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Biography
Margot at War: Love and Betrayal in Downing Street, 1912-1916

Margot at War: Love and Betrayal in Downing Street, 1912-1916

Anne De Courcy

$29.99

Margot Asquith was perhaps the most daring and unconventional Prime Minister's wife in British history. Known for her wit, style and habit of speaking her mind, she transformed 10 Downing Street into a glittering social and intellectual salon. Yet her last five years at Number 10 were a period of intense emotional and political turmoil in her private and public life.

In 1912, when Anne de Courcy's book opens, rumblings of discontent and cries for social reform were encroaching on all sides - from suffragettes, striking workers and Irish nationalists. Against this background of a government beset with troubles, the Prime Minister fell desperately in love with his daughter's best friend, Venetia Stanley; to complicate matters, so did his Private Secretary. Margot's relationship with her husband was already bedevilled by her stepdaughter's jealous, almost incestuous adoration of her father. The outbreak of the First World War only heightened these swirling tensions within Downing Street. 

Drawing on unpublished material from personal papers and diaries, Anne de Courcy vividly recreates this extraordinary time when the Prime Minister's residence was run like an English country house, with socialising taking precedence over politics, love letters written in the cabinet room and gossip and state secrets exchanged over the bridge table.

By 1916, when Asquith was forced out of office, everything had changed. For the country as a whole, for those in power, for a whole stratum of society, but especially for the Asquiths and their circle, it was the end of an era. Life inside Downing Street would never be the same again.
The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History

The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History

Boris Johnson

$32.99

Double Reward Points
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Marking the fiftieth anniversary of Winston Churchill's death, Boris Johnson explores what makes up the 'Churchill Factor' - the singular brilliance of one of the most important leaders of the twentieth century.

Taking on the myths and misconceptions along with the outsized reality, he portrays - with characteristic wit and passion-a man of multiple contradictions, contagious bravery, breath-taking eloquence, matchless strategising, and deep humanity. Fearless on the battlefield, Churchill had to be ordered by the King to stay out of action on D-Day; he embraced large-scale strategic bombing, yet hated the destruction of war and scorned politicians who had not experienced its horrors. He was a celebrated journalist, a great orator and won the Nobel Prize for Literature. He was famous for his ability to combine wining and dining with many late nights of crucial wartime decision-making. His open-mindedness made him a pioneer in health care, education, and social welfare, though he remained incorrigibly politically incorrect. Most of all, as Boris Johnson says, 'Churchill is the resounding human rebuttal to all who think history is the story of vast and impersonal economic forces'.

A book to be enjoyed not only by anyone interested in history: it is essential reading for anyone who wants to know what makes a great leader.
Penelope Fitzgerald: A Life

Penelope Fitzgerald: A Life

Hermione Lee

$19.99

Penelope Fitzgerald (1916-2000) was a great English writer, who would never have described herself in such grand terms. Her novels were short, spare masterpieces, self-concealing, oblique and subtle. She won the Booker Prize for her novel Offshore in 1979, and her last work, The Blue Flower, was acclaimed as a work of genius.

The early novels drew on her own experiences - a boat on the Thames in the 1960s; the BBC in war time; a failing bookshop in Suffolk; an eccentric stage-school. The later ones opened out to encompass historical worlds which, magically, she seemed to possess entirely: Russia before the Revolution; post-war Italy; Germany in the time of the Romantic writer Novalis.

Fitzgerald's life is as various and as cryptic as her fiction. It spans most of the twentieth century, and moves from a Bishop's Palace to a sinking barge, from a demanding intellectual family to hardship and poverty, from a life of teaching and obscurity to a blaze of renown. She was first published at sixty and became famous at eighty. This is a story of lateness, patience and persistence: a private form of heroism. 

Loved and admired, and increasingly recognised as one of the outstanding novelists of her time, she remains, also, mysterious and intriguing. She liked to mislead people with a good imitation of an absent-minded old lady, but under that scatty front were a steel-sharp brain and an imagination of wonderful reach.

