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Australian Biography
Margaret and Gough: The Love Story That Shaped a Nation

Margaret and Gough: The Love Story That Shaped a Nation

Susan Mitchell

$32.99

Gough had no small talk - Margaret had the gift of easy conversation.

He was often ill-at-ease in company and preferred his books. She was warm, inclusive and jollied him along. He had a vicious tongue and a quick temper. She always tried to see the best in people. He knew everything about the ideology, history and heroes of the labour movement. She trusted her instincts. They saw each other as equals and never hesitated to express their different viewpoints.

He may have passed the laws that changed the nation, but she made it possible.

This is a story of love, respect, struggle, success, failure, disappointment and resilience. The strength and endurance of this remarkable relationship helped change our nation politically, culturally and socially. Neither Gough Whitlam nor Margaret Dovey would have developed into what each became without the influence of the other. Through every major political change, every election campaign, every triumph and every loss, they stood together.

This takes us inside a partnership where the political was always personal and the personal was always political.
A Forger's Progress: The Life of Francis Greenway

A Forger's Progress: The Life of Francis Greenway

Alasdair McGregor

$49.99

The incredible fall, rise and demise of Francis Greenway, Australia's first government architect. A forger and convicted felon, Francis Greenway was transported to Sydney in 1814. Only a decade later, his dreams of a 'city superior in architectural beauty to London' began to be realised as he designed Hyde Park Barracks, St James' Church, the Supreme Court, St Luke's Church in Liverpool and the Windsor courthouse. In this first biography of Greenway since 1953 award-winning author Alasdair McGregor scrutinises the character and creative output of a man beset by contradictions and demons. He profiles Greenway's landmark buildings, his complex and fraught relationship with Governor Lachlan Macquarie, and his thwarted ambitions and self-destruction.
Bill: The Life of William Dobell

Bill: The Life of William Dobell

Scott Bevan

$35.00

In post-war Australia, William Dobell was a household name. But the most famous artist in the land was a broken man. His Archibald Prize-winning portrait of Joshua Smith was the subject of a sensational legal case, challenging not only Dobell’s right to the prize, but the very idea of art itself. Dobell won the legal battle but lost so much else. His health was shattered, and his desire to paint was wiped out. He had to get away. Just north of Sydney, Wangi Wangi is far removed from big city life. Dobell moved to Wangi to escape fame, but in that beguiling little place he found community and friendship, and he rediscovered the passion to paint – and the joy of life. Through years of research and interviews with Dobell’s friends and long-time locals, acclaimed author and former Wangi resident Scott Bevan discovered how the village protected the artist, cared and posed for him, drank and partied with him. Wangi loved him as one of their own. To the world, he was Sir William Dobell, famous artist, but to Wangi, he was simply Bill. This is the story of one of Australia’s greatest artists. It explores how ambition and talent took a working class boy a long way in the world, and how the reaction to one painting almost destroyed him. It’s also a celebration of community, and how one man finally discovered where he belonged – in the unlikeliest of places.
John Olsen: An Artist's Life

John Olsen: An Artist's Life

Darleen Bungey

$59.99

This landmark biography from Darleen Bungey, the author of the acclaimed Arthur Boyd biography, explores what drove John Olsen to become one of the country's greatest painters. An exhilarating book, both trenchant and tender, it strips away the veneer of showmanship and fame to show the substance of a painter driven by a need to depict his country's landscape as Australians had never seen it before. Given access to his uncensored diaries and drawing on years of extensive interviews with both Olsen and those who have known him best, she explores his passionate life and follows his navigation though the friendships, rivalries and politics of the Australian art world. How did a shy, stuttering boy from Newcastle, neglected by his alcoholic father, come to paint the great mural Salute to Five Bells at the Sydney Opera House? This biography follows that journey: from Olsen's early experiences in the bush, particularly a formative period at Yass (a time previously unrecorded), through his years of cleaning jobs to pay his way through art school, to a milestone time spent in France and Spain, and traces his constant travels and relocations within Australia, including his epic journeys into the outback and to Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre. From a child who was never taken to an art gallery, who learnt how to draw from comics, we come to see the famous artist in the black beret, the writer and poet, the engaging public speaker, the bon vivant - whose life has been defined by an absolute need to paint.
Private Bill: In Love and War

Private Bill: In Love and War

Barrie Cassidy

$29.99

The private battles of Barrie Cassidy's father, who was a WW2 prisoner of war for 1500 days and his mother who, for many months thought her husband was dead.

