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The Amazons: The Real Warrior Women of the Ancient World

The Amazons: The Real Warrior Women of the Ancient World

John Man

$34.99
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A groundbreaking history of the real warrior women of Central Asia.

Since the time of the ancient Greeks we have been fascinated by accounts of the Amazons, an elusive tribe of ruthless, hard-fighting, horse-riding female warriors. Equal to men in battle, legend has it they would cut off their breasts to improve their archery skills and routinely killed their boy children to purify their ranks.

For centuries these powerful, sexually liberated female soldiers were believed to be the fantastical invention of Greek myth and storytelling; a chimera, frequently the subject of choice for artists and poets, reflecting back the worst fears of a civilized patriarchy: the independent barbarian woman. Until now.

Following decades of new research and a series of groundbreaking archeological discoveries, we now know these powerful warrior queens did indeed exist. Examining the evidence, John Man travels to the grasslands of Central Asia, from the edge of the ancient Greek world to the borderlands of China, to discover the truth about the warrior women mythologized as Amazons.

In this deeply researched, sweeping historical epic, Man redefines our understanding of the Amazons and their culture, and examines the significance of their legend today.
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A Short History of the Minoans

A Short History of the Minoans

John Bennet

$27.99
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The Minoans have for decades tantalized all those who have tried to understand this most enigmatic people of the ancient world. The Minoan allure lies in large part in the riddles to which their mysterious culture gives rise.

What is contained in their earliest writing script, the still un-deciphered Linear A? Did their likely extinction by volcanic eruption shape the Atlantis legend? Why was their religion so thoroughly matriarchal, with its symbols of snake goddess, serpent and labrys (double-headed axe)? What was the purpose of their great palaces at Knossos, Phaestos and Malia? What is the meaning of the atmospheric bull dance fresco uncovered at the palace of Knossos? The archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans controversially 'rediscovered' and then restored the Minoan civilization in the early twentieth century, and tied it to King Minos, builder of the famous labyrinth and keeper of the legendary Minotaur.

In this lucid and absorbing new history of Crete from the 9th millennium BCE to the end of the Bronze Age (c 1000 BCE), John Bennet expertly draws on the latest archaeological and textual discoveries to separate fact from imagination, history from myth.
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The Holy Roman Empire: A Thousand Years of Europe's History

The Holy Roman Empire: A Thousand Years of Europe's History

Peter H. Wilson

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A great, sprawling, ancient and unique entity, the Holy Roman Empire, from its founding by Charlemagne to its destruction by Napoleon a millennium later, formed the heart of Europe.

A great, sprawling, ancient and unique entity, the Holy Roman Empire, from its founding by Charlemagne to its destruction by Napoleon a millennium later, formed the heart of Europe. It was a great engine for inventions and ideas, it was the origin of many modern European states, from Germany to the Czech Republic, its relations with Italy, France and Poland dictated the course of countless wars - indeed, European history as a whole makes no sense without it.

In this strikingly ambitious book, Peter H. Wilson explains how the Empire worked. It is not a chronological history, but an attempt to convey to readers the Empire's unique nature, why it was so important and how it changed over its existence. The result is a tour de force - a book that raises countless questions about the nature of political and military power, about diplomacy and the nature of European civilization and about the legacy of the Empire, which has continued to haunt its offspring, from Imperial and Nazi Germany to the European Union.
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Tacitus

Tacitus

Victoria Emma Pagan

$32.99
The greatest of Roman historians, Publius Cornelius Tacitus (56-117 CE) studied rhetoric in Rome. His rhetorical and oratorical gifts are evident throughout his most substantial works, the incomplete but still remarkable Annals and Histories.

In concise and concentrated prose, marked by sometimes bitter and ironic reflections on the human capacity to misuse power, Tacitus charts the violent trajectory of the Roman Empire from Augustus' death in 14 CE to the end of Domitian's rule in 96. Victoria Emma Pagan looks at Tacitus from a range of perspectives: as a literary stylist, perhaps influenced by Sallust; his notion of time; his modes of discourse; his place in the historiography of the era; and the later reception of Tacitus in the Renaissance and early modern periods. Tacitus remains of major interest to students of the Bible, as well as classicists, by virtue of his reference to 'Christus' and Nero's persecution of the Christians after the great fire of Rome in 64 CE.

This lively survey enables its readers fully to appreciate why, in holding a mirror up to venality and greed, the work of Tacitus remains eternal.
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Code Breakers: Inside the Shadow World of Signals Intelligence in Australia's Two Bletchley Parks

Code Breakers: Inside the Shadow World of Signals Intelligence in Australia's Two Bletchley Parks

Craig Collie

$32.99
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At the height of World War II in the Pacific, two secret organisations existed in Australia to break Japan's military codes. They were peopled by brilliant and idiosyncratic cryptographers, including some with achievements in mathematics and the Classics and others who had lived or grown up in Japan. These men patiently and carefully unravelled the codes in Japanese signals, ultimately playing a crucial role in the battles of Midway and the Coral Sea, as well as Macarthur's push into the Philippines. An intercept station in the Queensland bush brought about the end of Admiral Yamamoto.

But this is more than a story of codes. It is an extraordinary exploration of a unique group of men and their intense personal rivalries and loathing, of white-anting and taking credit for others' achievements. It is also the story of a fierce inter-national and inter-service political battle for control of war-changing intelligence between a group of cryptographers based at the Monterey apartment block in Melbourne's Albert Park and General MacArthur's counter group that eventually established its headquarters in suburban Brisbane. What happened between these two groups would have consequences for intelligence services in the years to follow.

Code Breakers brings this surprising and very secret world and the men who operated in it to rich life for the first time.
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The Honest History Book

The Honest History Book

David Stephens ,  Alison Broinowski

$34.99
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In Australia’s rush to commemorate all things Anzac, have we lost our ability to look beyond war as the central pillar of Australia’s history and identity?

The passionate historians of the Honest History group argue that while war has been important to Australia – mostly for its impact on our citizens and our ideas of nationhood – we must question the stories we tell ourselves about our history. We must separate myth from reality – and to do that we need to reassess the historical evidence surrounding military myths.

In this lively collection, renowned writers including Paul Daley, Mark McKenna, Peter Stanley, Carolyn Holbrook, Mark Dapin, Carmen Lawrence, Stuart Macintyre, Frank Bongiorno and Larissa Behrendt explore not only the militarisation of our history but the alternative narratives swamped under the khaki-wash – Indigenous history, frontier conflict, multiculturalism, the myth of egalitarianism, economics and the environment.
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Jewish Anzacs: Jews in the Australian Military

Jewish Anzacs: Jews in the Australian Military

Mark Dapin

$39.99
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A landmark history of Australian Jews in the military, from the First Fleet to the recent war in Afghanistan.

Over 7000 Jews have fought in Australia’s military conflicts, including more than 330 who gave their lives. While Sir John Monash is the best known, in Jewish Anzacs acclaimed writer and historian Mark Dapin reveals the personal, often extraordinary, stories of many other Jewish servicemen and women: from air aces to POWs, from nurses to generals, from generation to generation.

Weaving together official records and interviews, private letters, diaries and papers, Dapin explores the diverse lives of his subjects and reflects on their valour, patriotism, mateship, faith and sacrifice.
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The Shadow Men: The Leaders Who Shaped the Australian Army from the Veldt to Vietnam

The Shadow Men: The Leaders Who Shaped the Australian Army from the Veldt to Vietnam

Craig Stockings ,  John Connor

$34.99
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Australian military history is full of heroes – big names that loom large in the public memory of the nation’s wartime experiences, like Monash, Chauvel, Jacka and Blamey.

There is no question that these famous figures of the Australian Army are important, but their story is not the only story. There are also the individuals who shaped the history of the Australian Army in the 20th century, as intellectuals, strategists and administrators, but are largely invisible in popular memory. The Shadow Men brings together some of Australia’s best military historians to shed light on ten of these men and to bring their achievements and influence into the foreground.
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Badge, Boot, Button: The Story of Australian Uniforms

Badge, Boot, Button: The Story of Australian Uniforms

Craig Wilcox

$44.99
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Uniforms conceal, and uniforms reveal ...They envelop us in costumes akin to flags, in the bold designs and memorable colours of official, corporate and communal hierarchies ...And like any language, they reveal origins, status, aspirations and insecurities. So writes Craig Wilcox in the introduction of his latest book, Badge, Boot, Button: The Story of Australian Uniforms, a fascinating look at all kinds of uniform worn in Australia since 1788. Uniforms clothe the bodies of millions of Australians every day in something more than ordinary costume, and have done so since British settlement. Whatever the uniform- colourful, traditional or intimidating-each is a corporate signature, a sartorial soundbite, advertising a school or airline, regiment or hospital, and its wearer's place within the hierarchy. Badge, Boot, Button looks at all aspects of uniforms-what they look like, the materials they are made from, how they have changed and what they reveal about Australians and our history.
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Smile, Particularly in Bad Weather: The Era of the Australian Airline Hostess

Smile, Particularly in Bad Weather: The Era of the Australian Airline Hostess

Prudence Black

$29.99
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Air hostesses took to the skies in the 1930s, proud and excited to have the most glamorous job in the world, barely looking over their shoulders as they boarded aircraft. Air travel had created a new type of modern workplace-this was a job like no other-filled with adventure, shiny new technology and work that was thrilling, demanding and exhausting. Young women flocked in droves to be measured, weighed and squeezed into snappy uniforms. Smile, Particularly in Bad Weather tells a story about the development of this pioneering profession. It describes the shift from the 1930s, when the girl-next-door took to the air with a great degree of bravado, through to the 1960s and the 'coffee, tea or me?' stereotype where airlines sexualised the air hostess as a point of marketing difference, then on to a crucial period where the air hostess fought back, no longer wanting to be stereotyped nor discriminated against in terms of fair working conditions. This job shaped working women to become something more, it tested their independence, it encouraged self-enhancement and sophistication and it took them to places they hadn't dreamt about.
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Bully Beef & Balderdash, Volume II: More Myths of the AIF Examined and Debunked

Bully Beef & Balderdash, Volume II: More Myths of the AIF Examined and Debunked

Graham Wilson

$34.99
The late Graham Wilson delighted in his self-appointed role as the AIF's myth buster. In this, his second and final  volume of Bully Beef and Balderdash, he tackles another eight popularly accepted myths, exposing the 'Water Wizard' of Gallipoli who saved an army, dismissing the old adage that the 'lions of the AIF' were led by British  'donkeys', debunking the Gallipoli legends of the lost sword of Eureka and 'Abdul the Terrible', the Sultan's  champion marksman sent to dispose of AIF sniper Billy Sing, and unravelling a series of other long-standing  fictions.

Finally, he turns his formidable forensic mind to the 'lost' seven minutes at The Nek, the early cessation  of the artillery barrage which led to the slaughter of the Light Horsemen immortalised in Peter Weir's Gallipoli.  Wilson's crusade to debunk such celebrated fictions was born of the conviction that these myths do very real  damage to the history of the AIF. To demythologise this nation's Great War military history, he argues, is to  encourage Australians to view the AIF's record on its own merits. Such are these merits that they do not require  any form of embellishment to shine for all time. 

This book is a tribute to Graham Wilson's extraordinary passion  for truth and fact and his drive to set the historical record straight.
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The New Koreans: The Business, History and People of South Korea

The New Koreans: The Business, History and People of South Korea

Michael Breen

$35.00
The New Koreans...magnificent in its sweep and depth . (Bradley K. Martin, author of Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader). In the course of a couple of generations, South Koreans took themselves out of the paddy fields and into Silicon Valley, establishing themselves as a democracy alongside the advanced countries of the world. Yet for all their ambition and achievement, the new Koreans are a curiously self-deprecating people. Theirs is a land with a rich and complex past, certain aspects of which they would prefer to forget as they focus on the future. Having lived and worked in South Korea for many years, Michael Breen considers what drives the nation today, and where it is heading. Through insightful anecdotes and observations, he provides a compelling portrait of Asia's most contradictory and polarized country. South Koreans are motivated by defiance, Breen argues: defiance of their antagonistic neighbour, North Korea, of their own history and of international opinion. Here is an overlooked nation with, great drive, determined to succeed on its own terms.
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Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years

Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years

John Guy

$24.99
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In this ground-breaking biography, John Guy introduces us to a refreshingly unfamiliar Elizabeth: at once powerful and vulnerable, wilful and afraid. She confronts the challenges of a conspiracy to place Mary Queen of Scots on her throne, a ruinous war against the Catholic powers of France and Spain, and riots in London.

The authoritative new portrait, focusing on the unknown later years and based – incredibly – on new documents.

History has pictured Elizabeth I as Gloriana, an icon of strength. But it was only when she reached fifty and her advisers no longer sought to force her into marriage that she began to wield power in her own right. For twenty-five years – the period that writers have chiefly focused on until now – she had struggled to assert her authority. Now, she was determined not only to reign but to rule.

In this ground-breaking biography, John Guy introduces us to a refreshingly unfamiliar Elizabeth: at once powerful and vulnerable, wilful and afraid. She confronts the challenges of a conspiracy to place Mary Queen of Scots on her throne, a ruinous war against the Catholic powers of France and Spain, and riots in London. She reluctantly allows Sir Walter Ralegh to set up a colony in Virginia, is unpopular even with those who fight for her and wonders which of her military and naval commanders she can trust.

After years mining long-overlooked archives, and making fresh use of Elizabeth’s many letters, some newly discovered, John Guy sweeps away myths and reveals her innermost thoughts. At last we hear her in her own voice – and see the woman behind the polished veneer, racked by insecurity, often too anxious to sleep alone. Guy’s gripping narrative captures with dramatic immediacy the challenge of being both a woman and a queen.

This is the real Elizabeth, for the first time.
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This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

This Orient Isle: Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Jerry Brotton

$24.99
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In 1570, after plots and assassination attempts against her, Elizabeth I was excommunicated by the Pope. It was the beginning of cultural, economic and political exchanges with the Islamic world of a depth not again experienced until the modern age. England signed treaties with the Ottoman Porte, received ambassadors from Morocco and shipped munitions to Marrakech in the hope of establishing an accord which would keep the common enemy of Catholic Spain at bay. This awareness of the Islamic world found its way into many of the great English cultural productions of the day - especially, of course, Shakespeare's Othello and The Merchant of Venice. This Orient Isle shows that England's relations with the Muslim world were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we have ever appreciated, and that their influence was felt across the political, commercial and domestic landscape of Elizabethan England.
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A Land Without Borders: My Journey Around East Jerusalem and the West Bank

A Land Without Borders: My Journey Around East Jerusalem and the West Bank

Nir Baram ,  Jessica Cohen

$32.99
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Accessible, insightful and beautifully written, A Land Without Borders provides an extraordinary window into the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the region’s current political and cultural climate

Award-winning journalist and author Nir Baram spent a year and a half travelling around the West Bank and East Jerusalem. In this fascinating recount of that journey, Baram navigates the conflict-ridden regions and hostile terrain to speak with a wide range of people, among them Palestinian-Israeli citizens trapped behind the separation wall in Jerusalem and Jewish settlers determined to forge new lives on the West Bank.

Baram also talks to children on Kibbutz Nirim who lived through the war in Gaza, and ex-prisoners from Fatah who, after spending years detained in Israeli jails, are now promoting a peace initiative. And he returns again and again to Jerusalem, city of his birth, where a hushed civil war is in full swing.

A Land Without Borders is a clear-eyed, compassionate and essential guide to understanding a complex reality; a perceptive and sensitive exploration of a labyrinthine conflict and the experiences of the people ensnared in it, by one of the most distinctive writers working in Israel today.
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The Age of Genius: The Seventeenth Century and the Birth of the Modern Mind

The Age of Genius: The Seventeenth Century and the Birth of the Modern Mind

A C Grayling

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Bestselling author A. C. Grayling explains how - fuelled by original and unorthodox thinking, war, and technological invention - the seventeenth century became the crucible of modernity.

What happened to the European mind between 1605, when an audience watching Macbeth at the Globe might believe that regicide was such an aberration of the natural order that ghosts could burst from the ground, and 1649, when a large crowd, perhaps including some who had seen Macbeth forty-four years earlier, could stand and watch the execution of a king?

Or consider the difference between a magus casting a star chart and the day in 1639, when Jonathan Horrock and William Crabtree watched the transit of Venus across the face of the sun from their attic, successfully testing its course against Kepler's Tables of Planetary Motion, in a classic case of confirming a scientific theory by empirical testing.

In this turbulent period, science moved from the alchemy and astrology of John Dee to the painstaking observation and astronomy of Galileo; from the classicism of Aristotle, still favoured by the Church, to the evidence-based, collegiate investigation of Francis Bacon.

Yet the old ways still lingered and affected the new mind set. Descartes's dualism was an attempt to square the new philosophy with religious belief. And Newton - the man who understood gravity and the laws of motion - was to the very end of his life, still fascinated by alchemy.

By the end of that tumultuous century 'the greatest ever change in the mental outlook of humanity' had irrevocably taken place.

The Age of Genius: The Seventeenth Century and the Birth of the Modern Mind by A C Grayling at 131 York Street Sydney
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The Destruction of Hillary Clinton

The Destruction of Hillary Clinton

Susan Bordo

$29.99
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The result of the 2016 presidential election was widely thought to be a foregone conclusion - a historic victory for an extraordinarily well-qualified, experienced and admired candidate against an opponent seen as not just unelectable but unfit for office. As we know, it didn't work out like that. So how did Hillary Clinton lose? How did she come to be seen as a tool of the establishment, a chronic liar and a talentless politician? In this masterful narrative of the 2016 campaign year, Susan Bordo unpacks the right-wing assault on Clinton and her reputation, the way she provoked the suspicion and indifference of a younger generation, and the unprecedented influence of the media. Urgent, insightful, and engrossing, The Destruction of Hillary Clinton is an essential guide to understanding the most controversial presidential election in American history.
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How the Hell Did This Happen?: The US Election of 2016

How the Hell Did This Happen?: The US Election of 2016

P. J. O'Rourke

$29.99
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No comedian could have written the joke this election cycle has been. The punch line is too ridiculous (whoever the punch line is going to be). Celebrated political satirist, journalist, and diehard Republican P.J. O'Rourke brings his critical eye and inimitable voice to some serious risky business. How The Hell Did This Happen? covers the whole election process from the pig pile of presidential candidates circa June 2015, the dreadful key primaries and candidate debates through his come-to-Satan moment with Hillary - 'She's the second worst thing that could happen to our nation. I endorse her.' - to the Beginning of End Times in November. How The Hell Did This Happen? answers the key question of the 2016 presidential election: Should we laugh or should we cry or should we hurl? (They are not mutually exclusive.)
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The Romanovs: 1613-1918

The Romanovs: 1613-1918

Simon Sebag Montefiore

$24.99
The internationally bestselling epic history of Russia's imperial dynasty

The Romanovs were the most successful dynasty of modern times, ruling a sixth of the world's surface. How did one family turn a war-ruined principality into the world's greatest empire? And how did they lose it all?

