlefield requirements - raw courage.

But World War Two was also the war of top-secret technology. A conflict that began with Polish horsemen attacking German tanks ended with the dropping of two Atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. World War Two in Secret is a fascinating exploration of the hidden stories behind the first truly technological war. From Bouncing Bombs to Atomic Bombs, from S.O.E to S.A.S and from radar to Enigma code-breakers, the book will lift the lid on all aspects of World War Two that were crafty, cunning, and covert, explaining the thinking behind their creation and the influence that top-secret weapons and strategies had on the outcomes of the war. Dozens of eye-catching photographs have been drawn from the archives compiled by all the major fighting powers, accompanied by illuminating text. 

Inspiring and informative chapters follow the arc of the Axis attack, the turning of the tide, and the war going global, while placing special focus on crucial World War Two operations-for example, the secret war at sea, the role of the Special Forces in North Africa, the Blitz and the radar race.
Churchill and the Generals

Churchill and the Generals

Mike Lepine

$79.99

A limited edition hardcover book exploring Churchill's relationships with his generals This is the incredible story of the darkest days of World War II when Winston Churchill and his generals--Montgomery, Alexander, Wavell, and Brooke--were facing catastrophe on every front. They suffered defeat at Dunkirk and survived the Battle of Britain. With enormous amounts of courage and skill they fought off the Luftwaffe and managed to hold on until the Allied invasion of Europe. On May 10th, 1940 Churchill became Prime Minister and took control of Britain's War Effort. He appointed key men to command the forces upon which the free world's survival depended. Men like Montgomery, Slim, Auchinleck, Alanbrooke, and Alexander were given the highest command to wage war against a monstrous tyranny never surpassed in the dark lamentable catalogue of human crime. This is the story of his relationships with these remarkable men and the American generals who followed them including Dwight Eisenhower and George Marshall.
Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648

Christendom Destroyed: Europe 1517-1648

Mark Greengrass

$24.99

This addition to the landmark Penguin History of Europe series is a fascinating study of 16th and 17th century Europe and the fundamental changes which led to the collapse of Christendom and established the geographical and political frameworks of Western Europe as we know it.

From peasants to princes, no one was untouched by the spiritual and intellectual upheaval of this era. Martin Luther's challenge to church authority forced Christians to examine their beliefs in ways that shook the foundations of their religion. The subsequent divisions, fed by dynastic rivalries and military changes, fundamentally altered the relations between ruler and ruled. Geographical and scientific discoveries challenged the unity of Christendom as a belief-community. Europe, with all its divisions, emerged instead as a geographical projection. It was reflected in the mirror of America, and refracted by the eclipse of Crusade in ambiguous relationships with the Ottomans and Orthodox Christianity. 

Chronicling these dramatic changes, Thomas More, Shakespeare, Montaigne and Cervantes created works which continue to resonate with us. Christendom Destroyed is a rich tapestry that fosters a deeper understanding of Europe's identity today.
The Spy's Son: the True Story of the Highest-Ranking CIA Officer Ever Convicted of Espionage and the Son He Trained to Spy for Russia

The Spy's Son: the True Story of the Highest-Ranking CIA Officer Ever Convicted of Espionage and the Son He Trained to Spy for Russia

Denson Bryan

$32.99

The riveting, true story of the father-and-son co-conspirators who sold U.S. national secrets to Russia. Jim Nicholson was the highest-ranking CIA officer ever convicted of espionage. A single father, respected mentor, and brilliant case officer, he was also a double agent selling thousands of state secrets to the Russians. However, it was from behind the bars of a federal prison that he conducted his greatest betrayal. Just 12 years after Jim's conviction, his youngest son, Nathan, was arrested for the same crime. Through interviews, private letters, and access to Jim's personal journal, Pulitzer Prize-finalist Bryan Denson pieces together a fascinating family portrait of a father so caught up in his life as a double agent that he manipulated his own son - an army veteran - to betray his country in order to stay loyal to his family.
Longest Kill: The Story of Maverick 41, One of the Worlds Greatest Snipers

Longest Kill: The Story of Maverick 41, One of the Worlds Greatest Snipers

Craig Harrison

$29.99

It takes a tough mindset to be a successful sniper, to be able to dig in for days on your own as you wait for your target, to stay calm on a battlefield when you yourself have become the target the enemy most want to take out. Craig Harrison has what it takes and in November 2009 in Afghanistan, under intense pressure, he saved the lives of his comrades with the longest confirmed sniper kill - 2,475 metres, the length of 25 football pitches. In this action-packed, vivid memoir Craig takes us from a touch childhood to joining the army at 16, from serving in Bosnia through two tours of Iraq and Afghanistan. He describes the numerous campaigns he's taken part in and his special ops missions. He also reveals how injury forced him to leave the army and how, after his identity was revealed, Al Qaeda threatened him and his family. For Craig, the price of heroism has been devastatingly high.
The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

Thomas Goetz

$27.99

In 1882, through a series of experiments, scientist Robert Koch discovered the germ that caused TB. Eager for greater glory, he abandoned his principles and prematurely announced a cure, a remedy. As Europe's consumptives descended upon Berlin, so too did Arthur Conan Doyle, a small town doctor and sometime writer. Investigating Koch's remedy, he was aghast to discover its true nature. The Remedy explores this pivotal moment for both men. Conan Doyle was influenced by Koch's discoveries to create a scientific detective, Sherlock Holmes, and Koch defended his remedy.
Special Forces in Action