William (Bill) Cassidy - Barrie's father - survived almost 1500 days as a prisoner of war. He first saw conflict on Crete on 20 May, 1941, when he stood under the only large scale parachute invasion in wartime history. Just four days later, he was lying in a field hospital, wounded and captured.

Four years after that, virtually to the day, he woke up at a prison camp in Klagenfurt, Austria, to find the gates flung open and the guards gone.

During those years, Bill saw colleagues blown up in front of him. He witnessed the "murder" of the enemy, with their hands in the air surrendering. He survived a shocking six day journey crammed into a cattle train, an experience that killed others around him. He endured near starvation and extreme cold as part of a work gang in the Austrian alps.

He escaped, and helped others escape, and paid the cruel consequences.
His wife, Myra, too was a prisoner of sorts, inexplicably refusing to ever leave the house in the small country town where they lived after the war. She had her own secrets.

For many months after the Battle of Crete, Myra believed her husband was dead. She had an affair with a local man, gave birth to a son and had the child adopted at birth.

Just a few months after the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Crete - when Bill was 80 and Myra 76 - a letter arrived for Myra in the mail. The writer said, in part: "I think you're my mother and I want to meet you."

The revelation opened up old war wounds and threw an otherwise loving couple who had given their lives to one another, into a late life crisis.
What Days Are For: A Memoir

What Days Are For: A Memoir

Robert Dessaix

$29.99

One Sunday night in Sydney, Robert Dessaix collapses in a gutter in Darlinghurst, and is helped to his hotel by a kind young man wearing a T-shirt that says FUCK YOU. What follows are weeks in hospital, tubes and cannulae puncturing his body, as he recovers from the heart attack threatening daily to kill him. While lying in the hospital bed, Robert chances upon Philip Larkin's poem 'Days'. What, he muses, have his days been for? What and who has he loved - and why? This is vintage Robert Dessaix. His often surprisingly funny recollections range over topics as eclectic as intimacy, travel, spirituality, enchantment, language and childhood, all woven through with a heightened sense of mortality.
The Story of a Prime Minister: Paul Keating - The Biography

The Story of a Prime Minister: Paul Keating - The Biography

David Day

$49.99

In the tradition of his bestselling CURTIN and CHIFLEY, David Day's exhaustive biography of one of our most fascinating prime ministers. Paul Keating was one of the most significant political figures of the late twentieth century, firstly as Treasurer for eight years and then Prime Minister for five years. Although he has spent all of his adult life in the public eye, Keating has eschewed the idea of publishing his memoirs and has discouraged biographers from writing about his life. Undaunted, best-selling biographer David Day has taken on the task of giving Keating the biography that he deserves. Based on extensive research in libraries and archives, interviews with Keating's former colleagues and associates, and walking the tracks of Keating's life, Day has painted the first complete portrait of Paul Keating, covering both the public and private man.
Sir Henry Parkes: The Australian Colossus

Sir Henry Parkes: The Australian Colossus

Stephen Dando-Collins

$19.99

May 27, 2015 brings the 200th anniversary of the birth of Sir Henry Parkes. After he died, the London Times described him as 'a colonial colossus.' Henry Parkes received little schooling and worked on a rope-walk, breaking stones, as an ivory and bone turner, ironmonger, labourer and on the wharves before trying business life and ultimately politics. He and his first wife travelled to Australia on an assisted passage. Parkes steadily educated himself, reading voraciously and widely, including all the great poets. There has never been anyone else like Sir Henry Parkes in Australian public life. Not only was he the father of federation. His friends included Thomas Carlyle, fellow poet Lord Tennyson and British Prime Minister Gladstone. He convinced Florence Nightingale to send trained nurses to Australia. He conceived the international rabbit competition which led to the Pasteur affair and put Australia at the forefront of microbiology. He encouraged talented men to enter politics. Yet he shunned the limelight, rarely attending social functions. Whenever he received begging letters, (which he did, daily), Parkes always wrote back enclosing money. No wonder he went bankrupt three times! Yet he was Premier of NSW 5 times, leaving its finances well in the black every time. He married three times, the last time to a 23-year-old beauty. Clearly, Parkes loved women, and they loved him. He encouraged women to attend political meetings, even though they didn't have the vote. NSW Parliament House dining room was managed by a husband and wife; when the husband died, Parliament wanted to fire his widow, but Parkes stood up for her, saying she was perfectly capable of managing the dining room on her own, which she did for years to come. But not everyone loved Sir Henry; he had a long-running feud with poet Henry Lawson's mother after Parkes wouldn't give young Lawson the help she demanded and he constantly wrestled with political aspirants chasing his seat.
Only in New York