This is the intimate story of twenty tsars and tsarinas, some touched by genius, some by madness, but all inspired by holy autocracy and imperial ambition. Montefiore's gripping chronicle reveals their secret world of unlimited power and ruthless empire-building, overshadowed by palace conspiracy, family rivalries, sexual decadence and wild extravagance, and peopled by a cast of adventurers, courtesans, revolutionaries and poets.

Written with dazzling literary flair, drawing on new archival research, The Romanovs is at once an enthralling chronicle of triumph and tragedy, love and death, a universal study of power, and an essential portrait of the empire that still defines Russia today.
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A Child of Christian Blood: Murder and Conspiracy in Tsarist Russia: the Beilis Blood Libel

A Child of Christian Blood: Murder and Conspiracy in Tsarist Russia: the Beilis Blood Libel

Levin Edmund

$54.95  $15.00
A Jewish factory worker is falsely accused of ritually murdering a Christian boy in Russia in 1911, and his trial becomes an international cause célèbre.
 
On March 20, 1911, thirteen-year-old Andrei Yushchinsky was found stabbed to death in a cave on the outskirts of Kiev. Four months later, Russian police arrested Mendel Beilis, a thirty-seven-year-old father of five who worked as a clerk in a brick factory nearby, and charged him not only with Andrei’s murder but also with the Jewish ritual murder of a Christian child. Despite the fact that there was no evidence linking him to the crime, that he had a solid alibi, and that his main accuser was a professional criminal who was herself under suspicion for the murder, Beilis was imprisoned for more than two years before being brought to trial. As a handful of Russian officials and journalists diligently searched for the real killer, the rabid anti-Semites known as the Black Hundreds whipped into a frenzy men and women throughout the Russian Empire who firmly believed that this was only the latest example of centuries of Jewish ritual murder of Christian children - the age-old blood libel.
 
With the full backing of Tsar Nicholas II’s teetering government, the prosecution called an array of “expert witnesses” - pathologists, a theologian, a psychological profiler - whose laughably incompetent testimony horrified liberal Russians and brought to Beilis’s side an array of international supporters who included Thomas Mann, H. G. Wells, Anatole France, Arthur Conan Doyle, the archbishop of Canterbury, and Jane Addams. The jury’s split verdict allowed both sides to claim victory: they agreed with the prosecution’s description of the wounds on the boy’s body - a description that was worded to imply a ritual murder - but they determined that Beilis was not the murderer.

After the fall of the Romanovs in 1917, a renewed effort to find Andrei’s killer was not successful; in recent years his grave has become a pilgrimage site for those convinced that the boy was murdered by a Jew so that his blood could be used in making Passover matzo. Visitors today will find it covered with flowers.
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Isabella of Castile: Europe's First Great Queen

Isabella of Castile: Europe's First Great Queen

Giles Tremlett

$55.00
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One of Europe's great queens, Isabella of Castile is also one of the least well known, but undeservedly so. For no other European queen in history can fully rival her power or achievements as a female ruler who overcame huge obstacles. Formidable, tenacious and ambitious, as a teenager she saw off rivals to the crown from within her own family before going on to rule Castile in her own right.

Isabella was only twenty-three years old in 1474 when she ascended the throne of Castile, the largest and strongest kingdom in Hispania. At a time when successful queens were few and far between, Isabella faced not only the considerable challenge of being a young, female ruler in an overwhelmingly male-dominated world, but also of reforming a major European kingdom riddled with crime, debt, corruption and religious factionism. Her marriage to Ferdinand of Aragon united two kingdoms, a royal partnership in which Isabella more than held her own. Their pivotal reign was long and transformative, leaving behind a legacy that would resonate across the centuries that followed.

By the time of her death in 1504, Isabella had laid the foundations not just of modern Spain, but of one of Europe's greatest empires. In this major new biography, Giles Tremlett chronicles the life of Isabella of Castile as she led her country out of the middle ages and harnessed the newest ideas and tools of the early Renaissance to turn her ill-disciplined nation into a truly modern state with a powerful and ambitious monarch at its centre. With authority and insight, he relates the story of one of the most legendary and controversial of great European queens.
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Castle of the Eagles: Escape from Mussolini's Colditz

Castle of the Eagles: Escape from Mussolini's Colditz

Mark Felton

$29.99
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High in the Tuscan hills above Florence, the menacing Vincigliata Castle - a very special prisoner-of-war camp converted on Mussolini's personal orders - held thirteen of the most senior British and Commonwealth officers captured during the campaign in North Africa.

Against insuperable odds, these extraordinary middle-aged POWs drove a complex tunnel beneath the castle, and by March 1943 it was ready...

Six men would attempt the impossible: an air marshal, three brigadiers, two lieutenant-generals. Three were knights of the realm and two held the Victoria Cross. One was missing a hand and eye, another suffered a gammy hip. The youngest was 48, the oldest 63. During that rainswept night, three teams burst out of the earth and slipped away, intent on reaching neutral Switzerland.

Acclaimed historian Mark Felton, author of Zero Night and The Sea Devils, tells the amazing true story of their adventures on the run. But did any of them make it to freedom?
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On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century

On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century

Timothy Snyder

$19.99
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THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER. History does not repeat, but it does instruct. In the twentieth century, European democracies collapsed into fascism, Nazism and communism. These were movements in which a leader or a party claimed to give voice to the people, promised to protect them from global existential threats, and rejected reason in favour of myth. European history shows us that societies can break, democracies can fall, ethics can collapse, and ordinary people can find themselves in unimaginable circumstances. History can familiarise, and it can warn. Today, we are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to totalitarianism in the twentieth century. But when the political order seems imperilled, our advantage is that we can learn from their experience to resist the advance of tyranny. Now is a good time to do so.
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Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, from the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First

Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, from the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First

Frank Trentmann

$29.99
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What we consume has become the defining feature of our lives: our economies live or die by spending, we are treated more as consumers than workers, and even public services are presented to us as products in a supermarket. In this monumental study, acclaimed historian Frank Trentmann unfolds the extraordinary history that has shaped our material world, from late Ming China, Renaissance Italy and the British empire to the present. Astonishingly wide-ranging and richly detailed, Empire of Things explores how we have come to live with so much more, how this changed the course of history, and the global challenges we face as a result.
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The Two Eyes of the Earth: Art and Ritual of Kingship Between Rome and Sasanian Iran

The Two Eyes of the Earth: Art and Ritual of Kingship Between Rome and Sasanian Iran

Matthew P. Canepa

$63.00
This pioneering study examines a pivotal period in the history of Europe and the Near East. Spanning the ancient and medieval worlds, it investigates the shared ideal of sacred kingship that emerged in the late Roman and Persian empires. This shared ideal, while often generating conflict during the four centuries of the empires' coexistence (224-642), also drove exchange, especially the means and methods Roman and Persian sovereigns used to project their notions of universal rule: elaborate systems of ritual and their cultures' visual, architectural, and urban environments. 

Matthew Canepa explores the artistic, ritual, and ideological interactions between Rome and the Iranian world under the Sasanian dynasty, the last great Persian dynasty before Islam. He analyzes how these two hostile systems of sacred universal sovereignty not only coexisted, but fostered cross-cultural exchange and communication despite their undying rivalry. Bridging the traditional divide between classical and Iranian history, this book brings to life the dazzling courts of two global powers that deeply affected the cultures of medieval Europe, Byzantium, Islam, South Asia, and China.
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Travels with an Archaeologist: Finding a Sense of Place

Travels with an Archaeologist: Finding a Sense of Place

Richard Hodges

$39.99
'You must be very patient', most everyone asserts admiringly on encountering an archaeologist. Patience in the pursuit of history instantly earns consideration. Patience to sift through the soil to discover treasure, from gold to unidentifiable knick-knacks - an educated beachcomber. But, patience does not come into it so much as the chemistry of experiences from being in the company of others as the five senses are provoked and satisfied by the buried unexpected. Archaeology is about hearing, seeing, smelling, tasting and touching past textures in our time. With these senses, in the company of friends, new places are created from old ones. Travel with archaeologist and writer Richard Hodges as he explores sites across the globe and ponders the relationship of the individual with the past and the present of the past in its ruins, monuments and traces of distant worlds and civilisations.
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Byzantium

Byzantium

Giles Morgan

$17.99
Now recognised as having had a considerable influence on the Renaissance and a significant impact in the shaping of Europe, the Byzantine Empire is increasingly acknowledged by modern historians as having a pivotal role in the development of both Islam and Christianity - and the relationship between the two. The Byzantine Empire was often at the centre of profound geopolitical, cultural and religious forces that threatened to pull it apart. It lasted for over 1000 years, created remarkable art and a still reverberating cultural legacy.
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The Curse of the Pharaohs' Tombs: Tales of the Unexpected Since the Days of Tutankhamun

The Curse of the Pharaohs' Tombs: Tales of the Unexpected Since the Days of Tutankhamun

Paul Harrison

$52.99
The Curse of the Pharaoh's Tombs is the definitive book on Ancient Egyptian tomb curses, providing new information and data never before published whilst exploring the many incidents and deaths associated with tomb curses. The book puts the record straight on matters which have been wrongly recorded by others, such as the legend of Tutankhamun, as well as presenting new data never before published associated with matters such as the torment Howard Carter suffered before his death. It also contains exclusive information and interviews with the family members and archaeologists associated with the curses, including experts at the British Museum and Cairo Museum. Paul Harrison also covers the history of Egyptian tomb curses, why they were placed at the entrance to some tombs and not others, as well as the frightening reality of mummification after death in Ancient Egypt. Closer to home, the hundreds of deaths and haunted tube station (Museum) which are associated with the curse of Amen-Ra (housed in the British Museum) is covered along with the mysterious deaths and tragedy associated with Cleopatra's needle on the Embankment of the River Thames.
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The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge

The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta: The Persian Challenge

Paul Anthony Rahe

$39.99
A fresh appreciation of the pivotal role of Spartan strategy and tactics in the defeat of the mightiest empire of the ancient world More than 2500 years ago a confederation of small Greek city-states defeated the invading armies of Persia, the most powerful empire in the world. In this meticulously researched study, historian Paul Rahe argues that Sparta was responsible for the initial establishment of the Hellenic defensive coalition and was, in fact, the most essential player in its ultimate victory. Drawing from an impressive range of ancient sources, including Herodotus and Plutarch, the author veers from the traditional Atheno-centric view of the Greco-Persian Wars to examine from a Spartan perspective the grand strategy that halted the Persian juggernaut. Rahe provides a fascinating, detailed picture of life in Sparta circa 480 B.C., revealing how the Spartans' form of government and the regimen to which they subjected themselves instilled within them the pride, confidence, discipline, and discernment necessary to forge an alliance that would stand firm against a great empire, driven by religious fervor, that held sway over two-fifths of the human race.
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Pocket Museum: Ancient Greece

Pocket Museum: Ancient Greece

David Michael Smith

$27.99
Pocket Museum: Ancient Greece presents more than 200 objects currently housed in public collections around the world that offer both context and immediacy to the rich culture of Ancient Greece. From the bifacial hand tools of the Lower Palaeolithic to the Hellenistic Great Altar of Pergamon, the artifacts presented here reveal a complex sociocultural history of shifting priorities, spiritual beliefs, and cultural traditions; the influence on material culture of isolation and internationalism, of technological advance and decline, and of prosperity and adversity. They also reflect the transmission of shared social-cultural ideals across vast distances through relationships maintained for centuries at a time - objects from across the Greek world, valued in life and in death. Pocket Museum: Ancient Greece also offers an insight into the history of collecting and methods of interpretation, examining how the perception of objects has changed over time. Beautifully illustrated with photographs of each featured artifact, this is an absorbing introduction to a culture that has exerted an unparalleled influence on Western civilization.
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Athens Burning: The Persian Invasion of Greece and the Evacuation of Attica

Athens Burning: The Persian Invasion of Greece and the Evacuation of Attica

Robert Garland

$38.99
Between June 480 and August 479 BC, tens of thousands of Athenians evacuated, following King Xerxes' victory at the Battle of Thermopylae. Abandoning their homes and ancestral tombs in the wake of the invading Persian army, they sought refuge abroad. Women and children were sent to one safe haven, the elderly to another, while all men of military age were conscripted into the fleet. During this difficult year of exile, the city of Athens was set on fire not once, but twice.

In  Athens Burning, Robert Garland explores the reasons behind the decision to abandon Attica, the peninsular region of Greece that includes Athens, while analyzing the consequences, both material and psychological, of the resulting invasion.  Garland introduces readers to the contextual background of the Greco-Persian wars, which include the famous Battle of Marathon. He describes the various stages of the invasion from both the Persian and Greek point of view and explores the siege of the Acropolis, the defeat of the Persians first by the allied Greek navy and later by the army, and, finally, the return of the Athenians to their land. 

Taking its inspiration from the sufferings of civilians,  Athens Burning also works to dispel the image of the Persians as ruthless barbarians. Addressing questions that are largely ignored in other accounts of the conflict, including how the evacuation was organized and what kind of facilities were available to the refugees along the way, Garland demonstrates the relevance of ancient history to the contemporary world. This compelling story is especially resonant in a time when the news is filled with the suffering of nearly 5 million people driven by civil war from their homes in Syria.

Aimed at students and scholars of ancient history, this highly accessible book will also fascinate anyone interested in the burgeoning fields of refugee and diaspora studies.
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The Middle Ages

The Middle Ages

Johannes Fried ,  Peter Lewis

$59.99
Since the fifteenth century, when humanist writers began to speak of a 'middle'? period in history linking their time to the ancient world, the nature of the Middle Ages has been widely debated. Across the millennium from 500 to 1500, distinguished historian Johannes Fried describes a dynamic confluence of political, social, religious, economic, and scientific developments that draws a guiding thread through the era: the growth of a culture of reason.  

Beginning with the rise of the Franks, Fried uses individuals to introduce key themes, bringing to life those who have too often been reduced to abstractions of the medieval 'monk'? or 'knight.'? Milestones encountered in this thousand-year traversal include Europe's political, cultural, and religious renovation under Charlemagne; the Holy Roman Empire under Charles IV, whose court in Prague was patron to crowning cultural achievements; and the series of conflicts between England and France that made up the Hundred Years' War and gave to history the enduringly fascinating Joan of Arc. Broader political and intellectual currents are examined, from the authority of the papacy and impact of the Great Schism, to new theories of monarchy and jurisprudence, to the rise of scholarship and science.  

The Middle Ages is full of people encountering the unfamiliar, grappling with new ideas, redefining power, and interacting with different societies. Fried gives readers an era of innovation and turbulence, of continuities and discontinuities, but one above all characterized by the vibrant expansion of knowledge and an understanding of the growing complexity of the world.
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Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc

Frantz Funck-Brentano

$59.99
Warrior, martyr, saint: Joan of Arc has captivated imaginations around the world for centuries. The legendary heroine of a tumultuous episode from the Hundred Years' War, Joan led the French army to triumph over the English at the Siege of Orleans in 1429. Two years later the 19-year-old was captured by the enemy and their French collaborators, charged with heresy, and burned at the stake - the end of her life but the beginning of her enduring fame. This expertly translated and lavishly illustrated biography traces The Maid of Orleans' progress from ordinary peasant girl to seer of mystic visions to savior of France. Forty full-page color plates by French artist and illustrator O. D. V. Guillonnet enhance historian Frantz Funck-Brentano's highly readable narrative. Originally published in 1912 as part of a series of young adult biographies of French leaders, this beautiful and inspiring book will enchant readers of all ages.
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An Anthology of Ancient Mesopotamian Texts: When the Gods Were Human

An Anthology of Ancient Mesopotamian Texts: When the Gods Were Human

Sabine Franke

$49.99
Sabina Franke has gathered the best stories of ancient Near Eastern literature surrounding the Mesopotamian gods, men and kings. This book takes the reader on a journey back to the birth of literature in Mesopotamia, which seems to us so far and yet so near. Fairy tales, myths and epics of ancient Near Eastern literature are still able to charm readers today and allow us to delve into the fascinating life of the ancient Near East. This book includes fables such as the tooth worm which causes tooth pain as well as the great myth of Innanas which describes the transition of the goddess Ishtar into the underworld. There are also daily life stories such as that of a student and the Sumerian incantations against a crying baby.
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Julius Caesar's Disease

Julius Caesar's Disease

Francesco M. Galassi ,  Hutan Ashrafian

$52.99
It is generally accepted as a historical fact that Julius Caesar suffered from epilepsy, an illness which in classical times was sometimes associated with divinely bestowed genius. The ancient sources describe several episodes when, sometimes at critical junctures, one of the most famous military commanders in history was incapacitated by his illness referred to as morbus comitialis. But does the evidence really fit with the diagnosis of epilepsy? And if it was not epilepsy that afflicted Caesar, then what was it? These are the questions that doctors Galassi and Ashrafian seek to answer by applying modern medical knowledge to the symptoms and circumstances described by contemporary historians and commentators of Caesar's life (which include the great man himself). The result is a fascinating piece of historical-pathological detective work that challenges received wisdom about one of the most famous men of all time.
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Pocket Museum: Ancient Rome

Pocket Museum: Ancient Rome

Virginia L. Campbell

$27.99
If all the portable artifacts of Ancient Rome were in a single location, the lives of students, historians, and connoisseurs would be immeasurably simpler. But the masterpieces are in museums all over the world. This book identifies 200 of the most important of these works, and describes them vividly and informatively in ways that reveal how each is a key object in its own right - a creation that commemorates a great event or heralds the start of a new era in creativity or politics. From coins of the fifth century bce to pottery made at the time of the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 ce, each object reveals an important insight into this highly influential ancient civilization.
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Alice's Daughter: Lost Mission Child

Alice's Daughter: Lost Mission Child

Jackie Ferro ,  Rhonda Collard-Spratt

$34.95
‘My story is not about blame. It’s about sharing history that belongs to all of Australia. I needed a push, but I am happy to finally give little Rhonda a voice, so that my words will live on after I leave this world.’

In 1954, aged three, Rhonda Collard-Spratt was taken from her Aboriginal family and placed on Carnarvon Native Mission, Western Australia. Growing up in the white world of chores and aprons, religious teachings and cruel beatings, Rhonda drew strength and healing from her mission brothers and sisters, her art, music and poetry, and her unbreakable bond with the Dreaming.