This brilliant account - by a biographer whom Fitzgerald herself admired - pursues her life, her writing, and her secret self, with fascinated interest.
Darling Monster: The Letters of Lady Diana Cooper to Her Son John Julius Norwich

Darling Monster: The Letters of Lady Diana Cooper to Her Son John Julius Norwich

Diana Cooper ,  John Julius Norwich

$19.99

As read on BBC Radio 4. Lady Diana Cooper was an aristocrat, society darling, an actress of stage and early screen. When she married rising political star Duff Cooper, they became the golden couple who knew everyone who was anyone; they sat at the very heart of British public life. Diana's letters to her only son, John Julius Norwich, cover the period 1939 to 1952. They take us from the rumblings of war, through the Blitz, which the Coopers spent holed up in the Dorchester (because it was newer, and therefore less vulnerable, than the Ritz), to rurual Sussex where we see Diana blissfully setting up a smallholding as part of the war effort. After a spell with the Free French in Algiers, Duff was appointed British Ambassador to France and the couple settled into the glorious embassy in post-Liberation Paris. Over and beyond all the glitz, Diana emerges in these letters as highly intelligent, funny, fiercely loyal: a woman who disliked extravagance, who was often cripplingly shy, who was happiest in the countryside with her cow and goats and whose greatest love and preoccupation were her husband and son. As a portrait of a time and some of history's most dramatic and important events, these letters are invaluable. But they also give us a vivid and touching portrait of the love between a mother and son, separated by war, oceans - and the constraints of the time they lived in. Please, darling monster, write as often as you can. It's so sad waiting for letters that don't come and are not even written. I love my darling boy. Don't treat me so badly again or I'll have your lights and liver when I get home . (19 November 1939). I wish, I wish it was all over - Hitler defeated, the lights up again and the guns still . (2 October 1940). Yesterday was a gallop of spirits and people and sun and fun . (26 September 1948). I do my best but I'll always be a bum . (12 October 1948).
Grace: A Memoir

Grace: A Memoir

Grace Coddington

$34.99

For decades, Grace Coddington's personal touch has steered wildly imaginative fashion spreads in Vogue magazine. Then came The September Issue, the behind-the-scenes documentary that turned the spotlight on a woman with a no-nonsense attitude and an unerring visual instinct. Overnight, the flame-haired Grace became a heroine for fashion insiders and the general public alike. Witty and forthright, and illustrated throughout with vintage photographs and exclusive line-drawings, Grace: A Memoir shares the excitement and vision that go into producing so many unforgettable fashion images. Here are the designers, models, photographers, hairstylists, make-up artists and celebrities with whom Grace has created her 'stories in pictures' - whether it be Jerry Hall conquering the USSR or Tom Ford falling down a rabbit hole in Annie Leibovitz's version of Alice in Wonderland. Grace's own life has been as dream-like as one of her madcap fashion spreads. Brought up in windswept wartime Anglesey, she arrived in London, aged eighteen, and quickly became a face of the Sixties. The muse behind Vidal Sassoon's Five Point Cut, she posed for Bailey, Donovan, Duffy and Norman Parkinson in Swinging London and jumped into a pool in Saint-Tropez for Helmut Newton. Surviving a serious car-crash, she later became a fashion editor at British Vogue and during the Seventies and the Eighties started to create the fantasy travelogues that would become her trademark. Friendships bloomed - with Bruce Weber and Calvin Klein, whose offer of a job took Grace to New York. While two early marriages were brief, her romance with the hairstylist Didier Malige has endured. And her professional partnership with Anna Wintour - with whom she has collaborated for over twenty years - continues to have an astonishing influence on modern style.
Revolution

Revolution

Russell Brand

$35.00

Russell Brand wants you to join the revolution. We all know the system isn't working. Our governments are corrupt and the opposing parties pointlessly similar. Our culture is filled with vacuity and pap, and we are told there's nothing we can do - it's just the way things are . In this book, Russell Brand hilariously lacerates the straw men and paper tigers of our conformist times and presents, with the help of experts as diverse as Thomas Piketty and George Orwell, a vision for a fairer, sexier society that's fun and inclusive. You have been lied to, told there's no alternative, no choice and that you don't deserve any better. Brand destroys this illusory facade as amusingly and deftly as he annihilates Morning Joe anchors, Fox News fascists and BBC stalwarts. This book makes revolution not only possible, but inevitable and fun.
Who Knows Tomorrow