Only in New York

Lily Brett

$29.99

New York is a walker's city. You can walk for hours. The streets slip by. There is so much to look at, so much to take in. I walk a lot. Especially when I am not writing ...Lily Brett's love affair with New York began as an outsider in her late teens when she was posted on assignment there as a young Australian rock journalist. In her early forties she returned, together with her soul mate and three children, to start a new life, and for the last twenty-five years she has called New York home. This witty, candid and moving collection of short pieces celebrates the city that's now part of her heartbeat. A compulsive walker, Brett takes us to her favourite places and introduces us to the characters of the city that has nurtured, perplexed and inspired her. She brings to life the delights of Chinatown, the majesty of Grand Central Station, the lure of spandex and sequins in the Garment District, and the peculiarity of canine couture. And she muses on the miracle of love in the Lodz ghetto, the possibility of loneliness amidst skyscrapers, and the joy and redemption in a child's curiosity. Full of wisdom, humour and grace, Only in New York is a human portrait of a city much loved - and of a woman in step with herself.
Kerry Stokes: the Boy from Nowhere

Kerry Stokes: the Boy from Nowhere

Andrew Rule

$49.99

Kerry Stokes is a remarkable Australian. Not because he is one of Australia's wealthiest and most powerful people, but because of what he overcame to get there and because he has endured when others didn't. His success and his rise have intrigued the business world for decades but there is so much more to him than multi-million dollar deals or mergers. Behind the laconic front is a human story as tough and touching as a Dickens tale: Oliver Twist with great self-expectations. It is the story of a poor boy who stared down poverty, ignorance and the stigma of his illegitimate birth to achieve great wealth and fulfilment. He's a backstreets battler who has become a power player. It's a compelling and inspiring story that, until now, he has not told. Now he oversees a multi-billion dollar media, machinery and property empire. He is renowned for his art collection and for philanthropy, spending millions of dollars to buy - among other things - Victoria Crosses from soldiers' families to donate to the Australian War Memorial. But he's a private man. A man apart. He made his name in the West but kept his distance from the buccaneering band of entrepreneurs who forged fabulous fortunes in Perth from the 1960s until the 1987 crash. Bond went to jail, Holmes a Court died; Connell did both. Lesser lights flickered and faded but Stokes grew stronger, becoming a player alongside Murdoch, Packer and Lowy. His story fascinates all the more because he has spent most of his life guarding it. But now he's telling it, to one of Australia's great storytellers. He is the boy who came from nothing, who had nothing to lose. And now he has everything. It's a great Australian journey.
Bert: The Story of Australia's Favourite TV Star

Bert: The Story of Australia's Favourite TV Star

Graeme Blundell

$45.00

TV and radio star, interviewer and all-round media personality, Bert Newton's career spans the decades. He ruled the radio sets of Melbourne in the 1950s - when another young blade, Graham Kennedy, was also on the air - then made the transition to the box. Whether on television, radio or more recently on stage, Bert is the preeminent entertainer.Behind this most public of faces is the story of a boy whose father died early; a lad who loved riding the famous trams of his home town; and a young man whose compulsion to work led him to collapse.A consummate professional who holds the respect and admiration of his peers and multitude of fans alike, Bert has reinvigorated his career over and over as the world around him changed. And in a life full of dynamic partnerships - on screen with Graham Kennedy and Don Lane - Bert's marriage to Patti is the most enduring of them all.Graeme Blundell, journalist and bestselling author of King: The Life and Comedy of Graham Kennedy, delivers an insightful account of Bert Newton's life on and off the screen. Along the way he chronicles the Australian television industry from its earliest years.
The Never, Um, Ever Ending Story