Alice’s Daughter is the story of Rhonda’s search for culture and family as she faces violence, racism, foster families, and her father’s death in custody; one of the first deaths investigated as part of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.

Written in Rhonda’s distinctive voice, Alice’s Daughter is fearless, compelling and intimate reading. Coupled with her vibrant and powerful paintings and poetry, Rhonda’s is a journey of sadness, humour, resilience and ultimately survival.
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This is My Country

This is My Country

Ingetje Tadros

$55.00
This Is My Country looks at people standing on the precipice of life: disenfranchised, neglected and now threatened with displacement. It is a permanent record intended to bring attention to the plight of Aboriginal communities under threat. It will serve as a call to Australian society to support their First People and end the displacement of their communities.

This Is My Country is a hard cover book of 120 pages with 70 black and white photographs and texts from Aboriginal academics and activists. It is printed in a hardbound edition on 170 gsm paper at Ofset Yapimevi in Istanbul where all of FotoEvidence's high quality books are produced.

This is My Country was awarded with the Walkley Award for Excellence in Photojournalism, Feature Photographic Essay 2015 (the Australian equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize), the Amnesty International Media Awards 2015, photography, Best Feature Photographic Essay at the West Australian Media Awards 2015,the Exposure Award, digital display at The Louvre in Paris 2015 and the 2016 Prix d'Ani at Visa Pour L'Image.
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The Red Chief

The Red Chief

Ion Idriess

$29.99
In times past there was an Aboriginal man called Cumbo Gunnerah His people called him The Red Kangaroo. He was a clever chief and a mighty fighter (this man from Gunnedah) Later, the white people of this place called him The Red Chief. It would be hard to find a more satisfying hero than the young warrior Red Kangaroo, who by his mental and physical prowess became a chief of his tribe - the revered and powerful Red Chief of the Gunnedah district in northern New South Wales. His story is a first-rate tale of adventure but it is something more - a true story handed down from generation to generation by its hero s tribe and given by the last survivor, King Bungaree, to the white settlers of the district.
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Something About Emus: Indigenous Knowledge of Emus from Western Arnhem Land

Something About Emus: Indigenous Knowledge of Emus from Western Arnhem Land

Murray Garde

$39.95
The emu is an iconic Australian bird of significance to all Australians, but especially so to Indigenous Australians who have had a special relationship with this curious animal for thousands of years. In this bilingual, highly illustrated, full-colour publication, Something about emus reveals valuable ecological knowledge in a collection of essays by senior members of the Bininj Kunwok language group from Kakadu National Park and Western Arnhem Land. Something about emus goes beyond biology and ecology to encompass other culturally important domains such as the visual and verbal arts, music, ritual and the relationships between humans and animals. Whilst Indigenous ecological knowledge is increasingly acknowledged as a valuable part of Australia's cultural heritage, such knowledge is most richly expressed in Australia's Indigenous languages which have largely remained inaccessible to those outside their communities.
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Indigenous Archives: The Making and Unmaking of Aboriginal Art

Indigenous Archives: The Making and Unmaking of Aboriginal Art

Darren Jorgensen ,  Ian McLean

$39.99
In recording and ordering documents considered important, the archive is a source of power. It takes control of the past, deciding which voices will be heard and which won't, how they will be heard and for what purposes. Indigenous communities understood the power of the archive well before the European Enlightenment arrived and began archiving them. For them colonialism has been a struggle over archives as much as anything else.

The eighteen essays by twenty authors, seven of whom are Indigenous, investigate different aspects of this struggle in Australia, from Indigenous uses of traditional archives and the development of new ones to the deconstruction and appropriation of European archives by contemporary artists as acts of cultural empowerment.
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America's Covert War in East Africa: Surveillance, Rendition, Assassination

America's Covert War in East Africa: Surveillance, Rendition, Assassination

Clara Usiskin

$39.95
Clara Usiskin has spent eight years investigating the 'War on Terror' and its effects in the East and Horn of Africa, documenting hundreds of cases of rendition, secret detention and targeted killings. As a result of her work exposing abuses carried out by regional governments and their international partners, Clara was deported from Kenya and Uganda and is currently persona non grata in both countries. 

Her book sets out the historical background to today's covert war, including the early Somali jihads and British repression in colonial Kenya, through to the 1998 US Embassy Bombings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, and President Clinton's early rendition programme. America's Covert War in East Africa then looks at the US Military's new Africa Command, with its emphasis on counterterrorism, alongside increasing use of targeted killings by security forces in the region, and continued renditions and secret detention. 

Finally, Usiskin investigates the shorter and longer term consequences of such intensive militarisation, and the proliferation of surveillance and other technologies of control in East Africa and its surrounding waters, focusing in particular on their impact on vulnerable ethnic and religious groups in a highly volatile region.
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The New Scramble for Africa

The New Scramble for Africa

Padraig Carmody

$39.95
Once marginalized in the world economy, Africa today is a major global supplier of crucial raw materials like oil, uranium and coltan. China's part in this story has loomed particularly large in recent years, and the American military footprint on the continent has also expanded. But a new scramble for resources, markets and territory is now taking place in Africa involving not just state, but non state-actors, including Islamic fundamentalist and other rebel groups. The second edition of Padraig Carmody's popular book explores the dynamics of the new scramble for African resources, markets, and territory and the impact of current investment and competition on people, the environment, and political and economic development on the continent. Fully revised and updated throughout, its chapters explore old and new economic power interests in Africa; oil, minerals, timber, biofuels, land, food and fisheries; and the nature and impacts of Asian and South African investment in manufacturing and other sectors. The New Scramble for Africa will be essential reading for students of African studies, international relations and resource politics, as well as anyone interested in current affairs.
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Luzon 1945: The Final Liberation of the Philippines

Luzon 1945: The Final Liberation of the Philippines

Clayton Chun ,  Giuseppe Rava

$29.99
Driven from the Philippines in 1942, General Douglas MacArthur returned three years later to force the Japanese off of its main island of Luzon. Containing the capital of Manila, vital natural resources as well as thousands of Allied prisoners of war, the triumph at Luzon would be a vital step on the road to victory as the Americans continued to island-hop their way towards the Japanese home islands. This new study details one of the hardest-fought campaigns of the Pacific War with Japanese fatalities alone on Luzon topping 200,000. Emphasizing the differences in Japanese and American strategy, and detailing the combat operations of the campaign, this volume tells the story of how MacArthur kept his promise to return and liberate the Philippines.
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Bridges of Friendship: Reflections on Indonesia's Early Independence & Australia's Volunteer Graduate Scheme, 1920s-1960s

Bridges of Friendship: Reflections on Indonesia's Early Independence & Australia's Volunteer Graduate Scheme, 1920s-1960s

Kurnianingrate Ali Sastroamijoyo ,  Betty Feith ,  Ann McCarthy ,  Ailsa G. Thomson Zainuddin

$39.95
This volume casts new light on the intercultural and personal ties among Indonesians and Australians in the context of the post-war rise of secular volunteering and the unique political and social conditions then prevailing in the newly formed Indonesian Republic. It brings together previously unpublished manuscripts by Betty Feith, who has combined teaching and lecturing with a lifelong involvement in church and humanitarian service, and Kurnianingrat Ali Sastroamijoyo, an educator who worked extensively in English language teaching and training, and someone who took an active part in the Indonesian Revolution.
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The Unseen ANZAC: How an Enigmatic Polar Explorer Created Australia's World War I Photographs

The Unseen ANZAC: How an Enigmatic Polar Explorer Created Australia's World War I Photographs

Jeff Maynard

$29.99
The previously untold story of an extraordinary man and a great war photographer.

Cameras were banned at the Western Front when the Anzacs arrived in 1916, prompting correspondent Charles Bean to argue continually for Australia to have a dedicated photographer. He was eventually assigned an enigmatic polar explorer - George Hubert Wilkins.

Within weeks of arriving at the front, Wilkins' exploits were legendary. He did what no photographer had previously dared to do. He went 'over the top' with the troops and ran forward to photograph the actual fighting. He led soldiers into battle, captured German prisoners, was wounded repeatedly, and was twice awarded the Military Cross - all while he refused to carry a gun and armed himself only with a bulky glass-plate camera.

Wilkins ultimately produced the most detailed and accurate collection of World War I photographs in the world, which is now held at the Australian War Memorial. After the war, Wilkins returned to exploring and, during the next 40 years, his life became shrouded in secrecy. His work at the Western Front was forgotten, and others claimed credit for his photographs.

Throughout his life, Wilkins wrote detailed diaries and letters, but when he died in 1958 these documents were locked away. Jeff Maynard follows a trail of myth and misinformation to locate Wilkins' lost records and to reveal the remarkable, true story of Australia's greatest war photographer.
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Our Vietnam Nurses

Our Vietnam Nurses

Annabelle Brayley

$24.99
From the bestselling author of Bush Nurses and Nurses of the Outback comes this collection of compelling and moving stories of our heroic nurses in the Vietnam War. Being a nurse always requires a cool head, a steady hand and an open heart. But if you're working in a war zone, the challenges are much harder. When Australia joined the Vietnam War, civilian and military nurses were there to save lives and comfort the wounded. With spirit and good humour, they worked hard and held strong, even though most of them were completely unprepared for the war before they landed in the middle of it. Working incredibly long hours and surrounded by chaos and turmoil, these brave nurses and medics were integral to our war effort. These fifteen stories show a side to the Vietnam War that has received little recognition but played an important part in shaping Australia's presence in the war. From flying with critically wounded Australian soldiers out of turbulent war zones, to being held at gunpoint, the compassion, courage and grace under fire in Our Vietnam Nurses will inspire and astound.
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Kokoda: Beyond the Legend

Kokoda: Beyond the Legend

Karl James

$59.95
Courage. Endurance. Mateship. Sacrifice. These values, engraved in stone at the Isurava war memorial, have become synonymous with the Australian experience during the Kokoda campaign of 1942. The story of Kokoda and of the fighting in Papua has been told and retold in books, films and documentaries, but these popular narratives rarely explore beyond this one campaign. Kokoda: Beyond the Legend critically assesses not only the campaigns in Papua and their context in the wider lengthy Pacific war, but also the actions of senior Australian, American and Japanese military leaders. Moving beyond the legend, this book addresses the central question of why Kokoda holds such a significant place in Australian military history. In this book, Karl James brings together eminent military scholars to reassess the principal battles from both Allied and Japanese perspectives, providing readers with a more complete understanding of one of the major turning points in the Second World War.
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Tobruk 1941: Text Classics

Tobruk 1941: Text Classics

Chester Wilmot

$12.95
In early 1941 Australian soldiers stormed Italy's stronghold on the Libyan coast and took control of the port city of Tobruk. Heavily outnumbered, yet resourceful and defiant, the Australians then defended the garrison against sustained attack by German forces. For five months the 'Rats of Tobruk' held on, dealing a major blow to the Axis powers' North African campaign. Tobruk 1941 is the pioneering ABC reporter Chester Wilmot's on-the-ground account of the siege, a landmark work of war writing. This edition comes with a new introduction by the historian Peter Cochrane.
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The Long Road: Australia's Train, Advise and Assist Missions

The Long Road: Australia's Train, Advise and Assist Missions

Tom Frame

$39.99
Helping neighbours and partners stabilise their political systems and work towards peace and security is a core activity for the modern Australian Defence Force. The Long Road analyses the successes and failures of ADF's 'train, advise, assist' missions in Iraq, Afghanistan, Papua New Guinea, Bougainville, the Solomon Islands, South Vietnam and Uganda. With a diverse array of contributions from media commentators Chris Masters and Ian McPhedran, politicians Kevin Andrews and David Feeney, academics, aid workers and military personnel, The Long Road analyses Australia's efforts to help its neighbours and partners avoid armed conflict. More titles in the ACSACS Series
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English Voices: Lives, Landscapes, Laments

English Voices: Lives, Landscapes, Laments

Ferdinand Mount

$24.99
'A sheer delight' Times Literary Supplement Ferdinand Mount has spent many years writing articles, columns and reviews for prestigious magazines, newspapers and journals. Whether reviewing great published works by some of England's finest authors and poets (both alive and dead) including Kingsley Amis, John Osborne, John le Carre, Rudyard Kipling, E.M. Forster and Alan Bennett. He also analysed the works of a variety of our Masters covering the past four hundred years such as, of course, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, John Keats, Thomas Hardy, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Samuel Pepys. Whether it be holding up to account the writings of Winston Churchill, or celebrating the much-loved poems of Siegfried Sassoon, each essay reproduced in full here has been carefully chosen by Mount to weave a unique tapestry of the wealth of writings that have helped shape his own respected career as an author and political commentator. For anyone interested and passionate about writing and poetry across the centuries in the British Isles, this book will be a very welcome guide to the best one can pick up and read.
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So Great a Prince: England and the Accession of Henry VIII

So Great a Prince: England and the Accession of Henry VIII

Lauren Johnson

$24.99
The King is dead: long live the King. In 1509, Henry VII was succeeded by his son Henry VIII, second monarch of the house of Tudor. But this is not the familiar Tudor world of Protestantism and playwrights. Decades before the Reformation, ancient traditions persist: boy bishops, pilgrimage, Corpus Christi pageants, the jewel-decked shrine at Canterbury. So Great a Prince offers a fascinating glimpse of a country and people that at first appear alien - in calendar and clothing, in counting the hours by bell toll - but which on closer examination are recognisably and understandably human. Lauren Johnson tells the story of 1509 not just from the perspective of king and court, but of merchant and ploughman; apprentice and laundress; husbandman and foreign worker. She looks at these early Tudor lives through the rhythms of the ritual year, juxtaposing political events in Westminster and the palaces of southeast England with the liturgical and agricultural events that punctuated the year for the ordinary people of England.
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The English Conquest of Jamaica: Oliver Cromwell's Bid for Empire

The English Conquest of Jamaica: Oliver Cromwell's Bid for Empire

Carla Gardina Pestana

$67.00
In 1654, England's Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell conceived a plan of breathtaking ambition: the conquest of Spain's vast American empire. As the first phase of his Western Design, a large expedition sailed to the West Indies, under secret orders to take Spanish colonies. The English Conquest of Jamaica presents entrenched imperial fantasies confronting Caribbean realities. It captures the moment when the revolutionary English state first became a major player in the Atlantic arena.

Although capturing Jamaica was supposed to be only the first step in Cromwell s scheme, even that relatively modest acquisition proved difficult. The English badly underestimated the myriad challenges they faced, starting with the unexpectedly fierce resistance offered by the Spanish and other residents who tenaciously defended their island. After sixteen long years Spain surrendered Jamaica and acceded to an English presence in the Americas in the 1670 Treaty of Madrid. But by then, other goals including profit through commerce rather than further conquest had superseded the vision behind the Western Design.

Carla Gardina Pestana situates Cromwell's imperial project in the context of an emerging Atlantic empire as well as the religious strife and civil wars that defined seventeenth-century England. Though falling short of its goal, Cromwell's plan nevertheless reshaped England's Atlantic endeavors and the Caribbean region as a whole. Long before sugar and slaves made Jamaica Britain's most valuable colony, its acquisition sparked conflicts with other European powers, opened vast tropical spaces to exploitation by the purportedly industrious English, and altered England's engagement with the wider world.
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Heretics and Believers: A History of the English Reformation

Heretics and Believers: A History of the English Reformation

Peter Marshall

$59.99
A sumptuously written people's history and a major retelling and reinterpretation of the story of the English Reformation Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall's sweeping new history-the first major overview for general readers in a generation-argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of reform in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora's Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of religion itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.
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How to Read London: A Crash Course in London Architecture

How to Read London: A Crash Course in London Architecture

Chris Rogers

$19.99
Over 2,000 years of settlement give London its unique architectural heritage. Unlike Haussmann's Paris, neither monarch nor politician imposed their will; private ownership and enterprise shaped the city and defined its parts. Elegant West End squares and crescents hallmark the Classical townscape that emerged between 1600 and 1830, but medieval, Tudor and Victorian enclaves identified by occupation, class or guild make their own design statement, notably in the City and East End. From its renewal after the Great Fire of 1666 as a centre of commerce, culture, finance and as a railway hub, the seat of power and law, How to Read London reveals through the built environment how London's domestic, civic and commercial landscape has evolved and adapted from imperial capital to global city.
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Houses of Power: The Places That Shaped the Tudor World

Houses of Power: The Places That Shaped the Tudor World

Simon Thurley

$59.99
What was it like to live as a royal Tudor? Why were their residences built as they were and what went on inside their walls? Who slept where and with who? Who chose the furnishings? And what were their passions? The Tudors ruled through the day, throughout the night, in the bath, in bed and in the saddle. Their palaces were genuine power houses - the nerve-centre of military operations, the boardroom for all executive decisions and the core of international politics. Houses of Power is the result of Simon Thurley's thirty years of research, picking through architectural digs, and examining financial accounts, original plans and drawings to reconstruct the great Tudor houses and understand how these monarchs shaped their lives. Far more than simply an architectural history - a study of private life as well as politics, diplomacy and court - it gives an entirely new and remarkable insight into the Tudor world.
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British Destroyers 1939-45: Pre-War Classes

British Destroyers 1939-45: Pre-War Classes

Angus Konstam

$22.99
The Royal Navy entered World War II with a large but eclectic fleet of destroyers. Some of these were veterans of World War I, fit only for escort duties. Most though, had been built during the inter-war period, and were regarded as both reliable and versatile. Danger though lurked across the seas as new destroyers being built in Germany, Italy and Japan were larger and better armoured. So, until the new, larger Tribal-class destroyers could enter service, these vessels would have to hold the line. Used mainly to hunt submarines, protect convoys from aerial attack, and take out other destroyers, these ships served across the globe during the war. This fully illustrated study is the first in a two-part series on the real workhorses of the wartime Royal Navy, focusing on how these ageing ships took on the formidable navies of the Axis powers.
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The History of Modern Britain

The History of Modern Britain

Andrew Marr

$22.99
A History of Modern Britain by Andrew Marr confronts head-on the victory of shopping over politics. It tells the story of how the great political visions of New Jerusalem or a second Elizabethan Age, rival idealisms, came to be defeated by a culture of consumerism, celebrity and self-gratification. In each decade, political leaders think they know what they are doing, but find themselves confounded. Every time, the British people turn out to be stroppier and harder to herd than predicted. Throughout, Britain is a country on the edge - first of invasion, then of bankruptcy, then on the vulnerable front line of the Cold War and later in the forefront of the great opening up of capital and migration now reshaping the world. This history follows all the political and economic stories, but deals too with comedy, cars, the war against homosexuals, Sixties anarchists, oil-men and punks, Margaret Thatcher's wonderful good luck, political lies and the true heroes of British theatre.
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Shot at Dawn: Executions in World War One by Authority of the British Army Act

Shot at Dawn: Executions in World War One by Authority of the British Army Act

Julian Putkowski ,  Julian Sykes

$65.00
'I Could not look on Death, which being known, Men led me to him, blindfold and Alone.' (Epitaphs of the war: 'The Coward') 

Thus, in two short, bitter lines, Rudyard Kipling summed up a series of events that are among the most shameful and inglorious in all British history: The executions by firing squad of some 350 members of the British and Empire forces during the First World War.

