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Through the Window: Seventeen Essays (and One Short Story) by Julian Barnes at Abbey's Bookshop,

Through the Window: Seventeen Essays (and One Short Story)

Julian Barnes

9780099578581

Vintage


Prose: non-fiction

Paperback

288 pages

$19.95

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In these seventeen essays (and one short story) the 2011 Man Booker Prize winner examines British, French and American writers who have meant most to him, as well as the cross-currents and overlappings of their different cultures. From the deceptiveness of Penelope Fitzgerald to the directness of Hemingway, from Kipling's view of France to the French view of Kipling, from the many translations of Madame Bovary to the fabulations of Ford Madox Ford, from the National Treasure Status of George Orwell to the despair of Michel Houellebecq, Julian Barnes considers what fiction is, and what it can do. As he writes in his preface, 'Novels tell us the most truth about life: what it is, how we live it, what it might be for, how we enjoy and value it, and how we lose it.' When his Letters from London came out in 1995, the Financial Times called him our best essayist . This wise and deft collection confirms that judgment.

By:   Julian Barnes
Imprint:   Vintage
Country of Publication:   United Kingdom
Dimensions:   Height: 198mm,  Width: 129mm,  Spine: 19mm
Weight:   250g
ISBN:  

9780099578581


ISBN 10:   0099578581
Pages:   288
Publication Date:   November 2012
Audience:   General/trade ,  ELT Advanced
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In stock at Abbey's Bookshop
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Julian Barnes is the author of eleven novels, including Metroland, Flaubert's Parrot, Arthur & George and most recently The Sense of an Ending, which won the 2011 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. He has also written three books of short stories, Cross Channel, The Lemon Table and Pulse; and three collections of journalism, Letters from London, Something to Declare and The Pedant in the Kitchen. His work has been translated into more than thirty languages. In France he is the only British writer to have won both the Prix Medicis (for Flaubert's Parrot) and the Prix Femina (for Talking it Over). In 2004 he received the Austrian State Prize for European Literature, and in 2011 he was awarded the David Cohen Prize for Literature. He lives in London.


Engaging, eloquent, entertaining and erudite... There is a capacious generosity throughout this book, and I would defy anyone not to leave without feeling both better informed and better disposed... It is rare indeed for a collection of occasional pieces such as this to inspire feelings of profound thankfulness -- Stuart Kelly Scotsman A devastatingly brilliant critic -- Olivia Laing Prospect A truly wonderful collection Sunday Times The book relies on stylish intelligence and cool calm to accomplish its mastery. This is a coquettish book. Barnes flatters readers into feeling that they may be as shrewd, discriminating and attractive as he is -- Richard Davenport-Hines Spectator The parallels between Barnes's essays and his fiction run much deeper. The Sense of an Ending asks to be read twice, once to listen to what the narrator has to say, and a second time to hear what he is busily avoiding or repressing, and many of these essays work in a similar way.his collection is also full of unexpected pleasures. Even the index is brimming with jokes, with entries that include Bradbury, Malcolm: possibly made of plastic and Eric: few saints called Eric. Such local surprises are typical of the book as a whole, which encourages readers to dip and rewards them for lingering -- Robert Douglas-Fairhurst Telegraph

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