Who Knows Tomorrow

Lisa Lovatt-Smith

$34.99

After an essay contest at 18 landed her a plum internship at Anna Wintour's British Vogue, within a year Lisa Lovatt-Smith became the youngest photo editor in the history of Conde Nast and at 21 she was tapped to head Spanish Vogue. Lisa's meteoric rise soon saw her attending lavish parties with celebrities like the Rolling Stones, Madonna and Andy Warhol. By her mid-thirties, she had a dream career, a wardrobe to die for, and a beautiful home in Paris. But a decision to volunteer at an orphanage in Ghana changed her life - and many others forever. Confronted with the horrifying reality of the orphan's lives, Lisa is shocked out of her privileged life. She quits her job, sells her house and within 18 months abandons her glamorous life to move to Ghana, determined to make a difference. Today, Lisa lives in a mud hut in Ghana, from where she oversees her award-winning OrphanAid Africa, helping thousands of children separated from their families by poverty, AIDS or the exodus to the cities. Who Knows Tomorrow is a powerful and inspiring true story of a remarkable woman who reminds us all of what truly matters.
The Dark Art: My Undercover Life in Global Narco-Terrorism

The Dark Art: My Undercover Life in Global Narco-Terrorism

Edward Follis ,  Douglas Century

$32.99

A highly decorated veteran DEA agent recounts his incredible undercover career, and reveals the shocking links between narcotics trafficking and terrorism. What exactly is 'undercover'? From a law-enforcement perspective, it's the art of skillfully eliciting incriminating statements. From a personal and psychological standpoint, it's the dark art of gaining trust - then manipulating that trust. Edward Follis mastered the chess game - the dark art - over the course of his distinguished 27 years with the Drug Enforcement Administration, where he was one of the driving forces behind the agency's radical shift from a limited local focus to a global arena. Follis bought eightballs of coke in a red Corvette, negotiated multimillion-dollar deals onboard private aircraft, and developed covert relationships with men who were not only international drug traffickers, but - in some cases - operatives for Al Qaeda, Hezbollah, Hamas, and the Mexican federation of cartels. Spanning five continents and filled with harrowing stories about the world's most ruthless drug lords and terrorist networks, this memoir reads like a thriller. Yet every word is true, and every story is documented. The first and only insider's account of the confluence between narco-trafficking and terrorist organisations, The Dark Art is an electrifying page-turner.
How I Stopped Being a Jew

How I Stopped Being a Jew

Shlomo Sand ,  David Fernbach

$21.99

Shlomo Sand was born in 1946 in a displaced persons camp in Austria, to Jewish parents; the family later migrated to Palestine. During his life, Sand came to question his Jewish identity, even that as a 'secular Jew.' With this meditative and thoughtful mixture of essay and personal recollection, he articulates the problems at the centre of modern Jewish identity. How I Stopped Being a Jew discusses the negative effects of the Israeli exploitation of the 'chosen people' myth and its 'holocaust industry'. Sand criticises the fact that, in the current context, what 'Jewish' means is, above all, not being Arab and reflects on the possibility of a secular, non-exclusive Israeli identity, beyond the legends of Zionism.
Jerusalem: The Real Life of William Blake

Jerusalem: The Real Life of William Blake

Tobias Churton

$49.99

Delving into the spiritual side of one the Romantic period's most renowned artists and poets, this biography explores for the first time the deeper meanings and enlightened thoughts that sit at the heart of Blake's trademark symbolism. It's hard to believe that Blake was largely unrecognized in his own time, today we can look back and see the influence that his visionary words and images had on our most recent culture history. Resonating most strongly during times of change we last saw a resurgence of Blake's influence during the 60s in the inspiring music of the Doors or Jimi Hendrix and the enlightening words of Aldous Huxley. Now as we once again face massive change in the world it's time to open our minds to the real William Blake, a revolutionary spiritual guru who can bring us right into the heart of our own true being.
The Lost Carving: A Journey to the Heart of Making