Based on years of painstaking research, this is the first book to give complete details of all these executions, including names of victims; their 'crimes'; the circumstances, dates and places of execution, and of burial (where known); names of regiments and other units; and victims' personal histories and private circumstances (where known). The authors demonstrate the ineptness, ignorance and unfairness of the British court martial system at the time, and how frequently condemned men (from almost every regiment and corps in the army) were proved to have been formerly brave soldiers who had simply cracked under the pressure of trench warfare. These men were judicially killed as a lesson to other soldiers who, it was thought, might themselves crack. In the event, many of the victims went to their deaths with unbelievable courage and dignity, as eye-witness accounts in this book show. 

Here, too, are details of how next-of-kin of executed men were hoodwinked into believing that their men had died in action, a system of cover-up which persists to this day.
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The English Civil War

The English Civil War

David Clark

$17.99
The author, who has been exploring battlefields for 50 years, describes the celebrated battles - including Edgehill, Marston Moor and Naseby - together with the major political events, which characterised one of the most turbulent periods in English history. Contemporary documents and leading secondary sources have been used to produce a picture of those troubled times - years which revolutionised government and witnessed the first faltering steps of Parliamentarians towards the democratic form of government known today.
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King James and the History of Homosexuality

King James and the History of Homosexuality

Michael Young

$50.00
James VI & I, the namesake of the King James Version of the Bible, had a series of notorious male favorites. No one denies that these relationships were amorous, but were they sexual?

Michael B. Young merges political history with recent scholarship in the history of sexuality to answer that question. More broadly, he shows that James's favorites had a negative impact within the royal family, at court, in Parliament, and in the nation at large. Contemporaries raised the specter of a sodomitical court and an effeminized nation; some urged James to engage in a more virile foreign policy by embarking on war. Queen Anne encouraged a martial spirit and molded her oldest son to be more manly than his father. Repercussions continued after James's death, detracting from the majesty of the monarchy and contributing to the outbreak of the Civil War.

Persons acquainted with the history of sexuality will find surprising premonitions here of modern homosexuality and homophobia. General readers will find a world of political intrigue colored by sodomy, pederasty, and gender instability. For readers new to the subject, the book begins with a helpful overview of King James's life.
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A Military History of Afghanistan: From the Great Game to the Global War on Terror

A Military History of Afghanistan: From the Great Game to the Global War on Terror

Ali Ahmad Jalali

$63.95
The history of Afghanistan is largely military history. From the Persians and Greeks of antiquity to the British, Soviet, and American powers in modern times, outsiders have led military conquests into the mountains and plains of Afghanistan, leaving their indelible marks on this ancient land at the juncture of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

In this book Ali Ahmad Jalali, a former interior minister of Afghanistan, taps a deep understanding of his country's distant and recent past to explore Afghanistan's military history during the last two hundred years. With an introductory chapter highlighting the major military developments from early times to the foundation of the modern Afghan state, Jalali's account focuses primarily on the era of British conquest and Anglo-Afghan wars; the Soviet invasion; the civil war and the rise of the Taliban; and the subsequent U.S. invasion.

Looking beyond persistent stereotypes and generalizations (for example, the graveyard of empires designation emerging from the Anglo-Afghan wars of the 19th century and the Soviet experience of the 1980s), Jalali offers a nuanced and comprehensive portrayal of the way of war pursued by both state and non-state actors in Afghanistan against different domestic and foreign enemies, under changing social, political, and technological conditions. He reveals how the structure of states, tribes, and social communities in Afghanistan, along with the scope of their controlled space, has shaped their modes of fighting throughout history. In particular, his account shows how dynastic wars and foreign conquests differ in principle, strategy, and method from wars initiated by non-state actors including tribal and community militias against foreign invasions or repressive government.

Written by a professional soldier, politician, and noted scholar with a keen analytical grasp of his country's military and political history, this magisterial work offers unique insight into the military history of Afghanistan - and thus, into Afghanistan itself.
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Crisis in Greece

Crisis in Greece

Peter Siani-Davis

$34.95
For nearly five years the international press has been gripped by and reported at great length on 'the Greek crisis', with news stories gradually filtering out from the deeper recesses of the economic section to the front pages, as the crisis has intensified and mass protests in Athens have caught the world's attention. Meanwhile, what began as a localised fiscal deficit problem grew to be a crisis that challenged the political and social fabric of the nation and at times seemed destined to undermine the very existence of a global currency, the Euro. This book, written in an accessible and non-technical manner, tells the story of the lengthy crisis that has beset Greece and the wider Eurozone. Is it a purely economic phenomenon or something wider and deeper, as many Greeks would suggest? Are its causes to be found in the prevailing international financial environment or the economic and political system that has evolved in Greece since the early 1970s? Have many of the choices made by both domestic and international actors, such as the IMF and the EU, merely exacerbated the crisis?Most importantly, what has been the impact of the crisis on the daily lives of the country's inhabitants?
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Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China's Push for Global Power

Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China's Push for Global Power

Howard W. French

$35.00
From the former New York Times Asia correspondent and author of China's Second Continent, an incisive investigation of China's ideological development as it becomes an ever more aggressive player in regional and global diplomacy.

For many years after its reform and opening in 1978, China maintained an attitude of false modesty about its ambitions. That role, reports Howard French, has been set aside. China has asserted its place among the global heavyweights, revealing its plans for pan-Asian dominance by building its navy, increasing territorial claims to areas like the South China Sea, and diplomatically bullying smaller players. Underlying this attitude is a strain of thinking that casts China's present-day actions in decidedly historical terms, as the path to restoring the dynastic glory of the past.

If we understand how that historical identity relates to current actions, in ways ideological, philosophical, and even legal, we can learn to forecast just what kind of global power China stands to become and to interact wisely with a future peer.

Steeped in deeply researched history as well as on-the-ground reporting, this is French at his revelatory best.
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An Illustrated Brief History of China: Culture, Religion, Art, Invention

An Illustrated Brief History of China: Culture, Religion, Art, Invention

Wang Jian ,  Fang Xiaoyan

$29.99
This illustrated Chinese history book takes the reader on a visual journey of the most brilliant and significant segments of Chinese civilization over the course of five thousand years. As a cradle of human civilization, China has maintained its cohesion and cultural identity for thousands of years. With China's historical evolution as a backdrop, Each section focuses on the outstanding achievements of the period it covers and clearly sets out the long-established and profound cultural development of the Chinese nation.
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Napoleon: On War

Napoleon: On War

Bruno Colson

$30.95
This is the book on war that Napoleon never had the time or the will to complete.

In exile on the island of Saint-Helena, the deposed Emperor of the French mused about a great treatise on the art of war, but in the end changed his mind and ordered the destruction of the materials he had collected for the volume. Thus was lost what would have been one of the most interesting and important books on the art of war ever written, by one of the most famous and successful military leaders of all time.

In the two centuries since, several attempts have been made to gather together some of Napoleon's 'military maxims', with varying degrees of success. But not until now has there been a systematic attempt to put Napoleon's thinking on war and strategy into a single authoritative volume, reflecting both the full spectrum of his thinking on these matters as well as the almost unparalleled range of his military experience, from heavy cavalry charges in the plains of Russia or Saxony to counter-insurgency operations in Egypt or Spain.

To gather the material for this book, military historian Bruno Colson spent years researching Napoleon's correspondence and other writings, including a painstaking examination of perhaps the single most interesting source for his thinking about war: the copy-book of General Bertrand, the Emperor's most trusted companion on Saint-Helena, in which he unearthed a Napoleonic definition of strategy which is published here for the first time.

The huge amount of material brought together for this ground-breaking volume has been carefully organized to follow the framework of Carl von Clausewitz's classic On War, allowing a fascinating comparison between Napoleon's ideas and those of his great Prussian interpreter and adversary, and highlighting the intriguing similarities between these two founders of modern strategic thinking.
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Strange Bird: The Albatross Press and the Third Reich

Strange Bird: The Albatross Press and the Third Reich

Michele K. Troy

$57.99
The first book about the Albatross Press, a Penguin precursor that entered into an uneasy relationship with the Nazi regime to keep Anglo-American literature alive under fascism The Albatross Press was, from its beginnings in 1932, a strange bird : a cultural outsider to the Third Reich but an economic insider. It was funded by British-Jewish interests. Its director was rumored to work for British intelligence. A precursor to Penguin, it distributed both middlebrow fiction and works by edgier modernist authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway to eager continental readers. Yet Albatross printed and sold its paperbacks in English from the heart of Hitler's Reich. In her original and skillfully researched history, Michele K. Troy reveals how the Nazi regime tolerated Albatross-for both economic and propaganda gains-and how Albatross exploited its insider position to keep Anglo-American books alive under fascism. In so doing, Troy exposes the contradictions in Nazi censorship while offering an engaging detective story, a history, a nuanced analysis of men and motives, and a cautionary tale.
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Hitler at Home

Hitler at Home

Despina Stratigakos

$44.99
A revelatory look at the residences of Adolf Hitler, illuminating their powerful role in constructing and promoting the dictator's private persona both within Germany and abroad Adolf Hitler's makeover from rabble-rouser to statesman coincided with a series of dramatic home renovations he undertook during the mid-1930s. This provocative book exposes the dictator's preoccupation with his private persona, which was shaped by the aesthetic and ideological management of his domestic architecture. Hitler's bachelor life stirred rumors, and the Nazi regime relied on the dictator's three dwellings-the Old Chancellery in Berlin, his apartment in Munich, and the Berghof, his mountain home on the Obersalzberg-to foster the myth of the Fuhrer as a morally upstanding and refined man. Author Despina Stratigakos also reveals the previously untold story of Hitler's interior designer, Gerdy Troost, through newly discovered archival sources. At the height of the Third Reich, media outlets around the world showcased Hitler's homes to audiences eager for behind-the-scenes stories. After the war, fascination with Hitler's domestic life continued as soldiers and journalists searched his dwellings for insights into his psychology. The book's rich illustrations, many previously unpublished, offer readers a rare glimpse into the decisions involved in the making of Hitler's homes and into the sheer power of the propaganda that influenced how the world saw him.
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World War II German Motorized Infantry & Panzergrenadiers

World War II German Motorized Infantry & Panzergrenadiers

Nigel Thomas ,  Johnny Shumate

$22.99
In World War II Germany's doctrine of mobile warfare dominated the battlefield. By trial and error, the Germans were the first to correctly combine the strength in tanks and in mobile infantry and artillery. This integration of mobile units, equipment and tactics underpinned Germany's successes in the first half of the war. As the war dragged on, the Allies sought to copy German tactics but German armies remained supreme in this type of warfare until their losses had seriously degraded their capabilities. This study traces the development of the different types of unit that came together in the Panzergrenadier branch from the inter-war years through World War II. Using colour plates to display the changes in uniform, equipment and insignia in all theatres of operations throughout the conflict, this is a complete account of Hitler's elite armoured infantry.
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Berlin Rules: Europe and the German Way

Berlin Rules: Europe and the German Way

Paul Lever

$39.99
In the second half of the twentieth century, Germany became the dominant political and economic power in Europe - and the arbiter of all important EU decisions. Yet Germany's leadership of the EU is geared principally to the defence of German national interests. Germany exercises power in order to protect the German economy and to enable it to play an influential role in the wider world. Beyond that there is no underlying vision or purpose.In this book, former British ambassador in Berlin Paul Lever provides a unique insight into modern Germany. He shows how the country's history has influenced its current economic and political structures and provides important perspectives on its likely future challenges and choices, especially in the context of the 2015 refugee crisis which saw over 1 million immigrants offered a home in Germany.As Britain prepares to leave the European Union, this book will be essential reading and suggests the future shape of a Germany dominated Europe.
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Lions and Lambs: Conflict in Weimar and the Creation of Post-Nazi Germany

Lions and Lambs: Conflict in Weimar and the Creation of Post-Nazi Germany

Noah Benezra Strote

$64.00
A bold new interpretation of Germany's democratic transformation in the twentieth century, focusing on the generation that shaped the post-Nazi reconstruction Not long after the horrors of World War II and the Holocaust, Germans rebuilt their shattered country and emerged as one of the leading nations of the Western liberal world. In his debut work, Noah Strote analyzes this remarkable turnaround and challenges the widely held perception that the Western Allies-particularly the United States-were responsible for Germany's transformation. Instead, Strote draws from never-before-seen material to show how common opposition to Adolf Hitler united the fractious groups that had once vied for supremacy under the Weimar Republic, Germany's first democracy (1918-1933). His character-driven narrative follows ten Germans of rival worldviews who experienced the breakdown of Weimar society, lived under the Nazi dictatorship, and together assumed founding roles in the democratic reconstruction. While many have imagined postwar Germany as the product of foreign-led democratization, this study highlights the crucial role of indigenous ideas and institutions that stretched back decades before Hitler. Foregrounding the resolution of key conflicts that crippled the country's first democracy, Strote presents a new model for understanding the origins of today's Federal Republic.
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Special Forces Berlin: Clandestine Cold War Operations of the US Army's Elite, 1956-1990

Special Forces Berlin: Clandestine Cold War Operations of the US Army's Elite, 1956-1990

James Stejskal

$62.99
It is a little-known fact that during the Cold War, two U.S. Army Special Forces detachments were stationed far behind the Iron Curtain in West Berlin. The existence and missions of the two detachments were highly classified secrets. The massive armies of the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies posed a huge threat to the nations of Western Europe. US military planners decided they needed a plan to slow the juggernaut they expected when and if a war began. The plan was Special Forces Berlin.

The first 40 men who came to Berlin in mid-1956 were soon reinforced by 60 more and these 100 soldiers (and their successors) would stand ready to go to war at only two hours' notice, in a hostile area occupied by nearly one million Warsaw Pact forces, until 1990. Their mission should hostilities commence was to wreak havoc behind enemy lines, and buy time for vastly outnumbered NATO forces to conduct a breakout from the city. In reality it was an ambitious and extremely dangerous mission, even suicidal. Highly trained and fluent in German, each man was allocated a specific area.  They were skilled in clandestine operations, sabotage, intelligence tradecraft and able to act if necessary as independent operators, blending into the local population and working unseen in a city awash with spies looking for information on their every move.

Special Forces Berlin was a one of a kind unit that had no parallel. It left a legacy of a new type of soldier expert in unconventional warfare, one that was sought after for other deployments including the attempted rescue of American hostages from Tehran in 1979. With the U.S. government officially acknowledging their existence in 2014, their incredible story can now be told.
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The Birth of the Past

The Birth of the Past

Zachary Sayre Schiffman ,  Anthony Grafton

$68.00
How did people learn to distinguish between past and present? How did they come to see the past as existing in its own distinctive context?

In  The Birth of the Past, Zachary Sayre Schiffman explores these questions in his sweeping survey of historical thinking in the Western world. Today we automatically distinguish between past and present, labeling things that appear out of place as  anachronisms. 

Schiffman shows how this tendency did not always exist and how the past as such was born of a perceived difference between past and present. Schiffman takes readers on a grand tour of historical thinking from antiquity to modernity. He shows how ancient historians could not distinguish between past and present because they conceived of multiple pasts. Christian theologians coalesced these multiple pasts into a single temporal space where past merged with present and future. Renaissance humanists began to disentangle these temporal states in their desire to resurrect classical culture, creating a  living past.  

French enlighteners killed off this living past when they engendered a form of social scientific thinking that measured the relations between historical entities, thus sustaining the distance between past and present and relegating each culture to its own distinctive context. 

Featuring a foreword by the eminent historian Anthony Grafton, this fascinating book draws upon a diverse range of sources-ancient histories, medieval theology, Renaissance art, literature, legal thought, and early modern mathematics and social science-to uncover the meaning of the past and its relationship to the present.
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The Experience of History: An Introduction to History

The Experience of History: An Introduction to History

Kenneth R Bartlett

$35.95
The Experience of History is a lively and passionate introduction to the field that encourages students to seek and appreciate history inside the classroom and beyond. * Defines history as a discipline and the role of historians within it * Addresses the analytical and critical thinking skills needed to engage with the past * A variety of important topics in the study of history are discussed, such as historical evidence, primary documents, divisions of history, forms of historical writing, historiographical traditions, and recent categories of historical research Written by a renowned scholar of European history, this work helps students to become discerning examiners of history and historical evidence in a variety of modern settings like art, architecture, film, television, politics, current events, and more.
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India's War: The Making of Modern South Asia, 1939-1945

India's War: The Making of Modern South Asia, 1939-1945

Srinath Raghavan

$29.99
A ground-breaking new history of India's central role in the Second World War.

Between 1939 and 1945 India changed to an extraordinary extent. Millions of Indians suddenly found themselves as soldiers, fighting in Europe and North Africa but also - something simply never imagined - against a Japanese army threatening to invade eastern India. Many more were pulled into the vortex of wartime mobilization.