The Never, Um, Ever Ending Story

Ian 'Molly' Meldrum

$39.99

More than thirty-five years in the making, this is the story of Ian 'Molly' Meldrum and the television show that stopped the nation. In 1974 Molly was working as a record producer and music journalist when he was offered the chance to be the talent co-ordinator of a new music show called Countdown. It would run for the next thirteen years and become one of the most-loved and most-watched programs on Australian television. It also turned Molly into a national institution (or 'mental institution' as one of his friends put it). During that period he not only became the most influential voice in Australian music, he endeared himself to millions of viewers with a uniquely unpolished interviewing style and a tangible on-screen passion. For better or for worse, whether interviewing Prince Charles or Sid Vicious, Molly was always Molly. Along the way he talked, partied, argued, exchanged blows and became firm friends with a roll-call of the world's greatest musical names. Sir Elton John famously described him as 'the best thing that ever happened to Australian music.' Filled with outrageous anecdotes and a kaleidoscopic cast of musos, colourful characters and international superstars, The Never, Um, Ever Ending Story is Molly's hilarious, vivid, warm and always compelling memoir of his chaotic, incredible life and the show that made him famous.
Paul Hasluck: A Life

Paul Hasluck: A Life

Geoffrey Bolton

$49.99

Sir Paul Hasluck was for almost two and a half decades one of Australia's most prominent politicians. Born in Fremantle in 1905 and educated at Perth Modern School and The University of Western Australia, Hasluck worked for The West Australian and lectured at The University of Western Australia before moving into politics in 1949. After two decades in politics, including a variety of ministerial responsibilities, Hasluck was appointed as the 17th Governor General of Australia in 1969. This biography includes Hasluck's experience working for the Department of External Affairs during the Second World War. It covers his career as a writer, poet, historian, and politician, providing a complete and enthralling portrait of one of Australia's great men.
The Silver Moon: Reflections on Life, Death and Writing

The Silver Moon: Reflections on Life, Death and Writing

Bryce Courtenay

$24.99

Each of us has a place to return to in our minds, a place of clarity and peace, a place to think, to create, to dream. For Bryce Courtenay this place was a waterhole in Africa where he used to escape to as a boy, in search of solitude. One evening, while lingering there, he witnessed the tallest of the great beasts drinking from the waterhole in the moonlight, and was spellbound. Ever since, he drew inspiration from this moment. The Silver Moon gathers together some of the most personal and sustaining life-lessons from Australia's favourite storyteller. In short stories and insights, many written in his final months, Bryce reflects on living and dying, and how through determination, respect for others and taking pleasure in small moments of joy, he lived life to the fullest. From practical advice on how to write a bestseller to general inspiration on how to realise your dreams, The Silver Moon celebrates Bryce Courtenay's lifelong passion for storytelling, language and the creative process, and brings us closer to the man behind the bestsellers.
A Fortunate Life

A Fortunate Life

A.B. Facey

$19.99

Born in 1894, Albert Facey lived the rough frontier life of a sheep farmer, survived the gore of Gallipoli, raised a family through the Depression and spent sixty years with his beloved wife, Evelyn. Despite enduring hardships we can barely imagine today, Facey always saw his life as a 'fortunate' one. A true classic of Australian literature, his simply written autobiography is an inspiration. It is the story of a life lived to the full - the extraordinary journey of an ordinary man.
Pushing the Limits: Life, Marathons and Kokoda

Pushing the Limits: Life, Marathons and Kokoda

Kurt Fearnley ,  Warwick Green

$39.99

When Kurt Fearnley was a kid, he would leave his wheelechair at the front gate and go exploring with his brothers and sisters. 'You're going to have to be stronger than we are,' they told him, 'and we know you will be.' The boy from Carcoar was raised to believe he could do anything. At fifteen, he won his first medal. Then he conquered the world, winning three Paralympic gold medals, seven world championships and more than 35 marathons. A world-beater in and out of his wheelchair, Kurt is a true Australian champion. Inspiring, exhilarating and highly entertaining, Pushing the Limits takes us inside the mind of a kid with a disability growing up in a tiny town, a teenager finding his place in the world, and an elite sportsman who refuses to give up, no matter how extreme the challenge. 'Kurt Fearnley is the most inspiring figure in Australian sport, and this is a wondrous tale.' Peter FitzSimons 'There are only possibilities in Kurt's world. If you say he can't, he will.' Steve Waugh 'I love this bloke. Not only is he, in my opinion, Australia's greatest athlete, but he has such an enormous heart and zest for life. What Kurt does for the general community, and particularly for athletes with disabilities, is truly inspiring.' David Koch 'Kurt Fearnley gives life a good name.' Andrew Denton 'Aside from all the medals, accolades and achievements, in my humble opinion it is his larrikin sense of humour, positive attitude to life, never forgetting where he comes from and his belief that there is nothing he can't do that makes him a national treasure.' Layne Beachley
White Beech: The Rainforest Years