The Lost Carving: A Journey to the Heart of Making

David Esterly

$19.99

Awestruck by the sight of a Grinling Gibbons carving in a London church, David Esterly chose to dedicate his life to the art - its physical control, intricate beauty and intellectual demands. Forty years later, he is the foremost practitioner of Gibbons's forgotten technique, which revolutionised ornamental sculpture in the late 1600s. After a fire at Hampton Court Palace in 1986 destroyed much of Gibbons's masterpiece, the job fell to David Esterly to restore his idol's work to its former glory. It turned out to be the most challenging year in Esterly's life, forcing him to question his abilities and delve deeply into what it means to make something well. Exploring the determination, concentration and skill that go into achieving any form of excellence, Esterly breathes life into the world of wood carving and deftly illustrates the union of man and material necessary to create a lasting work of art.
Norman Mailer: A Double Life

Norman Mailer: A Double Life

J. Michael Lennon

$19.99

Norman Mailer was one of the most famous writers of his generation. People who have never read a word that he wrote know who he was because of his fame as a novelist or journalist, or his notoriety because of his womanising, his rivalries with other writers, his appearances on television, his political outspokenness and his prominence as a leading intellectual of his era. A provocative chronicler of the second half of the twentieth century, both as a journalist and a novelist, works such as The Naked and the Dead and The Executioner's Song vividly define a moment in American history. J. Michael Lennon was authorised by Mailer to write his biography, and as such has had access to family and friends, and to unpublished documents and letters. Norman Mailer: A Double Life reflects Mailer's dual identities: journalist and activist, devoted family man and notorious philanderer, intellectual and fighter, writer and public figure, Jew and atheist. Whether you admired him or loathed him, he was remarkable and unique. His was an astonishing life.
Spike Milligan: Man of Letters

Spike Milligan: Man of Letters

Spike Milligan

$22.99

Spike Milligan's letters contain some of the best material he ever wrote...Collected here for the first time are the funniest, rudest and most revealing of them - most of which have never been seen before - from one of the greatest comics of the twentieth century to some of its most famous politicians, actors, celebrities and rock stars (as well as a host of unlikely individuals on some surprising subjects): rounded teabags ('what did you do with the corners?'); backless hospital gowns ('beyond my comprehension'); and heartfelt apologies ('pardon me for being alive') and the imbalance of male and female ducks in London's parks. Here, then, is the real Spike Miligan: obsessive, rude, generous and relentlessly witty. Milligan's zaniness shines through . (Telegraph). The godfather of alternative comedy . (Eddie Izzard). Spike Milligan was one of the greatest and most influential comedians of the twentieth century. Born in India in 1918, he served in the Royal Artillery during WWII in North Africa and Italy. At the end of the war, he forged a career as a jazz musician, sketch-show writer and performer, before joining forces with Peter Sellers and Harry Secombe to form the legendary Goon Show. Until his death in 2002, he had success as on stage and screen and as the author of over eighty books of fiction, memoir, poetry, plays, cartoons and children's stories.
Testament of Youth: An Autobiographical Study of the Years 1900-1925

Testament of Youth: An Autobiographical Study of the Years 1900-1925

Vera Brittain

$22.99

In 1914 Vera Brittain was eighteen and, as war was declared, she was preparing to study at Oxford. Four years later her life - and the life of her whole generation - had changed in a way that was unimaginable in the tranquil pre-war era. TESTAMENT OF YOUTH, one of the most famous autobiographies of the First World War, is Brittain's account of how she survived the period; how she lost the man she loved; how she nursed the wounded and how she emerged into an altered world. A passionate record of a lost generation, it made Vera Brittain one of the best-loved writers of her time.
Unbroken