Srinath Raghavan's compelling and original book gives both a surprising new account of the fighting and of life on the home front. For Indian nationalists the war has tended to be seen as a distraction from the quest for national independence - but Raghavan shows that in fact the war lay at the very heart of how and why colonial rule ended in South Asia.
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India Turns East: International Engagement and US-China Rivalry

India Turns East: International Engagement and US-China Rivalry

Frederic Grare

$65.00
India Turns East tells the story of India's long and difficult journey to reclaim its status in a rapidly changing Asian environment increasingly shaped by the USChina rivalry and the uncertainties of US commitment to Asia's security. Launched by then Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao in 1992, the Look East policy initially aimed at reconnecting India with Asia's economic globalisation. As China became more assertive, Look East rapidly evolved into a comprehensive strategy with political and military dimensions and, in the past decade, has begun to attract US attention. Frederic Grare argues that, despite this rapprochement, the congruence of Indian and US objectives regarding China is not absolute. The two countries share similar concerns, but differ in their tactics as well as their thoughts about the role China should play in the emerging regional architecture. Moreover, though bilateral US policies are usually perceived positively in New Delhi, paradoxically, the multilateral dimensions of the US Rebalance to Asia policy sometimes pushes New Delhi closer to Beijing's positions than to Washington's. This important new book explores some of the possible ways out of India's 'Eastern' dilemma.
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Cityscapes of Violence in Karachi: Publics and Counterpublics

Cityscapes of Violence in Karachi: Publics and Counterpublics

Nichola Khan

$55.00
Karachi is a city framed in the popular imagination by violence, be it criminality and gangsterism or political factionalism. That perception also dominates literary, cinematic and scholarly representations and discussions of this great metropolis. By commenting in different ways on the trials and tribulations of Karachi and Pakistan, the contributors to this innovative book on the city build on past writings to say something new or different - to make their reader re-think how they understand the processes at work in this vast urban space. They scrutinise Karachi's diverse neighbourhoods to show how violence is manifested locally and citywide into protest drinking, social and religious movements, class and cosmopolitanism, gang wars, and how it affects the fractured lives of militants and journalists, among others. Oral history and memoir feature strongly in the volume as do insights gleaned from anthropology and political science The contributors include academics, ethnographers, journalists, writers and activists: Nadeem F. Paracha, Laurent Gayer, Zia Ur Rehman, Nida Kirmani, Nichola Khan, Oskar Verkaaik, Arif Hasan, Razeshta Sethna, Asif Farrukhi, Kausar S. Khan, Farzana Shaikh, and Kamran Asdar Ali.
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Venice and its Jews: 500 Years Since the Founding of the Ghetto

Venice and its Jews: 500 Years Since the Founding of the Ghetto

Donatella Calabi ,  Lenore Rosenberg

$29.99
500 years ago in Venice, the first ghetto was born. It was the first of many 'Jewish enclosures' ordained by political powers, such as the Venetian senate. A place to confine, it soon became an important cosmopolitan and commercial centre of the Republic. The architectural structure of its housing, which became extraordinarily high to accommodate the increasing number of inhabitants, is strictly interlaced with Venetian history, economy and culture. As one of the main Jewish centres in Italy and the Mediterranean, Venice played a crucial role in the Jewish world. The Venetian word 'geto' (from 'gettare', to throw away) originated from the sector of Venice where scrap metal accumulated from foundries. This was the area assigned to the Jews. Thus the word, over the course of time, has become a synonym for segregation. Venice, the Jews, and Europe exhibition runs in Venice until November 13 2016. Dontatella Calabi will be promoting his book at the 'Beyond the Ghetto' symposium in New York, hosted by the Center for Jewish History, on 18-19 September 2016.
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Stranger in A Strange Land: Searching for Gershom Scholem and Jerusalem

Stranger in A Strange Land: Searching for Gershom Scholem and Jerusalem

George Prochnik

$51.95
Prochnik creates a nonfiction Bildungsroman of one of the twentieth century's most important humanist thinkers, while also telling an intimate story of his own youth, marriage and spiritual quest in Jerusalem.

In Stranger in a Strange Land, Prochnik revisits the life and work of Gershom Scholem, whose once prominent reputation, as a Freud-like interpreter of the inner world of the Cosmos, has been in eclipse in the United States. He vividly conjures Scholem’s upbringing in Berlin, and compellingly brings to life Scholem’s transformative friendship with Walter Benjamin, the critic and philosopher. In doing so, he reveals how Scholem’s frustration with the bourgeois ideology of Germany during the First World War led him to discover Judaism, Kabbalah, and finally Zionism, as potent counter-forces to Europe’s suicidal nationalism.

Prochnik’s own years in the Holy Land in the 1990s brings him to question the stereotypical intellectual and theological constructs of Jerusalem, and to rediscover the city as a physical place, rife with the unruliness and fecundity of nature. Prochnik ultimately suggests that a new form of ecological pluralism must now inherit the historically energizing role once played by Kabbalah and Zionism in Jewish thought.
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Cuba's Revolutionary World

Cuba's Revolutionary World

Jonathan C. Brown

$75.00
On January 2, 1959, Fidel Castro, the rebel comandante who had just overthrown Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista, addressed a crowd of jubilant supporters. Recalling the failed popular uprisings of past decades, Castro assured them that this time the real Revolution had arrived. As Jonathan Brown shows in this capacious history of the Cuban Revolution, Castro's words proved prophetic not only for his countrymen but for Latin America and the wider world.

Cuba's Revolutionary World examines in forensic detail how the turmoil that rocked a small Caribbean nation in the 1950s became one of the twentieth century's most transformative events. Initially, Castro's revolution augured well for democratic reform movements gaining traction in Latin America. But what had begun promisingly veered off course as Castro took a heavy hand in efforts to centralize Cuba's economy and stamp out private enterprise. Embracing the Soviet Union as an ally, Castro and his lieutenant Che Guevara sought to export the socialist revolution abroad through armed insurrection.

Castro's provocations inspired intense opposition. Cuban anticommunists who had fled to Miami found a patron in the CIA, which actively supported their efforts to topple Castro's regime. The unrest fomented by Cuban-trained leftist guerrillas lent support to Latin America's military castes, who promised to restore stability. Brazil was the first to succumb to a coup in 1964; a decade later, military juntas governed most Latin American states. Thus did a revolution that had seemed to signal the death knell of dictatorship in Latin America bring about its tragic opposite.
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The Morning They Came for Us: Dispatches from Syria

The Morning They Came for Us: Dispatches from Syria

Janine Di Giovanni

$21.99
WINNER OF THE HAY FESTIVAL AWARD FOR PROSE
WINNER OF THE 2016 IWMF COURAGE IN JOURNALISM AWARD
SHORTLISTED FOR THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY'S HELEN BERNSTEIN EXCELLENCE IN JOURNALISM AWARD

In May of 2012, Janine di Giovanni travelled to Syria, marking the beginning of a long relationship with the country, as she began reporting from both sides of the conflict, witnessing its descent into one of the most brutal, internecine conflicts in recent history. Drawn to the stories of ordinary people caught up in the fighting, Syria came to consume her every moment, her every emotion. Speaking to those directly involved in the war, di Giovanni relays the personal stories of rebel fighters thrown in jail at the least provocation; of children and families forced to watch loved ones taken and killed by regime forces with dubious justifications; and the stories of the elite, holding pool parties in Damascus hotels, trying to deny the human consequences of the nearby shelling. 

Delivered with passion, fearlessness and sensitivity, The Morning They Came for Us is an unflinching account of a nation on the brink of disintegration, charting an apocalyptic but at times tender story of life in a jihadist war - and an unforgettable testament to human resilience in the face of devastating, unimaginable horrors.
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Jihad and Death: The Global Appeal of Islamic State

Jihad and Death: The Global Appeal of Islamic State

Olivier Roy

$34.95
How has ISIS been able to muster support far beyond its initial constituency in the Arab world and attract tens of thousands of foreign volunteers, including converts to Islam, and seemingly countless supporters online? In this compelling intervention into the debate about ISIS' origins and future prospects, the renowned French sociologist, Olivier Roy, argues that while terrorism and jihadism are familiar phenomena, the deliberate pursuit of death has produced a new kind of radical violence. In other words, we're facing not a radicalization of Islam, but the Islamization of radicalism.Jihad and Death is a concise dissection of the highly sophisticated narrative mobilised by ISIS: the myth of the Caliphate recast into a modern story of heroism and nihilism. According to Roy, this very contemporary aesthetic of violence is less rooted in the history of Islamic thought than it is entrenched in a youth culture that has turned global and violent.
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They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide

They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide

Ronald Grigor Suny

$59.99
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by 90 percent--more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian interpretations of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915-16 were committed. Drawing on archival documents and eyewitness accounts, this is an unforgettable chronicle of a cataclysm that set a tragic pattern for a century of genocide and crimes against humanity.
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Lawrence of Arabia's War: The Arabs, the British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WWI

Lawrence of Arabia's War: The Arabs, the British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WWI

Neil Faulkner

$37.99
A wealth of new research and thinking on Lawrence, the Arab Revolt, and World War One in the Middle East, providing essential background to today's violent conflicts Rarely is a book published that revises our understanding of an entire world region and the history that has defined it. This groundbreaking volume makes just such a contribution. Neil Faulkner draws on ten years of field research to offer the first truly multidisciplinary history of the conflicts that raged in Sinai, Arabia, Palestine, and Syria during the First World War. In Lawrence of Arabia's War, the author rewrites the history of T. E. Lawrence's legendary military campaigns in the context of the Arab Revolt. He explores the intersections among the declining Ottoman Empire, the Bedouin tribes, nascent Arab nationalism, and Western imperial ambition. The book provides a new analysis of Ottoman resilience in the face of modern industrialized warfare, and it assesses the relative weight of conventional operations in Palestine and irregular warfare in Syria. Faulkner thus reassesses the historic roots of today's divided, fractious, war-torn Middle East.
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The Great Game in West Asia: Iran, Turkey and the South Caucasus

The Great Game in West Asia: Iran, Turkey and the South Caucasus

Mehran Kamrava

$55.00
The Great Game in West Asia examines the strategic competition between Iran and Turkey for power and influence in the South Caucasus. These neighbouring Middle East powers have vied for supremacy and influence throughout the region and especially in their immediate vicinity, while both contending with ethnic heterogeneity within their own territories and across their borders. Turkey has long conceived of itself as not just a bridge between Asia and Europe but in more substantive terms as a central player in regional and global affairs. If somewhat more modest in its public statements, Iran's parallel ambitions for strategic centrality and influence have only been masked by its own inarticulate foreign policy agendas and the repeated missteps of its revolutionary leaders. But both have sought to deepen their regional influence and power, and in the South Caucasus each has achieved a modicum of success. In fact, as the contributions to this volume demonstrate, as much of the world's attention has been diverted to conflicts and flashpoints near and far, a new great game has been unravelling between Iran and Turkey in the South Caucasus.
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Cultural Exchange: Jews, Christians, and Art in the Medieval Marketplace

Cultural Exchange: Jews, Christians, and Art in the Medieval Marketplace

Joseph Shatzmiller

$38.95
Demonstrating that similarities between Jewish and Christian art in the Middle Ages were more than coincidental, Cultural Exchange meticulously combines a wide range of sources to show how Jews and Christians exchanged artistic and material culture.

Joseph Shatzmiller focuses on communities in northern Europe, Iberia, and other Mediterranean societies where Jews and Christians coexisted for centuries, and he synthesizes the most current research to describe the daily encounters that enabled both societies to appreciate common artistic values. Detailing the transmission of cultural sensibilities in the medieval money market and the world of Jewish money lenders, this book examines objects pawned by peasants and humble citizens, sacred relics exchanged by the clergy as security for loans, and aesthetic goods given up by the Christian well-to-do who required financial assistance.

The work also explores frescoes and decorations likely painted by non-Jews in medieval and early modern Jewish homes located in Germanic lands, and the ways in which Jews hired Christian artists and craftsmen to decorate Hebrew prayer books and create liturgical objects.  Conversely, Christians frequently hired Jewish craftsmen to produce liturgical objects used in Christian churches.

With rich archival documentation, Cultural Exchange sheds light on the social and economic history of the creation of Jewish and Christian art, and expands the general understanding of cultural exchange in brand-new ways.
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The Idea of the Muslim World: A Global Intellectual History

The Idea of the Muslim World: A Global Intellectual History

Cemil Aydin

$56.99
When President Barack Obama visited Cairo in 2009 to deliver an address to Muslims worldwide, he followed in the footsteps of countless politicians who have taken the existence of a unified global Muslim community for granted. But as Cemil Aydin explains in this provocative history, it is a misconception to think that the world's 1.5 billion Muslims constitute a single religio-political entity. How did this belief arise, and why is it so widespread?

The Idea of the Muslim World searches for the intellectual origins of a mistaken notion and explains its enduring allure for non-Muslims and Muslims alike. Conceived as the antithesis of Western Christian civilization, the idea of the Muslim world emerged in the late nineteenth century, when European empires ruled the majority of Muslims. It was inflected from the start by theories of white supremacy, but Muslims had a hand in shaping the idea as well. Aydin reveals the role of Muslim intellectuals in envisioning and essentializing an idealized pan-Islamic society that refuted claims of Muslims racial and civilizational inferiority.

After playing a key role in the politics of the Ottoman Caliphate, the idea of the Muslim world survived decolonization and the Cold War, and took on new force in the late twentieth century. Standing at the center of both Islamophobic and pan-Islamic ideologies, the idea of the Muslim world continues to hold the global imagination in a grip that will need to be loosened in order to begin a more fruitful discussion about politics in Muslim societies today.
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Empires of the Sea: The Final Battle for the Mediterranean, 1521-1580

Empires of the Sea: The Final Battle for the Mediterranean, 1521-1580

Roger Crowley

$24.99
Empires of the Sea shows the Mediterranean as a majestic and bloody theatre of war. Opening with the Ottoman victory in 1453 it is a breathtaking story of military crusading, Barbary pirates, white slavery and the Ottoman Empire - and the larger picture of the struggle between Islam and Christianity. Coupled with dramatic set piece battles, a wealth of riveting first-hand accounts, epic momentum and a terrific denouement at Lepanto, this is a work of history at its broadest and most compelling.
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Visions of Empire: How Five Imperial Regimes Shaped the World

Visions of Empire: How Five Imperial Regimes Shaped the World

Krishan Kumar

$81.00
The empires of the past were far-flung experiments in multinationalism and multiculturalism, and have much to teach us about navigating our own increasingly globalized and interconnected world. Until now, most recent scholarship on empires has focused on their subject peoples. Visions of Empire looks at their rulers, shedding critical new light on who they were, how they justified their empires, how they viewed themselves, and the styles of rule they adopted toward their subjects. 

Krishan Kumar provides panoramic and multifaceted portraits of five major European empires - Ottoman, Habsburg, Russian/Soviet, British, and French - showing how each, like ancient Rome, saw itself as the carrier of universal civilization to the rest of the world. Sometimes these aims were couched in religious terms, as with Islam for the Ottomans or Catholicism for the Habsburgs. Later, the imperial missions took more secular forms, as with British political traditions or the world communism of the Soviets. 

Visions of Empire offers new insights into the interactions between rulers and ruled, revealing how empire was as much a shared enterprise as a clash of oppositional interests.  It explores how these empires differed from nation-states, particularly in how the ruling peoples of empires were forced to downplay or suppress their own national or ethnic identities in the interests of the long-term preservation of their rule.

This compelling and in-depth book demonstrates how the rulers of empire, in their quest for a universal world order, left behind a legacy of multiculturalism and diversity that is uniquely relevant for us today.
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The Sensational Past: How the Enlightenment Changed the Way We Use Our Senses

The Sensational Past: How the Enlightenment Changed the Way We Use Our Senses

Carolyn Purnell

$38.95
Blindfolding children from birth. Playing a piano made of live cats. Using tobacco to cure drowning. Wearing flea -coloured clothes. These actions seem odd to us but in the eighteenth century they made sense. As Carolyn Purnell persuasively shows, while our bodies may not change dramatically, the way we think about the senses and put them to use has been rather different over the ages. Journeying through the past three hundred years, Purnell explores how people used their senses in ways that might shock now. Using culinary history, fashion, medicine, music and many other aspects of Enlightenment life, she demonstrates that, even though we may be human, over time we have used our senses in very different ways. In this clever, witty work, Purnell reminds us of the value of daily life and the power of the smallest aspects of existence.
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Richard Nixon: The Life

Richard Nixon: The Life

John A. Farrell

$63.95
Brilliantly researched, authoritatively crafted by a prize-winning biographer, and lively on the page, this is the Nixon we've been waiting for.

Richard Nixon opens with young Navy lieutenant  Nick  Nixon returning from the Pacific and setting his cap at Congress, an idealistic dreamer seeking to build a better world. Yet amid the turns of that now legendary 1946 campaign, Nixon's finer attributes quickly gave way to unapologetic ruthlessness. It is a stunning overture to John A. Farrell's magisterial portrait of a man who embodied postwar American cynicism. Within four years of that first win, Nixon would be a U.S. senator; in six the vice president of the United States of America. 

Few came so far, so fast, and so alone, Farrell writes. Finally president, Nixon's staff was full of bright young men who devised forward-thinking reforms addressing health care, poverty, civil rights, and protection of the environment. It was a fine legacy, but Nixon cared little for it. He aspired to make his mark on the world stage instead, and his 1972 opening to China was the first great crack in the Cold War. 

Nixon had another legacy, too: an America divided and polarized. It was Nixon who launched the McCarthy era, who set South against North, and who spurred the Silent Majority to despise and distrust the country's elites. He persuaded Americans to gnaw, as he did, on grievances - and to look at one another as enemies. Finally, in August 1974, after two years of the mesmerizing intrigue and scandal known as Watergate, Nixon became the only president to resign in disgrace.

Richard Nixon is an enthralling tour de force biography of our darkest president, one that reviewers will hail as a defining portrait, and the full life of Nixon readers have awaited.
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Bush and Cheney: How They Ruined America and the World

Bush and Cheney: How They Ruined America and the World

David Ray Griffin

$34.30
Was Americas response to the 9/11 attacks at the root of todays instability and terror? Because of various factors, including climate change, ISIS, the war in Syria, the growing numbers of immigrants, and the growing strength of fascist parties in Europe, commentators have increasingly been pointing out that the chaos in the world today was sparked by the post-9/11 attacks on Afghanistan and Iraq. At the same time, there has also been much discussion of ways in which the Bush-Cheney administrations response to 9/11 has damaged America itself by stimulating Islamophobia and fascist sentiments, undermining key elements in its Constitution, moving towards a police state, and in general weakening its democracy. While the first two parts of this book discuss various ways in which 9/11 has ruined America and the world, the third part discusses a question that is generally avoided: Were the Bush-Cheney attacks on Afghanistan and Iraq really at the root of the ruination of America and the world in general, or did the original sin lie in 9/11 itself?
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Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America

Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America

Michael Eric Dyson

$34.99
As the country grapples with racist division at a level not seen since the 1960s, one man's voice is heard above the rest. In his New York Times op-ed piece "Death in Black and White," Michael Eric Dyson moved a nation. Isabel Wilkerson called it "an unfiltered Marlboro of black pain" and "crushingly powerful," and Beyonce tweeted about it. Now he continues to speak out in Tears We Cannot Stop - a provocative and deeply personal call for change. Dyson argues that if we are to make real racial progress we must face difficult truths, including being honest about how black grievance has been ignored, dismissed, or discounted. Short, emotional, literary, powerful - this is the book that all Americans who care about the current and long-burning crisis in race relations will want to read.
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Three Minutes to Doomsday

Three Minutes to Doomsday

Joe Navarro

$34.99
Like a real-life John Le Carre thriller crossed with Spielberg's 'Bridge of Spies', this is a never-before-told true story of betrayal, espionage, a brilliant traitor and a resolute FBI agent in a world on the brink of annihilation...