White Beech: The Rainforest Years

Dr. Germaine Greer

$19.99

One bright day in December 2001, sixty-two-year-old Germaine Greer found herself confronted by an irresistible challenge in the shape of sixty hectares of dairy farm, one of many in south-east Queensland that, after a century of logging, clearing and downright devastation, had been abandoned to their fate. She didn't think for a minute that by restoring the land she was saving the world. She was in search of heart's ease. Beyond the acres of exotic pasture grass and soft weed and the impenetrable curtains of tangled Lantana canes there were Macadamias dangling their strings of unripe nuts, and Black Beans with red and yellow pea flowers growing on their branches . and the few remaining White Beeches, stupendous trees up to forty metres in height, logged out within forty years of the arrival of the first white settlers. To have turned down even a faint chance of bringing them back to their old haunts would have been to succumb to despair. Once the process of rehabilitation had begun, the chance proved to be a dead certainty. When the first replanting shot up to make a forest and rare caterpillars turned up to feed on the leaves of the new young trees, she knew beyond doubt that at least here biodepletion could be reversed. Greer describes herself as an old dog who succeeded in learning a load of new tricks, inspired and rejuvenated by her passionate love of Australia and of Earth, most exuberant of small planets.
Peacemongers

Peacemongers

Barry Hill

$45.00

In his first major prose work since 2002's Broken Song, Barry Hill has written an epic - a travel book, a history book, a peace book. His odyssey begins with a pilgrimage to Bodhi Gaya in India, where the Buddha received enlightenment and ends after he reaches Nagasaki, Japan, in the aftermath of its atomic bomb. His travelling is imbued with the life and ideas of India's greatest artist and intellectual, Rabindranath Tagore, along with that of MK Gandhi. Hill then travels, like Tagore, in Japan, and meditates on its militarist turn, its warmongering Buddhism and the Tokyo War Crimes Trial, with its riddled post-colonial legacy. He goes to Zen temples, secret islands, and into some of the recesses of Japanese history, all the while musing on his own capacity for inner-disarmament. Hill also has his late father with him, a union man and Australian peace activist, whose dated left-humanism may not be enough for the wars and ruins the West has recently created. The discourse of this incredible work - poetic, mobile, ambivalent - seeks to be an antidote to the political impotence of progressive thought over the last decade. But Peacemongers does not peddle hope, and when it sights hope it tends to be as an epiphany, as it was with Tagore.
Love Your Sister

Love Your Sister

Samuel Johnson ,  Connie Johnson

$32.99

Born a year apart, Connie and Samuel Johnson have always been close. Faced with the devastating news that they would soon be separated forever, they made a decision.After already surviving cancer twice in her young life, at 33 Connie was diagnosed with breast cancer. But this time it was a whole different ball game. This time she was told she will die, leaving behind her two sons. As a young mum faced with her own death, Connie wanted to make it all less meaningless, and she knew just the way to do it - send her brother, Sam, on a one-wheeled odyssey around Australia. The aims: to break the world record for the longest distance travelled on a unicycle. To raise $1 million for the Garvan Research Foundation. And, most importantly, to remind women to be breast aware and stop others having to say goodbye to those they love.Their message is simple: 'Don't fall into the booby trap.' Samuel has travelled through every state and ridden more than 15,000 kilometres to raise awareness and raise research dollars.But Connie had a secret fourth aim: to fix Samuel. And it worked. Sam cleared his diary, cleaned himself up and tenaciously kept his promise to his dying sister.For them the job isn't over. They are determined to raise more money for research. Connie vows to fight until her dying day and Sam says the fight will go on long after that. These two remarkable Australians share their tale, from childhood through to the finish line and beyond in this truly unique story. Part memoir, part travel diary, part conversation, LOVE YOUR SISTER is an inspiring and unforgettable story that shows just how far one man will go for his sister.
Kamahl: A Voice to Remember

Kamahl: A Voice to Remember

Kandiah Kamalesvaran

$29.99

Kamahl is the name which, for four decades, has identified the music and unique voice of a man who is one of the most sensational recording stars in Australian history. 