Unbroken

Laura Hillenbrand

$22.99

Now a major film directed by Angelina Jolie to be released in 2014, this is the true story of one incredibly resilient WWII flier from the author of 'Seabiscuit'. THE INTERNATIONAL NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER In 1943 a bomber crashes into the Pacific Ocean. Against all odds, one young lieutenant survives. Louise Zamperini had already transformed himself from child delinquent to prodigious athlete, running in the Berlin Olympics. Now he must embark on one of the Second World War's most extraordinary odysseys. Zamperini faces thousands of miles of open ocean on a failing raft. Beyond like only greater trials, in Japan's prisoner-of-war camps. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini's destiny, whether triumph or tragedy, depends on the strength of his will ...Now a major motion picture, directed by Angelina Jolie and starring Jack O' Connell.
Yes Please

Yes Please

Amy Poehler

$32.99

Part memoir, part 'missive-from-the-middle', YES PLEASE is a hilarious collection of stories, thoughts, ideas, haikus and words-to-live-by drawn from the life and mind of acclaimed actress, writer and comedian Amy Poehler. YES PLEASE finds Amy riffing on everything from sex and love to motherhood, family, friendship and plastic surgery, and is full of great jokes and sage advice (the useful kind, not the annoying kind you didn't ask for).
Young Lawrence: A Portrait of the Legend as a Young Man

Young Lawrence: A Portrait of the Legend as a Young Man

Anthony Sattin

$49.99

T. E. Lawrence was one of the most charismatic characters of the First World War; a young archaeologist who fought with the Arabs and wrote an epic and very personal account of their revolt against the Turks in Seven Pillars of Wisdom. Yet this was not the first book to carry that iconic title. In 1914 the man who would become Lawrence of Arabia burnt the first Seven Pillars of Wisdom, a manuscript in which he described his adventures in the Middle East during the five years before the war. Anthony Sattin uncovers the story Lawrence wanted to conceal: the truth of his birth, his tortuous relationship with a dominant mother, his deep affection for an Arab boy, the intimate details of the extraordinary journeys he took through the region with which his name is forever connected and the personal reasons that drove him from being a student to becoming an archaeologist and a spy. Young Lawrence is the first book to focus on the story of T. E. Lawrence in his twenties, before the war, during the period he looked back on as his golden years. Using first-hand sources, museum records and Foreign Office documents, Sattin sets these adventures against the background of corrosive conflicts in Libya and the Balkans. He shows the simmering defiance of Arabs, Armenians and Kurds under Turkish domination, while uncovering the story of an exceptional young man searching for happiness, love and his place in the world until war changed his life forever.
The Secret History of Vladimir Nabokov

The Secret History of Vladimir Nabokov

Andrea Pitzer

$21.95

Novelist Vladimir Nabokov witnessed the horrors of his century, escaping Revolutionary Russia then Germany under Hitler, and fleeing France with his Jewish wife and son just weeks before Paris fell to the Nazis. He repeatedly faced accusations of turning a blind eye to human suffering to write artful tales of depravity. But does one of the greatest writers in the English language really deserve the label of amoral aesthete bestowed on him by so many critics? Using information from newly-declassified intelligence files and recovered military history, journalist Andrea Pitzer argues that far from being a proponent of art for art s sake, Vladimir Nabokov managed to hide disturbing history in his fiction history that has gone unnoticed for decades. Nabokov emerges as a kind of documentary conjurer, spending the most productive decades of his career recording a saga of forgotten concentration camps and searing bigotry, from World War I to the Gulag and the Holocaust. Lolita surrenders Humbert Humbert s secret identity, and reveals a Nabokov appalled by American anti-Semitism. The lunatic narrator of Pale Fire recalls Russian tragedies that once haunted the world. From Tsarist courts to Nazi film sets, from CIA front organizations to wartime Casablanca, the story of Nabokov s family is the story of his century and both are woven inextricably into his fiction.
The Wild Truth: The Secrets That Drove Chris McCandless into the Wild