It is 1988 and Florida-based FBI agent Joe Navarro divides his time between SWAT assignments, flying air reconnaissance, and working counter-intelligence. A body-language expert with an uncanny ability to “read” those he interrogates, Navarro is known as super-intense – an agent whose work ethic quickly burns out partners. He craves an assignment that will get him noticed by the FBI top brass but then again, as he’ll come to learn: be careful what you wish for . . .

It was while on a routine assignment – interviewing a ‘person of interest’, a former US soldier named Rod Ramsay with links to another soldier, Clyde Conrad, recently arrested in Germany as a traitor – that Navarro thought he smelled a rat. He noticed a tic in Ramsay's hand when Conrad’s name was mentioned. Not a lot to go on, but enough for Navarro to insist that an investigation be opened.

What followed was extraordinary – and unique in the annals of espionage detection - a game of cat-and-mouse played at the highest level: on one side, an FBI agent who must not reveal that he suspects his target; on the other, a traitor, a seller of his country’s secrets, whose weakness is the thrill he gets from sparring with his inquisitor. To prise from Ramsay the full extent of the damage he had wrought, Navarro had to pre-choreograph every interview because Ramsay was exceptionally intelligent, with the second highest IQ ever recorded by the U.S. Army.

It would become an interrogation that literally pitted genius against genius – a battle of wits fought against one of the most turbulent periods of the 20th century – the demise and eventual collapse of the Eastern Bloc and the Soviet Union - and the very real possibility that Russia's leaders, in a last desperate bid to alter history’s trajectory, might engage in all-out war. As Navarro was to learn over the course of nearly fifty exhausting and mind-bending interviews and interrogations, Ramsay had handed the Soviets the knowledge needed to destroy America and its western allies…

In Three Minutes to Doomsday, Joe Navarro tells this extraordinary story for the first time - a story of the exposure and breaking of one of the most damaging espionage rings in US history whose treachery threatened the entire world.
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The Gatekeepers: How the White House Chiefs of Staff Define Every Presidency

The Gatekeepers: How the White House Chiefs of Staff Define Every Presidency

Chris Whipple

$51.95
The first in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at how the American presidency has hinged on the effectiveness of the White House chiefs of staff, and how their decisions have dictated the course of our country.

What do Dick Cheney and Rahm Emanuel have in common? Aside from polarizing personalities, both served as chief of staff to the president of the United States as did Donald Rumsfeld, Leon Panetta, and a relative handful of others. The chiefs of staff, often referred to as  the gatekeepers,  wield tremendous power in Washington and beyond; they decide who is allowed to see the president, negotiate with Congress to push POTUS's agenda, and most crucially are the first in line to the leader of the free world's ear.

Award-winning producer and journalist Chris Whipple demonstrates how those appointed to this lofty position have often served as de facto prime ministers, and the surprising extent to which their tenures have set the tone for our political climate. Through extensive, intimate interviews with all 20 living chiefs of staff and two former presidents,  The Gatekeepers  pulls back the curtain to expose how the nation's levers of power are operated by these right-hand advisors, and what each appointment reveals about its respective president.
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Douglas Macarthur: American Warrior

Douglas Macarthur: American Warrior

Arthur Herman

$41.95
A new, definitive life of an American icon, the visionary general who led American forces through three wars and foresaw his nation's great geopolitical shift toward the Pacific Rim-from the Pulitzer Prize finalist and bestselling author of Gandhi & Churchill.

Douglas MacArthur was arguably the last American public figure to be worshipped unreservedly as a national hero, the last military figure to conjure up the romantic stirrings once evoked by George Armstrong Custer and Robert E. Lee. But he was also one of America's most divisive figures, a man whose entire career was steeped in controversy. Was he an avatar or an anachronism, a brilliant strategist or a vainglorious mountebank? Drawing on a wealth of new sources, Arthur Herman delivers a powerhouse biography that peels back the layers of myth-both good and bad-and exposes the marrow of the man beneath.

MacArthur's life spans the emergence of the United States Army as a global fighting force. Its history is to a great degree his story. The son of a Civil War hero, he led American troops in three monumental conflicts-World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. Born four years after Little Bighorn, he died just as American forces began deploying in Vietnam. Herman's magisterial book spans the full arc of MacArthur's journey, from his elevation to major general at thirty-eight through his tenure as superintendent of West Point, field marshal of the Philippines, supreme ruler of postwar Japan, and beyond. More than any previous biographer, Herman shows how MacArthur's strategic vision helped shape several decades of U.S. foreign policy. Alone among his peers, he foresaw the shift away from Europe, becoming the prophet of America's destiny in the Pacific Rim.

Here, too, is a vivid portrait of a man whose grandiose vision of his own destiny won him enemies as well as acolytes. MacArthur was one of the first military heroes to cultivate his own public persona-the swashbuckling commander outfitted with Ray-Ban sunglasses, riding crop, and corncob pipe. Repeatedly spared from being killed in battle-his soldiers nicknamed him "Bullet Proof"-he had a strong sense of divine mission. "Mac" was a man possessed, in the words of one of his contemporaries, of a "supreme and almost mystical faith that he could not fail." Yet when he did, it was on an epic scale. His willingness to defy both civilian and military authority was, Herman shows, a lifelong trait-and it would become his undoing. Tellingly, MacArthur once observed, "Sometimes it is the order one disobeys that makes one famous."

To capture the life of such an outsize figure in one volume is no small achievement. With Douglas MacArthur, Arthur Herman has set a new standard for untangling the legacy of this American legend.
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Whistleblower at the CIA: An Insider's Account of the Politics of Intelligence

Whistleblower at the CIA: An Insider's Account of the Politics of Intelligence

Melvin A. Goodman

$32.99
Melvin Goodman's long career as a respected intelligence analyst at the CIA, specializing in US/Soviet relations, ended abruptly.

In 1990, after twenty-four years of service, Goodman resigned when he could no longer tolerate the corruption he witnessed at the highest levels of the Agency. In 1991 he went public, blowing the whistle on top-level officials and leading the opposition against the appointment of Robert Gates as CIA director. In the widely covered Senate hearings, Goodman charged that Gates and others had subverted "the process and the ethics of intelligence" by deliberately misinforming the White House about major world events and covert operations.

In this breathtaking expose, Goodman tells the whole story. Retracing his career with the Central Intelligence Agency, he presents a rare insider's account of the inner workings of America's intelligence community, and the corruption, intimidation, and misinformation that lead to disastrous foreign interventions. An invaluable and historic look into one of the most secretive and influential agencies of US government - and a wake-up call for the need to reform its practices.

Melvin A. Goodman served as a senior analyst and Division Chief at the CIA from 1966 to 1990. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Harper's, and many others. He is author of six books on US intelligence and international security.
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Eternity Street: Violence and Justice in Frontier Los Angeles

Eternity Street: Violence and Justice in Frontier Los Angeles

John Mack Faragher

$26.95
Eternity Street tells the story of a violent place in a violent time: the rise of Los Angeles from its origins as a small Mexican pueblo.

In a masterful narrative, John Mack Faragher relates a dramatic history of conquest and ethnic suppression, of collective disorder and interpersonal conflict. Eternity Street recounts the struggle to achieve justice amid the turmoil of a loosely governed frontier, and it delivers a piercing look at the birth of this quintessentially American city.

In the 1850s, the City of Angels was infamous as one of the most murderous societies in America. Saloons teemed with rowdy crowds of Indians and Californios, Mexicans and Americans. Men ambled down dusty streets, armed with Colt revolvers and Bowie knives. A closer look reveals characters acting in unexpected ways: a newspaper editor advocating lynch law in the name of racial justice; hundreds of Latinos massing to attack the county jail, determined to lynch a hooligan from Texas. Murder and mayhem in Edenic southern California. 

"There is no brighter sun...no country where nature is more lavish of her exuberant fullness",  an Angeleno wrote in 1853. And yet, with all our natural beauties and advantages, there is no country where human life is of so little account. Men hack one another to pieces with pistols and other cutlery as if God's image were of no more worth than the life of one of the two or three thousand ownerless dogs that prowl about our streets and make night hideous. 

This is L.A. noir in the act of becoming.
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John William McCormack: A Political Biography

John William McCormack: A Political Biography

Garrison Nelson

$50.00
In the first biography of U.S. House Speaker John W. McCormack, author Garrison Nelson uncovers previously forgotten FBI files, birth and death records, and correspondence long thought lost or buried.

For such an influential figure, McCormack tried to dismiss the past, almost erasing his legacy from the public's mind. John William McCormack: A Political Biography sheds light on the behind-the-curtain machinations of American politics and the origins of the modern-day Democratic party, facilitated through McCormack's triumphs. 

McCormack overcame desperate poverty and family tragedy in the Irish ghetto of South Boston to hold the second-most powerful position in the nation. By reinventing his family history to elude Irish Boston's powerful political gatekeepers, McCormack embarked on a 1928 - 1971 House career and from  1939-71, the longest house leadership career. Working with every president from Coolidge to Nixon, McCormack's social welfare agenda, which included Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, immigration reform, and civil rights legislation helped commit the nation to the welfare of its most vulnerable citizens. 

By helping create the Austin-Boston Connection, McCormack reshaped the Democratic Party from a regional southern white Protestant party to one that embraced urban religiously and racially diverse ethnics.  A man free of prejudice, John McCormack was the Boston Brahmin's favorite Irishman, the South's favorite northerner, and known in Boston as  Rabbi John,  the Jews' favorite Catholic.
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Reporting on the Kennedy Assassination

Reporting on the Kennedy Assassination

Willem L. Oltmans ,  Michael A. Rinella ,  David Stephenson

$63.95
In March 1964 the Dutch journalist Willem Oltmans (1925-2004) encountered Marguerite Oswald, Lee Harvey Oswald's mother, at JFK International Airport. In April 1977, he found himself testifying before the House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA).

In the thirteen years between these two events, Oltmans conducted his own investigation into the assassination of John F. Kennedy-an undertaking that would bring him into contact with a host of individuals with prominent roles in the case, most notably George de Mohrenschildt (1911-1977), whose involvement with Oswald and whose own untimely death remain mysteries to this day. Reporting on the Kennedy Assassination is Oltmans's account of his investigation, published here for the first time in English. Combining personal memoir and factual reporting, the book chronicles the journalist's interviews with figures such as Jim Garrison and Cyril Wecht, his long and complicated friendship with de Mohrenschildt and his wife, and his own whirlwind experience in the media spotlight. 

Most saliently, Reporting on the Kennedy Assassination  offers an intimate look at Oltmans's collaboration with de Mohrenschildt on the book that would later become Lee Harvey Oswald as I Knew Him, and at the circumstances surrounding de Mohrenschildt's death and his possible implication in Oswald's actions.

Systematically annotated and fact-checked, with an insightful introduction from editor Michael Rinella and a wealth of rare photographs and letters, this book provides a fascinating portrait of one of the twentieth century's most controversial journalists even as it completes a critical chapter in the investigation of the Kennedy assassination.
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Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era

Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era

Glenn F. Williams

$49.95
Known to history as  Dunmore's War,  the 1774 campaign against a Shawnee-led Indian confederacy in the Ohio Country marked the final time an American colonial militia took to the field in His Majesty's service and under royal command.

Led by John Murray, the fourth Earl of Dunmore and royal governor of Virginia, a force of colonials including George Rogers Clark, Daniel Morgan, Michael Cresap, Adam Stephen, and Andrew Lewis successfully enforced the western border established by treaties in parts of present-day West Virginia and Kentucky. The campaign is often neglected in histories, despite its major influence on the conduct of the Revolutionary War that followed.

In Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era, award-winning historian Glenn F. Williams describes the course and importance of this campaign. 

Supported by primary source research, the author corrects much of the folklore concerning the war and frontier fighting in general, demonstrating that the Americans did not adopt Indian tactics for wilderness fighting as is often supposed, but rather used British methods developed for fighting irregulars in the woods of Europe, while incorporating certain techniques learned from the Indians and experience gained from earlier colonial wars. As an immediate result of Dunmore's War, the frontier remained quiet for two years, giving the colonies the critical time to debate and declare independence before Britain convinced its Indian allies to resume attacks on American settlements. Ironically, at the same time Virginia militiamen were fighting under command of a king's officer, the colony was becoming one of the leaders in the move toward  American independence. Although he was hailed as a hero at the end of the war, Lord Dunmore's attempt to maintain royal authority put him in direct opposition to many of the subordinates who followed him on the frontier, and in 1776 he was driven from Virginia and returned to England.
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The Contender: Richard Nixon, the Congress Years, 1946-1952

The Contender: Richard Nixon, the Congress Years, 1946-1952

Irwin F. Gellman

$54.99
The definitive account of Richard Nixon's congressional career, back in print with a new preface Unsurpassed in the fifteen years since its original publication, Irwin F. Gellman's exhaustively researched work is the definitive account of Richard Nixon's rise from political unknown to the verge of achieving the vice-presidency. To document Nixon's congressional career, Gellman combed the files of Nixon's 1946, 1948, and 1950 campaigns, papers from the executive sessions of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), and every document dated through 1952 at the Richard Nixon Library. This singular volume corrects many earlier written accounts. For example, there was no secret funding of Nixon's senate campaign in 1950, and Nixon won universal praise for his evenhandedness as a member of HUAC. The first book of a projected five-volume examination of this complex man's entire career, this work stands as the definitive political portrait of Nixon as a fast-rising young political star.
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The Power of Objects in Eighteenth-Century British America

The Power of Objects in Eighteenth-Century British America

Jennifer van Horn

$94.00
Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and array of goods. The Power of Objects in Eighteenth-Century British America investigates these diverse artifacts - from portraits and city views to gravestones, dressing furniture, and prosthetic devices - to explore how elite American consumers assembled objects to form a new civil society on the margins of the British Empire.

In this interdisciplinary transatlantic study, artifacts emerge as key players in the formation of Anglo-American communities and eventually of American citizenship. Deftly interweaving analysis of images with furniture, architecture, clothing, and literary works, Van Horn reconstructs the networks of goods that bound together consumers in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Charleston.

Moving beyond emulation and the desire for social status as the primary motivators for consumption, Van Horn shows that Anglo-Americans' material choices were intimately bound up with their efforts to distance themselves from Native Americans and African Americans. She also traces women's contested place in forging provincial culture. As encountered through a woman's application of makeup at her dressing table or an amputee's donning of a wooden leg after the Revolutionary War, material artifacts were far from passive markers of rank or political identification. They made Anglo-American society.
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American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century

American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century

Gary Gerstle

$61.00
This sweeping history of twentieth-century America follows the changing and often conflicting ideas about the fundamental nature of American society: Is the United States a social melting pot, as our civic creed warrants, or is full citizenship somehow reserved for those who are white and of the 'right'? ancestry? Gary Gerstle traces the forces of civic and racial nationalism, arguing that both profoundly shaped our society.
 
After Theodore Roosevelt led his Rough Riders to victory during the Spanish American War, he boasted of the diversity of his men's origins- from the Kentucky backwoods to the Irish, Italian, and Jewish neighborhoods of northeastern cities. Roosevelt's vision of a hybrid and superior 'American race,'? strengthened by war, would inspire the social, diplomatic, and economic policies of American liberals for decades. And yet, for all of its appeal to the civic principles of inclusion, this liberal legacy was grounded in 'Anglo-Saxon'? culture, making it difficult in particular for Jews and Italians and especially for Asians and African Americans to gain acceptance.   
 
Gerstle weaves a compelling story of events, institutions, and ideas that played on perceptions of ethnic/racial difference, from the world wars and the labor movement to the New Deal and Hollywood to the Cold War and the civil rights movement. We witness the remnants of racial thinking among such liberals as FDR and LBJ; we see how Italians and Jews from Frank Capra to the creators of Superman perpetuated the New Deal philosophy while suppressing their own ethnicity; we feel the frustrations of African-American servicemen denied the opportunity to fight for their country and the moral outrage of more recent black activists, including Martin Luther King, Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, and Malcolm X.   
 
Gerstle argues that the civil rights movement and Vietnam broke the liberal nation apart, and his analysis of this upheaval leads him to assess Reagan's and Clinton's attempts to resurrect nationalism. Can the United States ever live up to its civic creed? For anyone who views racism as an aberration from the liberal premises of the republic, this book is must reading.   
 
Containing a new chapter that reconstructs and dissects the major struggles over race and nation in an era defined by the War on Terror and by the presidency of Barack Obama, American Crucible is a must-read for anyone who views racism as an aberration from the liberal premises of the republic.
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Rivals Unto Death: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr

Rivals Unto Death: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr

Rick Beyer

$32.99
The day was hot and sticky. The man in the rowboat was an impetuous hothead. His row across the choppy Hudson that morning led to a confrontation that has burned bright in the American mind for more than two hundred years.

When the most notorious duel in American history took place, Alexander Hamilton was 49, a former Treasury Secretary whose meteoric political rise had flamed out in the wake of a humiliating sex scandal. Vice President Aaron Burr, was just a year younger than Hamilton, at the top of a meteoric rise of his own in the nation's fledgling government.

Though the duel is famous, the fascinating three-decade dance that led to it is far less known. Rivals Unto Death will explore that dance, vividly sketching the key episodes that led to its violent end. It will start with the preliminaries of that fateful morning in 1804, then retrace the rivalry back to the earliest days of the American Revolution, when both men, brilliant, restless, and barely twenty years old, elbowed their way onto the staff of General George Washington.

It will follow them as they launch their competitive legal practices in New York City, the new country's bustling commercial center of thirty thousand people, through the insanity of the election of 1800, when Hamilton threw his support behind Thomas Jefferson in an effort to knock Burr out of the running for president, and through countless surprising moments in their past, such as when Burr saved Hamilton from capture and possible death at the hands of the British.

Sharply realized and compellingly written, Rivals Unto Death transports readers to the era of Hamilton and Burr and explores how what was once considered the New World ended up being too small for the both of them.
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Benjamin Franklin in London: The British Life of America's Founding Father

Benjamin Franklin in London: The British Life of America's Founding Father

George Goodwin

$24.99
A great man on an even greater stage: Benjamin Franklin arrives in London at the very moment it becomes the epicentre of the greatest power in the world.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London. With just a brief interlude, a house in Craven Street was to be his home until 1775.

From there he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful, whether in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, or on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends, and as an American colonial representative he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. These two events brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin long sought to prevent the break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event. On the eve of the American War of Independence, Franklin fled arrest and escaped by sea. He would never return to London.

With his unique focus on the fullness of Benjamin Franklin's life in London, George Goodwin has created an enthralling portrait of the man, the city and the age.
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Treasures of the New-York Historical Society

Treasures of the New-York Historical Society

Louise Mirrer

$24.99
Founded in 1804, the New-York Historical Society is New York City's oldest museum, with a rich history of scholarship, research, and illuminating exhibitions.