He always swam against the tide, acquiring along the way a reputation for toughness and arrogance which was a shield against the feelings of racial inferiority which have haunted him throughout his life. 

He cheerfully took career gambles as few others have done, audaciously hiring the London Palladium to star himself, twice playing carnegie Hall in New York, and arriving as an unknown in Europe with a hit about an elephant that made him a star there. 

This book is an insight into his thoughts over his career, the way he views the world today and a life of highs and lows and how he has survived them. This is what he has learned along the way... 
The Making of Julia Gillard

The Making of Julia Gillard

Jacqueline Kent

$24.99

Australians saw many versions of Julia Gillard during her political career. Witty sparring opponent to Tony Abbott. Loyal deputy to and night-time assassin of Kevin Rudd. Hanging-on-by-her-fingernails leader of the land. But what really happened behind the scenes? And why? Drawing on interviews with Julia Gillard's friends and foes - and with Gillard herself - award-winning biographer Jacqueline Kent gives us a complete account of Gillard's entire political career. She describes her Adelaide childhood, her time as a fiery student activist, her battles to get into Parliament, her policy decisions and their consequences. Kent depicts Gillard's dramatic ascent to becoming Australia's first female prime minister, and her tumultuous time in office. The Making of Julia Gillard is an insightful and immensely readable account of this remarkable woman and her leadership - and its abrupt ending. 'Jam-packed with anecdotes and titbits about this fascinating [woman].' Sydney Morning Herald 'Clear-sighted ...[Kent] gives us a portrait of a woman of remarkable composure and resilience, gifted with an extraordinary ability to get things done in the face of overwhelming odds ...Kent doesn't shy away from Gillard's weaknesses . ..but keeps them in perspective.' Saturday Age 'An inspirational figure ...Her story ...is one of determination, self-belief, resilience and hard work.' Weekend Australian
The Tunnel

The Tunnel

Dennis McIntosh

$9.99

When Dennis McIntosh went to work on an underground construction site in Melbourne's west, he was twenty-seven and starting over. His years as a shearer had ended badly, he was an alcoholic, and his eldest daughter had a brain injury. Having been kicked out of school in ninth grade, he had no prospects. He'd been through four jobs in as many months. The tunnel was his last chance. Tate was in 1985, and when he resurfaced seven years later Dennis was a changed man. He had endured bitter clashes with his crew and management, lonely nightshifts and a marriage breakup, but had overcome his claustrophobia and drinking. His turning point was the realisation that, like his daughter, he could retrain his brain - by getting an education. 'The genuine article: gritty and honest and harsh as a crow's cry.' Robert Drewe, On Dennis McIntosh's Beaten by a Blow 'Destined to take its place alongside the survival classics of Australian literature.' Sunday Herald Sun
It Takes Courage

It Takes Courage

Torah Bright

$32.99

This is Torah's heartfelt account of growing up in a close-knit Mormon family. In it she charts the highs and lows of her professional snowboarding career, during which she became the first Australian snowboarder to be awarded a Gold medal in the Winter Olympics for her sport. She talks about the serious head injury that threatened to end Torah's snowboarding career, the relationship with her brother and coach, Ben; her short marriage to American pro snowboarder Jake Welch; and losing her friend, Canadian freestyle skier Sarah Burke.
Billy Slater: From North Queensland to Melbourne Storm's Number One