Special Forces in Action

Alexander Stilwell

$29.99

In 1991 Coalition forces liberated Kuwait after its brief occupation by Saddam Husseins Iraq. In 2011, US Navy SEALs flew covertly into Pakistan and assassinated Osama bin Laden at his hideaway. In 2014, special forces fought ISIS in Syria in an effort to rescue journalist James Foley and other hostages. In 25 years, elite military formations have played an increasingly important role in the policing of the modern world. Special Forces in Action is a detailed account of the operations of the worlds special forces over the past 25 years. From the First Gulf War to the covert operations of special forces in Somalia, Sierra Leon, Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria today, this book brings the reader full details of the often clandestine activities of the worlds most elite soldiers. The invasion of Iraq, the search for war criminals in the Balkans, drug baron hunting in South America, hostage rescues in Africa, and the counterterrorist initiatives since 9/11 the special forces role is always expanding. With an authoritative text and rare photographs, the book is a highly illustrated guide to the recent operations of these most secretive and successful soldiers.
Warlords, Inc.: Black Markets, Broken States, and the Rise of the Warlord Entrepreneur

Warlords, Inc.: Black Markets, Broken States, and the Rise of the Warlord Entrepreneur

Andrew Trabulsi ,  Noah Raford ,  Robert Bunker

$22.99

From the rise of Mexican drug cartels, to technology driven revolts and violence in the Middle East and North Africa, to military conflicts in Eastern Europe, to the growth of slumlords and street gangs in India, and the proliferation of cyber-attacks and drone warfare, new types of political actors, and warfare, are coming to the fore. Crisis inevitably creates new opportunities for these actors to influence the future of the global political-economy. Tracing the history and evolution of such forces, Warlords, Inc. examines how the underworld of the global economy thrives, how it disrupts and maintains power, and why - looking towards the future - we should all be paying attention. Based on path-breaking research and analysis from leading political scientists, advisors to heads of state, and award-winning academics, this cutting-edge book pulls back the curtain on the secretive world of drug cartels and transnational criminal organizations, revealing their inner workings and implications for a world driven by unrelenting change and growing political uncertainty. It shows how, as the complexities and tensions of modern geopolitical pressures mount, the world's elaborate but fragile political systems are becoming increasingly vulnerable to break down and deliberate disruption. The authors demonstrate that as infrastructures such as IT networks, global supply chains, and financial markets become increasingly volatile, the stability of entire populations hangs in the balance. Bringing together a wealth of information and perspectives, they answer essential questions about who wins and who loses when the old order ceases to work.
A Dictionary of World History

A Dictionary of World History

Anne Kerr ,  Edmund Wright

$26.95

This wide-ranging dictionary contains a wealth of information on all aspects of history, from prehistory right up to the present day. Over 4,000 clear, concise entries include biographies of key figures in world history (living and dead), separate entries for every country in the world (summarising key historical events), and in-depth entries on religious and political movements, international organizations, and major conflicts and events and their after-effects. For this new edition, existing entries have been revised and updated to reflect the very latest global events including changes in leadership, wars, political situations, and the statistical information given for each country (population counts, currency, languages, religions). New entries have been included for key figures who have recently come to prominence and world events. The book also contains twenty-five detailed maps linked to key historical events and topics. These include the African slave trade, the Black Death, and the Normandy campaign. Also included are over 200 country maps. The dictionary is enhanced by entry-level web links which are accessed via a dedicated companion website. Encyclopedic in scope, this ambitious A to Z provides an excellent overview of world history both for students and anyone with an interest in the subject.
Das Reich: The March of the 2nd SS Panzer Division Through France (Audio Book)

Das Reich: The March of the 2nd SS Panzer Division Through France (Audio Book)

Max Hastings ,  Nigel Carrington

$39.95

Within days of the D-Day landings, the 'Das Reich' 2nd SS Panzer Division marched north through France to reinforce the front-line defenders of Hitler's Fortress Europe. Veterans of the bloodiest fighting of the Russian Front, 15,000 men with their tanks and artillery, they were hounded for every mile of their march by saboteurs of the Resistance and agents of the Allied Special Forces. Along their route they took reprisals so savage they will live forever in the chronicles of the most appalling atrocities of war.
The Korean War (Audio Book)

The Korean War (Audio Book)

Max Hastings ,  Cameron Stewart

$49.95

Critically acclaimed on publication, The Korean War remains the best narrative history of this conflict. On 25 June 1950 the invasion of South Korea by the Communist North launched one of the bloodiest conflicts of the last century. The seemingly limitless power of the Chinese-backed North was thrown against the ferocious firepower of the UN-backed South in a war that can be seen today as the stark prelude to Vietnam. Max Hastings has drawn on first-hand accounts of those who fought on both sides to produce this vivid and incisive reassessment of the Korean War, bringing the military and human dimensions into sharp focus.
Nemesis: The Battle for Japan 1944-45

Nemesis: The Battle for Japan 1944-45

Max Hastings ,  Cameron Stewart

$49.95

With an introduction read by Max Hastings. A companion volume to his best-selling 'Armageddon', Max Hastings' account of the battle for Japan is a masterful military history. Featuring the most remarkable cast of commanders the world has ever seen, the dramatic battle for Japan of 1944-45 was acted out across the vast stage of Asia: Imphal and Kohima, Leyte Gulf and Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Soviet assault on Manchuria.
Empires in Flames: The Pacific and the Far East

Empires in Flames: The Pacific and the Far East

Warlord Games ,  Professor of History Peter Dennis

$49.99

Far from the battlefields of Europe and North Africa, Allied forces fought a very different war against another foe. From the jungles of Burma to the islands of the Pacific and the shores of Australia, this new theater supplement for Bolt Action allows players to command the spearhead of the lightning Japanese conquests in the East or to fight tooth and nail as Chindits, US Marines and other Allied troops to halt the advance and drive them back. Scenarios, special rules and new units give players everything they need to recreate the ferocious battles and campaigns of the Far East, from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, from Singapore to the Phillipines, Iwo Jima and beyond.
           
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