The museum collection of the New-York Historical Society comprises more than 1.6 million works of art, featuring an impressive collection of Tiffany lamps, paintings by celebrated American portraitists, all the known preparatory watercolors for John James Audubon's Birds of America, and exquisite works by artists of the Hudson River School - including Thomas Cole's monumental series The Course of Empire. The Library is internationally known as a major research venue for the study of American and New York history.

Its rich collections include more than five million manuscript items, 350,000 books, and several million photographs, prints, architectural renderings, and related holdings. The Library's vast holdings of printed ephemera documenting daily life, culture, commerce, and politics from the eighteenth through the earlier twentieth centuries are unrivaled. The collections provide a continuous record of New York and American history from the founding of New Amsterdam through the tragic events of 9/11. 

The Library's deepest areas of original source material include the Colonial and Revolutionary eras, the Early Republic, the Civil War, and the Gilded Age, with emphases on slavery and Abolition, temperance, social welfare, urban life, and architecture.  Now celebrating a groundbreaking renovation and the dedication of its Center for the Study of Women's History, the Museum and Library present highlights from their remarkable holdings, from the folk art collection of sculptor Elie Nadelman to iconic ephemera from all eras of American history, for the first time as a Tiny Folio.

An ideal souvenir for the New-York Historical Society's visitors, this charming volume also features a special section of works depicting the city itself, alongside full-color photography and short introductory texts.
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Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America

Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America

Donald J. Trump

$22.99
In this book (previously published as Crippled America), we're going to look at the state of the world right now. It's a terrible mess, and that's putting it mildly. There has never been a more dangerous time. The politicians and special interests in Washington, DC are directly responsible for the mess we are in. So why should we continue listening to them?

It's time to bring America back to its rightful owners-the American people.

I'm not going to play the same game politicians have been playing for decades-all talk, no action, while special interests and lobbyists dictate our laws. I am shaking up the establishment on both sides of the political aisle because I can't be bought. I want to bring America back, to make it great and prosperous again, and to be sure we are respected by our allies and feared by our adversaries.

It's time for action. Americans are fed up with politics as usual. And they should be! In this book, I outline my vision to make America great again, including: how to fix our failing economy; how to reform health care so it is more efficient, cost-effective, and doesn't alienate both doctors and patients; how to rebuild our military and start winning wars-instead of watching our enemies take over-while keeping our promises to our great veterans; how to ensure that our education system offers the resources that allow our students to compete internationally, so tomorrow's jobseekers have the tools they need to succeed; and how to immediately bring jobs back to America by closing our doors to illegal immigrants, and pressuring businesses to produce their goods at home.

This book is my blueprint for how to Make America Great Again. It's not hard. We just need someone with the courage to say what needs to be said. We won't find that in Washington, DC.
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Lincoln and the Democrats: The Politics of Opposition in the Civil War

Lincoln and the Democrats: The Politics of Opposition in the Civil War

Mark E. Neely, Jr.

$39.95
Lincoln and the Democrats describes the vexatious behavior of a two-party system in war and points to the sound parts of the American system which proved to be the country's salvation: local civic pride, and quiet nonpartisanship in mobilization and funding for the war, for example. While revealing that the role of a noxious 'white supremacy' in American politics of the period has been exaggerated - as has the power of the Copperheads - Neely revives the claim that the Civil War put the country on the road to 'human rights', and also uncovers a previously unnoticed tendency toward deceptive and impractical grandstanding on the Constitution during war in the United States.
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Big Agenda: President Trump's Plan to Save America

Big Agenda: President Trump's Plan to Save America

David Horowitz

$39.99
Donald Trump's victory in the 2016 election was more than a historic upset. It was the beginning of a major political, economic, and social revolution that will change America - and the world. One of the nation's foremost conservative commentators, New York Times bestselling author, and a mentor to many of Donald Trump's key advisers, David Horowitz presents a White House battle plan to halt the Democrats' march to extinguish the values America holds dear.

With the White House and Senate in GOP hands, and a Supreme Court soon to follow, President Trump will have a greater opportunity than even Ronald Reagan had to reshape the American political landscape while securing the nation's vital security interests abroad. No president since FDR and his famed '100 Days' has the chance Donald Trump has,  Horowitz argues. But he writes that the GOP and Trump must recognize they are not fighting policy ideas, but an ideology - a progressive one with a radical agenda to stop Trump in an effort to reduce America's power and greatness.

Big Agenda is a rallying cry and indispensable guide for how to claim ultimate victory for the conservative cause. Horowitz writes,  One battle is over, but there are many more to come. This book is a guide to fighting the opponents of the conservative restoration. It identifies who the adversaries are - their methods and their motivations. It describes their agenda - not merely the particular issues with which they advance their goal, but the destructive goal itself. And it lays out a strategy that can defeat them.
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Republic of Spin: An Inside History of the American Presidency

Republic of Spin: An Inside History of the American Presidency

David Greenberg

$26.95
In Republic of Spin - a vibrant history covering more than one hundred years of politics - presidential historian David Greenberg recounts the rise of the White House spin machine, from Teddy Roosevelt to Barack Obama.

His sweeping, startling narrative takes us behind the scenes to see how the tools and techniques of image making and message craft work. We meet Woodrow Wilson convening the first White House press conference, Franklin Roosevelt huddling with his private pollsters, Ronald Reagan's aides crafting his nightly news sound bites, and George W. Bush staging his  Mission Accomplished  photo-op. We meet, too, the backstage visionaries who pioneered new ways of gauging public opinion and mastering the media-figures like George Cortelyou, TR's brilliantly efficient press manager; 1920s ad whiz Bruce Barton; Robert Montgomery, Dwight Eisenhower's canny TV coach; and of course the key spinmeisters of our own times, from Roger Ailes to David Axelrod.

Greenberg also examines the profound debates Americans have waged over the effect of spin on our politics. Does spin help our leaders manipulate the citizenry? Or does it allow them to engage us more fully in the democratic project? 

Exploring the ideas of the century's most incisive political critics, from Walter Lippmann and H. L. Mencken to Hannah Arendt and Stephen Colbert, Republic of Spin illuminates both the power of spin and its limitations-its capacity not only to mislead but also to lead.
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Dutch Armies of the 80 Years' War 1568-1648 1: Infantry

Dutch Armies of the 80 Years' War 1568-1648 1: Infantry

Bouko de Groot ,  Gerry Embleton

$21.99
The 80 Years' War (also known as the Dutch War of Independence) was the foundation of Dutch nationhood, and during the course of the conflict one of its main leaders - Maurice of Orange-Nassau - created an army and a tactical system that became a model throughout Europe. This study, the first of a two-part series, focuses on the Dutch infantry. It examines how Maurice of Orange-Nassau attracted volunteers and students from across Europe, introduced innovative new training methods such as common drill movements, and standardised the organisation and payment system of the army to make it more than a match for the occupying Spanish. His successes inspired officers and generals across the continent to copy his methods, including many English officers who went on to fight in the English Civil Wars. Featuring full-colour artwork and rare period illustrations, this book examines how the Dutch infantry was transformed into a fighting force able to defeat the might of Imperial Spain.
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Almost a French Australia: French-British Rivalry in the Southern Ocean

Almost a French Australia: French-British Rivalry in the Southern Ocean

Noelene Bloomfield

$36.95
Reprinted due to popular demand, a wonderfully illustrated book about the early years of exploration in Australian waters, and the strong rivalry between British and French navies. Featuring many luminaries who have lent their name to the region, such as Bougainville and La Perouse. Describes the fascinating history and context which these men lived through Includes a map of Australia littered with places that have French names, which stand as testimony to the endeavours of these explorers.
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Aitape Story: The Great New Guinea Tsunami of 1998

Aitape Story: The Great New Guinea Tsunami of 1998

Hugh Davies

$39.95
A comprehensive and gripping account of the disaster that devastated New Guinea in 1998, destroying towns and villages, and taking a shocking death toll. Professor Hugh Davies was there, and in this book he explains in harrowing detail the events of the earthquake and tsunami, and the recovery effort that followed. It also describes the history and geology of the area for layperson and scientist alike. Many lessons learned in the aftermath helped inform the response to earthquakes and tsunamis that followed, such as the Boxing Day tsunami and the Fukushima tsunami.
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Who Lost Russia?: How the World Entered a New Cold War

Who Lost Russia?: How the World Entered a New Cold War

Peter Conradi

$38.99
The collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991 appeared to usher in a remarkable new era of peace and co-operation with the West. This, we were told, was the end of history: now the entire world would embrace enlightenment values and liberal democracy. Reality has proved very different. Russia emerged from the 1990s battered and humiliated, a latter day Weimar Germany, its protests ignored as NATO expanded eastwards to take in Moscow's former satellites. Vladimir Putin offered a new start when he took the place of the erratic Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin, but, determined to restore his country's bruised pride, he has wrong footed the West with his incursions into Georgia, Ukraine and Syria. A cold war threatens to turn hot once again. In this provocative new work, based on exclusive interviews with key players either side of the new divide, Peter Conradi addresses the failures of understanding on both sides over the past twenty-five years and outlines how we can get relations back on track before it's too late.
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Sevastopol's Wars: Crimea from Potemkin to Putin

Sevastopol's Wars: Crimea from Potemkin to Putin

Mungo Melvin

$49.99
Founded by Catherine the Great, the maritime city of Sevastopol has been fought over for centuries. Crucial battles of the Crimean War were fought on the hills surrounding the city, and the memory of this stalwart defence inspired those who fruitlessly battled the Germans during World War II. Twice the city has faced complete obliteration yet twice it has risen, phoenix-like, from the ashes. In this groundbreaking volume, award-winning author Mungo Melvin explores how Sevastopol became the crucible of conflict over three major engagements - the Crimean War, the Russian Civil War and World War II - witnessing the death and destruction of countless armies yet creating the indomitable 'spirit of Sevastopol'. By weaving together first-hand interviews, detailed operational reports and battle analysis, Melvin creates a rich tapestry of history.
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Russia: The Story of War

Russia: The Story of War

Gregory Carleton

$54.95
No nation is a stranger to war, but for Russians war is a central part of who they are. Their motherland has been the battlefield where some of the largest armies have clashed, the most savage battles have been fought, the highest death tolls paid. Having prevailed over Mongol hordes and vanquished Napoleon and Hitler, many Russians believe no other nation has sacrificed so much for the world.

In Russia: The Story of War Gregory Carleton explores how this belief has produced a myth of exceptionalism that pervades Russian culture and politics and has helped forge a national identity rooted in war.

While outsiders view Russia as an aggressor, Russians themselves see a country surrounded by enemies, poised in a permanent defensive crouch as it fights one invader after another. Time and again, history has called upon Russia to play the savior of Europe, of Christianity, of civilization itself and its victories, especially over the Nazis in World War II, have come at immense cost. In this telling, even defeats lose their sting. Isolation becomes a virtuous destiny and the whole of its bloody history a point of pride.

War is the unifying thread of Russia's national epic, one that transcends its wrenching ideological transformations from the archconservative empire to the radical-totalitarian Soviet Union to the resurgent nationalism of the country today. As Putin's Russia asserts itself in ever bolder ways, knowing how the story of its war-torn past shapes the present is essential to understanding its self-image and worldview.
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Moscow 1956: The Silenced Spring

Moscow 1956: The Silenced Spring

Kathleen E. Smith

$54.95
Joseph Stalin had been dead for three years when his successor, Nikita Khrushchev, stunned a closed gathering of Communist officials with a litany of his predecessor s abuses. Meant to clear the way for reform from above, Khrushchev s Secret Speech of February 25, 1956, shattered the myth of Stalin s infallibility. In a bid to rejuvenate the Party, Khrushchev had his report read out loud to members across the Soviet Union that spring. However, its message sparked popular demands for more information and greater freedom to debate.

Moscow 1956: The Silenced Spring brings this first brief season of thaw into fresh focus. Drawing on newly declassified Russian archives, Kathleen Smith offers a month-by-month reconstruction of events as the official process of de-Stalinization unfolded and political and cultural experimentation flourished. Smith looks at writers, students, scientists, former gulag prisoners, and free-thinkers who took Khrushchev s promise of liberalization seriously, testing the limits of a more open Soviet system.

But when anti-Stalin sentiment morphed into calls for democratic reform and eventually erupted in dissent within the Soviet bloc notably in the Hungarian uprising the Party balked and attacked critics. Yet Khrushchev had irreversibly opened his compatriots eyes to the flaws of monopolistic rule. Citizens took the Secret Speech as inspiration and permission to opine on how to restore justice and build a better society, and the new crackdown only reinforced their discontent. The events of 1956 set in motion a cycle of reform and retrenchment that would recur until the Soviet Union s collapse in 1991.
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Black Wind, White Snow: The Rise of Russia's New Nationalism

Black Wind, White Snow: The Rise of Russia's New Nationalism

Charles Clover

$32.99
A fascinating study of the root motivations behind the political activities and philosophies of Putin's government in Russia Charles Clover, award-winning journalist and former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, here analyses the idea of Eurasianism, a theory of Russian national identity based on ethnicity and geography. Clover traces Eurasianism's origins in the writings of White Russian exiles in 1920s Europe, through Siberia's Gulag archipelago in the 1950s, the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and up to its steady infiltration of the governing elite around Vladimir Putin. This eye-opening analysis pieces together the evidence for Eurasianism's place at the heart of Kremlin thinking today and explores its impact on recent events, the annexation of Crimea, the rise in Russia of anti-Western paranoia and imperialist rhetoric, as well as Putin's sometimes perplexing political actions and ambitions. Based on extensive research and dozens of interviews with Putin's close advisers, this quietly explosive story will be essential reading for anyone concerned with Russia's past century, and its future.
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Kursk 1943: The Southern Front

Kursk 1943: The Southern Front

Robert Forczyk ,  Graham Turner

$29.99
Mauled at Stalingrad, the German army looked to regain the initiative on the Eastern Front with a huge offensive launched near the city of Kursk, 280 miles south-west of Moscow. Armed with the new Panther tank, Hitler and Field Marshal von Manstein were confident that they could inflict another crushing defeat on the Soviet Union. What they did not know is that the Soviets knew about the coming attack, and they were ready. This book focuses on the southern front of this campaign, which featured one of the biggest clash of armour of the warin the battle of Prokhorovka which involved over a thousand tanks. It examines in detail the tactics and mistakes of the army commanders as they orchestrated one of the bloodiest battles in World War II. Using campaign maps, stunning photographs and vivid artwork, this new study, a companion to Campaign 272 Kursk 1943: The Northern Front, examines whether that the German offensive was doomed from the start as it takes the reader through this titanic clash of armour.
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For the Motherland! For Stalin!: A Red Army Officer's Memoir of the Eastern Front

For the Motherland! For Stalin!: A Red Army Officer's Memoir of the Eastern Front

Boris Bogachev

$55.00
For the Motherland! is an absorbingly frank portrait of a Red Army officer's hellish yet heroic experience on the Eastern Front, and of the wide gap between ideology and reality in Stalinist Russia.Determined and resourceful, Boris Bogachev enlisted as soon as he turned seventeen. Life in the Red Army was harsh, with food shortages, inadequate equipment and fear-of the well-armed and formidably well trained Wehrmacht, but also of the trigger-happy NKVD political commissars at his back. Bogachev fought in many campaigns. He was wounded three times, and faced execution three times.Bogachev retired in 1985, a much-decorated colonel, but was also involved as a military lawyer in rehabilitating the victims of the Great Terror. His vivid memoir of life as a young officer in the Great Patriotic War is both a riveting tale of hardship and courage and an invaluable historical account.
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Fire and Blood: The European Civil War, 1914-1945

Fire and Blood: The European Civil War, 1914-1945

Enzo Traverso

$19.99
Fire and Blood looks at the European crisis of the two world wars as a single historical sequence: the age of the European Civil War (1914-1945). Its overture was played out in the trenches of the Great War; its coda on a ruined continent. It opened with conventional declarations of war and finished with 'unconditional surrender'. Proclamations of national unity led to eventual devastation, with entire countries torn to pieces. During these three decades of deepening conflicts, a classical interstate conflict morphed into a global civil war, abandoning rules of engagement and fought by irreducible enemies rather than legitimate adversaries, each seeking the annihilation of its opponents. It was a time of both unchained passions and industrial, rationalized massacre. Utilizing multiple sources, Enzo Traverso depicts the dialectic of this era of wars, revolutions and genocides. Rejecting commonplace notions of 'totalitarian evil', he rediscovers the feelings and reinterprets the ideas of an age of intellectual and political commitment when Europe shaped world history with its own collapse.
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Roman Republic at War: A Compendium of Roman Battles from 498 to 31 BC

Roman Republic at War: A Compendium of Roman Battles from 498 to 31 BC

Don Taylor

$65.00
In a single volume, Roman Republic at War catalogues and offers a brief description of every significant battle fought by the Roman Republic between 480 and 31 BC (and most of the minor ones too). The information in each entry is drawn exclusively from Ancient texts, in order to offer a brief description of each battle based solely on the information provided by the earliest surviving sources which chronicle the event. This approach provides the reader a concise foundation of information to which they can then confidently apply later scholarly interpretation presented in secondary sources in order to achieve a more accurate understanding of the most likely battlefield scenario. In writing the battle descriptions, the author has not sought analyse the evidence contained in the surviving accounts, nor embellish them beyond that which was necessary to provide clarity to the modern reader. He allows the original writers to speak for themselves, presenting the reader with a succinct version of what the ancient chroniclers tell us of these dramatic events. It is an excellent first-stop reference to the many battles of the Roman Republic.
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Breakdown: The Crisis of Shell Shock on the Somme, 1916

Breakdown: The Crisis of Shell Shock on the Somme, 1916

Taylor Downing

$22.99
Paralysis. Stuttering. The 'shakes'. Inability to stand or walk. Temporary blindness or deafness.

When strange symptoms like these began appearing in men at Casualty Clearing Stations in 1915, a debate began in army and medical circles as to what it was, what had caused it and what could be done to cure it. But the numbers were never large.

Then in July 1916 with the start of the Somme battle the incidence of shell shock rocketed. The high command of the British army began to panic. An increasingly large number of men seemed to have simply lost the will to fight. As entire battalions had to be withdrawn from the front, commanders and military doctors desperately tried to come up with explanations as to what was going wrong. 'Shell shock' - what we would now refer to as battle trauma - was sweeping the Western Front.

By the beginning of August 1916, nearly 200,000 British soldiers had been killed or wounded during the first month of fighting along the Somme. Another 300,000 would be lost before the battle was over. But the army always said it could not calculate the exact number of those suffering from shell shock. Re-assessing the official casualty figures, Taylor Downing for the first time comes up with an accurate estimate of the total numbers who were taken out of action by psychological wounds. It is a shocking figure.