The Wild Truth: The Secrets That Drove Chris McCandless into the Wild

Carine McCandless

$19.99

The key missing piece of Jon Krakauer's multi million, multi territory bestseller and widely acclaimed Sean Penn film Into the Wild is finally revealed by his best friend and sister, Carine. The story of Chris McCandless, who gave away his savings, hitchhiked to Alaska, walked into the wilderness alone, and starved to death in 1992, fascinated not just New York Times bestselling author Jon Krakauer, but the rest of the nation too. Krakauer's book and a Sean Penn film skyrocketed Chris McCandless to worldwide fame, but the real story of his life and his journey has not yet been told - until now. Carine McCandless, Chris's sister, featured in both the book and film, was the person with whom he had the closest bond, and who witnessed firsthand the dysfunctional and violent family dynamic that made Chris willing to embrace the harsh wilderness of Alaska. Growing up in the same troubled and volatile household that sent Chris on his fatal journey into the wild, Carine finally reveals the broader and deeper reality about life in the McCandless family. For decades, Carine and Chris's parents, a successful aerospace engineer and his beautiful wife, raised their children in the tony suburbs of Northern Virginia. But behind closed doors, her father beat and choked her mother. He whipped Carine and Chris with his belt. He cursed them, belittled their accomplishments, and told them they were nothing without him. Carine and Chris hid under the stairs, hoping to avoid his wrath. They were teenagers before they learned they were conceived while their father was still married and having babies with his first wife, who finally summoned the courage to leave him after he broke her back in a fight. In the 20-plus years since the tragedy of Chris's death, she has searched for some kind of redemption. But in this touching and deeply personal memoir, she reveals how she has learned that real redemption can only come from speaking the truth. Finally, she has found the truth not just in her brother's story, but also her own.
The Woman I Wanted to be

The Woman I Wanted to be

Diane Von Furstenberg

$29.99

One of the most influential, admired, and innovative women of our time: fashion designer, philanthropist, wife, mother, and grandmother, Diane von Furstenberg offers a book about becoming the woman she wanted to be. Diane von Furstenberg started out with a suitcase full of jersey dresses and an idea of who she wanted to be-in her words, the kind of woman who is independent and who doesn't rely on a man to pay her bills. She has since become that woman, establishing herself as a global brand and a major force in the fashion industry, all the while raising a family and maintaining my children are my greatest creation. In The Woman I Wanted to Be, von Furstenberg reflects on her extraordinary life-from childhood in Brussels to her days as a young, jet-set princess, to creating the dress that came to symbolise independence and power for an entire generation of women. With remarkable honesty and wisdom, von Furstenberg mines the rich territory of what it means to be a woman. She opens up about her family and career, overcoming cancer, building a global brand, and devoting herself to empowering other women, writing, I want every woman to know that she can be the woman she wants to be.
David Livingstone, Africa's Greatest Explorer: The Man, the Missionary and the Myth

David Livingstone, Africa's Greatest Explorer: The Man, the Missionary and the Myth

Paul Bayly

$44.99

In 1841, a twenty-eight-year-old Scottish missionary, David Livingstone, began the first of his exploratory treks into the African veldt. During the course of his lifetime, he covered over 29,000 miles uncovering what lay beyond rivers and mountain ranges where no other white man had ever been. Livingstone was the first European to make a trans-African passage from modern day Angola to Mozambique and he discovered and named numerable lakes, rivers and mountains. His explorations are still considered one of the toughest series of expeditions ever undertaken. He faced an endless series of life-threatening situations, often at the hands of avaricious African chiefs, cheated by slavers traders and attacked by wild animals. He was mauled by a lion, suffered thirst and starvation and was constantly affected by dysentery, bleeding from hemorrhoids, malaria and pneumonia.This biography covers his life but also examines his relationship with his wife and children who were the main casualties of his endless explorations in Africa. It also looks Livingstone's legacy through to the modern day. Livingstone was an immensely curious person and he made a habit of making meticulous observations of the flora and fauna of the African countryside that he passed through. His legacy includes numerable maps and geographical and botanical observations and samples. He was also a most powerful and effective proponent for the abolition of slavery and his message of yesterday is still valid today in a continent stricken with drought, desertification and debt for he argued that the African culture should be appreciated for its richness and diversity. But like all great men, he had great faults. Livingstone was unforgiving of those that he perceived had wronged him; he was intolerant of those who could not match his amazing physical powers; and finally and he had no compunction about distorting the truth, particularly about other people, in order to magnify his already significant achievements.
Good Son: JFK Jr. and the Mother He Loved