Billy Slater: From North Queensland to Melbourne Storm's Number One

John Ellicott

$29.95

The ultimate book for rugby fans -the story of Billy Slater, one of Australia's favourite Rugby League players. Hailing from Innesfail in rugged far north Queensland, Billy Slater's rugby league days began in the tough local Foley Shield competition, where his father and uncles had played before him. The struggle Billy endured to pursue the game, from his modest roots and remote locale, is symptomatic of the strength of character and physicality that saw him go on to play for the Melbourne Storm and eventually be voted the best footballer in the world. Now John Ellicott presents a finely crafted portrait of the star fullback: from his Spanish background and his family's beginnings up north, to the great rivalries of the Queensland towns who battled it out for the Foley Shield, through the eyes of former coaches and players who knew him. He has had a successful career: at Melbourne he set the club record for most ever tries and NRL record for most ever tries by a fullback. Slater also won three grand finals, the Clive Churchill Medal and the Dally M Medal with the Storm. With the Kangaroos he was the 2008 World Cup's top try-scorer and player of the tournament and won the 2008 Golden Boot Award as the World player of the year. Slater was also the winner of the television game show Australia's Greatest Athlete in 2009 and 2010. In 2012 he was the highest scoring fullback try scorer in the NRL. He scored the first try in Melbourne's 2013 World Club Challenge win over Leeds, he played at fullback for Australia in the 2013 ANZAC Test victory against New Zealand. He scored a hat-trick (3 Tries) against the Brisbane Broncos. Slater played all three games of the 2013 State of Origin series in which Queensland extended their record for consecutive series victories to eight. During 2013 Slater also became the 8th player in history of the League to score 150 tries. He was selected in Australia's 24-man squad for the 2013 Rugby League World Cup, which Australia won. The trials and tribulations, blood, sweat and tears that went into what became a victorious lifetime in Rugby League, are revealed and celebrated in this riveting biography.
Roy Higgins: Australia's Favourite Jockey

Roy Higgins: Australia's Favourite Jockey

Patrick Bartley

$39.99

Everyone loved Roy Higgins. A warm and genuine character with a great sense of humour, the boy from the bush was known as 'The Professor' for his freakish ability to read the track and his easy eloquence. Higgins' racing record was extraordinary. He rode Bart Cummings' first Melbourne Cup winner, Light Fingers, in 1965, and was one of a handful of jockeys to win the grand slam of racing: the Golden Slipper, Cox Plate, Caulfield Cup and Melbourne Cup. Over his 30-year career, Higgins clocked up 2312 wins, including 108 Group 1 races. All this, despite a never-ending battle with his weight. Roy Higgins died in March 2014, aged 75. His televised funeral took place in the mounting yard at Flemington, a fitting tribute to the humble man who had a profound effect on horseracing for more than five decades as jockey, commentator and teacher. This is a celebration of a great Australian, with racing royalty, friends and family sharing their stories and memories of Roy Higgins, the gentle trailblazer who touched their lives. 'Roy has been an inspiration, an icon and a legend. His legacy will live on forever.' Damien Oliver 'Roy wasn't just a great jockey and a fine ambassador for racing - that's only half the story. He was a great human being, and that might be the bigger story ...because it's harder to be a great human being.' Les Carlyon
Rhino

Rhino

Ryan Harris ,  Stephen Gray

$39.95

'Harris is built like a bullock, he approaches the pitch like he's about to shoulder-charge a door. More often than not, the ball goes straight as a desert highway through to the wicketkeeper. When it does, the man who learned his trade on a dead Adelaide deck turns and walks back to try again. Harris is not a magician. He's just very, bloody good. ' - Geoff Lemon, The Roar. An eye-catching fast bowler, Ryan Harris seemed destined for journeyman status until he made his international debut in 2009 at the age of 29. By the end of the following year he had become one of Australia's most prized Test and ODI bowlers, but his worst enemy was his own body. A chronic knee injury will be with him until he retires, and in the third Ashes Test at the MCG, he broke a bone in his left ankle that required surgery and ruled him out for half a year. It was testament to how highly the selectors rated Harris that, despite being 31, they wanted him back for the 2011 Test tour of Sri Lanka. He earned that respect by grabbing nine wickets in his first two Tests in New Zealand and 11 in three Ashes Tests while some of his team-mates struggled. In his initial one-day games, he had been irresistible, with two five-wicket hauls in his first three matches. When Harris took his 100th test wicket in the 2013 Ashes series against South Africa, his reputation as a quality fast bowler was cemented. In his fast paced autobiography Rhino, Harris charts his career from the years spent as a fringe player in South Australia to the behind-the-scenes stories from the Australian test team and what it took to get there.
           
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