Taylor Downing's revelatory new book follows units and individuals from signing up to the Pals Battalions of 1914, through to the horrors of their experiences on the Somme which led to the shell shock that, unrelated to weakness or cowardice, left the men unable to continue fighting. He shines a light on the official - and brutal - response to the epidemic, even against those officers and doctors who looked on it sympathetically. It was, they believed, a form of hysteria. It was contagious. And it had to be stopped.

Breakdown brings an entirely new perspective to bear on one of the iconic battles of the First World War.
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How Churchill Saved Civilization: The Epic Story of 13 Years That Almost Destroyed the Civilized World

How Churchill Saved Civilization: The Epic Story of 13 Years That Almost Destroyed the Civilized World

John Harte

$37.99
How Churchill Saved Civilization resolves the lingering mysteries surrounding the causes of the Second World War, and what transpired during the war to bring its end result. It proposes answers to such questions as "Why were the Allies unprepared?", "Why did France collapse so quickly?", "Why didn’t the British government accept Hitler’s peace proposals?" and “Why did the Germans allow Hitler to obtain life and death control over them?"

But the book’s main purpose is to provide an account of Winston Churchill’s actions and their intended consequences – as well as some of the unintended ones – for readers who are unlikely to read a military history book of 800 pages. The author has pared down the details of this at once fascinating and frightening story to an accessible length of how the world nearly ended in the 1940s. How Churchill Saved Civilization was written in honor of all those who sacrificed their lives in the War, and to caution readers that it could very easily happen again, as key factors like complacency, ignorance, and weakness continue to play a role in international diplomacy.

Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history - books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
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The Locomotive of War: Money, Empire, Power and Guilt

The Locomotive of War: Money, Empire, Power and Guilt

Peter Clarke

$34.99
A fresh and fascinating reappraisal of the first half of the twentieth century from one of our foremost historians

'War, comrades,' declared Trotsky, 'is a great locomotive of history.' He was thought to be acknowledging the opportunity the First World War had offered the Bolsheviks to seize power in Russia in 1917. Twentieth-century warfare, based on new technologies and mass armies, certainly saw the locomotive power of war geared up to an unprecedented level.

Peter Clarke explores the crucial ways in which war can be seen as a prime mover of history in the twentieth century through the eyes of five major figures. In Britain two wartime prime ministers - first David Lloyd George, later Winston Churchill - found their careers made and unmade by the unprecedented challenges they faced. In the United States, two presidents elected in peacetime - Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt - likewise found that war drastically changed their agenda. And it was through the experience of war that the economic ideas of John Maynard Keynes were shaped and came to exert wide influence.

When the United States entered the First World War in 1917, President Wilson famously declared: 'The world must be made safe for democracy.' This liberal prospectus was to be tested in the subsequent peace treaty, one that was to be bitterly remembered by Germans for its 'war guilt clause'. But both in the making of the war and the making of the peace the issue of guilt did not suddenly materialise out of thin air. As Clarke's narrative shows, it was an integral component of the Anglo-American liberal tradition.

The Locomotive of War is a forensic and punctilious examination of both the interplay between key figures in the context of the unprecedented all-out wars of 1914-18 and 1939-45 and the broader dynamics of history in this extraordinary period. Deeply revealing and insightful, it is history of the highest calibre.
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Triumph at Imphal-Kohima: How the Indian Army Finally Stopped the Japanese Juggernaut

Triumph at Imphal-Kohima: How the Indian Army Finally Stopped the Japanese Juggernaut

Raymond Callahan

$49.95
In the spring of 1944, on the eastern front of India near the Burmese border, the seemingly unstoppable Imperial Japanese Army suffered the worst defeat in its history at the hands of Lieutenant General William Slim's British XIV Army, most of whose units were drawn from the little-esteemed Indian Army. Triumph at Imphal-Kohima tells the largely unknown story of how an army that Winston Churchill had once dismissed as a welter of lassitude and inefficiency came to achieve such an unlikely, unprecedented, and critical victory for the Allied forces in World War II.
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Animal Heroes

Animal Heroes

Anthony Hill

$32.99
In Darwin in 1942, Gunner's barking alerted an entire army base of impending air raids, well before the enemy planes appeared on radar. Following an ambush, Sarbi the explosive detection dog was held captive by the Taliban for over a year, before heading home a hero. And when 135000 horses left Australia for the First World War, why was General Bridges' charger Sandy the only one to return home? Drawing from first-hand sources and interviews with those who were there, Anthony Hill brings to life the loyalty and courage of these animals, and the love their soldiers felt for them. From the donkeys that carried the wounded at Gallipoli to the dolphins that hunted underwater mines in Iraq, these animal heroes are at the heart of some of the most remarkable stories in Australia's military history. This fully revised and updated edition features inspiring true stories of heroism and sacrifice, many of them never told before.
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Panzer 38T vs BT-7: Barbarossa 1941

Panzer 38T vs BT-7: Barbarossa 1941

Steven J. Zaloga ,  Jim Laurier

$25.99
The tank battles in the Soviet Union during the summer of 1941 were the largest in World War II, exceeding even the more famous Prokhorovka encounter during the Kursk campaign. Indeed, they were the largest tank battles ever fought. This book examines two evenly matched competitors in this conflict, the German Panzer 38(t) and the Soviet BT-7. Both were of similar size, armed with guns of comparable firepower, and had foreign roots - the Panzer 38(t) was a Czechoslovak design and the BT-7 was an evolution of the American Christie tank. With full-colour artwork and archive and present-day photography, this absorbing study assesses the strengths and limitations of these two types against the wider background of armoured doctrine in the opening stages of Operation Barbarossa.
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The Suomi Submachine Gun

The Suomi Submachine Gun

Leroy Thompson ,  Adam Hook ,  Alan Gilliland

$25.99
Entering service in 1931, the 9x19mm Suomi KP/-31 submachine gun saw extensive combat with Finnish troops during their fight against Soviet forces in 1939-44. It was also manufactured under licence in Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden, and remained in Finnish service until the 1980s, an indication of its durability. Rugged and accurate, the Suomi was a favourite with Finnish ski troops who would strike from ambush, cutting down Soviet troops, then skiing away into the woods. Initially used by the Finns as a light machine gun at infantry squad level, it eventually became a dedicated submachine gun, and since it had been designed to be more accurate than the typical SMG, it was often even used as a sniping weapon, or to supplement longer-ranged rifles such as the Mosin-Nagant. Featuring first-hand accounts and specially commissioned colour artwork, this is the story of one of World War II's most distinctive and respected infantry weapons.
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The New Deal: A Global History

The New Deal: A Global History

Kiran Klaus Patel

$57.99
The New Deal: A Global History provides a radically new interpretation of a pivotal period in US history. The first comprehensive study of the New Deal in a global context, the book compares American responses to the international crisis of capitalism and democracy during the 1930s to responses by other countries around the globe - not just in Europe but also in Latin America, Asia, and other parts of the world.

Work creation, agricultural intervention, state planning, immigration policy, the role of mass media, forms of political leadership, and new ways of ruling America's colonies - all had parallels elsewhere and unfolded against a backdrop of intense global debates.  By avoiding the distortions of American exceptionalism, Kiran Klaus Patel shows how America's reaction to the Great Depression connected it to the wider world. Among much else, the book explains why the New Deal had enormous repercussions on China; why Franklin D. Roosevelt studied the welfare schemes of Nazi Germany; and why the New Dealers were fascinated by cooperatives in Sweden--but ignored similar schemes in Japan. 

Ultimately, Patel argues, the New Deal provided the institutional scaffolding for the construction of American global hegemony in the postwar era, making this history essential for understanding both the New Deal and America's rise to global leadership.
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World War II on the Russian Front 1941-1945

World War II on the Russian Front 1941-1945

Mike Lepine

$65.00
On June 22nd, 1941 Hitler launched his invasion of Russia Operation Barbarossa. Eighty per cent of all German soldiers lost in World War II were killed on the Russian Front. Here were the greatest civilian losses the largest battle and the biggest tank battle Kursk the world has ever seen. This was war on a scale and ferocity never seen before as Hitler and Stalin battled for the future of the world. Also included on four DVDs is the award winning History Channel Series Soviet Storm, never before released on DVD.
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The Month That Changed the World: July 1914 and WWI

The Month That Changed the World: July 1914 and WWI

Gordon Martel

$30.95
On 28 June 1914 the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in the Balkans. Five fateful weeks later the Great Powers of Europe were at war.

Much time and ink has been spent ever since trying to identify the "guilty" person or state responsible, or alternatively attempting to explain the underlying forces that 'inevitably' led to war in 1914. Unsatisfied with these explanations, Gordon Martel now goes back to the contemporary diplomatic, military, and political records to investigate the twists and turns of the crisis afresh, with the aim of establishing just how the catastrophe really unfurled.

What emerges is the story of a terrible, unnecessary tragedy - one that can be understood only by retracing the steps taken by those who went down the road to war. With each passing day, we see how the personalities of leading figures such as Kaiser Wilhelm II, the Emperor Franz Joseph, Tsar Nicholas II, Sir Edward Grey, and Raymond Poincare were central to the unfolding crisis, how their hopes and fears intersected as events unfolded, and how each new decision produced a response that complicated or escalated matters to the point where they became almost impossible to contain.

Devoting a chapter to each day of the infamous "July Crisis," this gripping step by step account of the descent to war makes clear just how little the conflict was in fact premeditated, preordained, or even predictable. Almost every day it seemed possible that the crisis could be settled as so many had been over the previous decade; almost every day there was a new suggestion that gave statesmen hope that war could be avoided without abandoning vital interests.

And yet, as the last month of peace ebbed away, the actions and reactions of the Great Powers disastrously escalated the situation. So much so that, by the beginning of August, what might have remained a minor Balkan problem had turned into the cataclysm of the First World War.
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The Anatomy of a Traitor: A History of Espionage and Betrayal

The Anatomy of a Traitor: A History of Espionage and Betrayal

Michael Smith

$59.99
Could you betray your country? Not only turn your back on your friends, family, everything you have ever known but actively seek to destroy it? The Anatomy of a Traitor focuses on the critical moment in a spy's life: that split-second when they decide to embrace a double life; to cheat and hide and hurt; to risk disgrace - even death - without any guarantee of being rewarded or even recognised. Each chapter centres on different motives, exploring them through the stories of famous spies, such as the Cambridge Five, Sidney Reilly and Aldrich Ames, following the path they took that lead, finally, to their treachery. Through in-depth insider knowledge, Michael Smith also uncovers new and unknown cases, including ISIS, President Trump's links with Russia and Edward Snowden's role as a whistleblower to offer compelling psychological portrait of these men and women, homing unerringly on the fault-lines and shady corners of their characters, their weaknesses and their strengths, the lies they tell other people, and the lies they always end up telling themselves.
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Ice Ghosts: The Epic Hunt for the Lost Franklin Expedition

Ice Ghosts: The Epic Hunt for the Lost Franklin Expedition

Paul Watson

$39.95
Ice Ghosts weaves together the epic story of the Lost Franklin Expedition of 1845-whose two ships and crew of 129 were lost to the Arctic ice-with the tale of the incredible discovery of the flagship's wreck in 2014. Paul Watson, who was on the icebreaker that led the discovery expedition, tells a fast-paced historical adventure story: Sir John Franklin and the crew of the HMS Erebus and Terror setting off in search of the fabled Northwest Passage, the hazards they encountered and the reasons they were forced to abandon ship hundreds of miles from the nearest outpost of civilization, and the decades of searching that exposed rumours of cannibalism and a few scattered papers and bones-until a combination of Inuit lore and the latest science yielded a discovery for the ages.
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The Alps: A Human History from Hannibal to Heidi and Beyond

The Alps: A Human History from Hannibal to Heidi and Beyond

Stephen O'Shea

$38.95
The Alps have seen the march of armies, the flow of pilgrims and Crusaders, the feats of mountaineers and the dreams of engineers-and some 14 million people live among their peaks today. In The Alps, Stephen O'Shea takes readers up and down these majestic mountains, journeying through their 500-mile arc across France, Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Germany, Austria and Slovenia. He explores the reality behind Hannibal's crossing; he reveals how the Alps have influenced culture from Frankenstein to Heidi and The Sound of Music; and he visits the spot of Sherlock Holmes's death scene, the bloody site of the Italians' retreat in the First World War and Hitler's notorious Eagle's Nest. Throughout, O'Shea records his adventures with the watch makers, salt miners, cable-car operators and yodelers who define the Alps today.
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War

War

Gwynne Dyer

$29.99
Gwynne Dyer's War, now in its first UK edition, is widely regarded as one of the most compelling analyses of the history and psychology of armed conflict.

Veteran political journalist and military historian Dyer argues against the inevitability of warfare in clear, intelligent and eminently accessible prose, submitting neither to resignation nor false optimism. The multipolar world that has arisen since the fall of the Iron Curtain has forced a re-examination of the accepted fundamentals of history. Dyer traces the psychology of soldiers to the workings of whole armies, and then to broader historical movements and how they change over time - or don't.

He argues that war, as an act of mass violence, has remained unchanged; the only real change has been technological. Can shared values, widely disseminated, help us move beyond mass warfare? Does the endless threat of terrorism help preserve the military status quo? Are traditional military and administrative hierarchies still relevant? Why do humans fight wars? Is it even possible to tame the impulse? How can we unlearn war?

War is essential reading on the way to resolving these perennial questions, and is a valuable historical treatise as well as a fervent, persuasive call to pacifism.
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Beans: A History

Beans: A History

Ken Albala

$29.99
This is the story of the bean, the staple food cultivated by humans for over 10,000 years. From the lentil to the soybean, every civilization on the planet has cultivated its own species of bean. The humble bean has always attracted attention - from Pythagoras' notion that the bean hosted a human soul to St. Jerome's indictment against bean-eating in convents (because they tickle the genitals ), to current research into the deadly toxins contained in the most commonly eaten beans. Over time, the bean has been both scorned as poor man's meat and praised as health-giving, even patriotic. Attitudes to this most basic of foodstuffs have always revealed a great deal about a society. Featuring a new preface from author Ken Albala, Beans: A History takes the reader on a fascinating journey across cuisines and cultures.
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Age of Anger: A History of the Present

Age of Anger: A History of the Present

Pankaj Mishra

$35.00
'Urgent, profound and extraordinarily timely... throws light on our  contemporary predicament, when the neglected and dispossessed of the  world have suddenly risen up to transform the world we thought we knew'. John Banville 

How can we explain the origins of the great  wave of paranoid hatreds that seem inescapable in our close-knit world - from American 'shooters' and ISIS to Trump, from a rise in vengeful  nationalism across the world to racism and misogyny on social media? In Age of Anger, Pankaj Mishra answers our bewilderment by casting his gaze back to the eighteenth century, before leading us to the present. 

He  shows that as the world became modern those who were unable to fulfil  its promises - freedom, stability and prosperity - were increasingly  susceptible to demagogues. The many who came late to this new world or  were left, or pushed, behind, reacted in horrifyingly similar ways:  intense hatred of invented enemies, attempts to re-create an imaginary  golden age, and self-empowerment through spectacular violence.  It was  from among the ranks of the disaffected that the militants of the 19th  century arose - angry young men who became cultural nationalists in  Germany, messianic revolutionaries in Russia, bellicose chauvinists in  Italy, and anarchist terrorists internationally. 

Today, just as then, the wider embrace of mass politics, technology, and the pursuit of  wealth and individualism has cast many more millions adrift in a literally demoralized world, uprooted from tradition but still far from  modernity - with the same terrible results  Making startling connections and comparisons, Age of Anger is a book of immense urgency and profound argument. It is a history of our present predicament unlike any other.
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The Canal Pioneers: Canal Construction from 2,500 BC to the Early 20th Century

The Canal Pioneers: Canal Construction from 2,500 BC to the Early 20th Century

Anthony Burton

$65.00
This is the story of canals used for transport and the men who built them from the earliest times, up to the end of the nineteenth century. This is a very long history: stones for the pyramids of Egypt were brought to the site by canal and one of the most imposing canal systems ever built, the Grand Canal of China, was begun in the sixth century BC.

Development after the end of the Roman Empire was slow, but saw the steady improvement of river navigations through locks - the mitre gates were actually first designed by Leonardo da Vinci.

The modern age of canals that cross summits began in France, and the most famous of these early waterways was the magnificent Canal du Midi, the brainchild of Pierre-Paul Riquet, completed in 1681. It was a visit to this canal, when he was a teenager on the Grand Tour, that inspired the Duke of Bridgewater to build his famous canal that inspired a rush of canal construction in Britain.

Britain's canals became the essential transport route that made the country's industrial revolution possible, thanks to engineers such as James Brindley, William Jessop and Thomas Telford. It was a period of intensive construction that lasted for fifty years from 1760. It saw many innovations from the use of cast iron for bridges and aqueducts, to inclined planes and vertical lifts to move boats from one canal level to another. The nineteenth century also saw extensive canal systems developing in North America, such as the famous Erie Canal, and culminated in two great ship canals at Suez and Panama.

The book tells an exciting story of canal development and the many men who made it possible.
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Radical Innovators: The Blessings of Adversity in Science and the Arts, 1500-2000

Radical Innovators: The Blessings of Adversity in Science and the Arts, 1500-2000

Anton Blok

$39.95
In this book leading cultural anthropologist Anton Blok sheds new light on the lives and achievements of pioneers who revolutionized science and art over the past five centuries, demonstrating that adversity rather than talent alone was crucial to their success.

Through a collective biography of some ninety radical innovators, including Erasmus, Spinoza, Newton, Bach, Sade, Darwin, Melville, Mendel, Cezanne, Curie, Brâncusi, Einstein, Wittgenstein, Keynes, and Goodall, Blok shows how a significant proportion in fact benefited from social exclusion. Beethoven’s increasing deafness isolated him from his friends, creating more time for composing and experimenting, while Darwin’s chronic illness gave him an excuse to avoid social gatherings and get on with his work.

Adversity took various forms, including illegitimate birth, early parental loss, conflict with parents, bankruptcy, chronic illness, physical deficiencies, neurological and genetic disorders, minority status, peripheral origins, poverty, exile, and detention. Blok argues, however, that all these misfortunes had the same effect: alienation from mainstream society. As outsiders, innovators could question conventional beliefs and practices. With little to lose, they could take chances and exploit opportunities.

With governments, universities and industry all emphasizing the importance of investing in innovation, typically understood to mean planned and focussed research teams, this book runs counter to conventional wisdom. For far more often, radical innovation in science and art is entirely unscripted, resulting from trial and error by individuals ready to take risks, fail, and start again.
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