Good Son: JFK Jr. and the Mother He Loved

Christopher Andersen

$32.99

Critically acclaimed author Christopher Andersen is a master of celebrity biographies-boasting sixteen bestsellers, among them These Few Precious Days, Mick, and William and Kate. Now, in his latest thrilling book, new and untold details of the life and death of JFK Jr. come to light, released in time for the fifteenth year marker of the tragic plane crash on July 16, 1999. At the heart of The Good Son is the most important relationship in JFK Jr.'s life: that with his mother, the beautiful and mysterious Jackie Kennedy Onassis. Andersen explores his reactions to his mother's post-Dallas suicidal depression and growing dependence on prescription drugs (as well as men); how Jackie felt about the women in her son's life, from Madonna and Sarah Jessica Parker, to Daryl Hannah and Carolyn Bessette, to his turbulent marriage; the senseless plane crash the took his life; the aftermath of shock, loss, grief, and confusion; and much more. Offering new insights into the intense, tender, often stormy relationship between this iconic mother and son, The Good Son is a riveting, bittersweet biography for lovers of all things Kennedy.
Byron: Life and Legend

Byron: Life and Legend

Fiona MacCarthy

$36.99

Fiona MacCarthy makes a breakthrough in interpreting Byron's life and poetry drawing on John Murray's world-famous archive. She brings a fresh eye to his early years: his childhood in Scotland, embattled relations with his mother, the effect of his deformed foot on his development. She traces his early travels in the Mediterranean and the East, throwing light on his relationships with adolescent boys - a hidden subject in earlier biographies. While paying due attention to the compelling tragicomedy of Byron's marriage, his incestuous love for his half-sister Augusta and the clamorous attention of his female fans, she gives a new importance to his close male friendships, in particular that with his publisher John Murray. She tells the full story of their famous disagreement, ending as a rift between them as Byron's poetry became more recklessly controversial. Byron was a celebrity in his own lifetime, becoming a 'superstar' in 1812, after the publication of Childe Harold. The Byron legend grew to unprecedented proportions after his death in the Greek War of Independence at the age of thirty-six. The problem for a biographer is sifting the truth from the sentimental, the self-serving and the spurious. Fiona MacCarthy has overcome this to produce an immaculately researched biography, which is also her refreshing personal view.
The Last Escaper

The Last Escaper

Peter Tunstall

$39.99

'When I began my operational career, I had precisely two hours and ten minutes' worth of experience as pilot in command of a bomber at night' The product of a lifetime's reflection, The Last Escaper is Peter Tunstall's unforgettable memoir of his days in the RAF and as one of the most celebrated of all British POWs. Tunstall was an infamous tormentor of his German captors dubbed the 'cooler king' (on account of his long spells in 'solitary'), but also a highly skilled pilot, loyal friend and trusted colleague. 'Single-mindedness is often the key to success in most things and, if what I am told is true - that I was to chalk up the all-comers British record number of escape attempts during the next twelve months - I attribute this entirely to that state of mind' Without false pride or bitterness, Tunstall recounts the high jinks of training to be a pilot, terrifying bombing raids in his Hampden and of elaborate escape attempts at once hilarious and deadly serious - all part of a poignant and human war story superbly told by a natural raconteur. ' - we had established that one could get away with using German uniform. After that, it became a regular stunt and my own speciality' The Last Escaper is a charming and hugely informative last testament written by 'the last man standing' from the Colditz generation who risked their lives in the Second World War. It will take its place as one of the classic first-hand accounts of that momentous conflict.
The Letterbooks of John Evelyn

The Letterbooks of John Evelyn

Douglas Chambers ,  David Galbraith

$275.00

A prolific author and founding member of the Royal Society, John Evelyn (1620-1706) was one of the most remarkable intellectuals in late seventeenth-century English society. While his diary has long been considered second only to that of Samuel Pepys in importance, until quite recently his papers were inaccessible to scholars. The Letterbooks of John Evelyn, a collection of more than eight hundred letters selected by Evelyn himself, constitutes an essential new resource for scholars of seventeenth-century England. The book gives modern readers access to Evelyn's correspondence with scientists and scholars such as Robert Boyle and Richard Bentley, political figures including Edward Hyde and Sidney Godolphin, and his friend and fellow diarist Samuel Pepys. It also includes Evelyn's accounts of major events such as the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, the Glorious Revolution of 1688, and the founding and early history of the Royal Society.
The Life and Loves of a He Devil: A Memoir

The Life and Loves of a He Devil: A Memoir

Graham Norton

$32.99

Graham Norton has been entertaining audiences and having fun with some of the world's biggest stars for nearly twenty years. He is loved across the nation for his delight in the peculiar and for his ability to find humour and a common ground in all that life brings. The Life and Loves of a He Devil is Graham's funny and honest memoir on the theme of love. As he shows, it's really the things you love that make you who you are and so Graham tells his story from his Irish childhood to the present day, describing just what and who he loved - and sometimes lost - as a young boy, and his new loves and obsessions - big and small - as he's grown older. It's been ten years since his last book and being a decade older Graham has come to realise that what makes a life interesting is less what happens to you and more what inspires and drives you, what you love. From Dolly Parton and dogs to wine and Ireland, Graham tells of his life and loves with characteristic humour and outrageous candour.
True Love

True Love

Jennifer Lopez

$29.99

This a story of love. It started when love was lost and I felt as if my world had fallen apart. What followed was a transformative journey, through the process of developing my first world tour, where I faced some of my greatest challenges, overcame some of my biggest fears, and, with the help of my incredible children, emerged a stronger person than I've ever been. This is the story of how I discovered quite simply the truest love of all.
Alex Ferguson My Autobiography

Alex Ferguson My Autobiography

Alex Ferguson

$19.99

Sir Alex Ferguson's compelling story is always honest and revealing he reflects on his managerial career that embraced unprecedented European success for Aberdeen and 26 triumphant seasons with Manchester United. Sir Alex Ferguson's best-selling autobiography has now been updated to offer reflections on events at Manchester United since his retirement as well as his teachings at the Harvard Business School, a night at the Oscars and a boat tour round the Hebrides, where he passed unrecognised. The extra material adds fresh insights and detail on his final years as United's manager. Both the psychology of management and the detail of football strategy at the top level can be complex matters but no-one has explained them in a more interesting and accessible way for the general reader than Sir Alex does here. MY AUTOBIOGRAPHY is revealing, endlessly entertaining and above all inspirational.
Playing it My Way: My Autobiography

Playing it My Way: My Autobiography

Sachin Tendulkar

$29.99

The greatest run-scorer in the history of cricket, Sachin Tendulkar retired in 2013 after an astonishing 24 years at the top. The most celebrated Indian cricketer of all time, he received the Bharat Ratna Award - India's highest civilian honour - on the day of his retirement. Now Sachin Tendulkar tells his own remarkable story - from his first Test cap at the age of 16 to his 100th international century and the emotional final farewell that brought his country to a standstill. When a boisterous Mumbai youngster's excess energies were channelled into cricket, the result was record-breaking schoolboy batting exploits that launched the career of a cricketing phenomenon. Before long Sachin Tendulkar was the cornerstone of India's batting line-up, his every move watched by a cricket-mad nation's devoted followers. Never has a cricketer been burdened with so many expectations; never has a cricketer performed at such a high level for so long and with such style - scoring more runs and making more centuries than any other player, in both Tests and one-day games. And perhaps only one cricketer could have brought together a shocked nation by defiantly scoring a Test century shortly after terrorist attacks rocked Mumbai. His many achievements with India include winning the World Cup and topping the world Test rankings. Yet he has also known his fair share of frustration and failure - from injuries and early World Cup exits to stinging criticism from the press, especially during his unhappy tenure as captain. Despite his celebrity status, Sachin Tendulkar has always remained a very private man, devoted to his family and his country. Now, for the first time, he provides a fascinating insight into his personal life and gives a frank and revealing account of a sporting life like no other.
           
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